Proposed Graduate Program in Disaster

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Proposed Graduate Program in Disaster

  1. 1. Full Vol 1: November 28, 2006 Proposal for a Masters of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management (MA in D&EM) York University
  2. 2. Program Brief – Volume One: The Program York University Master of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management (MA in D&EM) Table of Contents A. Introduction..........................................................................................................................................3 i.Program description............................................................................................................................3 ii.Program objectives.............................................................................................................................4 iii.Program scope...................................................................................................................................6 iv.York’s suitability to offer this program.............................................................................................6 v.Societal need and demand for the program........................................................................................7 vi.Innovative and distinguishing features of the program.....................................................................8 B. Faculty................................................................................................................................................10 i.Core Faculty .....................................................................................................................................10 ii.Faculty research funding..................................................................................................................15 iii.Faculty experience with graduate supervision................................................................................16 iv.Faculty complement and teaching loads.........................................................................................17 C. Physical and Financial Resources.......................................................................................................26 i.Library resources...............................................................................................................................26 ii.Computer resources..........................................................................................................................26 iii.Space/classrooms............................................................................................................................26 iv.Financial Support for Students .......................................................................................................26 v.Program administration....................................................................................................................26 D.Program regulations and courses.........................................................................................................28 i.Structure of the program ..................................................................................................................28 ii.Intellectual development and educational experience of the student...............................................28 iii.Admission requirements .................................................................................................................29 iv.Degree requirements........................................................................................................................30 v.Course Descriptions..........................................................................................................................32 vi.Collateral and supporting departments............................................................................................32 E. Graduate students................................................................................................................................34 i.Enrolment projections ......................................................................................................................34 ii.Employment of graduates.................................................................................................................34 MSc in Emergency Planning Management...............................................................................................1 Masters program in Geophysical Hazards.........................................................................................1 MSc Disaster Management and Sustainable Development.......................................................................1 American Public University .....................................................................................................................2 Masters of Art Degree in Emergency and Disaster Management.............................................................2 Public policy ............................................................................................................................................2 Anna Maria College .................................................................................................................................2 Master of Science in Emergency Management .......................................................................................2 Emergency management, safety and security...........................................................................................2 Arizona State University ..........................................................................................................................2 Master of Science with Emergency Management Concentration ............................................................2 Science ......................................................................................................................................................2 Courses: Chemistry of Hazards Materials (3 hrs); Comprehensive Emergency Management (3 hrs); Regulatory Framework (3 hrs); Industrial Hygiene (3 hrs); Industrial Toxicology (3 hrs); Terrorism, Page 1 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  3. 3. WMD, and Contemporary Issues (3 hrs); Research (3 hrs); Applied Project (3 hrs); Information Technology in Emergency Management (3 hrs); Risk Assessment (sample elective) (3 hrs);...............2 Jacksonville State University ...................................................................................................................3 Master of Science in Emergency Management........................................................................................3 YORK UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES.....................................................................................................5 University Librarian’s Office................................................................................................................5 Appendices A: Programs Elsewhere B: Full Course Proposals C: Elective Courses D: Criteria for Appointment E: Library Statement F: Decanal Letters of Support G: Internal Letters of Support H: External Letters of Support I: Recommended Student Progression Volume 2: Faculty CV’s Volume 3: List of Consultants Page 2 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  4. 4. Master of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management (MA in D&EM) A. Introduction i. Program description This is a proposal for a Master of Arts degree program in Disaster and Emergency Management (MA in D&EM) to be administratively housed within the School of Administrative Studies of the Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies at York University. The program has been developed in response to the growing recognition of the urgent need for graduate level education in this new and important field. Drawing on faculty from across York University with expertise in a wide range of areas, this program builds on an existing undergraduate level Professional Certificate in Emergency Management and a Bachelor’s degree program in development. The number and magnitude of natural, technological, and human-caused disasters and emergencies are on the rise. Whether an ice storm, tornado, hurricane, earthquake, flood, tsunami, water quality crisis, pandemic, chemical spill, biological hazard, train derailment, severe power outage, hostage taking, or terrorist attack, we are increasingly aware of the range of disasters and emergencies that threaten us, the environment and our quality of life. Increasingly, also, there is professional recognition, political acknowledgement and public discussion of the importance of working to prevent, mitigate, and prepare for these possible events locally, nationally, and internationally. Business, industry, government at all levels, not-for profit agencies, educational institutions, and communities, to name the most obvious sectors, recognize the importance of engaging well-educated professional disaster and emergency managers in a discussion of the hazards and risks they are likely to confront. With a goal to preparing first responders and emergency managers for work in this rapidly expanding area, over the last few years educational institutions have developed undergraduate level programming in Emergency Management. In Ontario, in addition to York’s undergraduate Professional Certificate that is intended largely for those pursuing management level work in this field, Centennial, Fleming, Sheridan, and George Brown colleges have developed entry-level programming in Emergency Management. There is, however, a pressing need for more advanced level study. Disaster and emergency management is a complex, interdisciplinary field. Those working in key positions of responsibility from politicians to emergency managers themselves, require an awareness of the full range of factors and conditions at play in comprehensive emergency and disaster management situations. This broad vision of disaster management is essential to effective decision-making. What is called for is both more extensive research in the field and better educated planners and policy makers at senior levels who can bring to bear a sophisticated analytical perspective informed by current research. This will allow for the generation of better and more effective legislation, policy, and doctrines as well as improved response. In recognition of this, many universities around the world have developed graduate programs in emergency management. Regrettably, Canada has lagged behind. The proposed graduate program in Disaster and Emergency Management will help to address this gap, and will contribute to the education of policy makers and senior executives in the private, public and NGO sectors internationally, nationally, provincially, and locally. The MA in D&EM emphasizes both breadth of focus and depth of understanding. The program is concerned with both emergencies (sometimes linear events that can cause deaths or significant injuries, which can seriously disrupt business or operations or threaten reputation or revenue, or which can cause significant physical or environmental damage) and disasters (large, complex, and non linear Page 3 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  5. 5. events that give rise to a serious disruption of the normal functioning of society, causing social, human, material, or environmental losses that exceed the ability of the affected community to cope with using only its own resources). Rooted in a social science framework with a strong emphasis on environmental studies complemented by participation of faculty from health, science, and engineering, the proposed program takes a systems approach, going beyond simple cause and effect models to consider the complex interaction of social, environmental, and technological systems and subsystems. Emergency management and disaster management are not synonymous terms, although they overlap. The former is concerned with the organization and management of resources and responsibilities for dealing with all aspects of emergencies. Emergency management involves plans, structures and arrangements established to engage the normal endeavours of government, voluntary and private agencies in a comprehensive and coordinated way to reduce risks related to emergencies. The latter (disaster management) deals with the body of legislation, policy, administrative decisions and operational activities required to prepare for, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the effects of natural, technological or human caused disasters. As a masters level program, the proposed MA in D&EM will focus on developing independent critical, analytical, and professional abilities. The program is intended for existing career professionals in the field, for those seeking employment opportunities in this rapidly expanding profession or for those simply interested in pursuing studies in this fascinating field. The program assumes some prior knowledge of or experience in the field, whether through work experience, undergraduate level study, a recognized college program, or the equivalent study as assessed by a comprehensive admissions examination. The program will build on the foundational knowledge students have in the field and help them to appreciate its complexity and the sophisticated methodology and analysis it calls on researchers and practitioners to employ. In an effort to accommodate the needs of this diverse student group, the program is available both on a part-time basis [four years] for students who intend to continue to work while pursuing their studies and as a full-time program for others [two years]. Experience internationally has shown that many practitioners take a leave of absence from work to pursue graduate level studies, returning to work upon completion of their degree. The proposed program is a collaborative effort of faculty across York University. Emergency Management faculty in the School of Administrative Studies in the Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies have worked with faculty in the Faculty of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science and Engineering, and the Faculty of Arts to develop a curriculum that is innovative and exciting. The program builds on their various expertise in environmental risks and management, natural hazards, public health, humanitarian law, public safety and security, crisis management, war and complex emergencies. Further, the program complements work being done in a number of areas across campus by the Nathanson Centre for the Study of Organized Crime and Corruption, York Centre for International and Security Studies (YCISS), the Centre for Refugee Studies, the York Institute for Research and Innovation in Sustainability (IRIS), and a large number of centres involved in geographic or area studies. ii. Program objectives The proposed Masters program is explicitly designed to advance the level of study and research beyond that of existing undergraduate programming. In its design, the program benefits enormously from the self-consciousness with which York emergency management faculty have approached the definition of learning goals. As part of a larger Alliance on Public Safety and Emergency Management, York faculty have been working to map the learning goals of programs at different levels Page 4 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  6. 6. within the emergency management field. The goal has been to find language to describe the continuum of learning within key areas of knowledge, tracing it from core competencies to critical understandings and integrated solutions, climaxing in creative research. This model is intended as an aid to students in helping them to select the program best suited to their needs and goals and as a contribution to on-going discussions around the development of professional standards and accreditation in this emerging field. The Learning Continuum Model Core Competencies Critical Understandings Integrated Solutions Creative Research Working within this framework, York’s undergraduate level Professional Certificate in Emergency Management is designed to provide students with the core competencies needed to become emergency managers. In this sense, it is mainly based in knowledge and operations, though some courses do go into selected issues in more depth. Broadly speaking, the general objective of the MA in D&EM is to take students beyond the core competencies needed by practitioners, to a deeper understanding of the reasons behind the practice, and to cultivate in them an ability to develop and implement integrated solutions to problems. The MA degree is intended to give students (a) the critical understandings in the field that underlie operations and core competencies, (b) an ability to think and operate within the emergency and disaster management discipline in an integrated way in order to have the ability to implement effective solutions, and (c) provide some experience in developing and implementing research in the field. Specifically, the proposed program intends that graduates will be able to: • Identify the specific root causes of natural, technological, health, and human-induced disasters, and use this knowledge to develop integrated risk reduction programs that take account of the complex links between social, environmental, and technological sectors. • Develop an understanding and ability to critically analyze current issues in disaster and emergency management, and to be able to place this new information within disaster theory and integrate it into their problem solving. • Develop an understanding of behavioral and organizational aspects of emergency and disaster management, and have the ability to apply this understanding to the management of a broad range of scenarios that require different approaches as a result of variations in inter- agency and institutional complexity and coupling. • Know how to analyze emergency and disaster case studies, and to design and conduct disaster and emergency management research. • Explore some topic of interest in sufficient depth so that it can be the basis for a major research paper, and have the scholarship and writing skills needed to defend the work at a post-graduate level. Page 5 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  7. 7. iii. Program scope Disaster and emergency management involves understanding the human condition in relation to our natural, social, and technological environment. As such, modern disaster management is an interdisciplinary field built upon the expertise of a wide variety of disciplines including sociology, psychology, management, logistics, political science, economics, IT, geography, nursing, health management and informatics, geophysics, environmental studies, urban planning, biology, earth science and meteorology. The MA in D&EM uses a multidisciplinary approach targeting advanced topics in disaster management theories, methods, issues and techniques. While issues of disaster and emergencies as they relate to war will be discussed as they emerge in the context of course work and discussion, they will not constitute a specific focus of the program. In particular, the M.A. in D&EM will emphasize the following areas for research and study: • Public Safety and Security • Environmental Issues and Disaster Management • Business Continuity Management • Technology and Disaster Management • Risk and Social Vulnerability These areas are not being brought forward as fields, but rather as conceptual areas to help students in the selection of elective courses. iv. York’s suitability to offer this program York University is one of only two Canadian universities offering a structured undergraduate program in disaster and emergency management. As such, it has a dedicated cadre of faculty with specific expertise in the area of emergency management. These faculty have expertise in: risk and vulnerability assessment; weather and climate related risk; disaster modeling; risk mitigation; disaster and emergency economics and finance; contingency operations; command, control, communications and leadership behaviour in emergency situations; terrorism; Geographic Information Systems [GIS]; business continuity; and post disaster recovery and reconstruction planning. All are active participants in a range of organizations contributing to the development of this new field. David Etkin, coordinator of the Emergency Management is co-chair of the Canadian Risks and Hazards Network – an organization established in 2003 committed to creating an environment in which the hazards research, education and emergency management practitioner communities can effectively share knowledge and innovative approaches that reduce disaster vulnerability. He is also a director of RedR Canada (Registered Engineers for Disaster Relief) and was principle investigator of the Canadian National Assessment of Natural Hazards. Niru Nirupama is an elected member of the editorial board of Natural Hazards, an international journal published by 'Springer' in Germany. She also serves on the international advisory committee of the ‘World Congress on Disaster Management, Infrastructure and Control Systems’ amongst other responsibilities. Ali Asgary has served as a planner in post earthquake reconstruction following a number of large earthquakes in Iran. He is also a member of the scientific committee of the “Integrated Natural Disaster Management Conference.” Ken McBey is regional coordinator for St. John Ambulance and a member of Wellington County’s Emergency Management committee. All have been active participants in extensive discussions over the design of programs in this field and the needs/requirements of professionals at different levels. In addition to this very focused group, York University has a wide range of faculty engaged in research and teaching related to disaster and emergency management who are eager to play an active role in the proposed program, including teaching and student supervision. These faculty are drawn from the Logistics, Management Science, and Human Resources Management areas of the School of Page 6 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  8. 8. Administrative Studies, and the School of Social Sciences of the Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies; the School of Nursing within the Faculty of Health; the Department of Biology and Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering of the Faculty of Science and Engineering; the Department of Geography, Department of Political Science, and Division of Social Science of the Faculty of Arts; and the Health and Environment and Environmental and Cultural Studies areas within the Faculty of Environmental Studies. York faculty have published on a wide range of subjects including: SARS, environmental disasters, environmental informatics, hazard assessment, risk mitigation measures, critical infrastructure, crisis management, and tsunamni early warning. This program, in bringing these faculty together, will function as a strongly interdisciplinary postgraduate program and will enhance collaboration between faculty whose teaching and research are related to disaster and emergency management. Located in Toronto, the MA in D&EM at York University will be able to attract students from across Canada as well as other parts of the world. For many years Canadian students seeking graduate level programming in emergency management have traveled to the US or Britain; this program offers an opportunity much closer to home. It also provides access to a wide range of academic and professional opportunities for collaboration with faculty in universities nearby; practitioners teaching in local college programs; the Canadian Forces College; emergency management specialists within public and private sectors organizations and elsewhere. v. Societal need and demand for the program There is an increasing need for graduate level programming in the area of disaster and emergency management. 1. According to a recent study published by Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC) there is an increasing demand for disaster and emergency management professionals in Canada (Bruce, J.A., Donovan K.F., and Hornof, M.J., “Emergency Management Education in Canada,: Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, Ottawa, 2005). It has been estimated that Canada as a whole needs more than 12,000 emergency managers in both public and private institutions, many of whom should have at least a masters level degree in disaster and emergency management. 2. As highlighted in a recent survey conducted by Royal Roads University, a majority of those already employed in the disaster and emergency management field are interested in and looking for advanced education in emergency management. For mid-career emergency managers who work for the federal, provincial or municipal governments, graduate-level education is key to a successful career. A leading study of senior federal public servants, The Superbureaucrats (by George Szablowski and Colin Campbell) has shown that having a graduate degree is closely associated with attaining more senior positions. York University’s Professional Certificate in Emergency Management [which is offered on a part-time and full-time basis during the day and in the evening] has received numerous enquiries from public servants who want to pursue graduate level education in the field. The absence of a postgraduate program able to accommodate working emergency managers has limited the ability of the three orders of government to renew and refresh their emergency management staff, and to ensure that future senior emergency managers will have the professional skills required to undertake their work effectively. 3. A considerable number of those who are currently holding emergency management positions have an undergraduate degree already – although commonly in a field outside emergency Page 7 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  9. 9. management. They are looking for career specific programming but are commonly interested in graduate level education rather than in completing a second undergraduate level program. 4. It is commonly accepted that senior emergency managers require advanced university level understanding of the field. 5. As the need for emergency management professionals increases, there is an increasing demand for faculty to teach them. It is expected that some MA in D&EM graduates will proceed to doctoral work elsewhere and will eventually establish themselves as experts researching and teaching in the field. Currently there is a huge gap in this area in Canada. (Bruce et al., 2005). Graduates of this program would be eligible for admission to a broad range of doctoral level programs depending on their undergraduate degree and the research focus within their Master’s program including a PhD in Environmental Studies, Geography, or Sociology. Graduates could also more directly pursue a PhD in the area of Emergency Management including North Dakota State University’s Ph.D. in Emergency Management, or the University of Delaware’s PhD in Environmental and Energy Policy with a concentration in Disaster and Public Policy. 6. There is also an increasing demand for disaster and emergency management research. Lack of research in this area is mainly due to the lack of researchers with experience in this field. The MA in D&EM will train future researchers in disaster and emergency management to fill the current gap. 7. Canada is also behind other countries such as the USA, Australia and the UK in the development of graduate level programs in disaster and emergency management. The MA in D&EM at York University will be the second such program in Canada. This program is expected to appeal to emergency managers at all three levels of government, in private sector businesses and companies, in non-governmental organizations, and also to high-performing students in undergraduate programs seeking graduate degrees in disaster management. The breadth of focus of the current program will fill the needs of these four target groups in a way previously unavailable in Canada. [See Appendix H: Letters of external support for the program.] vi. Innovative and distinguishing features of the program At present, there is only one other graduate level program in Emergency Management in Canada - Royal Roads University’s Master of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management, which is scheduled to start in April 2007. In contrast to the proposed program’s emphasis on the advancement of research and creation of new knowledge, the Royal Roads program exclusively targets practitioners and places emphasis on training and the more practical or applied aspects of disaster and emergency management. The first group of scholars to engage explicitly in disaster studies were sociologists. The first recognized scholarly study of disaster was Samuel Henry Price’s study of the response to the Halifax explosion, “Catastrophe and Social Change” completed in 1920 toward a PhD in Sociology at Columbia. A number of graduate programs are still heavily rooted in sociology including that at the University of Delaware. One of the oldest and best known programs in the United States is the University of North Texas’ Masters of Public Administration with a Specialization in Emergency Administration and Planning. This program’s administrative or management focus is quite similar to that of many Homeland Security programs. Almost one-half of the programs in the United States fall within this category. Page 8 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  10. 10. A number of programs such as that at the University of Arkansas have a strongly technical focus, whether rooted in geography, science, or engineering. Such programs emphasize risk assessment and the application of a variety of technologies to the field. Other programs are rooted in Development Studies such as the Masters of Science in Disaster Management and Sustainable Development at Northumbria University. Still other programs, including that at the University of Coventry, emphasize a military perspective that applies a command and control approach to emergency management. [See Appendix A: Programs elsewhere.] In contrast to all the programs categorized above, the proposed program takes a problem-oriented rather than a disciplinary approach to the study of disaster and emergency management. The proponents feel strongly that a disciplinary approach can be a barrier to effectiveness. Instead, the core of the proposed program draws on a wide range of disciplines, approaches and methodologies to help students appreciate the complexity of perspective and approach required in this field. Perhaps the most similar American program is that offered by the American Public University. Page 9 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  11. 11. B. Faculty i. Core Faculty As an interdisciplinary program, the proposed MA in D&EM draws on faculty from across York University. The faculty listed below will serve as core members of the program, both teaching courses and supervising major research papers. York University has a strong tradition of graduate programs that draw on faculty from across the University. [See Appendix F for letters from the appropriate Deans supporting the involvement of their faculty in the program. See also Appendix D: Criteria for appointment.] Table 1: Core Faculty Members FACULTY MEMBERS Retirement Date if within the Supervisory Faculty Name & Rank M/F Home Unit next seven years Privileges Category 1 Ali Asgary, B.A.( Tehran, Iran), School of Administrative M.A.(Tehran, Iran), Ph.D. ( Newcastle, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of UK), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional full Studies Abdullah Dasci, B.Sc. (Ankara, School of Administrative Turkey), M.Sc. (Ankara, Turkey), Ph.D. Studies, Atkinson Faculty of full (McGill), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional Studies Rongbing Huang, B.Sc (East China School of Administrative Normal University), M Sc. (Fudan), Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full Ph. D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Niru Nirupama, M.Sc.( Kanpur, India) School of Administrative M.E.(Roorkee, India), Dr. Eng.( Kyoto, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of F full Japan), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Ron Ophir, BSc (Hebrew University), School of Administrative MSIA (Carnegie Mellon), PhD Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full (Carnegie Mellon), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Hassan Qudrat-Ullah,BA (Punjab, School of Administrative Pakistan), M Sc. (Multan, Pakistan), Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M. Phil. (Bergen, Norway),PhD M Liberal and Professional full (Singapore), Assistant Professor Studies Cristóbal Sanchez-Rodriguez, BA School of Administrative (Murcia, Spain), PhD (Murcia, Spain) Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Category 2 Walter Perchal, B.A. (Toronto), M.A. M School of Social Sciences, full (Western Ontario), Ph.D. (York), Ph.D. Atkinson Faculty of Liberal Page 10 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  12. 12. FACULTY MEMBERS Retirement Date if within the Supervisory Faculty Name & Rank M/F Home Unit next seven years Privileges Category 1 Ali Asgary, B.A.( Tehran, Iran), School of Administrative M.A.(Tehran, Iran), Ph.D. ( Newcastle, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of UK), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional full Studies Abdullah Dasci, B.Sc. (Ankara, School of Administrative Turkey), M.Sc. (Ankara, Turkey), Ph.D. Studies, Atkinson Faculty of full (McGill), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional Studies Rongbing Huang, B.Sc (East China School of Administrative Normal University), M Sc. (Fudan), Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full Ph. D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Niru Nirupama, M.Sc.( Kanpur, India) School of Administrative M.E.(Roorkee, India), Dr. Eng.( Kyoto, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of F full Japan), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Ron Ophir, BSc (Hebrew University), School of Administrative MSIA (Carnegie Mellon), PhD Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full (Carnegie Mellon), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies (Greenwich), Sessional Assistant and Professional Studies Professor Category 3 Harris Ali, B.A. (McMaster), M.A. Faculty of Environmental (McMaster), B.Eng. (McMaster), Studies M full Ph.D (McMaster ), Associate Professor Qiuming Cheng, B.Sc.(Changchun, Department of Earth and China), M.Sc.(Changchun, China) Space Science and M full Ph. D. (Ottawa), Professor Engineering Mary Ann Jenkins, B.Sc. (Waterloo) Department of Earth and M.Sc. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Toronto), Space Science and F full Associate Professor Engineering Lillie Lum, B.Ss.N. (U.B.C.), M.Sc.N. F Faculty of Health (Western Ontario), Ph.D. (Toronto) full Associate Professor Ken McBey, B.A. (Toronto), M.B.A. M School of Administrative (York), B.Ed. (Toronto), Ph.D. (York) Studies, Atkinson Faculty of full Associate Professor Liberal and Professional Studies David Roger Mutimer, B.A. (Western M Department of Political Ontario), M.A. (York), Ph. D.(York), Science, Faculty of Arts full Associate Professor Page 11 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  13. 13. FACULTY MEMBERS Retirement Date if within the Supervisory Faculty Name & Rank M/F Home Unit next seven years Privileges Category 1 Ali Asgary, B.A.( Tehran, Iran), School of Administrative M.A.(Tehran, Iran), Ph.D. ( Newcastle, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of UK), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional full Studies Abdullah Dasci, B.Sc. (Ankara, School of Administrative Turkey), M.Sc. (Ankara, Turkey), Ph.D. Studies, Atkinson Faculty of full (McGill), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional Studies Rongbing Huang, B.Sc (East China School of Administrative Normal University), M Sc. (Fudan), Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full Ph. D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Niru Nirupama, M.Sc.( Kanpur, India) School of Administrative M.E.(Roorkee, India), Dr. Eng.( Kyoto, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of F full Japan), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Ron Ophir, BSc (Hebrew University), School of Administrative MSIA (Carnegie Mellon), PhD Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full (Carnegie Mellon), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Peter Timmerman, B.A. (Toronto), Faculty of Environmental M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (London), Studies M full Assistant Professor Paul F. Wilkinson, B.A. (York), M.A. Faculty of Environmental (Toronto), Ph.D. (Toronto), M Studies full Professor Category 4 David Etkin, B.Sc. (York ), B.Ed. School of Administrative (Toronto), M.Sc.(York) Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full Sessional Lecturer Liberal and Professional Studies Category 5 Constadinos Armenakis, Dipl. Ing. Geomatics Canada, (Athens, Greece), M. Sc. E . (New M Centre for Topographic Co-supervision Brunswick), Ph. D.(New Brunswick) Information Adjunct Faculty Jason Levy, B.A.Sc. (Waterloo), Applied M.A.Sc. (Waterloo), Ph.D. (Waterloo) M Disaster & Emergency Adjunct Faculty Studies Co-supervision Brandon University Ioan Nistor, Dipl. Eng.(Iasi, Romania), Dept. of Civil Engineering Ph.D.(Yokohama, Japan), Adjunct University of Ottawa Co-supervision Faculty M Page 12 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  14. 14. FACULTY MEMBERS Retirement Date if within the Supervisory Faculty Name & Rank M/F Home Unit next seven years Privileges Category 1 Ali Asgary, B.A.( Tehran, Iran), School of Administrative M.A.(Tehran, Iran), Ph.D. ( Newcastle, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of UK), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional full Studies Abdullah Dasci, B.Sc. (Ankara, School of Administrative Turkey), M.Sc. (Ankara, Turkey), Ph.D. Studies, Atkinson Faculty of full (McGill), Assistant Professor M Liberal and Professional Studies Rongbing Huang, B.Sc (East China School of Administrative Normal University), M Sc. (Fudan), Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full Ph. D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Niru Nirupama, M.Sc.( Kanpur, India) School of Administrative M.E.(Roorkee, India), Dr. Eng.( Kyoto, Studies, Atkinson Faculty of F full Japan), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Ron Ophir, BSc (Hebrew University), School of Administrative MSIA (Carnegie Mellon), PhD Studies, Atkinson Faculty of M full (Carnegie Mellon), Assistant Professor Liberal and Professional Studies Peter Penz, B.A.(British Columbia), Faculty of Environmental M.A. (British Columbia), D. Phil. M Studies Co-supervision / (Oxford), Professor Emeritus Teaching Kumaraswamy Ponnambalam, B.E. Department of Systems (Madras, India), M.A. (National M Design Engineering Co-supervision University of Ireland), Ph.D.(Toronto) University of Waterloo Adjunct Faculty Category 6 none Category 1: tenured or tenure track core faculty members whose graduate involvement is exclusively in the graduate program under review. For this purpose the Masters and doctoral streams of a program are considered as a single program. Category 2: non-tenure-track core faculty members whose graduate involvement is exclusively in the graduate program under review. Category 3: tenured or tenure-track core faculty members who are involved in teaching and/or supervision in other graduate program(s) in addition to being a core member of the graduate program under review. Category 4: non-tenured or tenure-track core faculty members who are involved in teaching and/or supervision in other graduate program(s) in addition to being a core member of the graduate program under review. Page 13 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  15. 15. Category 5: other core faculty: this category includes emeritus professors with supervisory privileges and persons appointed from government laboratories or industry as adjunct professors. Category 6: non-core faculty who participate in the teaching of graduate courses. Page 14 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  16. 16. ii. Faculty research funding The following table presents the annual aggregate value of the research grants and contracts received by the program’s participating faculty since1999-2000. Details of the awards are included in the cv’s of program faculty attached as Volume 2 of the proposal. Table 2: Faculty research funding Operating Research Funding by Source and Year Source(s) Granting Other Peer Contracts & TOTAL Year1 Foundations Internal6 Councils2 Adjudicated3 others5 1999/00 38,900 0 0 273,166 0 312,066.00 2000/01 48,900 37,500 0 231,250 0 317,650.00 2001/02 91,300 37,500 0 317,495 4,800 451,095.00 2002/03 127,700 37,500 0 575,600 31,250 772,050.00 2003/04 156,000 37,500 0 785,160 39,000 1,017,660.00 2004/05 895,000 0 0 265,300 59,025 1,219,325.00 2005/06 666,000 22,000 0 868,800 38,400 1,595,200.00 2006/07 999,000 50,400 0 843,000 64,500 1,956,900.00 Totals 3,022,800.00 222,400.00 0 4,159,771.00 236,975.00 7,641,946.00 Page 15 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  17. 17. iii. Faculty experience with graduate supervision The following table summarizes the experience of the program’s participating faculty with the supervision of graduate students. Table 3: Graduate Supervision Career and Proposed Program Numbers of Thesis Supervisions Career Current Master Master Masters Masters Member Research PhD PDF Research PhD PDF Thesis Thesis Paper Paper Category 1 Ali Asgary 0(19) - 0(4) - 0(2) - 0(1) - Abdullah Dasci - - - - - - - - Rongbing Huang - - - - - - - - Niru Nirupama - - - - 0(1) - - - Ron Ophir - - - - - - - - Hassan Qudrat-Ullah 0(1) - - - 0(9) - - - Cristobal Sanchez- - - - - - - - - Rodriguez Category 2 Walter Perchal - - - - - - - - Category 3 Harris Ali - 0(27) - - - - 0(2) - Qiuming Cheng - 0(11) 0(2) 0(4) - 0(1) 0(6) 0(2) Mary Ann Jenkins - 0(3) 0(1) 0(1) - 0(2) - 0(1) Lillie Lum 0(1) - - - - - - 0(1) Ken McBey 0(5) - - - 0(2) - - - David R. Mutimer 0(20) - 0(4) 0(3) - 0(4) - Peter Timmerman - - - - - - - - Paul F. Wilkinson 0(11) 0(63) 0(3) - - 0(3) 0(1) - Category 4 David Etkin 0(2) 0(2) - - 0(1) 0(1) - - Category 5 Constadinos - - - - - - - - Armenakis Jason Levy - - - - - - - - Ioan Nistor - 0(3) - - - - - - Peter Penz 0(30) - 0(6) 0(2) - - - Kumaraswamy 0(24) - 0(5) 0(2) 0( 2) - 0(2) - Ponnambalam Category 6 None Page 16 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  18. 18. iv. Faculty complement and teaching loads With approval, the faculty for the MA in D&EM will be drawn from a number of graduate and undergraduate programs in the Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies, the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Environmental Studies, and the Faculty of Science and Engineering. Identified faculty will contribute through the supervision of research papers and teaching. Many of the elective courses are established courses already routinely offered by their originating programs. Core courses developed by emergency management faculty may be co-taught or team taught. Table 4A: Undergraduate teaching 3 credits means 3 contact hours per week for one term. Undergraduate teaching Comments e.g. Dept. Chair / Name Rank FW03-04 FW04-05 FW05-06 FW06-07 sabbatical Category 1 Ali Asgary Assistant 40:255 3.00 40:255 3.00 AK/ADMS 3700 AK/ADMS 3700 Chair of Professor Introduction to Introduction to 3.00 Section A 3.00 Section Department Physical Planning Physical Planning Fundamentals of Summer Applied Disaster and Critical and Critical Emergency Fundamentals of & Infrastructure Infrastructure Management Emergency Emergency Management Management 40:152 3.00 40:352 3.00 AK/ADMS 3700 2004 – 2005 Introduction to Emergency 3.00 AK/ADMS 3700 Emergency Management Law Fundamentals of 3.00 Section A Management Emergency Fundamentals of 40:399 3.00 Management Emergency 40:452 3.00 Directed Studies in Management Disaster and Applied Disaster AK/ADMS 3700 Development and Emergency 3.00 Section M AK/ADMS 3700 Studies Fundamentals of 3.00 Section B 40:252 3.00 Emergency Fundamentals of Emergency 40:252 3.00 Management Emergency Planning and Emergency Management Management Planning and AK/ADMS 3700 Management 3.00 Section N AK/ADMS 3700 40:399 3.00 Fundamentals of 3.00 Directed Studies in 40:399 3.00 Emergency Business Applied Disaster Directed Studies in Management Continuity and Emergency Applied Disaster Fundamentals of Studies and Emergency Emergency Studies Management 40:448 3.00 Disaster and Emergency Practicum (at Brandon (at Brandon University) University) Page 17 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  19. 19. Abdullah Assistant Management Operations Operations AK/ADMS 3330 Dasci Professor science (equivalent management management 3.00 to AK/ADMS (equivalent to AK/ (equivalent to AK/ Quantitative 3331) ADMS 3351) ADMS 3351) Methods (at University (at University of (at University of of Alberta) North Carolina at North Carolina at Charlotte) Charlotte) Rongbing Huang Assistant AK/ADMS 2320 AK/ADMS 3300 Professor 3.00 Quantitative 3.00 Decision Methods I Analysis AK/ADMS 3330 AK/ADMS 2320 3.00 Quantitative 3.00 Quantitative Methods II Methods I - - AK/ADMS 3300 3.00 Decision Analysis AK/ADMS 3331 3.00 Introduction to Operations Research Niru Nirupama Assistant 40:253 3.00 40:253 3.00 AK/ADMS 3701 AK/ADMS 3701 Dept.Chair Professor Hazard and Risk Hazard and Risk 3.00 3.00 Applied Disaster Assessment Assessment Emergency Emergency & Emergency Management: Management: Studies, 40:39, 3.00 40:391 3.00 Hazards, Hazards, Brandon Environmental Environmental Vulnerability and Vulnerability and University, Disasters Disasters Risk Assessment Risk Assessment 2005 40:25 3.00 40:39 3.00 AK/ADMS 3703 Hired at York Natural Disasters: Organizational 3.00 2005-2006 Causes and Responses to Business Physical Dynamics Disasters and Continuity (also developed for Emergencies Distance Education, 40:251 3.00 Campus Manitoba) Natural Disasters: Causes and 40: 498 3.00 Physical Dynamics Disaster modeling (also developed for Distance Education, Campus Manitoba) 40:49 3.00 Directed readings: Disaster relief related logistics and supply chain 40:399 3.00 Directed studies: Hazardous (at Brandon materials research University) and implications (at Brandon University) Page 18 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  20. 20. Ron Ophir Assistant AK/ADMS 2400 AK/ADMS 2400 AK/ADMS 2400 AK/ADMS 2400 Professor 3.00 (3 sections) 3.00 (3 sections) 3.00 (3 sections) 3.00 (3 sections) Introduction to Introduction to Introduction to Introduction to Organizational Organizational Organizational Organizational Behaviour Behaviour Behaviour Behaviour Hassan Qudrat- Assistant ECON 3470 3.00 ADMS 3300 3.0 ADMS 3300 3.0 ADMS 4300 3.00 Ullah Professor Recruitment, (2) (3) Decision Making Selection and Decision Analysis Decision Analysis Performance Appraisal of ADMS 4300 3.00 ADMS 3345 3.00 Personnel Decision Making Systems Thinking and Modeling for ADMS 3300 3.00 Management (2) Decision Analysis ADMS 3360 3.00 Integrated Logistics Management I ADMS 4300 3.00 Decision Making Cristobal Assistant ADMS 3511 3.00 ADMS 2511 3.00 ADMS 2320 3.00 Sanchez- Professor (4 sections) Management Quantitative Rodriguez Information Methods I Systems (4 sections) (4 sections) - ADMS 2511 3.00 Management Information Systems (2 sections) Category 2 Walter Perchal AK/SOSC 1810 Sessional AS/SOSC 1910 AK/SOSC 1810 AK/SOSC 1810 6.00 Assistant 9.00 6.00 6.00 Communication Professor Education and Communication Communication and Mass Media Social Change and Mass Media and Mass Media AK/SOSC 1880 AK/SOSC 1810 AK/SOSC 1880 AK/SOSC 1880 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Social Change in Communication Social Change in Social Change in Canada and Mass Media Canada Canada AS/SOSC 1910 AK/SOSC 3560 AS/SOSC 1910 AS/SOSC 1910 9.00 6.00 9.00 9.00 Education and Mass Media and Education and Education and Social Change Ideology Social Change Social Change AK/SOSC 1950 6.00 Prospects and Perils in the 21st Century Category 3 Page 19 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  21. 21. Harris Ali Associate ENVS 2150 3.00 ENVS 2150 3.00 _ Undergraduate ENVS 2150 3.00 Professor Environment, Environment, Program Environment, Technology and Technology and Director & Chair Technology and Sustainable Sustainable of Sustainable Society Society Yndergraduate Society Curriculum Subcommittee ENVS 3450 3.00 2003-2006 Environment and Health: Social and Sabbatical Political 2006-2007 Dimensions ENVS 4440 3.00 Environmental Disasters Qiuming Professor AS/SC/GEOG AS/SC/GEOG AS/SC/GEOG AS/SC/GEOG GIS/RS Cheng 4340 3.00 4340 3.00 4340 3.00 4340 3.00 Certificate GIS GIS GIS GIS Coordinator of ESSE SC/EATS 4400 SC/EATS 4400 SC/EATS 4400 Since 2005 3.00GIS and Data 3.00GIS and Data 3.00GIS and Data Integration Integration Integration GS/ESS 5020 3:00Time Series and Spectral Analysis Mary Ann Associate SS5205 3.00 SS5205 3.00 SS5205 3.00 SS5205 3.00 Jenkins Professor Cloud Physics and Cloud Physics and Cloud Physics and Cloud Physics and Radar Radar Radar Radar Meteorology Meteorology Meteorology Meteorology SS5201 3.00 SS5201 3.00 Storms and Storms and Weather Systems Weather Systems Associate NSE 112 3.00 AK/NURS 3400 HLST 1010 HLST 1010 Hired at York Lillie Lum Professor Social Political 3.00 3.00Foundations to 3.00Foundations to 2004-2005 Perspectives in Development of Health Studies Health Studies Nursing Self as Nurse: Ethical Ways of AK/NURS 3400 Research Methods Knowing and 3.00 Caring in Nursing Critical AK/NURS 3400 Perspectives on 3.00 AK/NURS 3000 Health Development of 3.00 Organizations: Self as Nurse: Professionhood: Micro Level Issues Ethical Ways of classroom; one in Healthcare Knowing and section of basic Management Caring in Nursing degree program (at Ryerson year 3 University) Ken McBey Associate AK/ADMS 3430 AK/ADMS 3410 AK/ADMS 3430 AK/ADMS 3440 Director, York Professor 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00Leadership University Human Resources Training and Human Resources and Interpersonal Graduate Planning Development Planning Skills Program in AK/ADMS 3410 AK/ADMS 3410 Human AK/ADMS 3430 3.00 (B,C) 3.00 Resource AK/ADMS 3440 3.00 Training and Training and Management Page 20 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  22. 22. 3.00 Human Resources Development Development Leadership and Planning 2006-2007 Interpersonal Skills Course release for development of undergraduate certificate in EM program 2004-2005 David Associate AS/POLS 4910 Principal R. Mutimer Professor 3.00 Research Violence and Fellow, Security Capstone Centre for International _ _ _ Cooperation and Security, University of Bradford 2004-2006 Peter Assistant ES/ENVS 2100 ENVS 1000 ENVS 1000 ENVS 1000 MES Timmerman Professor 6.00 6.00 6.00Perspectives in 6.00 Programme Foundations in Perspectives in Environmental Perspectives in Coordinator Environment and Environmental Studies Environmental 2000-2005 Culture: Studies Studies Philosophy, Arts, International Technology, and ES/ENVS 4100 Student Advisor Education 3.00 2005-2007 Environmental ENVS 1000 Literatures Community Arts 6.00 Practice Perspectives in Coordinator Environmental 2006-2007 Studies Paul F. Wilkinson Professor ENVS 3011 3.00 ENVS 5119 3.00 ENVS _ Senate Introduction to Management 5016 3.00/ENVS 2003, 2005, Senior Honours 4446 3.00 2006 Member Work ENVS 3011 3.00 Protected Acting Introduction to Area Vice-Chair Senior Honours Management Work Office of the Dean, FES Coordinator 2006-2007 Category 4 David Etkin Sessional AK/ADMS 3702 AK/ADMS 3702 Emergency Lecturer 3.00 3.00 Management Emergency Emergency Program Management: Management: Coordinator Mitigation, Mitigation, 2005 – 2007 Preparedness, Preparedness, Response, Response, Hired at York - - Recovery Recovery 2005-2006 ES/ ENVS 4440 3:00 Environmental Disasters Page 21 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  23. 23. Category 5 Constadinos Adjunct _ _ _ _ _ Armenakis Faculty Jason Levy Assistant ICS 111 3.00 ICS 135 3.00 ADES 40.495 3.00 ADES 40.252 3.00 Acting Chair in Professor Introduction to Introduction to Decision Making Emergency 2006, Computer Science Database and Computer Planning and Brandon Management Support for Management University ICS 211 3.00 Emergency Datastructures and ICS 101 3.00 Management ADES 40.451 3.00 Algorithms Tools for the Disaster Modeling Information Age II, ICS 241 3.00 ADES 40.362 Discrete I, ICS 141 3.00 ADES 40.451 3.00 3.00 Mathematics for Discrete Disaster Modeling Disaster Response Computer Science Mathematics for and Emergency Computer Science Management (at Brandon (at Brandon (at Brandon (at Brandon University) University) University) University) Ioan Nistor Adjunct GVG3120 3.00 GVG3120 3.00 GVG3120 3.00 Faculty Hydrology Hydrology Hydrology _ GVG2111 3.00 GVG2111 3.00 GVG2111 3.00 Introduction to Introduction to Introduction to Fluid Mechanics Fluid Mechanics Fluid Mechanics Peter Penz Professor AS/POLS 4212 AS/POLS 4212 AS/POLS 4212 Emeritus 3.00 3.00 3.00 Sabbatical Global Justice and Global Justice and Global Justice and 2004-2005 Humanitarian Humanitarian Humanitarian Internationalism Internationalism Internationalism _ ES/ENVS 4312 ES/ENVS 4312 ES/ENVS 4312 3.00 3.00 3.00 Global Justice and Global Justice and Global Justice and Humanitarian Humanitarian Humanitarian Internationalism Internationalism Internationalism Kumaraswamy Adjunct SYDE312 3.00 SYDE312 3.00 SYDE312 3.00 SYDE312 3.00 Ponnambalam Faculty Numerical Numerical Numerical Numerical Methods Methods Methods Methods SYDE454 3.00 SYDE454 3.00 SYDE454 3.00 SYDE454 3.00 Computer Computer Computer Computer Simulation of Simulation of Simulation of Simulation of Systems Systems Systems Systems SYDE322 3.00 SYDE322 3.00 SYDE322 3.00 SYDE322 3.00 Software Design Software Design Software Design Software Design SYDE121 3.00 SYDE121 SYDE121 Digital 3.00Digital 3.00Digital Computation Computation Computation (at University of (at University of (at University of (at University of Waterloo) Waterloo) Waterloo) Waterloo) Table 4 B: Graduate teaching Graduate Comments Page 22 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  24. 24. Name Rank FW03-04 FW04-05 FW 05-06 FW 06-07 Category 1 Ali Asgary Assistant ENVS 6599 3.00 Professor Individual Directed Study ENVS 6599 3.00 Individual _ _ _ Directed Study ENVS 6599 3.00 Individual Directed Study Abdullah Assistant Decision Decision Dasci Professor analysis (MBA) analysis (MBA) Operations management _ (MBA) (at University (at University of of Alberta) Alberta) Rongbing Assistant Huang Professor _ _ _ _ Niru Nirupama Assistant Professor _ _ _ _ Ron Ophir Assistant _ _ _ _ Professor Hassan Qudrat- Assistant Ullah _ _ _ _ Professor Cristobal Assistant Sanchez- Professor _ _ _ Rodriguez Category 2 Sessional _ Walter Perchal Assistant _ _ _ Professor Category 3 Harris Ali Associate ENVS 6130 3.00 Professor Health and Environment Qiuming Professor GEOG5050 GEOG5050 GEOG5050 Chair, Chang 3.00 3.00 3.00 Adjudication GIS and GIS and GIS and committee of Geographic Geographic Geographic T&P Analysis Analysis Analysis 2005 – GIS/RS ESS5400 ESS5400 certificate 3.00 3.00 coordinator of GIS and GIS and ESSE Data Data Integration Integration Page 23 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management
  25. 25. Mary Ann Associate SS5205 3.00 SS5205 3.00 SS5205 3.00 SS5205 3.00 Jenkins Professor Cloud Physics Cloud Physics and Cloud Physics and Cloud Physics and Radar Radar Meteorology Radar and Radar Meteorology Meteorology Meteorology SS5201 3.00 Storms and Weather SS5201 3.00 Systems Storms and Weather Systems Lillie Lum Associate _ Professor _ _ _ Ken McBey Associate _ GS/ADMS 6100 GS/ADMS 6100 GS/ADMS 6100 Professor 3.00 3.00 3.00 Staffing Staffing Staffing Organizations Organizations Organizations David R. Associate GS/POLS Society, Principal Mutimer Professor 6200.06 3.00 Technology Research Advanced and Fellow, Study of Warfare Centre for International (Graduate International Relations Institute Cooperation (PhD of and Security, Core Course) International University of Studies, Bradford GS/POLS University 2004-2006 _ 6220.03 3.00 of Critical Security Geneva)as Studies a Visiting PhD Reading Professor Course Critical Security Studies Peter ENVS 5103 ENVS 5103 ENVS 5103 Timmerman Assistant 3.00 3.00 3.00 Professor Nature and Nature and Nature and Society Society Society ENV 1002S Case Study in Environmental Management (U of T) Paul F. GEOG 5410 Wilkinson Professor _ 3.00 _ _ Resource Management Category 4 David Etkin Sessional Natural Disasters, Natural Disasters, ENVS 6599 ENVS 6599 Lecturer and Unnatural and Unnatural 3.00 3.00 Phenomenon Phenomenon Natural Disasters, Natural An Unnatural Disasters, An (University of (University of Phenomenon Unnatural Toronto) Toronto) Phenomenon Category 5 Page 24 of 94 MA in Disaster and Emergency Management

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