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Proposed Graduate Program in Disaster
 

Proposed Graduate Program in Disaster

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    Proposed Graduate Program in Disaster Proposed Graduate Program in Disaster Document Transcript

    • Full Vol 1: November 28, 2006 Proposal for a Masters of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management (MA in D&EM) York University
    • Program Brief – Volume One: The Program York University Master of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management (MA in D&EM) Table of Contents A. Introduction..........................................................................................................................................3 i.Program description............................................................................................................................3 ii.Program objectives.............................................................................................................................4 iii.Program scope...................................................................................................................................6 iv.York’s suitability to offer this program.............................................................................................6 v.Societal need and demand for the program........................................................................................7 vi.Innovative and distinguishing features of the program.....................................................................8 B. Faculty................................................................................................................................................10 i.Core Faculty .....................................................................................................................................10 ii.Faculty research funding..................................................................................................................15 iii.Faculty experience with graduate supervision................................................................................16 iv.Faculty complement and teaching loads.........................................................................................17 C. Physical and Financial Resources.......................................................................................................26 i.Library resources...............................................................................................................................26 ii.Computer resources..........................................................................................................................26 iii.Space/classrooms............................................................................................................................26 iv.Financial Support for Students .......................................................................................................26 v.Program administration....................................................................................................................26 D.Program regulations and courses.........................................................................................................28 i.Structure of the program ..................................................................................................................28 ii.Intellectual development and educational experience of the student...............................................28 iii.Admission requirements .................................................................................................................29 iv.Degree requirements........................................................................................................................30 v.Course Descriptions..........................................................................................................................32 vi.Collateral and supporting departments............................................................................................32 E. Graduate students................................................................................................................................34 i.Enrolment projections ......................................................................................................................34 ii.Employment of graduates.................................................................................................................34 MSc in Emergency Planning Management...............................................................................................1 Masters program in Geophysical Hazards.........................................................................................1 MSc Disaster Management and Sustainable Development.......................................................................1 American Public University .....................................................................................................................2 Masters of Art Degree in Emergency and Disaster Management.............................................................2 Public policy ............................................................................................................................................2 Anna Maria College .................................................................................................................................2 Master of Science in Emergency Management .......................................................................................2 Emergency management, safety and security...........................................................................................2 Arizona State University ..........................................................................................................................2 Master of Science with Emergency Management Concentration ............................................................2 Science ......................................................................................................................................................2 Courses: Chemistry of Hazards Materials (3 hrs); Comprehensive Emergency Management (3 hrs); Regulatory Framework (3 hrs); Industrial Hygiene (3 hrs); Industrial Toxicology (3 hrs); Terrorism, Page 1 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • WMD, and Contemporary Issues (3 hrs); Research (3 hrs); Applied Project (3 hrs); Information Technology in Emergency Management (3 hrs); Risk Assessment (sample elective) (3 hrs);...............2 Jacksonville State University ...................................................................................................................3 Master of Science in Emergency Management........................................................................................3 YORK UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES.....................................................................................................5 University Librarian’s Office................................................................................................................5 Appendices A: Programs Elsewhere B: Full Course Proposals C: Elective Courses D: Criteria for Appointment E: Library Statement F: Decanal Letters of Support G: Internal Letters of Support H: External Letters of Support I: Recommended Student Progression Volume 2: Faculty CV’s Volume 3: List of Consultants Page 2 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Master of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management (MA in D&EM) A. Introduction i. Program description This is a proposal for a Master of Arts degree program in Disaster and Emergency Management (MA in D&EM) to be administratively housed within the School of Administrative Studies of the Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies at York University. The program has been developed in response to the growing recognition of the urgent need for graduate level education in this new and important field. Drawing on faculty from across York University with expertise in a wide range of areas, this program builds on an existing undergraduate level Professional Certificate in Emergency Management and a Bachelor’s degree program in development. The number and magnitude of natural, technological, and human-caused disasters and emergencies are on the rise. Whether an ice storm, tornado, hurricane, earthquake, flood, tsunami, water quality crisis, pandemic, chemical spill, biological hazard, train derailment, severe power outage, hostage taking, or terrorist attack, we are increasingly aware of the range of disasters and emergencies that threaten us, the environment and our quality of life. Increasingly, also, there is professional recognition, political acknowledgement and public discussion of the importance of working to prevent, mitigate, and prepare for these possible events locally, nationally, and internationally. Business, industry, government at all levels, not-for profit agencies, educational institutions, and communities, to name the most obvious sectors, recognize the importance of engaging well-educated professional disaster and emergency managers in a discussion of the hazards and risks they are likely to confront. With a goal to preparing first responders and emergency managers for work in this rapidly expanding area, over the last few years educational institutions have developed undergraduate level programming in Emergency Management. In Ontario, in addition to York’s undergraduate Professional Certificate that is intended largely for those pursuing management level work in this field, Centennial, Fleming, Sheridan, and George Brown colleges have developed entry-level programming in Emergency Management. There is, however, a pressing need for more advanced level study. Disaster and emergency management is a complex, interdisciplinary field. Those working in key positions of responsibility from politicians to emergency managers themselves, require an awareness of the full range of factors and conditions at play in comprehensive emergency and disaster management situations. This broad vision of disaster management is essential to effective decision-making. What is called for is both more extensive research in the field and better educated planners and policy makers at senior levels who can bring to bear a sophisticated analytical perspective informed by current research. This will allow for the generation of better and more effective legislation, policy, and doctrines as well as improved response. In recognition of this, many universities around the world have developed graduate programs in emergency management. Regrettably, Canada has lagged behind. The proposed graduate program in Disaster and Emergency Management will help to address this gap, and will contribute to the education of policy makers and senior executives in the private, public and NGO sectors internationally, nationally, provincially, and locally. The MA in D&EM emphasizes both breadth of focus and depth of understanding. The program is concerned with both emergencies (sometimes linear events that can cause deaths or significant injuries, which can seriously disrupt business or operations or threaten reputation or revenue, or which can cause significant physical or environmental damage) and disasters (large, complex, and non linear Page 3 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • events that give rise to a serious disruption of the normal functioning of society, causing social, human, material, or environmental losses that exceed the ability of the affected community to cope with using only its own resources). Rooted in a social science framework with a strong emphasis on environmental studies complemented by participation of faculty from health, science, and engineering, the proposed program takes a systems approach, going beyond simple cause and effect models to consider the complex interaction of social, environmental, and technological systems and subsystems. Emergency management and disaster management are not synonymous terms, although they overlap. The former is concerned with the organization and management of resources and responsibilities for dealing with all aspects of emergencies. Emergency management involves plans, structures and arrangements established to engage the normal endeavours of government, voluntary and private agencies in a comprehensive and coordinated way to reduce risks related to emergencies. The latter (disaster management) deals with the body of legislation, policy, administrative decisions and operational activities required to prepare for, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the effects of natural, technological or human caused disasters. As a masters level program, the proposed MA in D&EM will focus on developing independent critical, analytical, and professional abilities. The program is intended for existing career professionals in the field, for those seeking employment opportunities in this rapidly expanding profession or for those simply interested in pursuing studies in this fascinating field. The program assumes some prior knowledge of or experience in the field, whether through work experience, undergraduate level study, a recognized college program, or the equivalent study as assessed by a comprehensive admissions examination. The program will build on the foundational knowledge students have in the field and help them to appreciate its complexity and the sophisticated methodology and analysis it calls on researchers and practitioners to employ. In an effort to accommodate the needs of this diverse student group, the program is available both on a part-time basis [four years] for students who intend to continue to work while pursuing their studies and as a full-time program for others [two years]. Experience internationally has shown that many practitioners take a leave of absence from work to pursue graduate level studies, returning to work upon completion of their degree. The proposed program is a collaborative effort of faculty across York University. Emergency Management faculty in the School of Administrative Studies in the Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies have worked with faculty in the Faculty of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science and Engineering, and the Faculty of Arts to develop a curriculum that is innovative and exciting. The program builds on their various expertise in environmental risks and management, natural hazards, public health, humanitarian law, public safety and security, crisis management, war and complex emergencies. Further, the program complements work being done in a number of areas across campus by the Nathanson Centre for the Study of Organized Crime and Corruption, York Centre for International and Security Studies (YCISS), the Centre for Refugee Studies, the York Institute for Research and Innovation in Sustainability (IRIS), and a large number of centres involved in geographic or area studies. ii. Program objectives The proposed Masters program is explicitly designed to advance the level of study and research beyond that of existing undergraduate programming. In its design, the program benefits enormously from the self-consciousness with which York emergency management faculty have approached the definition of learning goals. As part of a larger Alliance on Public Safety and Emergency Management, York faculty have been working to map the learning goals of programs at different levels Page 4 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • within the emergency management field. The goal has been to find language to describe the continuum of learning within key areas of knowledge, tracing it from core competencies to critical understandings and integrated solutions, climaxing in creative research. This model is intended as an aid to students in helping them to select the program best suited to their needs and goals and as a contribution to on-going discussions around the development of professional standards and accreditation in this emerging field. The Learning Continuum Model Core Competencies Critical Understandings Integrated Solutions Creative Research Working within this framework, York’s undergraduate level Professional Certificate in Emergency Management is designed to provide students with the core competencies needed to become emergency managers. In this sense, it is mainly based in knowledge and operations, though some courses do go into selected issues in more depth. Broadly speaking, the general objective of the MA in D&EM is to take students beyond the core competencies needed by practitioners, to a deeper understanding of the reasons behind the practice, and to cultivate in them an ability to develop and implement integrated solutions to problems. The MA degree is intended to give students (a) the critical understandings in the field that underlie operations and core competencies, (b) an ability to think and operate within the emergency and disaster management discipline in an integrated way in order to have the ability to implement effective solutions, and (c) provide some experience in developing and implementing research in the field. Specifically, the proposed program intends that graduates will be able to: • Identify the specific root causes of natural, technological, health, and human-induced disasters, and use this knowledge to develop integrated risk reduction programs that take account of the complex links between social, environmental, and technological sectors. • Develop an understanding and ability to critically analyze current issues in disaster and emergency management, and to be able to place this new information within disaster theory and integrate it into their problem solving. • Develop an understanding of behavioral and organizational aspects of emergency and disaster management, and have the ability to apply this understanding to the management of a broad range of scenarios that require different approaches as a result of variations in inter- agency and institutional complexity and coupling. • Know how to analyze emergency and disaster case studies, and to design and conduct disaster and emergency management research. • Explore some topic of interest in sufficient depth so that it can be the basis for a major research paper, and have the scholarship and writing skills needed to defend the work at a post-graduate level. Page 5 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • iii. Program scope Disaster and emergency management involves understanding the human condition in relation to our natural, social, and technological environment. As such, modern disaster management is an interdisciplinary field built upon the expertise of a wide variety of disciplines including sociology, psychology, management, logistics, political science, economics, IT, geography, nursing, health management and informatics, geophysics, environmental studies, urban planning, biology, earth science and meteorology. The MA in D&EM uses a multidisciplinary approach targeting advanced topics in disaster management theories, methods, issues and techniques. While issues of disaster and emergencies as they relate to war will be discussed as they emerge in the context of course work and discussion, they will not constitute a specific focus of the program. In particular, the M.A. in D&EM will emphasize the following areas for research and study: • Public Safety and Security • Environmental Issues and Disaster Management • Business Continuity Management • Technology and Disaster Management • Risk and Social Vulnerability These areas are not being brought forward as fields, but rather as conceptual areas to help students in the selection of elective courses. iv. York’s suitability to offer this program York University is one of only two Canadian universities offering a structured undergraduate program in disaster and emergency management. As such, it has a dedicated cadre of faculty with specific expertise in the area of emergency management. These faculty have expertise in: risk and vulnerability assessment; weather and climate related risk; disaster modeling; risk mitigation; disaster and emergency economics and finance; contingency operations; command, control, communications and leadership behaviour in emergency situations; terrorism; Geographic Information Systems [GIS]; business continuity; and post disaster recovery and reconstruction planning. All are active participants in a range of organizations contributing to the development of this new field. David Etkin, coordinator of the Emergency Management is co-chair of the Canadian Risks and Hazards Network – an organization established in 2003 committed to creating an environment in which the hazards research, education and emergency management practitioner communities can effectively share knowledge and innovative approaches that reduce disaster vulnerability. He is also a director of RedR Canada (Registered Engineers for Disaster Relief) and was principle investigator of the Canadian National Assessment of Natural Hazards. Niru Nirupama is an elected member of the editorial board of Natural Hazards, an international journal published by 'Springer' in Germany. She also serves on the international advisory committee of the ‘World Congress on Disaster Management, Infrastructure and Control Systems’ amongst other responsibilities. Ali Asgary has served as a planner in post earthquake reconstruction following a number of large earthquakes in Iran. He is also a member of the scientific committee of the “Integrated Natural Disaster Management Conference.” Ken McBey is regional coordinator for St. John Ambulance and a member of Wellington County’s Emergency Management committee. All have been active participants in extensive discussions over the design of programs in this field and the needs/requirements of professionals at different levels. In addition to this very focused group, York University has a wide range of faculty engaged in research and teaching related to disaster and emergency management who are eager to play an active role in the proposed program, including teaching and student supervision. These faculty are drawn from the Logistics, Management Science, and Human Resources Management areas of the School of Page 6 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Administrative Studies, and the School of Social Sciences of the Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies; the School of Nursing within the Faculty of Health; the Department of Biology and Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering of the Faculty of Science and Engineering; the Department of Geography, Department of Political Science, and Division of Social Science of the Faculty of Arts; and the Health and Environment and Environmental and Cultural Studies areas within the Faculty of Environmental Studies. York faculty have published on a wide range of subjects including: SARS, environmental disasters, environmental informatics, hazard assessment, risk mitigation measures, critical infrastructure, crisis management, and tsunamni early warning. This program, in bringing these faculty together, will function as a strongly interdisciplinary postgraduate program and will enhance collaboration between faculty whose teaching and research are related to disaster and emergency management. Located in Toronto, the MA in D&EM at York University will be able to attract students from across Canada as well as other parts of the world. For many years Canadian students seeking graduate level programming in emergency management have traveled to the US or Britain; this program offers an opportunity much closer to home. It also provides access to a wide range of academic and professional opportunities for collaboration with faculty in universities nearby; practitioners teaching in local college programs; the Canadian Forces College; emergency management specialists within public and private sectors organizations and elsewhere. v. Societal need and demand for the program There is an increasing need for graduate level programming in the area of disaster and emergency management. 1. According to a recent study published by Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC) there is an increasing demand for disaster and emergency management professionals in Canada (Bruce, J.A., Donovan K.F., and Hornof, M.J., “Emergency Management Education in Canada,: Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, Ottawa, 2005). It has been estimated that Canada as a whole needs more than 12,000 emergency managers in both public and private institutions, many of whom should have at least a masters level degree in disaster and emergency management. 2. As highlighted in a recent survey conducted by Royal Roads University, a majority of those already employed in the disaster and emergency management field are interested in and looking for advanced education in emergency management. For mid-career emergency managers who work for the federal, provincial or municipal governments, graduate-level education is key to a successful career. A leading study of senior federal public servants, The Superbureaucrats (by George Szablowski and Colin Campbell) has shown that having a graduate degree is closely associated with attaining more senior positions. York University’s Professional Certificate in Emergency Management [which is offered on a part-time and full-time basis during the day and in the evening] has received numerous enquiries from public servants who want to pursue graduate level education in the field. The absence of a postgraduate program able to accommodate working emergency managers has limited the ability of the three orders of government to renew and refresh their emergency management staff, and to ensure that future senior emergency managers will have the professional skills required to undertake their work effectively. 3. A considerable number of those who are currently holding emergency management positions have an undergraduate degree already – although commonly in a field outside emergency Page 7 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • management. They are looking for career specific programming but are commonly interested in graduate level education rather than in completing a second undergraduate level program. 4. It is commonly accepted that senior emergency managers require advanced university level understanding of the field. 5. As the need for emergency management professionals increases, there is an increasing demand for faculty to teach them. It is expected that some MA in D&EM graduates will proceed to doctoral work elsewhere and will eventually establish themselves as experts researching and teaching in the field. Currently there is a huge gap in this area in Canada. (Bruce et al., 2005). Graduates of this program would be eligible for admission to a broad range of doctoral level programs depending on their undergraduate degree and the research focus within their Master’s program including a PhD in Environmental Studies, Geography, or Sociology. Graduates could also more directly pursue a PhD in the area of Emergency Management including North Dakota State University’s Ph.D. in Emergency Management, or the University of Delaware’s PhD in Environmental and Energy Policy with a concentration in Disaster and Public Policy. 6. There is also an increasing demand for disaster and emergency management research. Lack of research in this area is mainly due to the lack of researchers with experience in this field. The MA in D&EM will train future researchers in disaster and emergency management to fill the current gap. 7. Canada is also behind other countries such as the USA, Australia and the UK in the development of graduate level programs in disaster and emergency management. The MA in D&EM at York University will be the second such program in Canada. This program is expected to appeal to emergency managers at all three levels of government, in private sector businesses and companies, in non-governmental organizations, and also to high-performing students in undergraduate programs seeking graduate degrees in disaster management. The breadth of focus of the current program will fill the needs of these four target groups in a way previously unavailable in Canada. [See Appendix H: Letters of external support for the program.] vi. Innovative and distinguishing features of the program At present, there is only one other graduate level program in Emergency Management in Canada - Royal Roads University’s Master of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management, which is scheduled to start in April 2007. In contrast to the proposed program’s emphasis on the advancement of research and creation of new knowledge, the Royal Roads program exclusively targets practitioners and places emphasis on training and the more practical or applied aspects of disaster and emergency management. The first group of scholars to engage explicitly in disaster studies were sociologists. The first recognized scholarly study of disaster was Samuel Henry Price’s study of the response to the Halifax explosion, “Catastrophe and Social Change” completed in 1920 toward a PhD in Sociology at Columbia. A number of graduate programs are still heavily rooted in sociology including that at the University of Delaware. One of the oldest and best known programs in the United States is the University of North Texas’ Masters of Public Administration with a Specialization in Emergency Administration and Planning. This program’s administrative or management focus is quite similar to that of many Homeland Security programs. Almost one-half of the programs in the United States fall within this category. Page 8 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • A number of programs such as that at the University of Arkansas have a strongly technical focus, whether rooted in geography, science, or engineering. Such programs emphasize risk assessment and the application of a variety of technologies to the field. Other programs are rooted in Development Studies such as the Masters of Science in Disaster Management and Sustainable Development at Northumbria University. Still other programs, including that at the University of Coventry, emphasize a military perspective that applies a command and control approach to emergency management. [See Appendix A: Programs elsewhere.] In contrast to all the programs categorized above, the proposed program takes a problem-oriented rather than a disciplinary approach to the study of disaster and emergency management. The proponents feel strongly that a disciplinary approach can be a barrier to effectiveness. Instead, the core of the proposed program draws on a wide range of disciplines, approaches and methodologies to help students appreciate the complexity of perspective and approach required in this field. Perhaps the most similar American program is that offered by the American Public University. Page 9 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • B. Faculty i. Core Faculty As an interdisciplinary program, the proposed MA in D&EM draws on faculty from across York University. The faculty listed below will serve as core members of the program, both teaching courses and supervising major research papers. York University has a strong tradition of graduate programs that draw on faculty from across the University. [See Appendix F for letters from the appropriate Deans supporting the involvement of their faculty in the program. See also Appendix D: Criteria for appointment.] Table 1: Core Faculty Members FACULTY MEMBERS Retirement Date if within the Supervisory Faculty Name & Rank M/F Home Unit next seven years Privileges Category 1 Ali Asgary, B.A.( Tehran, Iran), School of Administrative M.A.(Tehran, Iran), Ph.D. ( Newcastle, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of UK), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional full Studies Abdullah Dasci, B.Sc. (Ankara, School of Administrative Turkey), M.Sc. (Ankara, Turkey), Ph.D. Studies, Atkinson Faculty of full (McGill), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional Studies Rongbing Huang, B.Sc (East China School of Administrative Normal University), M Sc. (Fudan), Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full Ph. D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Niru Nirupama, M.Sc.( Kanpur, India) School of Administrative M.E.(Roorkee, India), Dr. Eng.( Kyoto, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of F full Japan), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Ron Ophir, BSc (Hebrew University), School of Administrative MSIA (Carnegie Mellon), PhD Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full (Carnegie Mellon), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Hassan Qudrat-Ullah,BA (Punjab, School of Administrative Pakistan), M Sc. (Multan, Pakistan), Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M. Phil. (Bergen, Norway),PhD M Liberal and Professional full (Singapore), Assistant Professor Studies Cristóbal Sanchez-Rodriguez, BA School of Administrative (Murcia, Spain), PhD (Murcia, Spain) Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Category 2 Walter Perchal, B.A. (Toronto), M.A. M School of Social Sciences, full (Western Ontario), Ph.D. (York), Ph.D. Atkinson Faculty of Liberal Page 10 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • FACULTY MEMBERS Retirement Date if within the Supervisory Faculty Name & Rank M/F Home Unit next seven years Privileges Category 1 Ali Asgary, B.A.( Tehran, Iran), School of Administrative M.A.(Tehran, Iran), Ph.D. ( Newcastle, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of UK), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional full Studies Abdullah Dasci, B.Sc. (Ankara, School of Administrative Turkey), M.Sc. (Ankara, Turkey), Ph.D. Studies, Atkinson Faculty of full (McGill), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional Studies Rongbing Huang, B.Sc (East China School of Administrative Normal University), M Sc. (Fudan), Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full Ph. D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Niru Nirupama, M.Sc.( Kanpur, India) School of Administrative M.E.(Roorkee, India), Dr. Eng.( Kyoto, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of F full Japan), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Ron Ophir, BSc (Hebrew University), School of Administrative MSIA (Carnegie Mellon), PhD Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full (Carnegie Mellon), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies (Greenwich), Sessional Assistant and Professional Studies Professor Category 3 Harris Ali, B.A. (McMaster), M.A. Faculty of Environmental (McMaster), B.Eng. (McMaster), Studies M full Ph.D (McMaster ), Associate Professor Qiuming Cheng, B.Sc.(Changchun, Department of Earth and China), M.Sc.(Changchun, China) Space Science and M full Ph. D. (Ottawa), Professor Engineering Mary Ann Jenkins, B.Sc. (Waterloo) Department of Earth and M.Sc. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Toronto), Space Science and F full Associate Professor Engineering Lillie Lum, B.Ss.N. (U.B.C.), M.Sc.N. F Faculty of Health (Western Ontario), Ph.D. (Toronto) full Associate Professor Ken McBey, B.A. (Toronto), M.B.A. M School of Administrative (York), B.Ed. (Toronto), Ph.D. (York) Studies, Atkinson Faculty of full Associate Professor Liberal and Professional Studies David Roger Mutimer, B.A. (Western M Department of Political Ontario), M.A. (York), Ph. D.(York), Science, Faculty of Arts full Associate Professor Page 11 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • FACULTY MEMBERS Retirement Date if within the Supervisory Faculty Name & Rank M/F Home Unit next seven years Privileges Category 1 Ali Asgary, B.A.( Tehran, Iran), School of Administrative M.A.(Tehran, Iran), Ph.D. ( Newcastle, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of UK), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional full Studies Abdullah Dasci, B.Sc. (Ankara, School of Administrative Turkey), M.Sc. (Ankara, Turkey), Ph.D. Studies, Atkinson Faculty of full (McGill), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional Studies Rongbing Huang, B.Sc (East China School of Administrative Normal University), M Sc. (Fudan), Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full Ph. D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Niru Nirupama, M.Sc.( Kanpur, India) School of Administrative M.E.(Roorkee, India), Dr. Eng.( Kyoto, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of F full Japan), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Ron Ophir, BSc (Hebrew University), School of Administrative MSIA (Carnegie Mellon), PhD Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full (Carnegie Mellon), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Peter Timmerman, B.A. (Toronto), Faculty of Environmental M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (London), Studies M full Assistant Professor Paul F. Wilkinson, B.A. (York), M.A. Faculty of Environmental (Toronto), Ph.D. (Toronto), M Studies full Professor Category 4 David Etkin, B.Sc. (York ), B.Ed. School of Administrative (Toronto), M.Sc.(York) Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full Sessional Lecturer Liberal and Professional Studies Category 5 Constadinos Armenakis, Dipl. Ing. Geomatics Canada, (Athens, Greece), M. Sc. E . (New M Centre for Topographic Co-supervision Brunswick), Ph. D.(New Brunswick) Information Adjunct Faculty Jason Levy, B.A.Sc. (Waterloo), Applied M.A.Sc. (Waterloo), Ph.D. (Waterloo) M Disaster & Emergency Adjunct Faculty Studies Co-supervision Brandon University Ioan Nistor, Dipl. Eng.(Iasi, Romania), Dept. of Civil Engineering Ph.D.(Yokohama, Japan), Adjunct University of Ottawa Co-supervision Faculty M Page 12 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • FACULTY MEMBERS Retirement Date if within the Supervisory Faculty Name & Rank M/F Home Unit next seven years Privileges Category 1 Ali Asgary, B.A.( Tehran, Iran), School of Administrative M.A.(Tehran, Iran), Ph.D. ( Newcastle, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of UK), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional full Studies Abdullah Dasci, B.Sc. (Ankara, School of Administrative Turkey), M.Sc. (Ankara, Turkey), Ph.D. Studies, Atkinson Faculty of full (McGill), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional Studies Rongbing Huang, B.Sc (East China School of Administrative Normal University), M Sc. (Fudan), Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full Ph. D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Niru Nirupama, M.Sc.( Kanpur, India) School of Administrative M.E.(Roorkee, India), Dr. Eng.( Kyoto, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of F full Japan), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Ron Ophir, BSc (Hebrew University), School of Administrative MSIA (Carnegie Mellon), PhD Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full (Carnegie Mellon), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Peter Penz, B.A.(British Columbia), Faculty of Environmental M.A. (British Columbia), D. Phil. M Studies Co-supervision / (Oxford), Professor Emeritus Teaching Kumaraswamy Ponnambalam, B.E. Department of Systems (Madras, India), M.A. (National M Design Engineering Co-supervision University of Ireland), Ph.D.(Toronto) University of Waterloo Adjunct Faculty Category 6 none Category 1: tenured or tenure track core faculty members whose graduate involvement is exclusively in the graduate program under review. For this purpose the Masters and doctoral streams of a program are considered as a single program. Category 2: non-tenure-track core faculty members whose graduate involvement is exclusively in the graduate program under review. Category 3: tenured or tenure-track core faculty members who are involved in teaching and/or supervision in other graduate program(s) in addition to being a core member of the graduate program under review. Category 4: non-tenured or tenure-track core faculty members who are involved in teaching and/or supervision in other graduate program(s) in addition to being a core member of the graduate program under review. Page 13 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Category 5: other core faculty: this category includes emeritus professors with supervisory privileges and persons appointed from government laboratories or industry as adjunct professors. Category 6: non-core faculty who participate in the teaching of graduate courses. Page 14 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • ii. Faculty research funding The following table presents the annual aggregate value of the research grants and contracts received by the program’s participating faculty since1999-2000. Details of the awards are included in the cv’s of program faculty attached as Volume 2 of the proposal. Table 2: Faculty research funding Operating Research Funding by Source and Year Source(s) Granting Other Peer Contracts & TOTAL Year1 Foundations Internal6 Councils2 Adjudicated3 others5 1999/00 38,900 0 0 273,166 0 312,066.00 2000/01 48,900 37,500 0 231,250 0 317,650.00 2001/02 91,300 37,500 0 317,495 4,800 451,095.00 2002/03 127,700 37,500 0 575,600 31,250 772,050.00 2003/04 156,000 37,500 0 785,160 39,000 1,017,660.00 2004/05 895,000 0 0 265,300 59,025 1,219,325.00 2005/06 666,000 22,000 0 868,800 38,400 1,595,200.00 2006/07 999,000 50,400 0 843,000 64,500 1,956,900.00 Totals 3,022,800.00 222,400.00 0 4,159,771.00 236,975.00 7,641,946.00 Page 15 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • iii. Faculty experience with graduate supervision The following table summarizes the experience of the program’s participating faculty with the supervision of graduate students. Table 3: Graduate Supervision Career and Proposed Program Numbers of Thesis Supervisions Career Current Master Master Masters Masters Member Research PhD PDF Research PhD PDF Thesis Thesis Paper Paper Category 1 Ali Asgary 0(19) - 0(4) - 0(2) - 0(1) - Abdullah Dasci - - - - - - - - Rongbing Huang - - - - - - - - Niru Nirupama - - - - 0(1) - - - Ron Ophir - - - - - - - - Hassan Qudrat-Ullah 0(1) - - - 0(9) - - - Cristobal Sanchez- - - - - - - - - Rodriguez Category 2 Walter Perchal - - - - - - - - Category 3 Harris Ali - 0(27) - - - - 0(2) - Qiuming Cheng - 0(11) 0(2) 0(4) - 0(1) 0(6) 0(2) Mary Ann Jenkins - 0(3) 0(1) 0(1) - 0(2) - 0(1) Lillie Lum 0(1) - - - - - - 0(1) Ken McBey 0(5) - - - 0(2) - - - David R. Mutimer 0(20) - 0(4) 0(3) - 0(4) - Peter Timmerman - - - - - - - - Paul F. Wilkinson 0(11) 0(63) 0(3) - - 0(3) 0(1) - Category 4 David Etkin 0(2) 0(2) - - 0(1) 0(1) - - Category 5 Constadinos - - - - - - - - Armenakis Jason Levy - - - - - - - - Ioan Nistor - 0(3) - - - - - - Peter Penz 0(30) - 0(6) 0(2) - - - Kumaraswamy 0(24) - 0(5) 0(2) 0( 2) - 0(2) - Ponnambalam Category 6 None Page 16 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • iv. Faculty complement and teaching loads With approval, the faculty for the MA in D&EM will be drawn from a number of graduate and undergraduate programs in the Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies, the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Environmental Studies, and the Faculty of Science and Engineering. Identified faculty will contribute through the supervision of research papers and teaching. Many of the elective courses are established courses already routinely offered by their originating programs. Core courses developed by emergency management faculty may be co-taught or team taught. Table 4A: Undergraduate teaching 3 credits means 3 contact hours per week for one term. Undergraduate teaching Comments e.g. Dept. Chair / Name Rank FW03-04 FW04-05 FW05-06 FW06-07 sabbatical Category 1 Ali Asgary Assistant 40:255 3.00 40:255 3.00 AK/ADMS 3700 AK/ADMS 3700 Chair of Professor Introduction to Introduction to 3.00 Section A 3.00 Section Department Physical Planning Physical Planning Fundamentals of Summer Applied Disaster and Critical and Critical Emergency Fundamentals of & Infrastructure Infrastructure Management Emergency Emergency Management Management 40:152 3.00 40:352 3.00 AK/ADMS 3700 2004 – 2005 Introduction to Emergency 3.00 AK/ADMS 3700 Emergency Management Law Fundamentals of 3.00 Section A Management Emergency Fundamentals of 40:399 3.00 Management Emergency 40:452 3.00 Directed Studies in Management Disaster and Applied Disaster AK/ADMS 3700 Development and Emergency 3.00 Section M AK/ADMS 3700 Studies Fundamentals of 3.00 Section B 40:252 3.00 Emergency Fundamentals of Emergency 40:252 3.00 Management Emergency Planning and Emergency Management Management Planning and AK/ADMS 3700 Management 3.00 Section N AK/ADMS 3700 40:399 3.00 Fundamentals of 3.00 Directed Studies in 40:399 3.00 Emergency Business Applied Disaster Directed Studies in Management Continuity and Emergency Applied Disaster Fundamentals of Studies and Emergency Emergency Studies Management 40:448 3.00 Disaster and Emergency Practicum (at Brandon (at Brandon University) University) Page 17 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Abdullah Assistant Management Operations Operations AK/ADMS 3330 Dasci Professor science (equivalent management management 3.00 to AK/ADMS (equivalent to AK/ (equivalent to AK/ Quantitative 3331) ADMS 3351) ADMS 3351) Methods (at University (at University of (at University of of Alberta) North Carolina at North Carolina at Charlotte) Charlotte) Rongbing Huang Assistant AK/ADMS 2320 AK/ADMS 3300 Professor 3.00 Quantitative 3.00 Decision Methods I Analysis AK/ADMS 3330 AK/ADMS 2320 3.00 Quantitative 3.00 Quantitative Methods II Methods I - - AK/ADMS 3300 3.00 Decision Analysis AK/ADMS 3331 3.00 Introduction to Operations Research Niru Nirupama Assistant 40:253 3.00 40:253 3.00 AK/ADMS 3701 AK/ADMS 3701 Dept.Chair Professor Hazard and Risk Hazard and Risk 3.00 3.00 Applied Disaster Assessment Assessment Emergency Emergency & Emergency Management: Management: Studies, 40:39, 3.00 40:391 3.00 Hazards, Hazards, Brandon Environmental Environmental Vulnerability and Vulnerability and University, Disasters Disasters Risk Assessment Risk Assessment 2005 40:25 3.00 40:39 3.00 AK/ADMS 3703 Hired at York Natural Disasters: Organizational 3.00 2005-2006 Causes and Responses to Business Physical Dynamics Disasters and Continuity (also developed for Emergencies Distance Education, 40:251 3.00 Campus Manitoba) Natural Disasters: Causes and 40: 498 3.00 Physical Dynamics Disaster modeling (also developed for Distance Education, Campus Manitoba) 40:49 3.00 Directed readings: Disaster relief related logistics and supply chain 40:399 3.00 Directed studies: Hazardous (at Brandon materials research University) and implications (at Brandon University) Page 18 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Ron Ophir Assistant AK/ADMS 2400 AK/ADMS 2400 AK/ADMS 2400 AK/ADMS 2400 Professor 3.00 (3 sections) 3.00 (3 sections) 3.00 (3 sections) 3.00 (3 sections) Introduction to Introduction to Introduction to Introduction to Organizational Organizational Organizational Organizational Behaviour Behaviour Behaviour Behaviour Hassan Qudrat- Assistant ECON 3470 3.00 ADMS 3300 3.0 ADMS 3300 3.0 ADMS 4300 3.00 Ullah Professor Recruitment, (2) (3) Decision Making Selection and Decision Analysis Decision Analysis Performance Appraisal of ADMS 4300 3.00 ADMS 3345 3.00 Personnel Decision Making Systems Thinking and Modeling for ADMS 3300 3.00 Management (2) Decision Analysis ADMS 3360 3.00 Integrated Logistics Management I ADMS 4300 3.00 Decision Making Cristobal Assistant ADMS 3511 3.00 ADMS 2511 3.00 ADMS 2320 3.00 Sanchez- Professor (4 sections) Management Quantitative Rodriguez Information Methods I Systems (4 sections) (4 sections) - ADMS 2511 3.00 Management Information Systems (2 sections) Category 2 Walter Perchal AK/SOSC 1810 Sessional AS/SOSC 1910 AK/SOSC 1810 AK/SOSC 1810 6.00 Assistant 9.00 6.00 6.00 Communication Professor Education and Communication Communication and Mass Media Social Change and Mass Media and Mass Media AK/SOSC 1880 AK/SOSC 1810 AK/SOSC 1880 AK/SOSC 1880 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Social Change in Communication Social Change in Social Change in Canada and Mass Media Canada Canada AS/SOSC 1910 AK/SOSC 3560 AS/SOSC 1910 AS/SOSC 1910 9.00 6.00 9.00 9.00 Education and Mass Media and Education and Education and Social Change Ideology Social Change Social Change AK/SOSC 1950 6.00 Prospects and Perils in the 21st Century Category 3 Page 19 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Harris Ali Associate ENVS 2150 3.00 ENVS 2150 3.00 _ Undergraduate ENVS 2150 3.00 Professor Environment, Environment, Program Environment, Technology and Technology and Director & Chair Technology and Sustainable Sustainable of Sustainable Society Society Yndergraduate Society Curriculum Subcommittee ENVS 3450 3.00 2003-2006 Environment and Health: Social and Sabbatical Political 2006-2007 Dimensions ENVS 4440 3.00 Environmental Disasters Qiuming Professor AS/SC/GEOG AS/SC/GEOG AS/SC/GEOG AS/SC/GEOG GIS/RS Cheng 4340 3.00 4340 3.00 4340 3.00 4340 3.00 Certificate GIS GIS GIS GIS Coordinator of ESSE SC/EATS 4400 SC/EATS 4400 SC/EATS 4400 Since 2005 3.00GIS and Data 3.00GIS and Data 3.00GIS and Data Integration Integration Integration GS/ESS 5020 3:00Time Series and Spectral Analysis Mary Ann Associate SS5205 3.00 SS5205 3.00 SS5205 3.00 SS5205 3.00 Jenkins Professor Cloud Physics and Cloud Physics and Cloud Physics and Cloud Physics and Radar Radar Radar Radar Meteorology Meteorology Meteorology Meteorology SS5201 3.00 SS5201 3.00 Storms and Storms and Weather Systems Weather Systems Associate NSE 112 3.00 AK/NURS 3400 HLST 1010 HLST 1010 Hired at York Lillie Lum Professor Social Political 3.00 3.00Foundations to 3.00Foundations to 2004-2005 Perspectives in Development of Health Studies Health Studies Nursing Self as Nurse: Ethical Ways of AK/NURS 3400 Research Methods Knowing and 3.00 Caring in Nursing Critical AK/NURS 3400 Perspectives on 3.00 AK/NURS 3000 Health Development of 3.00 Organizations: Self as Nurse: Professionhood: Micro Level Issues Ethical Ways of classroom; one in Healthcare Knowing and section of basic Management Caring in Nursing degree program (at Ryerson year 3 University) Ken McBey Associate AK/ADMS 3430 AK/ADMS 3410 AK/ADMS 3430 AK/ADMS 3440 Director, York Professor 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00Leadership University Human Resources Training and Human Resources and Interpersonal Graduate Planning Development Planning Skills Program in AK/ADMS 3410 AK/ADMS 3410 Human AK/ADMS 3430 3.00 (B,C) 3.00 Resource AK/ADMS 3440 3.00 Training and Training and Management Page 20 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • 3.00 Human Resources Development Development Leadership and Planning 2006-2007 Interpersonal Skills Course release for development of undergraduate certificate in EM program 2004-2005 David Associate AS/POLS 4910 Principal R. Mutimer Professor 3.00 Research Violence and Fellow, Security Capstone Centre for International _ _ _ Cooperation and Security, University of Bradford 2004-2006 Peter Assistant ES/ENVS 2100 ENVS 1000 ENVS 1000 ENVS 1000 MES Timmerman Professor 6.00 6.00 6.00Perspectives in 6.00 Programme Foundations in Perspectives in Environmental Perspectives in Coordinator Environment and Environmental Studies Environmental 2000-2005 Culture: Studies Studies Philosophy, Arts, International Technology, and ES/ENVS 4100 Student Advisor Education 3.00 2005-2007 Environmental ENVS 1000 Literatures Community Arts 6.00 Practice Perspectives in Coordinator Environmental 2006-2007 Studies Paul F. Wilkinson Professor ENVS 3011 3.00 ENVS 5119 3.00 ENVS _ Senate Introduction to Management 5016 3.00/ENVS 2003, 2005, Senior Honours 4446 3.00 2006 Member Work ENVS 3011 3.00 Protected Acting Introduction to Area Vice-Chair Senior Honours Management Work Office of the Dean, FES Coordinator 2006-2007 Category 4 David Etkin Sessional AK/ADMS 3702 AK/ADMS 3702 Emergency Lecturer 3.00 3.00 Management Emergency Emergency Program Management: Management: Coordinator Mitigation, Mitigation, 2005 – 2007 Preparedness, Preparedness, Response, Response, Hired at York - - Recovery Recovery 2005-2006 ES/ ENVS 4440 3:00 Environmental Disasters Page 21 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Category 5 Constadinos Adjunct _ _ _ _ _ Armenakis Faculty Jason Levy Assistant ICS 111 3.00 ICS 135 3.00 ADES 40.495 3.00 ADES 40.252 3.00 Acting Chair in Professor Introduction to Introduction to Decision Making Emergency 2006, Computer Science Database and Computer Planning and Brandon Management Support for Management University ICS 211 3.00 Emergency Datastructures and ICS 101 3.00 Management ADES 40.451 3.00 Algorithms Tools for the Disaster Modeling Information Age II, ICS 241 3.00 ADES 40.362 Discrete I, ICS 141 3.00 ADES 40.451 3.00 3.00 Mathematics for Discrete Disaster Modeling Disaster Response Computer Science Mathematics for and Emergency Computer Science Management (at Brandon (at Brandon (at Brandon (at Brandon University) University) University) University) Ioan Nistor Adjunct GVG3120 3.00 GVG3120 3.00 GVG3120 3.00 Faculty Hydrology Hydrology Hydrology _ GVG2111 3.00 GVG2111 3.00 GVG2111 3.00 Introduction to Introduction to Introduction to Fluid Mechanics Fluid Mechanics Fluid Mechanics Peter Penz Professor AS/POLS 4212 AS/POLS 4212 AS/POLS 4212 Emeritus 3.00 3.00 3.00 Sabbatical Global Justice and Global Justice and Global Justice and 2004-2005 Humanitarian Humanitarian Humanitarian Internationalism Internationalism Internationalism _ ES/ENVS 4312 ES/ENVS 4312 ES/ENVS 4312 3.00 3.00 3.00 Global Justice and Global Justice and Global Justice and Humanitarian Humanitarian Humanitarian Internationalism Internationalism Internationalism Kumaraswamy Adjunct SYDE312 3.00 SYDE312 3.00 SYDE312 3.00 SYDE312 3.00 Ponnambalam Faculty Numerical Numerical Numerical Numerical Methods Methods Methods Methods SYDE454 3.00 SYDE454 3.00 SYDE454 3.00 SYDE454 3.00 Computer Computer Computer Computer Simulation of Simulation of Simulation of Simulation of Systems Systems Systems Systems SYDE322 3.00 SYDE322 3.00 SYDE322 3.00 SYDE322 3.00 Software Design Software Design Software Design Software Design SYDE121 3.00 SYDE121 SYDE121 Digital 3.00Digital 3.00Digital Computation Computation Computation (at University of (at University of (at University of (at University of Waterloo) Waterloo) Waterloo) Waterloo) Table 4 B: Graduate teaching Graduate Comments Page 22 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Name Rank FW03-04 FW04-05 FW 05-06 FW 06-07 Category 1 Ali Asgary Assistant ENVS 6599 3.00 Professor Individual Directed Study ENVS 6599 3.00 Individual _ _ _ Directed Study ENVS 6599 3.00 Individual Directed Study Abdullah Assistant Decision Decision Dasci Professor analysis (MBA) analysis (MBA) Operations management _ (MBA) (at University (at University of of Alberta) Alberta) Rongbing Assistant Huang Professor _ _ _ _ Niru Nirupama Assistant Professor _ _ _ _ Ron Ophir Assistant _ _ _ _ Professor Hassan Qudrat- Assistant Ullah _ _ _ _ Professor Cristobal Assistant Sanchez- Professor _ _ _ Rodriguez Category 2 Sessional _ Walter Perchal Assistant _ _ _ Professor Category 3 Harris Ali Associate ENVS 6130 3.00 Professor Health and Environment Qiuming Professor GEOG5050 GEOG5050 GEOG5050 Chair, Chang 3.00 3.00 3.00 Adjudication GIS and GIS and GIS and committee of Geographic Geographic Geographic T&P Analysis Analysis Analysis 2005 – GIS/RS ESS5400 ESS5400 certificate 3.00 3.00 coordinator of GIS and GIS and ESSE Data Data Integration Integration Page 23 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Mary Ann Associate SS5205 3.00 SS5205 3.00 SS5205 3.00 SS5205 3.00 Jenkins Professor Cloud Physics Cloud Physics and Cloud Physics and Cloud Physics and Radar Radar Meteorology Radar and Radar Meteorology Meteorology Meteorology SS5201 3.00 Storms and Weather SS5201 3.00 Systems Storms and Weather Systems Lillie Lum Associate _ Professor _ _ _ Ken McBey Associate _ GS/ADMS 6100 GS/ADMS 6100 GS/ADMS 6100 Professor 3.00 3.00 3.00 Staffing Staffing Staffing Organizations Organizations Organizations David R. Associate GS/POLS Society, Principal Mutimer Professor 6200.06 3.00 Technology Research Advanced and Fellow, Study of Warfare Centre for International (Graduate International Relations Institute Cooperation (PhD of and Security, Core Course) International University of Studies, Bradford GS/POLS University 2004-2006 _ 6220.03 3.00 of Critical Security Geneva)as Studies a Visiting PhD Reading Professor Course Critical Security Studies Peter ENVS 5103 ENVS 5103 ENVS 5103 Timmerman Assistant 3.00 3.00 3.00 Professor Nature and Nature and Nature and Society Society Society ENV 1002S Case Study in Environmental Management (U of T) Paul F. GEOG 5410 Wilkinson Professor _ 3.00 _ _ Resource Management Category 4 David Etkin Sessional Natural Disasters, Natural Disasters, ENVS 6599 ENVS 6599 Lecturer and Unnatural and Unnatural 3.00 3.00 Phenomenon Phenomenon Natural Disasters, Natural An Unnatural Disasters, An (University of (University of Phenomenon Unnatural Toronto) Toronto) Phenomenon Category 5 Page 24 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Constadinos Adjunct _ _ _ _ Armenakis Faculty Jason Levy Adjunct _ Faculty _ _ _ Ioan Nistor Adjunct CVG5111 3.00 CVG5111 3.00 CVG5111 3.00 Faculty Hydraulic Hydraulic Hydraulic Structures Structures Structures _ CVG6120 CVG6120 CVG6120 3.00Coastal 3.00Coastal 3.00Coastal Engineering Engineering Engineering Peter Penz Professor ENVS 5068 Society, ENVS 5068 Sabbatical Emeritus 3.00 Technology and 3.00 2004-2005 Global Justice Warfare Global Justice Global Justice and the and the Environment Environment ENVS 5124 3.00 Development Studies ENVS 6147 3.00Humanitarian Crises (at University of Geneva) SYDE511 3.00 SYDE511/760 3.00 SYDE511/760 SYDE511/760 Kumaraswamy Adjunct Optimization Optimization 3.00 3.00 Ponnambalam Faculty MethodsfFor Methods for Optimization Optimization Stochastic Stochastic Systems Methods for Methods for Systems Stochastic Systems Stochastic SYDE760 3.00 Systems SYDE760 3.00 Integrated Medical Probabilistic Information Mgt. Design SYDE723 3.00 Software Composition (at University of (at University of (at University of (at University of Waterloo) Waterloo) Waterloo) Waterloo) Page 25 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • C. Physical and Financial Resources i. Library resources The York University Library system already had an appreciable collection of materials relevant to the study of disaster and emergency management developed in support of teaching and research being conducted across a number of disciplines. This collection has been expanded considerably over the last year in support of the newly established Professional Certificate in Emergency Management and the research agenda of the faculty hired in association with that program. Emergency management faculty continue to consult with the Library on the acquisition of additional materials, but feel that the library resources in their current state are sufficient to support the proposed program. [See Appendix E for a statement from the University Librarian.] ii. Computer resources Computer resources will be required for the graduate program director and graduate program assistant. The program will also require the use of a specially equipped computer lab to support teaching and research. The lab will be equipped with a range software including Remote Sensing, Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis, Emergency Management, and Business Continuity as well as ArcGIS capabilities (in order to make use of “HAZUS,” a software package developed by FEMA for disaster impact and damage assessment). At least initially, the needs of the program will be accommodated within existing computer laboratory space. However, to maximize the utilization of available software and to provide optimal benefit to students from the experiential aspects of the program, the program may need to work to secure a dedicated space that can be established as a specialized lab based on the concept of an Emergency Operations Centre. This lab would be used for the delivery of all core courses and would be available to students working on class assignments and research papers. iii. Space/classrooms Eventually, all core courses delivered as part of this program will be delivered in the computer laboratory that supports the needs of the program. In the interim, those courses not taught in shared lab facilities will require classrooms equipped with dual screen audio-visual capacity. This will allow faculty to present visual materials such as photographs, films, and tables that are central to the case study based approach faculty in this area commonly employ. iv. Financial Support for Students Part-time students will not be eligible for graduate funding. Full-time students may be eligible for the following: Scholarships, Teaching Assistantships, Graduate Assistantships, and Research Assistantships (derived from faculty members’ external research grants). In addition, there are a limited number of bursaries to support students on the basis of financial need. v. Program administration The proposed masters program will be offered by York’s Faculty of Graduate Studies. The program will be housed administratively within the Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies and the Dean of Page 26 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • the Atkinson Faculty will serve as resource Dean for the program. Within the Faculty, the program will be part of the School of Administrative Studies. The program will be supported by a graduate administrative assistant and administered by a Graduate Program Director who will be appointed by the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies on the recommendation of core faculty and in consultation with the Director of School of Administrative Studies and the Dean of the Atkinson Faculty and who is eligible for reappointment. The Director will serve a term not to exceed three years and will be compensated according to the Appendix P of the YUFA Collective Agreement. The GPD will serve as the chair of the program’s Executive Committee. This committee will consist of no fewer than four additional faculty including the director of the undergraduate program in Emergency Management, at least one additional faculty member hired explicitly to an emergency management position, and the chairs, directors, or coordinators of other relevant programs, departments, or divisions across the university. In addition, the committee will include one graduate student. The Executive Committee will meet at least monthly to determine program policy and respond to specific issues as they arise. At least initially, this committee will serve as the program’s admissions committee also. The program will liaise closely with other related programs at the university in periodic meetings and will consider establishing a York wide Council on Emergency Management. Page 27 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • D. Program regulations and courses i. Structure of the program The MA in D&EM is designed as a full-time program with a part-time option. Students proceeding directly from undergraduate study will likely find the full-time option attractive as will those embarking on a career in emergency management for the first time or intent on a career in teaching and research. In addition, it is anticipated that many professionals working in the field will take a leave of absence from their work to pursue graduate studies, returning to work on completion of their degree. Certainly, many working emergency managers who already hold graduate degrees followed this pattern, moving to the US or Britain to pursue their studies and then returning to Canada. At the same time, however, it is expected that some professional emergency managers living and working in the Greater Toronto Area may wish to pursue this degree on a part-time basis, and the program will accommodate this. On a full-time basis the program will take eighteen months to two years to complete. Part-time students may take up to four years. The program consists of a single option of course-work combined with a major research paper. Full-time students are expected to spend two-three terms on course work and will complete their MRP over the remaining time. Part-time students will vary slightly in how they proceed depending on personal circumstances, but will likely complete one to two courses a term over six-eight terms. [See Appendix I: Recommended student progression.] All students in the program complete a common core of four courses. The core is designed to provide a broad overview of critical understandings and to develop the integrated thinking needed in the field. Placing disaster and emergency management within a broader social and environmental context, the four core courses are intended to provide a base of understanding and a world view that will enable students to succeed in this field. In addition, students must complete a research methods course designed specifically for the program in order to provide them with a broad foundation in the distinctive approaches and techniques that distinguish the emergency management field. Students also complete six credits elective courses which help to introduce them to specific areas of study relevant to their area of interest. This is meant to enrich their understanding of a particular topic as they move into their MRP. ii. Intellectual development and educational experience of the student In order to promote the intellectual development of students in the program, faculty will apply a deep approach to learning to move students toward contextual knowing. This program will encourage students to think independently as professionals and to work with case studies of the kinds of disasters and emergencies they are likely to encounter in both practice and research. The proposed program is committed to providing students with a positive, productive and superior educational experience. This will be accomplished by emphasizing a student oriented approach to education. In particular, the program will encourage team work among the students in most courses and program activities. This approach will help student to appreciate the factors that contribute to effective teamwork and to recognize how essential good teamwork is to a successful approach to disaster and emergency management. The program will emphasize the frequent use of guest speakers in class. Visitors could include politicians, policy makers and government advisors, experts from disaster relief organizations such as, the Red Cross; scientists from premier federal institutions such as, Natural Resources Canada Page 28 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • (NRCan); international visiting professors and professionals working on specific disasters cases; members of the media; and military experts. Whenever possible students will be taken to field studies and disaster drills where they can examine various hazard mitigation measures, emergency preparedness activities, emergency response and post disaster recovery and reconstruction. Students will be encouraged to participate as volunteers in provincial, national and international conferences, workshops, and seminars including the annual World Conference on Disaster Management organized by Canadian Centre for Emergency Preparedness, and workshops and seminars organized by the Ontario Association of Emergency Managers. Faculty will take advantage of their relationships with organizations such as Emergency Management Ontario (EMO) and Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC) to provide opportunities for graduate students to become engaged directly with the practice of disaster and emergency management. In a commitment to providing support to students throughout the length of their program, on admission to the program, each student will be appointed a general faculty advisor who will provide them with guidance on course selection and other York related issues. Subsequently, once a student’s research interests solidify, and on the basis of an interview with their general faculty advisor and a review of a formal statement of research interest, they will be matched with a research supervisor who will provide guidance in the design and completion of their major research paper. iii. Admission requirements To be considered for admission, candidates must have: 1. an Honours Bachelors degree in Emergency Management, or its equivalent from a recognized University with a minimum grade point average of B+ in the final two years of study. OR 2. an Honours Bachelors degree from a recognized University with a minimum grade point average of B+ in the final two years of study with one of the following: a. Certificate in the area of Emergency Management from a recognized University or a recognized professional granting body, with a minimum grade point average of B+ b. Completion of a post-graduate College certificate in Emergency Management with a minimum grade point average of A from a recognized College program c. Completion of the following core undergraduate courses in Emergency Management offered by York University with a grade of no less than B+ in any course: AK/ADMS 3700 3.00 Fundamentals of Emergency Management; AK/ADMS 3701 3.00 Emergency Management: Hazard, Vulnerability and Risk Assessment; and AK/ADMS 3702 3.00 Emergency Management: Mitigation, Preparedness, Response, Recovery d. Successful completion of a comprehensive exam on emergency management fundamentals administered by the Graduate Program in Disaster and Emergency Management e. Extensive experience in the emergency management field as assessed by the graduate admissions committee of the Disaster and Emergency Management program. Page 29 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • In exceptional circumstances, the program admissions committee may recommend applicants to the Faculty of Graduate Studies for admission on condition that they complete specified courses in emergency management at the undergraduate level. The program will work closely with York Admissions to ensure that all letters of admissions for students in this category are explicit concerning precisely what courses a student is expected to complete with what grade within what timeline and that all parties are clear on the consequences of a student not fulfilling the stated conditions. iv. Degree requirements Students must complete the following: A. 24 credits including: 1. Core required courses: 12 credits GS/DEMS 5010 3.00 Advanced Disaster and Emergency Management [new course] GS/DEMS 5020 3.00// ES/ENVS 6401 3.00 Natural Disasters: An Unnatural Phenomenon GS/DEMS 5030 3.00 Social and Behavioral Dimensions of Disasters [new course] GS/DEMS 5040 3.00 Contemporary Issues in Disaster Studies/Management [new course] 2. 6 additional credits research methods: GS/DEMS 5050 6.00 Research Methods in Disaster and Emergency Management [new course] or In consultation with the student’s supervisor, an alternative 6 credits research methods from elsewhere in the Faculty of Graduate Studies. 3. 6 additional credits selected in consultation with student’s advisor from appropriate graduate courses offered across the University based on student’s field of specialization including the following listed below. Normally these courses will be from one of five broadly defined areas of study. B. Major Research Paper (MRP) Candidates for the Masters of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management will be required to write a major research paper (MRP) on an approved topic. Topics can either be a critical evaluation and synthesis of the current state of knowledge and research within a defined area of study or may focus on a specific research topic in depth. Papers should comprise original material of a scholarly nature, demonstrate that the student is capable of independent research and critical analysis, and be of publishable quality. The MRP should be between 80-100 pages. The paper will be supervised by a full member of the graduate program and graded on a pass/fail basis by a committee composed of the student's general faculty advisor, supervisor and one other Faculty member who has not been involved in the MRP process. Page 30 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • List of suggested elective courses: (All courses are existing graduate courses unless otherwise specified. It is anticipated that the development of this program will lead to the development of other specialized graduate course offerings.) [See Appendix C for a full list of elective courses with course descriptions and letters of support from offering units concerning the listing of these courses] 1. Public Safety and Security ES/ENVS 5068 3.00 // ES/ENVS 4312 3.00 Global Justice and Humanitarian Internationalism ES/ENVS 6147 3.00 Humanitarian Crises GS/POLS 6225 3.00 Critical Security Studies GS/POLS 6220 3.00 Contemporary Security Studies: Regional Security and Conflict Management 2. Environmental Issues and Disaster Management ES/ENVS 5123 3.00 // ES/ENVS 4123 3.00 Environment and Behavior ES/ENVS 6156 3.00 Critical Theory of International Development ES/ENVS 6175 3.00 Global Environmental Politics GS/CMCT 6120 3.00 Culture and the Environment 3. Business Continuity Management ES/ENVS 6156 3.00 Critical Theory of International Development GS/LOGS 6300 3.00 Fundamentals of Logistics Management [new courses being brought forward as part of this program but also included in a forthcoming proposal for a graduate program in Logistics Management – See Appendix B] GS/LOGS 6362 3.00 Global Logistics and Operations Management [new courses being brought forward as part of this program but also included in a forthcoming proposal for a graduate program in Logistics Management - See Appendix B] 4. Technology and Disaster Management GS/ESS 5420 3.00 Advanced Geospatial Information Technology GS/GEOG 5050 3.00 Geographical Information Systems and Spatial Analysis GS/GEOG 5015 3.00 Remote Sensing and Image Processing for Geographical Analysis and Environmental Monitoring 5. Risks and Social Vulnerability ES/ENVS 5068 3.00 // ES/ENVS 4312 3.00 Global Justice and Humanitarian Internationalism ES/ENVS 5124 3.00 Development Studies ES/ENVS 6137 3.00 Women, Development and Globalization ES/ENVS 6147 3.00 Humanitarian Crises ES/ENVS 6156 3.00 Critical Theory of International Development GS/ADMS 6800 3.00 Global Mindsets and People Management GS/POLS 6580 3.00 Africa: Politics of Continental Crisis GS/SOCI 6310 3.00 Environmental Sociology GS/SOCI 6315 3.00 Cultural Politics of Environment and Development II: Environmental Issues [Please see Appendix C for course descriptions for recommended elective options.] Page 31 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • v. Course Descriptions [Please see Appendix B for full course proposals.] Core courses: GS/DEMS 5010 3.00 Advanced Disaster and Emergency Management This course examines and explores the applications of advanced theory, methods and technologies in disaster and emergency management. Disaster and emergency management decision and planning methods and models, decision support systems, information systems and disaster databases, geographic information systems, remote sensing, various disaster and emergency management software and their applications is will be illustrated. GS/DEMS 5020 3.00// ES/ENVS 6401 3.00 Natural Disasters: An Unnatural Phenomenon This course examines natural disasters from an interdisciplinary point of view, particularly considering why there seem to be more natural disasters, and how and why decisions made by people create vulnerable communities. No pre-/co-requisites. GS/DEMS 5030 3.00 Social and Behavioral Dimensions of Disasters [new course] This course examines social and behavioural dimensions of human interactions before, during and after emergencies and disasters, including behavioural myths and realities; linkages between individuals, families, groups, organizations, community social systems, and various levels of government; social vulnerability and the disproportionate impact of disasters upon various societal groups, etc. There are no pre/co-requisites. GS/DEMS 5040 3.00 Contemporary Issues in Disaster Studies/Management [new course] This course focuses on recent/current natural disasters that have taken place anywhere in the world. Using these disasters as case studies, students will analyse various aspects of disaster management. Research Methods: GS/DEMS 5050 6.00 Research Methods in Disaster and Emergency Management [new course] This course is an advanced and subject specific course on how to do quality research in disaster and emergency management. Students are provided with a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of various qualitative and quantitative research methods and their applications in disaster and emergency management. This course also assists students in developing skills in analyzing disaster and emergency management research done by others. Using examples and case studies, this course also examines the particular problems and issues of conducting research in disaster and emergency management. Pre-/co-requisites: none vi. Collateral and supporting departments As many programs at York University, the proposed program in Disaster and Emergency Management will draw on faculty from across York University. The program is offered by the Faculty of Graduate Studies and supported by the Dean of the Atkinson Faculty who is the program’s resource Dean. The core courses of the program were developed by the emergency management faculty group within the Atkinson faculty, but these courses may be co or team taught by core faculty from other in other areas. Core courses developed in support of the program will be open to students enrolled in other graduate programs with permission of the Graduate Program Director. The research methods course will Page 32 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • commonly be team taught. Elective courses are drawn from graduate course offerings across the University. All core faculty members will participate in graduate supervision regardless of the Faculty in which they hold their appointment. [See Appendix F: Deans’ Letters of Support] The program hopes to collaborate closely with a number of research centres on campus including the Nathanson Centre for the Study of Organized Crime and Corruption, theYork Centre for International and Security Studies (YCISS), and the York Institute for Research and Innovation in Sustainability (IRIS). In addition, the proponents hope to establish connections with a number of centres involved in geographic or area studies. [See Appendix G: Internal Letters of Support] In addition, the program is supported by a number of adjunct faculty who will provide additional breadth of research interest and expertise. Dr. Nistor of the University of Ottawa’s expertise lies in coastal hazards. Dr. Ponnambalam of the University of Waterloo specializes in floods and computing methods to deal with a wide range of issues associated with the risks arising from natural and technological hazards. Dr. Armenakis of Natural Resources Canada is an expert in processing and providing geospatial information; how to use vector and image data to monitor spatial and temporal changes due to natural hazards and contribute to decision making pertaining to disaster risk reduction. Dr. Jason Levy of Brandon University specializes in the use of geospatial technology for hazard planning and emergency management. He is an affiliate faculty member at the Water Resources Research Center (University of Hawaii) and was recently a visiting professor at Kyoto University (Disaster Prevention Research Institute) and Beijing Normal University (Environmental Change and Natural Disasters). Page 33 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • E. Graduate students i. Enrolment projections Table 3: Projected enrolment Total FT & Heads FT Year 1 FT Year 2 FT Total PT Yr 1 PT Yr 2 PT Yr 3 PT Yr 4 Total PT PT 2007-2008 3 0 3 9 0 0 0 9 12 2008-2009 4 3 7 12 8 0 0 20 27 2009-2010 12 4 16 8 10 8 0 26 42 2010-2011 15 12 27 9 8 10 8 35 62 2011-2012 17 15 32 11 8 8 10 37 69 2012-2013 17 17 34 11 9 8 8 36 70 2013-2014 17 17 34 11 9 9 8 37 71 steady 2014-2015 17 17 34 11 9 9 9 38 72 state Total FT & FTE FT Year 1 FT Year 2 FT Total PT Yr 1 PT Yr 2 PT Yr 3 PT Yr 4 Total PT PT 2007-2008 3.0 0.0 3.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 6.0 2008-2009 4.0 3.0 7.0 4.0 2.7 0.0 0.0 6.7 13.7 2009-2010 12.0 4.0 16.0 2.7 3.3 2.7 0.0 8.7 24.7 2010-2011 15.0 12.0 27.0 3.0 2.7 3.3 2.7 11.7 38.7 2011-2012 17.0 15.0 32.0 3.7 2.7 2.7 3.3 12.3 44.3 2012-2013 17.0 17.0 34.0 3.7 3.0 2.7 2.7 12.0 46.0 2013-2014 17.0 17.0 34.0 3.7 3.0 3.0 2.7 12.3 46.3 steady 2014-2015 17.0 17.0 34.0 3.7 3.0 3.0 3.0 12.7 46.7 state Assumptions 1. Assumes intake split of 40% FT and 60% PT for first two years of program. 2. Assumes intake split of 60% FT and 40% PT for subsequent years of program. 3. Assumes FT will take up to 2 years and PT will take up to 4 years to complete degree. 4. Assumes retention rates (at steady state) of: year 1 to year FT - 2 100.00% year 1 to year PT - 2 81.82% year 2 to year 3 100.00% year 3 to year 4 100.00% ii. Employment of graduates Potential employers of graduates from the proposed MA in D&E include Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada; provincial emergency measures organizations such as Emergency Management Ontario; federal departments and provincial ministries that are mandated to hire emergency managers; municipalities; hospitals; and universities and colleges (who need to employ faculty, researchers, and practitioners). The Department of National Defense is focusing increasingly on disaster management, and will find graduates of the proposed program attractive as well as sending Page 34 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • their own staff to complete the program. Some international organizations such as the United Nations may hire graduates of this program. In the private sector, larger corporations such as banks, large utility companies, and insurance companies are potential employers. As well, some NGOs, particularly those involved in disaster relief or community development such as the Red Cross, UNICEF, CARE and OXFAM, will be interested in graduates with Masters level education in this ever more important field. Page 35 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Appendix A: Comparable Programs Page 36 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Examples of Master Programs in Disaster and Emergency Management in other universities University Degree Name Degree focus List of courses Canadian Universities Royal Roads Master of Arts In Residency I: Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Management in Theory (3); Emergency mitigation, preparedness, University Disaster and Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Management in Practice (3). response, and recovery and disaster Emergency Residency II: Skills and Strategies: Capstone Simulation (3); Insights and Issues: management / leadership, teamwork, Management Professional Development in Emergency and Disaster Management (3). communication, inter-agency collaboration / analytical thinking, strategic Distance Courses: Emergency and Disaster Assessment, Planning, Prevention and Protection (3); Incident Management and Post-incident Recovery (3); Research planning, decision making, problem Methods (3); Practicum (3). solving, conflict and crisis management / Independent Research: Master’s Project (12). research. United Kingdom Universities Leicester Risk and crisis management. Courses: Theories of Risk and Crisis; Managing Risk and Crisis, Research Methods University MSc in Emergency in the study of Risk; Crisis and Disaster Management; Case Studies in Emergency Planning Management Planning, Management; Models of Risk, Crisis and Disaster; Emergency Planning Management University Hazards Foundation Courses: Geological Hazards; Meteorological Hazards College Masters program in Research method courses: Research methods; Presentation of data; Principles of London- Geophysical Hazards quantitative modeling; Field techniques and hazard mapping; Remote sensing data; Benfield Geographical Information Systems; Hazard Advanced courses: Advanced Seismological Hazards; Earthquake mechanics and Research energy; Earthquake statistics and prediction; Fracture mechanics; Seismic waves and Centre rays; Case studies; Volcanological Hazards; Dynamics of explosive eruptions; Dynamics of effusive eruptions; Monitoring techniques; Forecasting eruptions; Case studies; Meteorological and Hydrogeological Hazards; Weather dynamics; Forecasting storms and hurricanes; Flood dynamics; Forecasting floods; Groundwater dynamics; Landslide dynamics; Forecasting slope failure; Case studies Northumbria Disaster Management and Sustainable Core modules (taken by all) include: Themes in Sustainable Development; University- Disaster and MSc Development in both 'Third World' and Disaster Risk Reduction and Response ; Approaches to, and Methods for, Project 'First World' contexts. Management; Research Methods for Disaster and Development ; MSc Disaster Developmen Disaster Management and Sustainable Development Dissertation. t Centre (DDC) Management Optional Modules (of which you select two) include: GIS Applications in Disaster and Management & Sustainable Development; Physical and Mental Health for Disaster Management and Development; An approach to Integrated UK Emergency Sustainable Planning; Disaster Management and Sustainable Development Work Placement; Page 1 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Disaster and Development Subject Exploration (in a topic of your choosing) Development US Universities Arkansas Master of Science Emergency management and homeland Courses: Principles and Practices of Disaster Relief and Recovery; Disaster and Tech Degree in Emergency security. Emergency Management Ethics; Community Management of Hazardous Materials University Management and Special Problems and Topics; Design and Management of Preparedness and Homeland Security Mitigation Systems; Technology for Comprehensive Emergency Management; Risk and Vulnerability Assessment for Business and Industry; Foundations of Leadership Contemporary Issues in Emergency Management; Legal Issues in Emergency Management; Independent Study; Workshop. Required Course: Research Methods American Masters of Art Degree Public policy Core Courses: Public Policy, Emergency and Disaster Theory; Emergency and Public in Emergency and Disaster Planning and Management; Interagency Disaster Management University Disaster Management Required courses: Essentials of Emergency Management; Incident Command Anna Maria Master of Science in Emergency management, safety and System (ICS); Hazard Analysis and Risk Management; Principles of Occupational College Emergency security Health and Safety; Principles of Emergency Response Planning and Management Management Elective course: Business Continuity and Emergency Management; Counter Terrorism Mitigation; Introduction to the Preservation of Cultural Resources; Microbiology for Emergency Response Workers (hands-on work in biohazards) Arizona Master of Science Science Courses: Chemistry of Hazards Materials (3 hrs); Comprehensive Emergency State with Emergency Management (3 hrs); Regulatory Framework (3 hrs); Industrial Hygiene (3 hrs); University Management Industrial Toxicology (3 hrs); Terrorism, WMD, and Contemporary Issues (3 hrs); Concentration Research (3 hrs); Applied Project (3 hrs); Information Technology in Emergency Management (3 hrs); Risk Assessment (sample elective) (3 hrs); The George Master of Science in Science and Engineering Core engineering courses: The Management of Technical Organizations; Survey of Washington Engineering Finance and Engineering Economics; Elements of Problem Solving and Decision University Management with a Making for Managers; Systems Engineering concentration in Crisis, Emergency, and Risk Management core courses: Crisis and Emergency Crisis, Emergency Management; Information Technology in Crisis and Emergency Management; and Risk Management Management of Risk and Vulnerability for Natural and Technological Hazards; Information Management and Information Systems. Courses in the student’s area of interest, at least two of which must come from Page 2 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • the following Crisis, Emergency, and Risk Management elective courses: Information Security; Homeland Security: The National Challenge; Issues in International Crisis and Emergency Management; Health and Medical Issues in Emergency Management; Management of Preparedness and Response to Mass Terrorism; Directed Studies (Master’s level); Crisis Management, Disaster Recovery and Organizational Continuity; Disaster Mitigation and Recovery; Environmental Hazard Management; Political Violence and Terrorism Comprehensive emergency management. Jacksonville Master of Science in Required emergency management courses (21 credits): Foundations of State Emergency Emergency Management (3); Disaster Recovery (3); Research Methods in University Management Emergency Management (3); Hazard Mitigation (3); Emergency Preparedness (3); Disaster Response (3); Capstone in Emergency Management (3) Elective emergency management courses (9 credits): Legal Aspects of Emergency Management; Terrorism and Homeland Security; Vulnerability and Capacity-Building; Management Systems in Disaster (3); Crisis Management for Business and Industry; Biosecurity; Health and Medical Aspects of Emergency Management; Directed Studies; Internship; Emergency Management Leadership and Organizational Behavior John Jay MS in Protection Science and engineering Foundation Courses: Introduction to Emergency Management (3 credits); Theory College, Management with and Design of Automated Fire Extinguishing Systems (3 credits); Safety and City Concentration in Security in the Built Environment (3 credits); Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention (3 University Emergency credits) of New Management and Emergency Management Concentration required courses: Security of York Master of Public Information and Technology (3 credits); Theory and Design of Security Systems (3 Administration with credits); Investigative Techniques (3 credits); Emergency Management: Mitigation Concentration in and Recovery (3 credits); Emergency Management: Preparedness and Response (3 Emergency credits); Management Electives: Law, Evidence and Ethics (3 credits); Using Computers in Social Research (3 credits) Lynn Master of Science in Emergency planning and policy Public Administration Foundation Courses: Management and Administration (3 University Administration/Specia credit hours); Applied Research Methods (3 credit hours); Administrative and lization in Emergency Regulatory Law (3 credit hours); Public Institutions, Public Policy, and Democracy Planning (3 credit hours); Financial Management (3 credit hours); Emergency Planning Specialization Courses: Internship in Emergency Planning and Administration (3 credit hours—optional); Technology in Emergency Planning and Administration (3 credit hours) ; Planning Processes for Emergency Administration (3 credit hours); The Social Dimensions of Disaster (3 credit hours); Page 3 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Political and Public Policy Basis of Emergency Planning and Administration (3 credit hours); Living in a Hazardous Environment (3 credit hours); Vulnerability Analysis and Hazard Mitigation (3 credit hours) Graduate Project :Graduate Project in Emergency Planning and Administration (3 credit hours) Metropolita Master of Public Emergency management-response Courses: Impact of Disaster on Cultures and Communities; Evaluating Service n College of Administration Delivery Systems; Research and Analysis Methods in Disasters; Values and New York Degree in Ethics for Admin Decision Making; Economics of Hazards and Disasters; Emergency and Systematic Approaches to Management; Organizational and Municipal Disaster Continuity/Community Planning; Public Health Systems and Preparedness; Management Identification of Disaster Response Needs; Field Experience; Individual and Collective Response to Disaster; Economic/Social Trends and Org of Services; Private Sector Emergency Management; Information Technology Disaster Planning; Initiating and Managing Service Innovation; Field Experience. North Master Degree in The program will consist of three six- Module 1: Emergency Management: A broad foundation of how emergency Dakota State Emergency month modules, and two one-week resident management is currently conducted in the United States, with respect to both natural University Management sessions in Las Vegas. The final one-week and man-made disasters. session will be a field trip to Washington Module 2: Homeland Security, Combating Terrorism: Focus on terrorist incident D.C. management, exploring the entire spectrum of pre-incident, crisis management, and consequence management phases. Module 3 – Electives: A broad array of elective courses for each student to pursue based on individual preference and organizational requirements. 1University Master of Public The curriculum emphasizes preparation for Students may choose from a wide range of electives in the emergency management of North Administration leadership roles in public and nonprofit track including: Context of Emergency Management; Environmental Planning and Texas w/Specialization in organizations. Graduates of the program Hazards ; Legal Issues in Emergency Management ; Managing Networks; Sociology Emergency hold a number of leadership roles with of Disasters; Administration and FEMA, the American Red Cross, and local Planning disaster agencies. Page 4 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Appendix B: Full Course Proposals GS/DEMS 5010 3.00 Advanced Disaster and Emergency Management GS/DEMS 5020 3.00// ES/ENVS 6401 3.00 Natural Disasters: An Unnatural Phenomenon [existing] GS/DEMS 5030 3.00 Social and Behavioral Dimensions of Disasters GS/DEMS 5040 3.00 Contemporary Issues in Disaster Studies/Management GS/DEMS 5050 6.00 Research Methods in Disaster and Emergency Management Also elective courses GS/LOGS 6300 3.00 Fundamentals of Logistics Management GS/LOGS 6362 3.00 Global Logistics and Operations Management Page 1 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Disaster Emergency Management Program Graduate Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title GS/DEMS 5010 3.00 Advanced Disaster and Emergency Management 2. Effective Date and term This is a required core course for the proposed Master of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management 3. Calendar Course Description This course explores the applications of advanced theory, methods and technologies in disaster and emergency management. Disaster and emergency management decision and planning methods and models, decision support systems, information systems and disaster databases, geographic information systems, remote sensing, various disaster and emergency management software and their applications are discussed. Pre/co-requisites: none Cross-Listing: none. 4. Expanded Course Description Advances in planning and management methods as well as computing and telecommunications technologies have significantly transformed emergency management. Technological developments enhance the acquisition of information and resources and the use of technology in all elements of decision making by those involved in disaster and emergency management and research. These advances in methods and technologies facilitate better and more efficient decision making and resource allocation, and the capacity to analyze more complex issues in disaster and emergency management. This course examines and explores the use of advanced methods and technologies in all aspects of comprehensive disaster and emergency management. The main learning objectives of the course are: 1) To understand the nature and extent of current and emerging advanced methods and technologies used in disaster and emergency management. 2) To be able to use and apply advanced planning and decision making methods and technologies in disaster and emergency mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery planning and research. 3) To be able to examine problems and issues associated with the use of new methods and technologies in disaster and emergency management. This class makes use of guest speakers, industry demonstrations, computer imaging, slides, video tapes, case studies, and applied problems. Proposed Lecture Topics: Introduction to Advanced Disaster and Emergency Management Part 1: Advanced Methods Geographic Information Systems Remote Sensing Decision Support Systems Global Positioning Systems Disaster and Emergency Management software Disaster and Emergency Management Information systems Page 2 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Part 2: Advanced Methods and Technologies in Hazard Mitigation Planning Advanced Methods and Technologies in Hazard and Risk Assessment Advanced Catastrophe Modeling Advanced Vulnerability Analysis with Spatial Methods Advanced Hazard Mitigation Planning Methods Advanced Hazard Mitigation Technologies Part 3: Advanced Methods and Technologies in Disaster and Emergency Preparedness and Response Emergency Operation Systems Early Warning Systems Methods and Technologies Evacuation Modeling Emergency Preparedness Education Emergency Communication Systems Emergency Modeling Search and Rescue Methods Disaster Logistics Methods Part 4: Advanced Methods and Technologies in Disaster Recovery and Reconstruction Modeling Post Disaster Reconstruction Disaster Impact Assessment Methods Recover and Reconstruction Financial Methods 5. Faculty Resources David Etkin, Ali Asgary, Niru Nirupama, Ken McBey and other interested faculty. The course will be offered once per year. 6. Evaluation Grades for the class will be based on student performance in completing five class assignments and one term paper. Six assignments, 60% Term paper and class presentation, 40% During the term, students will be asked to complete assignments related to the course topics. Assignments will be completed and submitted to the course instructor for review and will be returned to students after they were marked. The term paper will be a research paper comprising at least twenty pages with references. The report will be a detailed examination of one of the class topics, chosen by students in coordination with the course instructor, with a special emphasis on advance methods and technologies in disaster and emergency management. The term paper will be a detailed examination of the issue or application and its contribution to disaster and emergency management. Students will be asked to make a 20 minute in-class presentation on their class project during the last two sessions of the class. 7. Bibliography (Books Only) ALOHA: Areal Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA Ver. 5.2). Drawn from ALOHA ver. 5.2 Help Software, U.S. EPA, and NOAA. Washington, D.C. 1996. Alter, Steven, Information Systems: A Management Perspective. Second Edition. Menlo Park, CA: Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Company, Inc., 1996 (Chapter 1; Chapter 2 pp. 20 - 38). Amdahl Gary, 2001, “Disaster Response: GIS for Public Safety”, ESRI Press; 2nd edition. Page 3 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Bankoff, Greg, Freks G., and Hilhorst, D., 2004, “Mapping Vulnerability: Disasters, Development and People”, Earthscan. Baumann, Paul. “Flood Analysis: 1993 Analysis.” Volume 4 Applications in Remote Sensing. [The Remote Sensing Core Curriculum Educating Tomorrow’s Technology Leaders. See: http://umbc7.umbc.edu/~tbenja1/baumann/baumann.html. Benson Charlotte , and Clay Edward J., 2004, “Understanding the Economic and Financial Impacts of Natural Disasters”, World Bank Publications. Carlson, George R. and Beni Patel. A New Era Dawns for Geospatial Imagery. Houston Advanced Research Center The Woodlands. See Student Reading 8-Carlson. Dilley, Maxx, Robert S. Chen, Uwe Deichmann, Arthur L. Lerner-Lam, Margaret Arnold, 2005, “Natural Disaster Hotspots: A Global Risk Analysis”, World Bank Publications. Dye, Chris and Gay Nigel., 2003, “Modeling the SARS Epidemic”, Science Express, 300( 5627), 1884 – 1885. Emani, Srinivas and Jeanne X. Kasperson. “Disaster Communication via the Information Superhighway: Data and Observations on the 1995 Hurricane Season.” International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters. pp. 321 – 342, Vol. 14, No. 3, Nov. 1996. Greene, R. W., 2002, “Confronting Catastrophe: A GIS Handbook”, Esri Press. Grossi P., and Kunreuther Howard, 2005, “Catastrophe Modelling: A New Approach to Managing Risk”, Springer. Herring, Thomas A. “The Global Positioning System,” Scientific American. Feb 1996. Pp 44–50. Kunreuther Howard , 1978, “An Interactive Modeling System for Disaster Policy Analysis”, Univ of Colorado Natural Hazards. Monmonier, Mark, 1998, “Cartographies of Danger: Mapping Hazards in America”, University of Chicago Press. Nan Johnson, O. Gerald Uba, Michael McGuire, Jeffrey Milheizler, Schneider P., and Whitney M., 1997, “Fire, flood, quake, wind! GIS to the rescue: how new mapping systems are being used to cope with natural disasters”, American Planning Association. National Climatic Data Center. About NOAA’s Satellites. Asheville, NC. See: Student Readings, 8- About GOES—an HTML Document. National Institute of Justice, 2002, “Crisis Information Management Software (CIMS) Feature Comparison Report”, Special Report. National Research Council, Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Steering Committee, Workshop Series on High Performance Computing and Communications. “Application Needs for Computing and Communications,” Computing and Communications in the Extreme: Research for Crisis Management and Other Applications. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1996. Chapter 1. National Research Council. NRENAISSANCE Committee. “U.S. Networking: The Past is Prologue,” in Realizing the Information Future: The Internet and Beyond, Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. 1994. http://www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/rtif/toc. Okuyama, Yasuhide, and Chang Stephanie E., 2004, “Modeling Spatial and Economic Impacts of Disasters (Advances in Spatial Science)”, Springer. Oyen, Richard “911: The System Behind the Phone Number.” In Steven Alter. Information Systems: A Management Perspective. The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Company: Menlo Park, CA. 1996. Pp. 690 - 692. Sajo, Erno. “Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling.” Lecture. Department of Nuclear Science and the Institute for Environmental Studies, Louisiana State University. July, 1997. Simard, Albert J. “A Global Emergency Management Information Network Initiative: GEMINI,” The Disaster 96 First Internet Conference. London: http://www.mcb.co.uk/confhome.htm 1996. Page 4 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Simard, Albert J. “The Canadian Wildfire Fire Information System,” The Disaster 96 First Internet Conference. MCB University Press. http://www.co.uk/confhome.htm. 1996. Stanley, Ellis M., Sr. and William L. Waugh, Jr. “Emergency Managers for the New Millennium,” Handbook of Crisis and Emergency Management. Farazmand, New York: Marcel Dekker, 1999. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Integrated Risk Information System. See: http://www.epa.gov/ ngispgm3/iris/index.html. See also Readings: 7-IRIS (Word File). van Oosterom, Peter, Siyka Zlatanova, and Elfriede M. Fendel, 2005, “Geo-information for Disaster Management “,Springer. Virkud, Uday, 2005, “Insurers can brace for multiple catastrophes; disaster-modeling software helps carriers prepare for worst-case scenarios.(Piling On): An article from: ... & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management”, National Underwriter Property & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management, 109 (8). 8. Resources (library/physical/other) Most of the books needed for this course are available in York Libraries and the remaining books are being purchased. Journal articles are available on line. DEM Lab will be part of resources to be used for this course. 9. Integrated Courses This is not an integrated course. 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is proposed as a required course for the Master of Arts in Disaster & Emergency Management degree program. There is no other existing York graduate level course covering issues examined in this course Master students in disaster and emergency management need to become familiar and able to use advanced methods in disaster and emergency management. Page 5 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • September 27, 2006 ENVS 6401 Natural Disasters: An Unnatural Phenomenon. This is an existing course in the Faculty of Environmental Studies. 1. Course Number and Title ENVS 6401 Natural Disasters: An Unnatural Phenomenon. 2. Effective Date and Term Winter 2007 3. Calendar Course Description This course examines natural disasters from an interdisciplinary point of view, particularly considering why there seem to be more natural disasters, and how and why decisions made by people create vulnerable communities. No pre-/co-requisites. 4. Expanded Course Description This course will focus on the risk to society from natural hazards and disasters, and how society adapts to those risks. A variety of hazards will be examined, both hydrometeorological and geological (biological hazards will be excluded). An interdisciplinary and mainly social science approach with a global perspective will be taken, with some emphasis on Canadian content. General topics will include (1) risk, hazard & vulnerability, (2) disaster theory, (3) human response and coping mechanisms, (4) costs of disasters, and (5) case studies of disasters. The course will consist of lectures, round table discussion, critiques by students on papers selected in consultation with the course instructor, and the examination of case studies. By its nature this is a very interdisciplinary subject and therefore where appropriate guest lecturers will be brought in to discuss their specialities. Lecture Topics (subject to change at the instructor’s discretion): 1. Student introductions. Disaster definitions. Pressure and Release Model. Hazard profiles. 2. Hydrometeorological hazards. Disaster ranking. Case study. 3. Geological hazards. Case Study. 4. Risk perception. Risk homeostasis. Tragedy of the commons 5. Vulnerability theory. Disaster Myths. 6. Disaster Ecology. Effect of climate change on disasters 7. 1st versus 3rd world disasters. Organizational response. 8. The Emergency Management Cycle. Disasters and ethics. 9. Adaptation Strategies. Case study. 10. Insurance. Government Disaster Assistance Programs. 11. Student presentations. 12. Case study 13. Course summary. Student evaluation. Page 6 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • The text for the course will be: Wisner, B., Blaikie, P., Cannon, T. and Davis, I., 2004. At Risk, 2nd Edition. Natural Hazards, People’s Vulnerability and Disasters. Routledge, 469 pp. In addition, specific readings for the course will be distributed by the instructor as required. 5. Faculty Resources The following faculty are qualified to teach this course: In the Emergency Management Area Professors David Etkin, Ali Asgary, Niru Nirupama and Kenneth McBey. In FES Professors Haris Ali and Peter Timmerman. This 3 credit course will be offered once per year. This course will have no impact on FES faculty resources. 6. Evaluation • Oral Presentation / critique (15%) o Students will present and critique a refereed paper of his/her choice within the subject area. • Case Study (20%) o Students will analyze a case study of a natural disaster, show how it fits into disaster theory and make recommendations as a result of their analysis. • Course Paper (40%) o Students will select a specialty topic in the subject area and do a literature review of it. • Final exam (25%) 7. Bibliography 1. Burton, I., Kates, R. and White, G. 1993. Environment as Hazard (2nd edition), New York: The Guilford Press. 2. Varley, A. (Editor), 1994. Disaster, Development and Environment. London: John Wiley and Sons. 3. Etkin, D., Haque, C.E. and Brooks, G.R. (editors), 2003. An Assessment of Natural Hazards and Disasters in Canada. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 4. Hewitt, K., 1997. Regions of Risk: A Geographical Introduction to Disasters. Addison Wesley Longman Ltd, Harlow, England, 389 pp. 5. Hyndman, D. and Hyndman D., 2005. Natural Hazards and Disasters. Thomson, Brooks/Cole, 490 pp. 6. Ingleton, J. 1999. Natural Disaster Management. Tudor Rose Holdings Ltd, Leicester, England, 320 pp. 7. IPCC 2001. 2001. Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Houghton, J.T., Ding, Y., Griggs, D.J., Noguer, M., van der Linden, P.J., Dai, X., Maskell, K., and Johnson, C.A. (Eds)]. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. 8. ISDR 2002. Living with Risk: A global review of disaster reduction initiatives (Version 1), Geneva: United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction. 9. Mitchell, J.K., (editor) 1999. Crucibles of Hazard: Mega-Cities and Disasters in Transition. United Nations University Press, 530 pp. Page 7 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • 10. Mileti, D.S. 1999. Disasters by Design, Washington, DC: Joseph Henry Press. 11. Shrubsole, D., Brooks, G., Halliday, B., Haque, E., Kumar, A., Lacroix, J., Rasid, H., Rousselle, J. and Simonovic, S. 2003. An assessment of flood hazards and management in Canada. ICLR Research Paper No. 28. Toronto: ICLR. 12. Slovic, P. 2002. The Perception of Risk. Earthscan Publications, Londond. 473 pp. 13. Smith, K. 1996. Environmental Hazards: Assessing Risk and Reducing Disaster (2nd edition), London: Routledge. 14. Wisner, B., Blaikie, P., Cannon, T. and Davis, I., 2004. At Risk, 2nd Edition. Natural Hazards, People’s Vulnerability and Disasters. Routledge, 469 pp. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) A statement from a university librarian was provided previously, certifying that adequate library resources are available. 9. Integrated Courses This is not an integrated course. 10. Crosslisted Courses Crosslisted courses are offered between two or more graduate programmes. For crosslisted courses, include a statement of agreement from the director of the other graduate programme. 11. Rationale There is no other graduate course being offered on this subject. Two other courses in FES may have some overlap. (1) ENVS 5073 NEW SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Examination of new social movements that have arisen in response to the crisis of industrial culture, economic restructuring, shifting political formations, and ecological disasters. The focus is on current theories of social movements in action. Opportunities for students to gain first-hand experience with social movement organizations through participatory research projects are provided. (Integrated with ENVS 4161.03). “ (2) ENVS 6147 HUMANITARIAN CRISES “Humanitarian crises, causing or threatening mass deaths, include natural disasters, famines, epidemics, genocide and war. The progression of such crises, responses to them, and their causes and prevention are covered, in concrete and theoretical terms. Student work emphasizes cases.” Both of these courses, combined with ENVS 6401 provide students with a broad understanding of the social context of natural disasters and how people respond and cope with them. ENVS 6401 places the issue within the context of disaster theory and disaster management and as such provides a different and broader lens with which to view the natural disaster issue. Page 8 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Emergency Management Program Graduate Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title GS/DEMS 5030 3.00 Social and Behavioural Dimensions of Disasters 2. Effective Date and term This is a required core course for the proposed Master of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management 3. Calendar Course Description This course examines social and behavioural dimensions of human interactions before, during and after emergencies and disasters, including behavioural myths and realities; linkages between individuals, families, groups, organizations, community social systems, and various levels of government; social vulnerability and the disproportionate impact of disasters upon various societal groups, etc. There are no pre/co-requisites. 4. Expanded Course Description This course will examine social and behavioural dimensions of disasters and emergencies. As social and behavioural analyses are interdisciplinary in nature, we will be utilizing theoretical perspectives from a variety of disciplines including psychology, sociology, political science, organizational behaviour and human resources. Although we will be analyzing a variety of international disasters, the course will be focusing upon the context of improving the operational effectiveness of Canadian emergency/disaster managers and responders, based upon analysis of scholarly research into behaviour in such adverse settings. The course will consist of lectures, class discussions, student critiques and presentations, and case studies. Films, and where appropriate, guest speakers will be brought in to discuss their expertise and experiences dealing with social aspects of disasters. Proposed Lecture Topics (subject to change) 1. Course, instructor and student introductions. Why study social and behavioural aspects of disasters? Course definitions incl. hazards, risks, emergencies, disasters, catastrophes 2. Human behaviour during emergencies and disasters: Fact and Fiction 3. Public attitudes (including apathy) towards disaster preparedness. Disaster warning as a social process, public response. Evacuation 4. Social vulnerability, identifying vulnerable groups, reducing vulnerability/buildings resilient communities, and emergent social groups 5. Stress: CI and PTSD. Denial 6. Organizations and Disasters: Government, Private, Public, NGOs, Community-based groups & charities. Mutual aid. Continuity and impact upon community functioning, rural:urban issues. 7. Communications, stakeholders and the Media during disasters (including PIO, press briefings, and `rumour’ control) 8. Leader/Follower/Victim, & EM & First Responder (staff and line), relations Page 9 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • 9. Group dynamics and dealing with conflict 10. C3, Incident Command, EOCs & CPs, Multi-agency (MACS), multiple jurisdiction coordination and liaison, SOPs, Effective DM in situations of high complexity 11. Social & Behavioural Issues: Ethics, Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism, Post-incident issues, etc. 12. Student presentations, Course summary and course evaluation 5. Faculty Resources This course will be offered once per year, and will be taught by Ken McBey. Other faculty resources include Ali Asgary, David Etkin and Niru Nirupama. 6. Course Evaluation Oral presentation & executive summary 30% Major research paper 40% Individual take-home assignment 30% 7. Bibliography Professor McBey will compile a required reading list of journal articles and books available from York University library resources (including e-resources). Supplementary Readings: Alexander, David. 2002. Principles of Emergency Planning and Management, Oxford University Press, Harpenden, U.K. Barton, A. 1969. Communities in Disaster: A sociological analysis of collective stress situations, Doubleday, New York. Blocker, T.J. and Sherkat, D. 1992. In the eyes of the beholder: Technological and naturalistic interpretations of a disaster. Industrial Crisis Quarterly, 6: 153-166. Blocker, T.J. and Rocheford, E. and Sherkat, D. 1991. Political responses to natural disaster: Social movement participation following a flood disaster. International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, 9: 367-382 Burby, Involving citizens in hazard mitigation planning, http://www.ema.gov.au/ema/emaInternet the Australian Journal of Emergency Management 16/3 Dissmeyer, V. 1983. Are you ready to meet a disaster? Harvard Business Review, May-June, 7p. HBR Reprint #83302 Drabek, T. 1986. Human System Responses to Disaster: An Inventory of Sociological Findings, Springer- Verlag, New York. Dynes, R., DeMarchi, B. and Pelanda, C. 1987. Sociology of Disasters, Franco Angeli, Milan, Italy. Page 10 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Dynes, R., 1970. Organized Behavior in Disaster, D.C. Heath, Lexington Books. Fisher, Henry. 1998. Response to Disaster: Fact versus Fiction and its perpetuation. The Sociology of Disaster (2nd Edition), University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland. Fischer, H. 2002. Terrorism and 11 September 2001: Does the `Behavioral Response to Disaster’ Model fit? International Journal of Disaster Prevention and Management, 11/3. Fischer, H. 1996. What Emergency Management officials should know to enhance mitigation and effective disaster response. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 4/4, 208-217. Gillespie, D. Perry, R. and Mileti, D. 1974. Collective stress and community transformation, Human Relations, October, 27: 767-778. Haddow, G. & Bullock, J. 2006. Emergency Management, Butterworth-Heinemann Homeland Secutiy Series, Burlington, USA. Hinterhuber, H. and Thomson, H. 1992. Are you a strategist or just a manager? Harvard Business Review, January-February. 8p. HBR Reprint #92104. Hollihan, Tony. 2004. Disasters of Western Canada: Courage amidst the Chaos, Folklore publishing, Edmonton. Kathleen, J. 2000. Disaster Resistant Communities, FEMA report at http://www.udel.edu/DRC/ Mileti, D. 1999. Disasters by Design, John Henry Press, Washington Neal, D. 1990. Human Behavior in Disaster: Fact and Fiction, Contingency Journal 1 (2) 60-61 Neal, D. 1991. Organizational response during a disaster, Contingency Journal 2 (2) 52-53 Neal, D. 1991. Mental health issues following a disaster, Contingency Journal 2 (4) 36-37 Nilson, L. and Nilson, D. 1981. Resolving the `sooner vs. later’ controversy surrounding the public announcement of earthquake predictions’, Disasters, 5 (4) 391-397. Perry, J, and Pugh, M.D. 1978. Collective Behavior: Response to Social Stress, West, New York. Quarantelli, E.L. 1978. Disasters: Theory and Research, Sage, Beverly Hills. Quarantelli, E.L. 1998 What is a Disaster? Perspectives on the Question, Routledge, New York. Quarantelli. 1972. When Disaster strikes (it isn’t much like what you’ve heard and read about), Psychology Today, 5(9): February 61-70. Quarantelli, 1977. Response to social crisis and disaster, Annual Review of Sociology, 3: 23-49. Quarantelli. E.L. and Dynes, R. 1976. Community Conflict: Its absence and its presence in natural disasters, Mass Emergencies, , 1: 139-152 Turnver, R. 1983. Waiting for disasters: Changing reactions to earthquake forecasts in Southern California. Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, August, 1: 307-334. Page 11 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Vroom, V. and Jago, A. 1974. Decision making as a social process. Decision Sciences Whiteman, M. 1981. Planning for disasters: The preparedness dimension in emergency assistance, Development Digest, 19: 93-97. Wisner, B., Blaikie, P., Cannon, T., and David, I. 2004. At Risk: Natural Hazards, People’s Vulnerability and Disasters (2nd Edition), Routledge, 469p. EMO. PSEPC, FEMA, publications and websites, etc. Emergency Management Canada Disasters: The Journal of Disaster Studies and Management International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters DVDs/Videos: Group-think, `Disasters of the Century’ series. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) A statement from the University Librarian is attached 9. Integrated Courses This is not an integrated course. 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is proposed as a required course for the Master of Arts in Disaster & Emergency Management degree program. There is no other existing York graduate level course covering issues examined in this course Page 12 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Disaster Emergency Management Graduate Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title GS/DEMS 5040 3.00 Contemporary Issues in Disaster Management 2. Effective Date and term This is a required core course for the proposed Master of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management 3. Calendar Course Description This course focuses on recent natural and man-induced disasters that have taken place anywhere in the world. Using these disasters as case studies, students will critically analyse various aspects of disaster management strategies, including a need for prevention measures in order to build more resilient communities and thus mitigate the impacts of disasters. Pre-requisites: None 4. Expanded Course Description The starting point for any disaster management and mitigation program is determining the physical and socio-economic vulnerabilities of the people and infrastructures. Recent major disasters represent a more or less complete cross-section of disaster categories including atmosphere, the oceans and solid earth. Disasters can best be understood and managed through the adoption of a broad interdisciplinary approach that includes law, economics, psychology, social science and the physical sciences. In this course, using recent disasters as case studies, the students will learn to critically understand the phenomenon of unfolding of disasters followed by a natural (rapid or slow onset), human-induced or terrorism related event and work individually towards developing their own disaster risk reduction models. The underlying concepts of disasters will be discussed using the following guideline for topics: 1. A critical examination of the currently existing mitigation measures, such as, what worked; what didn’t and why 2. Identify root causes of people’s vulnerability 3. Progression of vulnerabilities leading to unsafe conditions 4. Socio-economic and political impacts 5. Health issues 6. Insurance against disasters 7. Legal issues 8. Moral, ethical and philosophical issues 9. Role of NGO’s and self-help groups 10. Role of various levels of government and international agencies 11. Issues related to regions, cultures, and religion 12. Education and awareness 13. Short term and long term recovery strategies 14. Building resilient communities 15. Mitigation measures for sustainable community development 16. Terrorism related issues Page 13 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Some of the examples of cases of disasters that occurred recently are as follows: • Indian Ocean tsunami of 26 December 2004 • Alaska oil spill – December 2004 • Storm surge in southeast USA from hurricane Katrina starting on 29 August 2005 and followed by hurricane Rita, Wilma, which affected an area larger than U.K. • Contamination concerns after Katrina • Hurricane and landslide in Guatemala (October 2005) • Earthquake in Northern Pakistan – November 2005 • Earthquake in China – December 2005 • Hawaii dam bursts – March 2006 • North Carolina toxic fire – October 2006 • Terrorist attack of 9/11 Every year the case studies will vary depending on the current events taking place in the world. A balance between the developed and developing world would be taken into account. Lab component: This course will have a lab using GIS techniques on simulations exercises to produce loss estimates for use by federal, state, regional and local governments in planning for risk mitigation, emergency preparedness, response and recovery. The mythology deals with nearly all aspects of the built environment, and a wide range of different types of losses. 5. Faculty Resources Niru Nirupama David Etkin Harris Ali Peter Timmerman Ali Asgary 6. Evaluation • Take-home assignment (20%) • 2 Oral Presentations / critique. No written work required (40%) • Course Paper (40%) 7. Bibliography (Books Only) Abbott, P.L. 2005 (Fifth Edition). Natural Disasters: McGraw Hill. 496 pp. Aptekar, L. 1994. Environmental Disasters in Global Perspective. G.K. Hall & Co. (an imprint of Macmillan Company). 198 pp. Cutter, S.L. (Ed.) 1994. Environmental risks and hazards. Prentice Hall, p413. Etkin, D., Haque, C.E. and Brooks, G.R. (editors), 2003. An Assessment of Natural Hazards and Disasters in Canada. Kluwer Academic Publishers. Grossi, P. and Junreuther, H (Editors). 2005. Catastrophe Modelling: A New Approach to Managing Risk: Springer. 245 pp. Page 14 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • ISDR 2004. Living with Risk: A global review of disaster reduction initiatives – Volume 1. United Nations publication, New York and Geneva. p429. Keller, E.A. and Blodgett, R.H. 2006. Natural Hazards: Earth’s Processes as Hazards, Disasters, and Catastrophes: Pearson Prentice Hall395 pp. OCED 2004. Large-Scale Disasters: Lessons Learned. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. 98 pp. Posner, R.A., 2004. Catastrophe: Risk and Response: Oxford University Press. 322 pp. Quarantelli, E.L. (Ed.). 1998. What is a disaster, Routledge, p311. Ronan, K.R. and Johnston, D.M., 2005. Promoting Community Resilience in Disasters: The Role for Schools, Youth and Families: Springer. 210 pp. Smith, K. 1996. Environmental Hazards: Assessing Risk and Reducing Disaster (2nd edition), London: Routledge. Wisner, B., Blaikie, P., Cannon, T. and Davis, I., 2004. At Risk, 2nd Edition. Natural Hazards, People’s Vulnerability and Disasters. Routledge, 469 pp. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) Most of the books needed for this course are available in York Libraries and the remaining books are being purchased. Journal articles are available online. DEM Lab will be part of resources to be used for this course. 9. Integrated Courses This is not an integrated course. 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is proposed as a required course for the Master of Arts in Disaster & Emergency Management degree program. There is no other existing York graduate level course covering issues examined in this course Page 15 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Disaster Emergency Management Graduate Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title GS/DEMS 5050 6.00 Research Methods in Disaster and Emergency Management 2. Effective Date and term This is a required core course for the proposed Master of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management 3. Calendar Course Description This course is an advanced and subject specific course on how to do quality research in disaster and emergency management. Students are provided with a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of various qualitative and quantitative research methods and their applications in disaster and emergency management. This course also assists students in developing skills in analyzing disaster and emergency management research done by others. Using examples and case studies, this course also examines the particular problems and issues of conducting research in disaster and emergency management. Pre-/co-requisites: none Cross listing or integration: none 4. Expanded Course Description This is an advanced and subject specific course focusing on methods to carry out research in disaster and emergency management. Students are provided with a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of various qualitative and quantitative research methods and their applications in disaster and emergency management related research. Topics include identifying research problem, field surveys, cross-national comparisons and disaster and emergency modeling. The methods of conducting research, as well as, communicating the results to interested parties are of paramount importance. Necessary skills and tools will be provided to understand and critically analyze the research works of other academics and professionals which is am important learning objective of the M.A. in D & EM. Use of data collection tools, data analysis and presentation software will be covered as well. This course will also have special focus on topics such as issues involved in conducting field research in disaster and emergency; social and psychological dimensions of disaster management, individual and collective coping strategies, individual and organizational response to disasters and emergencies, public education, evacuation, communication and warning systems, post disaster recovery and reconstruction research, gender issues affecting field research; the use of simulation as a technique for verifying hypotheses generated in exploratory field studies; and ethical issues encountered in conducting disaster and emergency management research. Using examples and case studies, it examines the particular problems of conducting research in disaster and emergency management. Research cases on disaster and emergency mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery phases of disasters will be examined and explored. During this course students will learn how to develop acceptable research proposals in disaster and emergency management field. The following topics will be covered in the course: Part 1: Introduction • Introduction to the course Page 16 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • • What is research in disaster and emergency management? • The History of Disaster Research Part 2: Doing Disaster and Emergency Management Research • Disaster Research Methods • Developing a Researchable Issue in Disaster and Emergency Management: Research Questions, Hypotheses and Models • Disaster and Emergency Management Literature and the Role of Disaster Theories. • Qualitative Research and its Place in Disaster and Emergency Management • Quantitative Research and its Place in Disaster and Emergency Management Part 3: Research Design • Disaster and Emergency Management Research Design • Examples of Quantitative Research Design in Disaster and Emergency Management Research • Examples of Qualitative Research Design in Disaster and Emergency Management Research Part 4: Sampling and Data Collection Methods • Sampling Methods: What sampling strategies are used by disaster researchers? • Observation Method • Interview Method • Questionnaires Method • Focus Group Method • Participatory Method • Secondary sources • Experimental and Behavioral Research • Quasi-experimental Research • Archival Research in Disaster and Emergency Management • Cross-cultural Research in Disaster and Emergency Management • Survey Research in Disaster and Emergency Management Part 5: Analysis of Disaster and Emergency Management Research Data • Qualitative Data Analysis in Disaster and Emergency Management Research • Quantitative Data Analysis in Disaster and Emergency Management Research Part 6: Reporting Disaster and Emergency Management Research Results • Reporting Qualitative Disaster and Emergency Management Research Results • Reporting Quantitative Disaster and Emergency Management Research Results Part 7: Special Topics • Research Ethics in Disaster and Emergency Management • Common Weaknesses in Disaster and Emergency Management Research • The Importance of Multi- and Inter-disciplinary Research on Disasters and for Emergency Management • Problems and Prospects of Disaster and Emergency Management Research in the Developing World. • Future Disaster Research Page 17 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • 5. Faculty Resources A number of faculty members will be able to teach this course including the following. Ali Asgary Niru Nirupama David Etkin Ken McBey Peter Timmerman Peter Penz This course is expected to be offered once each year and will be team taught by some of the above faculty members. 6. Evaluation Task Weighting (%) Critiques of published disaster and 25 emergency management research Research design assignment 25 Data collection and analysis assignments 25 Research proposal 25 TOTAL 100 7. Bibliography Anthony Oliver-Smith, 1996, “Anthropological Research on Hazards and Disasters”, Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 25. (1996), pp. 303-328. Berg, Bruce L., 2006, “Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Sciences”, Allyn & Bacon. Dennis S. Mileti. 1987, “Sociological Methods and Disaster Research.” Sociology of Disasters: Contribution of Sociology to Disaster Research, edited by Russell R. Dynes, Bruna DeMarchi and Carlo Pelanda. Milano, Italy: Franco Angeli. Drabek, Thomas E., 1986, “Human System Responses to Disaster: An Inventory of Sociological Findings”, New York: Springer-Verlag. Dynes, Russell R, Drabek, Thomas E., 1992, “The Structure of Disaster Research: Its Policy and Disciplinary Implications”, Disaster Research Center Series/Report, Preliminary Papers; 183. Erikson, Kai. 1976, “Everything In It’s Path”, New York: Simon and Schuster. Fischer, Henry W., 1998, “Response to Disaster: Fact Versus Fiction & Its Perpetuation. The Sociology of Disaster”, 2nd Edition. Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America. Ira H. Cisin and Walter B. Clark. 1962. “The Methodological Challenge of Disaster Research.” Pp. 23-49 in Man and Society in Disaster, edited by George W. Baker and Dwight W. Chapman. New York: Basic Books; Kreps, G.A., “Sociological Inquiry and Disaster Research”, Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 10. (1984), pp. 309-330. Page 18 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Lewis M. Killianm, 1956, “An Introduction to Methodological Problems of Field Studies in Disasters”, Washington, D.C.: National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council; Pijawka, K. David et al., 1988, “Coping with Extreme Hazard Events: Emerging Themes in Natural and Technological Disaster Research”, Omega: Journal of Death and Dying, 18(4), 281-97. Preston, Richard, 1994, “The Hot Zone”, New York: Random House. Priscilla R. Ulin, Elizabeth T. Robinson, Elizabeth E. Tolley”, 2004, “Qualitative Methods in Public Health: A Field Guide for Applied Research”, Jossey-Bass (November 1, 2004). Quarantelli, E. L. , 1997, “The Disaster Research Center (DRC) Field Studies of Organized Behavior in the Crisis Time Period of Disasters Authors:”, Disaster Research Center Series/Report, P reliminary Paper;254. Quarantelli, E. L. 1987, “Disaster Studies: An Analysis of the Social Historical Factors Affecting the Development of Research in the Area Authors”, Social Factors Issue Date: Nov-1987 Series/Report, Articles; 195B. Quarantelli, E. L., 1999, “Disaster related social behavior: Summary of 50 years of research findings”, University of Delaware, Disaster Research Center, Preliminary Paper, 280. Quarantelli, E.L., 1978, “Disasters: Theory and Research”, Beverly Hills: Sage. Quarantelli, E.L., 2000, “What is a Disaster? Perspectives on the Question”, New York: Routledge. Quarantelli, E.L., 1994, “Disaster Studies: The Consequences of the Historical Use of a Sociological Approach in the Development of Research”, University of Delaware, Disaster Research Center, Preliminary Paper, 264. Robert K. Yin, 1984, “Case Study Research: Design and Methods”, Beverly Hills, California: Sage Publications; Rodriguez, Havidán. 2004. “The Role, Contributions, and Complexities of Interdisciplinary Research: A Holistic Approach to Hazards and Disasters.” Paper presented at the 29th Annual Natural Hazards Workshop, July 14, Boulder, Colorado. Stallings, Robert A., 2003, “Methods of Disaster Research”, International Research Committee on Disasters, Xlibris Corporation. Thomas E. Drabek. 1970. “Methodology of Studying Disasters: Past Patterns and Future Possibilities.” American Behavioral Scientist 13:331-343; Thomas E. Drabek, 1989, “Taxonomy and Disaster: Theoretical and Applied Issues.” Pp. 317-345 in Social Structure and Disaster, edited by Gary A. Kreps. Newark, Delaware: University of Delaware Press. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) A statement from a university librarian in the area must accompany the proposal and certify that adequate library resources are available. 9. Integrated Courses Page 19 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • This is not an integrated course. 10. Crosslisted Courses This is not a cross listed course. 11. Rationale While there are similarities between research methods used by social and natural sciences and disaster and emergency management, but these methods must be applied under unique circumstances. Researchers new to this field need to understand how the disaster context affects the application of the methods of research. Page 20 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title: LOGS 6300 3.00 - Fundamentals of Logistics Management 2. Effective Date and Term: FW 2007/08 3. Calendar Course Description Provides an in-depth study of the theory and practice of the logistics management functions in the manufacturing and service industries and facilitates an understanding of the strategic concepts and tools necessary for meeting the challenges of logistics management. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 4. Expanded Course Description This course aims to provide students with: (i) comprehensive knowledge of the key areas of logistics - purchasing, operations, distribution, and integration; (ii) an understanding of the interactions and the integration of these key logistics system elements; and (iii) an appreciation of the impact of logistics activities on the overall profitability of the firm and the society. The role of technology and information systems is crucial to the success of logistics operations (e.g., inventory management). Transportation, customer relationships, and service management are the key areas of the distribution area. All of these logistics activities have to work in a coordinated and integrated way to bring potential benefits to the organization. Integration requires firms to account for various risks (e.g., risks in global operations). High levels of logistics performance occur when decisions and strategies at each individual functional level fit with the overall business strategy of the firm. Beginning with a macro approach to each of these fundamental elements, the course will move to more conceptual, in-depth, and critical analysis of the key issues involved. For instance, in purchasing the critical issues emphasized will include supplier management, supplier alliances and outsourcing. The course will use a mixture of case studies, role-laying and simulation games, and exercises and discussions throughout. The following main topics will be covered: • Logistics Management: Context and Overview • Purchasing Management: Concepts and Issues  The Role of Purchasing in a Organization  The Purchasing Process  Sourcing Decisions  Supplier Selection and Relationship Management  Design of Purchasing Organization  Global Sourcing and Purchasing • Management of Logistics Operations  Demand Management  Inventory Management Page 21 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    •  ERP Systems  Process Management • Managing Distribution Function  Transportation Management  Customer Relationship Management  Facility Location Decisions  Service Response Management • Managing Competitive Advantage  Logistics Integration Process  Integration Models and Issues  Integrated Performance Management 5. Faculty Resources Faculty most likely to teach this course include: Hassan Qudrat-Ullah, Mustafa Karakul, Abdullah Dasci, Fatma Gzara. Others qualified to teach this course are: Rongbing Huang, Henry Bartel, Cristobal Sanchez. The course will be offered annually. 6. Evaluation Evaluation will be based on assignments and tests. The breakdown of the marks will be as follows: Assignments/ In-class Exams (4) 30% Case Analysis (2) 30% Research Project (Written Report, Presentation) 40% 7. Bibliography Chi Kin Chan, H.W.J. Lee (editors). (2005). Successful strategies in supply chain management. Hershey, PA: Idea Group Pub. Kocabasoglu, C. & Suresh, N. (2006). Strategic Sourcing: An Empirical Investigation of the Concept and Its Practices in U.S. Manufacturing Firms. Journal of Supply Chain Management, 42(2): 4-17. Leenders, M., Flynn, A., Josnson, P., and Fearon, H. (2006). Purchasing and supply management: with 50 supply chain cases (13th edition). New York: McGraw-Hill. (This is the second text book) Magee, J., Capacino, W., and Rosenfield, D. (1985). Modern Logistics Management: Integrating Marketing, Manufacturing and Physical Distribution. New York: Wiley. Maltz, A & Ellram, L. (1997). Total cost of relationship: An analytical framework for the logistics outsourcing decision. Journal of Business Logistics, 18(1): 45-67. Murphy, P., Murphy, D., and Regis, P. (2004). Contemporary logistics. N.J. : Prentice Hall. Nilsson, F. (2006). Logistics management in practice - towards theories of complex logistics. International Journal of Logistics Management, 17(1): 38-57. Page 22 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Simchi-Levi, D., P. Kaminsky and Simchi-Levi, E. (2003). Designing and managing the supply chain: concepts, strategies, and case studies. New York: McGraw-Hill. Wisner, J., Leong, G., and Tan, K. (2005). Principles of supply chain management. USA: Thomson South-Western. (This is the first text book). Website Resources: (http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/epic/internet/indsib-logi.nsf/en/Home): Industry Canada: information, studies and statistics about the logistics industry in Canada. (http://www.sclcanada.org): Supply Chain & Logistics Canada: non-profit organization offering opportunities in education, research and networking. (http://www.ctl.ca): Canadian Transportation & Logistics: information about Canadian logistics industry, case studies, and Canadian logistics trends and issues. (http://www.cscmp.org): Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals: information for professionals and academics including educational material and case studies, supply chain management and logistics definitions, conferences, and career information. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) See library statement 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is designed as a core course for the proposed MSc in Logistics Management program. Page 23 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title: LOGS 6362 3.00 - Global Logistics and Operations Management 2. Effective Date and Term: FW 2007/08 3. Calendar Course Description Focuses on operations management issues unique to manufacturers with extensive international operations. Emphasis is on international transportation, warehousing, customer service, inventory control, strategic facility design, global sourcing, multi-national product design, and tax and subsidies. Prerequisites: AK/ADMS 6320 4. Expanded Course Description The globalization of businesses has resulted in companies having to manage global networks of suppliers, integrators, contract manufacturers; logistics service providers, distributors, and service support operators in geographically dispersed locations. This course focuses on (1) how global and international companies can overcome geographical, cultural, and organizational barriers, and leverage the strengths of the network to create value; and (2) how these companies may use different ways to manage operations in different regions to take full advantage of local strengths and limitations. This course deals with the development of strategies for business logistics and supply chain management involving the transfer of goods and services across national boundaries. Topics include the impact of economic globalization on supply chain strategies; the design of global logistics networks; managerial processes and systems for international production and distribution; and risk management for international logistics. Textual readings, lectures and assigned articles will provide a conceptual overview to the material. Contemporary readings and case studies will provide focus for class discussion. Study groups are formed for class presentations, case analyses and for research leading to a term paper. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to topics in global logistics and operations management and reviews their application in many practical settings. It will comprise of a set of lectures that will cover the theoretical fundamentals of the area, as well as an overview of the status of current practice in the field through the presentation and discussion of recent cases. Throughout the course, we will be dealing with operational, tactical, and strategic decisions that arise in international logistics and operations management. The course begins with strategic issues at a global firm. It starts with a discussion of product design and research and development activities at a global setting. Then international production/distribution system design and global sourcing issues will be discussed. Concepts such as subsidies and taxes, import duties, tariffs, political risks, and trade agreements and their impact on global network design decisions will be demonstrated. The second part of the course focuses on tactical decision making such as transportation, inventory, and purchasing management issues. Issues such as transport mode selection, inventory control under long-lead times, and purchasing decisions will be elaborated on. 5. Faculty Resources Page 24 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Most likely course directors: Abdullah Dasci, Mustafa Karakul. Others qualified to teach this course: Fatma Gzara, Hassan Qudrat-Ullah Frequency: annually 6. Evaluation Midterm exam 25% Final exam 25% Case analyses and material for class discussion 30% Term Paper and group class presentation 20% 7. Bibliography Apte, UM and RO Mason – “Global outsourcing of information processing services” in The Service Productivity and Quality Challenge, Ed. Patrick Harker, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1995 Bramel, J. and D. Simchi-Levi, Logic of Logistics: Theory, Algorithms, and Application for Logistics Management, 1997, Springer-Verlag, NY. Chopra, S. and P. Meindl, Supply Chain Management: Strategy, Planning and Operation, 2001, Prentice-Hall, NJ. Daskin, M.S. Network and Discrete Location: Models, Algorithms and Applications, 1995, John Wiley and Sons, NY. Dornier, Philllippe-Pierre, Ricardo Ernst, Michel Fender, and Panos Kouvelis. Global Operations and Logistics – Text and Cases. Wiley, 1998 (ISBN: 0-471-12036-7). Ferdows, K. “Making the most of foreign factories”, Harvard Business Review, 1997. Flaherty, T. Global Operations Management. McGraw-Hill Companies, 1996. Kent N. Gourdin, Global Logistics Management, Second Edition, Blackwell Publishers Inc. Lessard, DR and JB Lightstone. “Volatile exchange rates can put operations at risk”. Harvard Business Review, 1986 Loader, D. Fundamentals of Global Operations Management. John Wiley and Sons, Inc. 2006. McGrath, ME and RW Hoole. “Manufacturing’s New Economies of Scale”. Harvard Business Review, 1992 Pierre David, International Logistics, Atomic Dog Publishing Russell, R. and BW Taylor, Operations Management: Quality and Competitiveness in a Global Environment. John Wiley and Sons, Inc. 2006. Page 25 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Scholes MS. and MA Wolfson. Taxes and Business Strategy: A Planning Approach Prentice Hall, 2002. Schniederjans, MJ. Operations Management in a Global Context, Quorum Books, 1998. Simchi-Levi, D. , P. Kaminsky and E. Simchi-Levi, Designing and managing the supply chain: concepts, strategies, and case studies, 2003, McGraw-Hill, NY. Wilson, MI “The office farther back: Business services, productivity, and the offshore back office The Service Productivity and Quality Challenge, Ed. Patrick Harker, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1995 Yip, G. Total Global Strategy. Prentice-Hall, 1995. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) See library statement. 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is designed as an elective course for the proposed MSc in Logistics Management program. Page 26 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Appendix C: Elective Course Options Page 27 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • frequency of Elective Courses for MA in D&EM description offering Global Justice and ES/ENVS 5068 3.00 //ES/ENVS 4312 Humanitarian fw 03-04; fw 04-05; 3.00 Internationalism fw 05-06; fw 06-07 ES/ ENVS 5123 3.00 // ES/ENVS 4123 fw 03-04; fw 04-05; 3.00 Environment and Behavior TBA fw 05-06; fw 06-07 Survey of the evolution of development theory over the past three decades. Economic, social, political, and environmental ideas are discussed in relation to the process of development in both northern Canada and fw 03-04; f 04; f 05; ES/ENVS 5124 3.00 Development Studies the Third World. fw 06-07 NOT CLEAR IF Management of Turbulent COURSE STILL ES/ 5141 3.00 Environments EXISTS Overview of current issues in gender and development analysis as a framework for the integration of women in Third World development. Emphasis is placed on theoretical and conceptual issues as the necessary background to project- Women, Development and oriented approaches to fw 03-04; f 04; f 05; ES/ ENVS 6137 3.00 Globalization Women and Development. fw 06-07 Page 1 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Humanitarian crises, causing or threatening mass deaths, include natural disasters, famines, epidemics, genocide and war. The progression of such crises, responses to them, and their causes and prevention are covered, in concrete and theoretical terms. Student ES/ENVS 6147 3.00 Humanitarian Crises work emphasizes cases w 06; fw 06-07 Study of theories of development, underdevelopment and maldevelopment in Third World Countries, with stress on the social, economic, political, ideological and ecological bases for development approaches. Historical and current approaches to the theory of development are presented, and the extent to which they Critical Theory of respond to environmental f 02; w 05; w 06; fw ES/ENVS 6156 3.00 International Development concerns is investigated. 06-07 Page 2 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Advanced exploration of the linkages between the global political system and the world's natural environment. In particular, the course addresses: history of conceptions of the environment as a political issue in the global arena; theories of international conflict and cooperation with respect to the natural environment; interactions between the current global political economy and the environment; and empirical investigation of key issue Global Environmental areas which illustrate the ES/ENVS 6175 3.00 Politics above concepts. f 02; w 03; w 06 This course considers four themes: the internationalization of business activity; the changing notion of the 'expatriate'; the institutional contexts in which people management takes place; Global Mindsets and the concept of global fw 04-05; fw 05-06; GS/ADMS 6800 3.00 People Management mindsets and leaders. fw 06-07 Page 3 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Critical exploration into current literature in the emerging field of Cultural Studies. Examination of the discourses through which we attach "culture" to nature, place and space. Particular attention is given to what resources contemporary cultural studies might offer in analysing interactions between culture, nature, and place; between social Culture and the identity, community, and built fw 03-04; f 04; f 05; GS/CMCT 6120 3.00 Environment and natural environments. fw 06-07 This course examines the communication strategies of governments, political parties, and advocacy groups in the context of contemporary media and communications technologies, with particular reference to Canada. It examines theories of political discourse, ideology, and public opinion. Same as Environmental Studies 6143 3.0, Political Science 6165 3.0 and Ryerson Graduate Communication & Culture w 03; s 05; w 06; fw GS/CMCT 6304 3.00 /// ES/ 6143 3.00 Political Communication 945. 06-07 Page 4 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • This course is designed to help students understand the latest research and development of geospatial information and communication technology (GeoICT). The course will cover topics in advanced spatial positioning, imaging, remote sensing, and advanced geospatial algorithms such as open Advanced Geospatial GIS, internet GIS, 3D GIS, w 03; fw 04-05;fw GS/ESS 5420 3.00 Information Technology etc. 06-07 Geographical Information Systems and Spatial fw 03-04; w 05; w 06; GS/GEOG 5050 3.00 Analysis n/a fw 06-07 Page 5 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • This course focuses on ways remote sensing systems are used to acquire data, how these data are analysed and how the information is used in studies of natural and produced environments. Special emphasis is placed on satellite sensors operating in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum (Landstat TM and SPOT), and on airborne and spaceborne radar systems. In addition to learning the characteristics of the sensors, how they record data and how the data are processed, the students will analyse these data using digital processing Remote Sensing and techniques. Image Processing for Integrated with the Geographical Analysis and undergraduate course fw 03-04; fw 04-05; GS/GEOG 5015 3.00 Environmental Monitoring Geography 4440.03. fw 05-06; fw 06-07 fw 03-04; fw 04-05; GS/POLS 6225 3.00 Critical Security Studies n/a fw 05-06; fw 06-07 Africa: Politics Of GS/POLS 6580 3.00 Continental Crisis n/a f 98; wf 06-07 Contemporary Security Studies: Regional Security fw 03-04; fw 04-05; GS/POLS 6220 3.00 and ConflictManagement n/a fw 05-06; fw 06-07 fw 03-04; fw 05-06; GS/SOCI 6310 3.00 Environmental Sociology n/a fw 06-07 Cultural Politics of Environment and Development fw 03-04; fw 04-05; GS/SOCI 6315 3.00 II:Environmental Issues n/a fw 05-06; fw 06-07 Page 6 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Appendix D: Criteria for Appointment Page 1 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Appendix D: Criteria Regarding Appointments, Re-Appointments, and Periodic Review [MA in D&EM] A. Required Information and Material All individuals seeking appointment, re-appointment or periodic review of their appointment must submit an up-to-date C.V., in OCGS format and a statement describing their graduate teaching and supervision assignments. Individuals may also provide supplementary material to help in an assessment of suitability for appointment or re-appointment. B. Process of Recommendation The Graduate Programme Director is responsible for making recommendations to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies on appointments, re-appointments and review of appointments. The recommendation of the Graduate Director is based on the assessment made by the Executive Committee of the program regarding the individual’s suitability for appointment, re-appointment or a continuing appointment. This recommendation is based on the criteria established by the Senate of York University, Faculty of Graduate Studies [“Membership in the Faculty of Graduate Studies: Appointment and Periodic Review of the Appointment”] and the specific interpretations of these criteria laid out by the Graduate Programme in Public Policy, Administration, and Law below. C. Interpretations of Criteria for Appointment A candidate for appointment must: 1. Hold a PhD (or equivalent) degree or have otherwise demonstrated achievement as a researcher, scholar or professional in accordance with the expectations of the discipline. 2. Have demonstrated evidence of a continuing contribution to research or scholarship or professional activity in a form that is available for peer review and critical analysis. This will normally include a combination of: − A minimum of four peer-adjudicated publications and or book chapters during the previous seven years [and evidence of new research activity each year] − Peer-adjudicated research grants − Invited or peer-adjudicated presentations at conferences or symposia − Other modes of presentation subject to peer review. While these represent reasonable expectations, it is recognized that not all candidates can be expected to produce the same number of publications or show high levels of research funding including: as yet untenured recent PhD’s, those deeply involved in the practice of disaster and emergency management, and faculty heavily involved in administration. The programme recognizes that these candidates can make valuable contributions to a Graduate programme and that their circumstances should be taken into account in an evaluation of their candidacy. In addition, other means of demonstrating a contribution to research or scholarship or professional activity will be considered including: contract research, provision of services that contribute to the development of the academic literature, discourse and analysis or professional practice in the candidate’s field, provided: − The work constitutes a significant scholarly or professional contribution to the field; and Page 2 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • − The results of the work are disseminated through a process that involves the equivalent of academic peer review; or − The results of the work are publicly accessible and are submitted to peer-review by assessors agreed upon by the individual and the Director of the programme. The Executive Committee of the Advisory Board may also take into consideration other types of publication, professional activities and awards including: − Organization and direction of major conferences, symposia etc. − Publication of non-refereed articles; − Honours, awards or grants related to the field; − Development of legislation, policy or doctrines; − Participation in outside professional or scholarly organizations, directly related to the discipline, including editorial roles and/or advisory roles; − Creation of multi-media works, software packages, etc. − Professional activity: applied work on disaster and emergency management; consultants for government, industry or community groups; bilateral, multinational and international agencies; reports; etc. 3. Where previously engaged in graduate teaching and supervision, show evidence of satisfactory performance as an instructor and/or supervisor. The criteria will normally include: − Evidence of satisfactory teaching performance in the form of a written statement of teaching and supervisory responsibilities, student evaluations, and, if warranted, peer evaluations. − Sufficient availability to students and evidence of an ability to contribute effectively to the quality of students’ work and their completion within a reasonable time. − Evidence of effective communication of relevant theoretical and conceptual material. D. Provisions for Consultation and Reconsideration In situations in which the Programme Director plans to recommend against appointment, or recommend limitations on the appointment, he or she must discuss this recommendation with the individual concerned prior to notification. The individual may request reconsideration by the Executive Committee [Advisory Board] of its recommendation and submit any supplementary information, or appeal personally before the Executive Committee [Advisory Board] within 10 days. The decision made on reconsideration is the last one made at the level of the Graduate Programme, and it is then forwarded to the Dean of Graduate Studies for consideration. An individual who does not concur with the final decisions of the Executive Committee may exercise the right of appeal by forwarding a written statement of reasons within ten working days of receiving the Executive Committees decision regarding reconsideration. Page 3 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Appendix E: Library Statement Page 4 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • YORK Memo UNIVERSITY To: Jane Harrison - Senior Coordinator Academic Planning Ali Asgary - Emergency Management Program LIBRARIES From: Cynthia Archer, University Librarian University Date: September 27, 2006 Librarian’s Subject: Library Statement – Masters of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Office Management 4700 Keele St. Since the inception of this new area of research and teaching the library has been actively building and developing a collection with the goal of supporting a graduate program. Close collaboration between the Faculty and the Liaison Librarian for the School of Administrative Studies has resulted in a strong collection in support of the proposed Masters of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management. The widest range of print and online materials area available for research and learning including books, journals, government documents, videos, DVDs, statistics and data, GIS resources and a wide range of online full-text databases. The Liaison Librarian can develop a meaningful information literacy component in support of graduate studies and research. At Scott Library, Graduate students have exclusive access to a state-of-the art study room which includes wired and wireless access for laptops, several computer workstations and a scholarly setting conducive to intensive research. Future plans for York University Libraries include campus collaborations for several digital initiatives such as archiving electronic theses, expanding into electronic books and publishing electronic journals. cc: Sophie Bury – Business Librarian Catherine Davidson – Associate University Librarian, Collections Page 5 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Memo To: Cynthia Archer, University Librarian From: Sophie Bury, Business Librarian, Peter F. Bronfman Business Library Date: October 27 2006 Subject: Library Statement, Proposed Masters of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management (MA D&EM) York University Libraries will be able to support the proposed new Masters of Arts program in Disaster and Emergency Management to be administratively housed within the School of Administrative Studies of the Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies at York University. It should be noted that the collections at the Libraries of relevance to disaster and emergency management studies have been substantially enhanced commencing summer 2005 when planning for programming in these areas began with the development of a number of undergraduate courses and a certificate program in emergency management. From the beginning close faculty/librarian collaboration ensured that the collection was built in areas where it needed to grow and work to build the collection further is ongoing. Faculty teaching and conducting research in emergency management at the School of Administrative Studies shared lengthy lists of recommended books and government publications for addition to the collection, in addition to suggested video/DVD titles for purchase, publisher names of relevance, as well as requesting a number of new key journals in the field. Funds were found to enable the purchase of the requested materials. Sophie Bury, liaison librarian to the School of Administrative Studies, also arranged meetings with other relevant subject specialists on campus during summer 2005 to ensure that they were aware of anticipated collections’ needs in emergency management – a highly interdisciplinary field. A considerable number of the new acquisitions purchased in the last academic year will be relevant in supporting the study of emergency and disaster management at an advanced level. Indeed, faculty, mindful from the beginning, of aspirations to develop a Masters program recommended acquisitions for the Libraries with this likely future development in mind. It should also be noted that when the approval plan to support the business collections policy was updated in Fall 2005, new and developing program areas like Emergency Management were integrated, and as such librarians automatically see new monograph titles in these areas when reviewing newly published books. Additionally, it should be noted that the monies allocated to support the purchase of firm order items (i.e. non approval plan items) for the School of Administrative Studies were also increased commencing in the academic year 2005/06 largely to support new program areas including emergency and disaster management. The library resources available in support of the proposed MA in Disaster and Emergency Management include a wide ranging collection of both print and online materials including books, dissertations, journals, magazines, newspapers, government documents, videos/DVDs, statistics and data, maps and GIS resources, and a wide range of relevant online full- text databases. Given the nature of the fields of disaster and emergency management, and the specific program objectives outlined in the program proposal, emphasis on the adoption of a broad interdisciplinary approach is fundamental to the teaching and research which will be conducted as part of this new program. Emergency and disaster management are both areas which build upon the research and expertise of a wide range of disciplines and as such library materials of relevance are dispersed among the multiple libraries on campus and among the Library of Congress call number ranges as follows: • Bronfman Business Library: materials relating to business and industry responses and initiatives around emergencies and disasters can be found at this library, the primary library on campus serving the needs of the School of Administrative Studies. Other materials of relevance include materials pertaining to business continuity, risk management, crisis management, management science and logistics management (all areas to be covered in the new program) Page 6 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • • Osgoode Hall Law Library: Legislation and regulations pertaining to emergency and disaster situations are made available by the law library on campus, in addition to resources of relevance to some other legal areas covered by this program including humanitarian law and the general area of public safety and security. • Scott Library: it is here that the social sciences collection is largely located with monograph and periodical collections of relevance to many program courses with themes and content falling within multiple disciplinary areas such as geography, political science, economics, psychology, sociology, and environmental studies. In addition the government documents collection is largely located at the Scott Library, as is the Map Library which offers resources and expertise of relevance to this program (especially in terms of Geographic Information Systems or GIS). • Steacie Science & Engineering Library: Health, medical, and technological disasters will form one focus in this proposed new masters program and many of the relevant materials in this regard are located at Steacie. Additionally other areas of relevance to modern disaster management identified in the program proposal include IT, nursing, biology, earth sciences and meteorology and much of the material in these specific areas is located at the Steacie Science & Engineering Library. In the following section an overview and description of the main specific resource types available at the Libraries in support of the proposed MA in Emergency and Disaster Management is provided: Required/Recommended Reading Materials: Searching of the YULcatalogue and other relevant electronic library systems for materials included in the reading lists for the new courses in this masters program indicates that a substantial number of the books, journal articles, and other specified materials are available at the Libraries. Where monograph items are unavailable they will be purchased immediately. In the case of the small number of articles, which are unavailable in the local collection, relevant faculty will be consulted to determine whether any new periodical subscriptions are recommended as a means to provide access to the recommended reading materials. It should be noted that while this new Masters program does comprise some entirely new courses, quite a number of courses (especially the elective courses) are existing graduate courses, and as such the Libraries are already aware of them, would have prepared library statements in the past to support them, and engaged in collection building to ensure availability of recommended reading materials. Monographs: An appreciable collection of monographs of relevance to the fields of emergency management and disaster management is available at the Libraries and as indicated above can be found dispersed among the different libraries and across the LC call number system. Funds continue to be allocated to build the collection further both in support of undergraduate and graduate studies. Periodicals: A number of significant new titles were added to the already existing periodical collection relating to emergency and disaster management studies in the academic year 2005/06, including but not limited to the Journal of Emergency Management, the International Journal of Emergency Management, and Emergency Management Canada. A list of core journals in the York University Libraries collection pertaining to the fields of emergency and disaster management is included in Appendix A, and is also available on the Bronfman Business Library’s web site at: www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/BG/guides/emjournals.htm It should be noted that growth in the journal collection, including titles of relevance to emergency and disaster studies, has been made possible in recent years through York University Libraries’ participation in consortial purchases from publishers such as Blackwell, Elsevier, Wiley and others which are made available to all Ontario University Libraries via Scholars Portal. Many journals are also available via full-text via aggregator databases including business databases such as ABI/INFORM Global, Business Source Premier (a recent addition to the Libraries’ collection), and multidisciplinary databases such as the Research Library and other sources. It should also be noted that subject/keyword access to a broad range of relevant periodical literature in the fields of emergency and disaster management is made available by means of a wide range of online periodical indexes. These databases offer sophisticated search functionality to allow students and faculty to track many articles of relevance on chosen topics, in addition to linking technologies via SFX software. This means that by clicking on the Find it @ York links within these databases a user will be brought to the full-text online of the chosen article, where available, and/or the catalogue record for the journal, where available. In light of the highly interdisciplinary nature of the proposed masters program relevant periodical indexes include databases in Business, the Social Sciences, and Science and Medicine. Relevant examples include but are not limited to: ABI/INFORM Global, Business Source Premier, CBCA Complete, Computer Database, General Science Index, Geography, Medline, PAIS, PsycInfo, Research Library, Social Sciences Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science, Worldwide Political Science Abstracts Page 7 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • In addition to journals and magazines, students and faculty in the new masters program will benefit from online access to national and international, as well as current and historic, news stories relating to emergencies and disasters via York University Libraries’ impressive newspaper/newswire database collection. Relatively recent additions to the collection such as Factiva and Canadian Newsstand have served to enhance preexisting databases of relevance including LexisNexis ,which is available to all students enrolled in programs at the School of Administrative Studies or Schulich School of Business. For a detailed guide to newspaper sources available at York University Libraries this guide can be consulted: http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/Home/ResearchAndInstruction/finding-newspapers/index.jsp Dissertations: A significant collection of online full-text dissertations (written since 1997) including coverage of emergency and disaster management related topics, is available via the Libraries’ subscription to Proquest Dissertations & Theses. Government Documents: it is noted that government publications are of fundamental importance in any program focusing on emergency and disaster management. A wealth of information is increasingly published by government at all levels relating to disaster and emergency planning, policy, programs etc. and the Emergency Management subject research guide available on the Bronfman Business Library’s web site highlights some key publicly-available government resources; see: http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/BG/guides/emguide.htm#gov While a substantial amount of material is available for free online, some significant material is fee-based, and the Libraries serve faculty and students by providing access to key government information of relevance. Examples include Microlog: Canadian Research Index (an index of Canadian government publications largely available on microfiche at the Libraries), Marcive (a backfile of digital publications and documents, all available via YULcatalogue, selected by the US Federal Depository Library Program) and SourceOECD and AccessUN – all subscription databases offered by the Libraries with materials of relevance to emergency and disaster studies. The Libraries also house additional publications of relevance to disaster and emergency management from provincial and federal government bodies in Canada, in addition to some from other foreign governments. Of note is the access to over 10,000 publications produced by the Federal Emergency Management Agency through microfiche and online collections. In addition to materials from the OECD and the United Nations, some other relevant publications from intergovernmental organizations are available at the Libraries including the publications from the World Bank. DVDs/Videos: Since the introduction of emergency management curricula at York in 2005, relevant librarians have worked with faculty to enhance the DVD/video collection. This collection will serve to support the Masters of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management. A full list of videos of relevance to programs supported by the Business Library is available from this web site. This URL displays key videos and DVDs recently added to the Libraries’ collection, which appear under the subject heading of emergency management: http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/BG/collections/dvd.htm#em Statistics & Data Resources: York University Libraries provide access to a number of subscription statistics and data sources of relevance to emergency and disaster management. An important and key Canadian example is CANSIM which contains billions of time series data from Statistics Canada. Relevant statistics are also available from other sources. A statistics & data librarian is available at the Scott Library to help students with specific requests and an extensive subject guide to sources of data and statistics is also available on the York University Libraries’ web site at: http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/LibraryDataServices/SubjectGuides/index.htm GIS Resources: The study of geographic information systems (GIS) and the use of geospatial data sets will be important in the proposed Masters of Emergency and Disaster Management. A detailed guide to the geospatial data sets at the Libraries is made available on the Map Library’s web site at, as are a number of handouts providing guidance on the use of GIS technologies available at York University: http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/Map/collections/digitalgeospatial/index.htm http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/Map/classhandouts/index.htm The Map and GIS Librarian is available to provide help with GIS related research requests. While information resources of relevance in the Libraries collection will be fundamental in supporting the proposed MA in Disaster and Emergency Management, the importance of relevant key library services available in support of faculty and Page 8 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • students who would be connected with this program is of great importance also. As such core services available to support faculty and students in this proposed new program are outlined below: • Liaison & Reference Support Services: Sophie Bury is the librarian assigned specifically to liaise with faculty who are engaged in teaching of disaster and emergency management at York University. In some cases referrals may be made by her to subject specialists in other libraries. Indeed, this is predicted to be very important in such an interdisciplinary area where the expertise of a number of library professionals will be relevant. Assistance with business information resources is available from reference staff at the Bronfman Business Library seven days a week. Reference librarians are also available at other library locations on campus. Reference service is provided in-person, by phone, by e-mail, and by virtual chat reference. In addition, the Libraries make available a wide range of online reference guides designed to help students with research. This includes specific business research guides made available on the Bronfman Business Library’s web site, including an Emergency Management Research Guide, in addition to a number of more general online guides and tutorials for finding key resources including a guide to finding dissertations, a Web Research Tutorial and more. See: Business specific guides: http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/BG/guides/index.htm General research guides: http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/Home/ResearchAndInstruction/startresearch.htm • Instructional Services: Instructional sessions tailored to specific programs or courses including emergency and disaster management are available by contacting Sophie Bury at the Peter F. Bronfman Business Library. In addition the Libraries prepare course-related web guides to serve as an additional resource for students to refer to in support of course-related library instructional sessions. Examples of these guides can be viewed for business courses and programs at the Bronfman Business Library web site: http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/BG/assignments/index.htm Drop-in workshops designed to enhance the information literacy skills of students are also offered each term at the libraries and graduate students are welcome to attend. The Libraries also offer tutorials on a regular basis on RefWorks bibliographic management software, an important tool freely available to all registered students and faculty at York University. • Access to information resources not held locally: Resource sharing (or interlibrary loan) serves to supplement the collection of York University Libraries by sourcing materials from other libraries, organizations and document delivery services. Books and microforms can be borrowed from Resource Sharing free of charge, and articles and copies of US dissertations are made available for a nominal subsidized fee. RACER (Rapid Access to Collections by Electonic Requesting) has very recently been made available and gives users greater and easier access to twenty participating Ontario Council of University Libraries’ collections. Faculty and students in the new program will also benefit from Direct Borrowing privileges which have been in place at most Canadian universities since May 1, 2002. This enables direct borrowing from university libraries across Canada through the Canadian Reciprocal Borrowing Agreement. In conclusion the Libraries are well placed to support the proposed new MA in Disaster and Emergency Management. Collections and services, which have been substantially enhanced in the most recent academic year, to provide support for the program, will continue to grow as relevant librarians work with faculty to meet teaching and research needs at the graduate level. I very much look forward to being a part of this new development at the School of Administrative Studies and to working with all involved faculty and students connected with this new graduate program. Sophie Bury Business Librarian & Liaison Librarian, School of Administrative Studies, Atkinson Faculty of Liberal & Professional Studies Page 9 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Appendix A Emergency Management/Disaster Management: Key Journals and Magazines at York University Libraries All of the following journals are available in print and/or electronic form from York University Libraries. Note some journals listed below are freely available on the Internet. Most of these electronic journals are available only to current York University students, faculty and staff. In order to access the journals online from off-campus locations, you will need an active library card i.e. a library barcode and PIN. Australasian Journal of Disaster and Trauma Studies Freely available e-journal, 1997 - present Australian Journal of Emergency Management Freely available e-journal, v.13, 1998 - present. Also available in print (incomplete set of issues): (v.10, 1995/96); (v.13, 1998/99 - v.14, 1999/2000); v.15, 2000/01 - v.16, 2001/02; (v.17, 2002); v.18, 2003 - present Bronfman Business Library. Call no.: HV 553 M22 Canadian Security Magazine Freely available e-journal, 2004 - present Contingency Planning & Management Freely available e-journal, July/August 1999 - present Disasters E-Access available through Scholars Portal, v.21, 1997 - present. Also available in print: v.1, 1977 - v.27, 2003. Scott Library. Call no.: HV 553 D57 Disaster Prevention & Management E-Access available through Scholars Portal, v.1 1992 - present; and ABI/INFORM Global, 1995 (Volume 4, Issue 5) - present , delayed 1 year(s). Disaster Management & Response E-Access available through Scholars Portal, v.1, no.2, 2003 - present. Disaster Recovery Journal Freely available e-journal. Winter 1998 - present. Page 10 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Emergency Management Canada Available in print: v.1, no.2, 2005 - present Bronfman Business Library. Call no: HV 551.5 C3 E44 Global Environmental Change E-Access available through Scholars Portal, v.1, 1990 - present. Global Environmental Change Part B: Environmental Hazards E-Access available through Scholars Portal, v. , 1999 - present International Journal of Emergency Management Available in print: v.2, no.4, 2005 - present Bronfman Business Library. Call no.: HV 551.2 I567 Internet Journal of Rescue & Disaster Medicine Freely available e-journal, 1998 - current Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management E-Access available through Blackwell/Synergy, v.5, 1997 - present; and through Business Source Premier, March 1993- (Current issues may not be available due to publisher restrictions) Journal of Emergency Management (JEM) Available in print: v.4, 2006 - present Bronfman Business Library. Call no.: HV 551.2 J68 Journal of Homeland Security Freely available e-journal, October 2000 - present Journal of Homeland Security & Emergency Management E-Access available through bepress, v.1, 2004 - present. Organization & Environment E-Access available through Sage, v.10, 1997 - present; and ABI/INFORM Global, Mar 1997 (Volume 10, Issue 1) - current , delayed 1 year(s). Also available in print: v.13, 2000 - v.17, 2004, Scott Library. Call no: HD 49 I53 Natural Hazards E-Access available through Kluwer. v.14, no.2/3, 1996/97 - present Natural Hazards Informer Freely available e-journal, 1999 - present Natural Hazards Observer Freely available e-journal, March 1996- present Risk: Health, Safety & Environment E-Access available through HEIN online, Vols. 1-13 (1990-2002). Risk Analysis E-Access available through Scholar's Portal, v. 18 (5), 1998 - present, and through Blackwell Publishing, v. 1 (1981) - present; and through Business Source Premier, Feburary 2000 - (Current issues may not be available due to publisher restrictions). Also available in print: v.1, 1981 - v.13, 1993 Steacie Science & Engineering Library. Call no: T 174.5 R55 Risk Management E-Access available through ABI/INFORM Global, Oct 1987 (Volume 34, Issue 10) – current Page 11 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Risk Management & Insurance Review E-Access available through ABI/INFORM Global, v. 5, 2002 - present, Blackwell Synergy, v.4, no. 2 - present, and through Business Source Premier, v.6 - present. Security Management E-Access available through ABI/INFORM Global, Jan 1991 (Volume 35, Issue 1) - current and through Business Source Premier, Jan. 1994 - present. Created August 2005, Updated Oct. 2006 Page 12 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Appendix F: Decanal Letters of Support Atkinson Faculty, Dean R. Lenton Faculty of Arts, Dean R. Drummond Faculty of Environmental Studies, Dean J. Seager Faculty of Health, Dean H. Skinner Faculty of Science and Engineering, Dean N. Cercone Page 13 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Appendix G: Internal Letters of Support Lesley Beagrie, Faculty of Health, Nursing Page 14 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Appendix H: External Letters of Support David Baumken, Manager, Emergency Preparedness and Business Continuity Planning, Hydro One Networks Inc. Trevor Daniel, Assoc Professor, University of Adelaide. James K. Mitchell, Dept of Geography, Rutgers John Newton, John Newton Associates Inc., Crisis and Risk Management Counsel. Narendra Saxena, Professor and Director, Pacific Mapping Program, University of Hawai’i at Manoa Lieutenant Col C.A. Trollope, National Defense Chris Webb, Academic Projects Manager, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Aukland University of Technology, New Zealand. Page 15 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Appendix H: Recommended student progression Page 16 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • Recommended Student Progression: MA in D&EM F1 W1 S1 F2 W2 S2 F3 W3 S3 F4 W4 S4 Full-time Full-time students are expected to spend four terms on course work and the remainder of the two years on the completion of their MRP. 3 courses GS/DEMS GS/DEMS XXXX Work 3.00 credit electives Completion of MRP per term XXXX 3.00 3.00// ES/ENVS on GS/DEMS XXXX Advanced 6599 3.00 Natural MRP 3.00 Contemporary Disaster and Disasters: An Issues in Disaster Emergency Unnatural Studies/Management Management Phenomenon [new course] [new course] GS/DEMS XXXX 6.00 Research Methods in Disaster and Emergency Management [new course] GS/DEMS 3.00 credit electives XXXX 3.00 Social and Behavioral Dimensions of Disasters [new course] Part-time: Part-time students will have up to 4 terms to complete GS/DEMS GS/DEMS XXXX Research methods 6.00 Work GS/DEMS GS/DEMS XXXX Work 3.00 3.00 Completion XXXX 3.00 3.00// ES/ENVS on XXXX 3.00 3.00 Contemporary on electives electives of MRP Option 1: 1 Advanced 6599 3.00 Natural MRP Social and Issues in Disaster MRP course per Disaster and Disasters: An Behavioral Studies/Management term [or Emergency Unnatural Dimensions [new course] some Management Phenomenon of Disasters combination [new course] [new of this and course] option 2] Page 1 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
    • F1 W1 S1 F2 W2 S2 F3 W3 S3 F4 W4 S4 Option 2: 2 GS/DEMS GS/DEMS XXXX Research methods 6.00 3.00 Completion of MRP courses a XXXX 3.00 3.00// ES/ENVS electives term Advanced 6599 3.00 Natural Disaster and Disasters: An Emergency Unnatural Management Phenomenon [new course] GS/DEMS GS/DEMS XXXX 3.00 XXXX 3.00 3.00 Contemporary electives Social and Issues in Disaster Behavioral Studies/Management Dimensions of [new course] Disasters [new course] Page 2 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management