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Plan Documentation Plan Documentation Document Transcript

  • I. Plan Documentation Promulgation Document The promulgation document puts the plan “in force”. It officially announces the plan and makes it official; giving both authority and responsibility to those organizations identified within it to perform their given tasks. It should describe the process and responsibilities for those tasked with identifying, preparing and maintaining standard operating procedures that explain “how” the tasks will be completed. It should also commit those organizations tasked to train and exercise as appropriate to successfully be able to implement the plan. Promulgation of the College/University Emergency Operations Plan By virtue of the authority vested in me by authorizing policy/regulation as President of College/University and as the administrator ultimately responsible for emergency management on campus, I hereby promulgate and issue the College/University Emergency Operations Plan (“the Plan”) dated Date. The Plan provides for college/university’s response to emergencies and disasters in order to save lives; to protect public health, safety, and property; to restore essential services; and to enable and assist with economic recovery. The Plan complies with Code of Virginia Title 23 and Title 44 and is consistent with the National Incident Management System as implemented in the National Response Framework adopted January 2008. The College/University Coordinator of Emergency Management, on behalf of the President, is hereby authorized to activate the College/University Emergency Operations Center (“EOC”) in order to direct and control college/university emergency operations. Augmentation of the EOC shall constitute implementation of the Plan. Furthermore, the College/University Coordinator of Emergency Management is hereby authorized, in coordination with the President’s Office, to amend the Plan as necessary to ensure the continued health and safety of the students, faculty, staff and property of the college/university. In accordance with the duties and responsibilities assigned in the Plan, the head of each designated college/university department or program shall appoint a lead and at least one alternate Emergency Coordination Officer for the department or program. The Emergency Coordination Officer is assigned the following responsibilities: 1. Coordinate with the Coordinator of Emergency Management on emergency preparedness, response, and recovery issues; 2. Prepare and maintain designated parts of the Plan for which the department or program is responsible; This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-1
  • 3. Prepare and maintain internal plans and procedures to fulfill the responsibilities designated in the Plan; 4. Maintain a roster of department or program faculty and staff to assist in disaster operations and ensure that persons on the roster are accessible and available for training, exercises, and activations of the Plan; 5. Coordinate appropriate training for department of program personnel assigned to disaster operations; 6. Prepare and maintain internal emergency preparedness, response, and recovery plans for the department or program’s resources (facilities, personnel, and assets) that outline a comprehensive and effective program to ensure continuity of essential functions under all circumstances; 7. Assure the Coordinator of Emergency Management that preparedness plans for its department facilities are coordinated with the applicable local emergency management agency. This Promulgation rescinds Promulgation Number issued on date, by President Name. This Promulgation shall be effective upon its signing and shall remain in full force and effect until amended or rescinded by further promulgation. Given under my hand and under the Seal of the College/University, this date day of Month Year. President of College/University Attest: Witness This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-2
  • Approval and Implementation This document introduces the plan, outlines its applicability, and indicates that it supersedes all previous plans. It must include a date and be signed by the senior elected official(s). RESOLUTION OF ADOPTION WHEREAS, the Board of Visitors of University/College is concerned with the health and well- being of its students, facility and staff and desires that the best possible emergency service be available to them; and, the President is concerned with the health and well- being of its students, facility and staff and desires that the best possible emergency service be available to them; and WHEREAS, the Code of Virginia Chapter 1 of Title 23 and Title 44 that any public institution of higher education shall develop, adopt, and keep current a written crisis and emergency management plan; and every four years, each institution shall conduct a comprehensive review and revision of its crisis and emergency management plan to ensure the plan remains current, and the revised plan shall be adopted formally by the board of visitors or other governing body. Such review shall also be certified in writing to the Department of Emergency Management; and WHEREAS, such a plan has been developed by College/University Staff in coordination with the Virginia Department of Emergency Management with input from college/university departments and the city/county/town Emergency Management Agency; NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the College/University Board of Visitors, on this # day of Month, Year, does hereby officially adopt the College/University Emergency Operations Plan, to include plans and procedures for both peace time and war-caused disasters. * * * * * I, name, do hereby certify that the foregoing writing is a true, correct copy of a resolution unanimously adopted by the Board of Visitors of College/University at a meeting held on Month Day, Year. SIGNED Name Title, Board of Visitors This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-3
  • Record of Changes All updates to this document must be tracked. This section should include some format in which to do this. It should at minimum contain: date of change, page or section of change, name and title of person making the change. Change Date of Page or Summary of Change Name of Number Change Section Person Changed Authorizing Change 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-4
  • Record of Distribution The record of distribution can be used to prove that those tasked within the plan have acknowledged receipt, reviewed and accepted the plan. Distribution to the public can also be listed, but the plan should be “clean” or without any sensitive or personal information. Group Agency/Department Title of Recipient How Distributed (electronic or hard-copy) College/University Emergency Emergency Locality Management Manager Virginia Department Local Planning of Emergency State Agencies Assistance Electronic Management, Program Manager Planning Division Volunteer Organizations Support Agencies This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-5
  • II. Introduction A crisis or emergency can happen at anytime and could impact one individual, single building or the entire college campus. This document is the College/University’s Emergency Operation Plan (EOP). Emergencies cause confusion and stress for all involved. In order to minimize these effects, initial activation and implementation of the emergency plan should always be handled in a calm, consistent manner. Efficient implementation of the plan will provide a clear direction, responsibility and continuity of control for key officials and administrators. The basic idea to any well constructed emergency plan is to minimize the possible threat to individuals and properties during an actual emergency. In order to minimize the threat of an emergency, annual evaluation and reviews need to be done to the emergency plan. Purpose The purpose is a general state of what the EOP is meant to do. It should be supported by a brief synopsis of the Basic Plan, the Functional Annexes and Hazard-Specific Appendices. The purpose of this plan is to direct actions intended to preserve life and protect property from further destruction in the event of an emergency. The overall plan establishes an emergency organization to direct and control operations during an emergency situation by assigning responsibilities to specific entities. All essential entities are to utilize any and all available resources when mitigating against, preparing for, responding to, and recovering from a natural or man-made emergency. This plan consists of the basic plan, the appendices, and the emergency support function and incident annexes. The basic plan provides and overview of the college/university’s approach to emergency response and operations. It explains the policies, organization and tasks that would be involved with the response to an emergency. The appendices give definition to the terms and acronyms used throughout the basic plan, and are the location for any supporting figures, maps, and forms. The emergency support function annexes focus on detailing the specific responsibilities, tasks and operational actions to complete a specific emergency operations function; while the incident annexes focus on any additional special planning or response needs beyond the basic response plan for particular event scenarios. Scope The scope should define the emergencies/disasters to which the plan applies, the entities to which it applies, and the location (geographic area) to which it applies. This plan and all it contents applies to all of the college/university’s students, facility and staff. Major emergencies may impact the surrounding community in addition to the campus. If this occurs, the college/university will make every effort to cooperate with local, state, and federal officials in their delivery of emergency services. Personnel or partner who has a roll will have access and be knowledgeable of the EOP. This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-6
  • Situation Situation is based on the college or university’s hazard identification analysis. It includes characterizations of the population, probability and impact of hazards, vulnerable facilities, and risk to college/university assets and populations. Most communities in Virginia have an approved Hazard Mitigation Plan; the hazard analysis section should be reviewed as part of the plan development process and referenced in the Authorities and References. Some colleges and universities in Virginia have also completed Disaster Resistant University Plans; if your school has completed this plan, it will provide you a very specific hazard identification and risk assessment that can be referenced and used to plan for appropriate hazards. Maps should be included to help further identify features or hazards that are identified in this section. The situation describes the “environment” and should clearly identify why the Emergency Operations Plan is needed. This section should identify, summarize and prioritize all hazards faced by the college or university. The situation should: • Describe the probability and impact of all possible hazards (a great resource for completing this task is the Kaiser Permanente tool which is available online at http://www.calhealth.org/public/press/Article%5C103%5CHazard %20&%20Vulnerability%20Analysis_kaiser_model.xls); • Identify and map all geographic areas affected by each hazard; • List all vulnerable critical facilities; • Describe the population and its distribution trends; • Describe any special needs populations and their distribution trends; and • Identify any dependencies on outside entities for support and critical resources. College/University is located in City/County, Virginia, which is (give description of location). College/University was founded in year and (give a brief history of the school). The campus of college/university encompasses number acres from (give boundaries). The college/university is situated in an (urban/rural/suburban) area and has (give a description of the campus property and landscaping). The total enrollment for college/university in the semester was number. Of that number, the undergraduate enrollment was number. The college/university has over number full-time faculty and over number staff. College/University facilities can provide housing for about number students. During the summer semester, these numbers typical decrease approximately number% for students, number% for faculty, and number% for staff. This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-7
  • Based on a hazard identification and risk assessment that was completed for the college/university within the College/University Disaster Resistant University Plan/ Appendix C of this plan/etc., the hazards that were determined as most likely to impact the college/university are: Hazard Significance Ranking Natural Hurricane None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Tornado None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Severe Weather None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Wildfire None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Conflagration None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Resource Shortage None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Earthquake None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Flood None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Human-Caused Terrorism None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Criminal Activity None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Internal Threat Assessment None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Pandemic None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Mass Casualty None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Civil Unrest None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Chemical Incident None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Radiological Incident None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Biological Incident None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Explosive Incident None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Nuclear Incident None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Communication Failure None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Infrastructure Failure None/Limited/Moderate/Significant Hazard indices and vulnerability assessments for moderate and significant risk events were developed for the buildings on the college/university campus. The hazard indices evaluated the extent to which the buildings were at risk from a particular hazard. The vulnerability assessments estimated the potential impacts if a particular building were affected by a specific hazard. These assessments can be found within the College/University Disaster Resistant University Plan/Appendix C of this plan/etc., A capability assessment may be included or referenced in the plan. Capability assessments indicate the strength and knowledge of the faculty and staff in emergency procedures, the importance of the installed and tested emergency alert system throughout the campus, and reinforce the need to continue efforts to integrate campus response with the locality’s response plans. Example: This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-8
  • A capability assessment for the college/university was completed in year and can be accessed through the college/university’s emergency management department. Assumptions Assumptions are what the planning team assumed to be fact describe things that are assumed to be true during the planning process Assumptions describe the limitations of the EOP and provide a basis for improvisation and modification. Examples may include: • The Coordinator or Emergency Management will mobilize resources and personnel as required by the situation. • Incidents are managed initially by the College/University. • College/Universities will have mutual aid agreements with neighboring jurisdictions and other colleges and universities. • The college/university will use the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command Structure (ICS). • Any special facilities on the campus (hospital, nursing home, adult day care and child care facilities) are required to develop emergency plans in accordance with their licensing regulations. • Extra resources and assistance will be available from within the local community. (e.g. fire and police departments, medical and nursing facilities, emergency rescue squads, and other life agencies) • A college administrator within the decision-making chain will be able to implement the necessary requirements needed within the emergency plan. • Full cooperation between faculty, administrative staff, staff members and students will be present. This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-9
  • III. Concept of Operations The concept of operations should capture the overall approach to the planned response to include: • The sequence of action and the scope of the planned emergency response • Declaration of emergency; • Evaluating requests for resources and determining how these requests will be met, including the use of outside aid; • Direction and control, including considerations for the EOC; • Alert and warning considerations; and General This section should give an overall summary of the college or university’s plan for response to any emergency/disaster. It should give general information on primary roles and responsibilities and primary actions to be completed. A primary goal of colleges/universities is to provide a safe environment for the students, faculty and staff members. Identify by title the individual responsible for implementation of the emergency plan (typically the Institution’s president or designee) The emergency plan will only be employed when there is an actual or imminent threat to a large population. If and when an emergency or crisis strikes, the college/university will need to be prepared to handle the initial impact of the disaster until further assistance can be given. The number of casualties and the amount of destruction suffered during an emergency could be reduced if the emergency plan is followed and order is maintained. In the event an incident exceeds the colleges/university’s emergency response capabilities, outside assistance may be available, either through mutual support agreements with nearby jurisdictions or volunteer emergency organizations. University resources must be fully committed before local, state or federal assistance is requested. Sequence of Action This section describes incident management actions ranging from preparatory activities, to initial threat notification, to early coordination efforts to assess and disrupt the threat, to activation of the ESF structure, to deployment of resources in support of incident response and recovery operations. These actions do not necessarily occur in sequential order; many may be undertaken concurrently in response to single or multiple threats or incidents. Preparedness This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-10
  • These are actions that are implemented during non-emergency or disaster periods that will prepare the college/university for potential emergency response if necessary. Examples: 1. Public information and educational materials will be provided to the students, faculty and staff via newsletters, brochures, publications in telephone directories, web-sites and other media. 2. Develop, review, exercise and update emergency operations plans and standard operating procedures. 3. Develop training and drills to enhance readiness of emergency response. 4. Test and maintain emergency resources and equipment. 5. Assure the viability and accuracy of emergency contact lists, resource lists and emergency contracts. 6. Assure that all relevant continuity of operations plans (COOP) are current. Pre-Incident These are actions that are implemented if College/University Emergency Manager receives notice of a potential emergency from the local emergency operations center, Virginia Emergency Operations Center (VEOC), federal Homeland Security Advisory System, National Weather Service, or other reliable sources. Some issues to consider at this point in the incident are: • Communication alert & warning; • Public health and safety; • Responder health and safety; • Property protection; and • Possible partial activation of the EOC. Examples of Actions: 1. Brief the governing body of the impending situation. 2. Access hazard-specific experts to determine potential impacts. 3. Determine any protective action measures that need to be implemented in preparation for the situation. 4. Alert emergency response personnel and develop a staffing pattern. 5. Set up the EOC. 6. Prepare the financial tracking structure for potential costs related to the event. 7. Notify students, faculty and staff, when determined appropriate, of the situation and any protective actions measures they should take. Utilize all appropriate sources of alert notification. Response These actions are taken to preserve life, property, the environment, and the social and economic structure of the college/university. Some issues to consider at this point in the incident are: This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-11
  • • Law enforcement; • Protection of responder health and safety; • Fire; • Emergency medical services; • Evacuations ; • Dissemination of public information; • Actions to minimize additional damage; • Urban search and rescue; • Public health and medical services; • Distribution of emergency supplies; • Debris clearance; and • Protection and restoration of critical infrastructure. Examples: 1. Daily functions of the college/university that do not contribute directly to the emergency operation may be suspended for the duration of the emergency response. 2. Efforts and resources may be redirected to accomplish an emergency task. 3. If not already completed, set up and staff the EOC. 4. Implement delegations of authority for emergency response activities. 5. Monitor the situation and adjust response actions as needed. 6. Implement evacuation orders as needed. 7. Maintain security. 8. Close routes of ingress and egress as deemed necessary for the situation. 9. Open and staff emergency shelters as needed. 10. Assure public information is accurate, appropriate and timely to all populations including media. Set up a briefing location for media if necessary. Consider early designation of a Public Information Officer (PIO). 11. Assure all available resources are applied directly and effectively to disaster response. 12. Monitor resource needs and request additional resources through appropriate means as required. 13. Accurately track financial costs utilizing prepared event cost-tracking system. Requesting resources from the VEOC by the institution: If state resources are needed by the institution during an emergency, the request should be made by the local government on the institution’s behalf. This is consistent with recent amendments to the Code of Va.§44-146.18 and §23-9.2:9. The local government should designate a point of contact by title to make requests for resources to the Virginia Emergency Operations Center on behalf of the institution. The point of contact designated to carry out this function must be identified in the local EOP and the institution’s EOP. This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-12
  • The contact information should be available at the institution and when an emergency occurs at the institution and local assistance is required, this individual should be contacted immediately. This individual shall remain as a point of contact and a liaison to the institution and the Va. Emergency Operations Center during the response. This individual should be designated by title in the Roles and Responsibilities of the local EOP and the institution’s EOP. An alternate should be designated by title as well. Once immediate response missions and life-saving activities conclude, the emphasis shifts from response to recovery operations, and if applicable, hazard mitigation. Recovery These actions occur after the initial response has been implemented. These actions should assist individuals and the college/university to return to normal as much as feasible. During the recovery period, some of the issues that will need to be handled are: • Behavioral/mental health assessment; • Preliminary damage assessment; • Gradual resumption of normal business activities, including conducting of classes; • Long-term recovery; • Cleanup and restoration of public facilities, businesses, and residences; • Re-establishment of habitats and prevention of subsequent damage to natural resources; and • Protection of cultural or archeological resources during other recovery operations. Examples of Recovery Actions: 1. Provide traffic and crowd control to assure site security. 2. Assure continued public information that is accurate, appropriate and timely to all populations including media. Set up a briefing location for media if necessary. 3. Within 72 hours of impact, complete an Initial Damage Assessment and submit to the VEOC, VCCS or locality as determined by normal structure. 4. Assess the mental and behavioral health impacts to students, faculty, staff and responders and request appropriate resources to address issues as needed. Set up a Family or Victim’s Assistance Center if needed. 5. Assist with local, state or federal investigations as necessary. 6. Assist with identification of injured or deceased individuals as needed. 7. Assess infrastructure and determine viability for re-entry. 8. Begin immediate repairs to electric, water and sewer lines and stations. 9. Complete disaster-related expense records. Begin request for reimbursement through the state or federal public assistance program if eligible. This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-13
  • Mitigation These actions are completed to reduce or eliminate long-term risk to people and property from hazards and their side effects. • Grant programs for loss reduction measures (if available); • Delivery of loss reduction building-science expertise; • Coordination of Federal Flood Insurance operations and integration of mitigation with other program efforts; • Conducting flood recovery mapping to permit expedited and accurate implementation of both recovery and mitigation programs; • Predictive modeling to protect critical assets; • Early documentation of losses avoided due to previous hazard mitigation measures; and • Community education and outreach necessary to foster loss reduction. 1. Review the Disaster Resistant University or local All-Hazard Mitigation Plan and update as necessary any mitigation actions that could be of value in preventing similar impacts for a future disaster. 2. Work with the Virginia Department of Emergency Management Mitigation Program to develop mitigation grant projects to address the most at risk areas. 3. Implement mitigation measures in the rebuilding of infrastructure damaged in the event. Activation of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) The President of the College/ University or their designee may activate the EOC if this becomes necessary. However, the Coordinator of Emergency Management or chief law enforcement officer may activate the EOC if the following conditions exist: • There is an imminent threat to public safety or health on a large scale; • An extensive response and coordination will be required to resolve or recover from the emergency or disaster event; • The disaster will affect not only the institution but also its surrounding jurisdictions which may utilize the same response resources; and/or • The college/university’s emergency operations plan is implemented to control the major emergency or disaster event. Availability of staff and operational needs may allow or require positions to be combined, or positions to not be filled (responsibilities held by the next higher position). Communication, Alert and Warning will be provided to the public via the Emergency Alert System (EAS). Examples of systems that may be available include: • Text messaging, • On-campus video feed, • Automated phone trees, This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-14
  • • Outdoor warning systems, • E-mail alerts, and • On-foot alert routes. • NOAAH Radio IV. Organization This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-15
  • The plan indentifies the college/university’s personnel that will participate in the emergency response. Detailed descriptions of their roles should be provided in the ESF annexes. The colleges/universities will use the Incident Command Structure (ICS) and National Incident Management system (NIMS) A college/university’s EOP could reflect the NIMS and ICS and include the following structures: • Incident Commander; • Incident Command Posts, on-scene using the Incident Command System (ICS); • Area Command (if needed); • Emergency Operations Centers; • Joint Field Office (which is responsible for coordinating Federal assistance and supporting incident management activities locally; • Local Department of Emergency Management; • Senior Administrative Officer (President or designee); and • Coordinator of Emergency management / Deputy Coordinator; Incident Command System (ICS) should ensure: • Manageable span of control (3 to 7 staff; optimum is 5); • Personnel accountability (each person reports to only one person in the chain of command); and • Functional positions staffed only when needed (responsibilities for any positions that are not staffed remain with the next higher filled position This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-16
  • The diagram below is an example of a Field Incident Command structure. These structures should be detailed further in standard operating procedures for first response groups. This structure will directly link with the EOC if the center is set up to assist in response to the event. Not all events will require the response of the EOC, but all events will require the response of a field incident team even if multiple responsibilities are handled by single individuals. Emergency Coordinator PIO External Affairs Operations Planning Logistics Finance/ Section Section Section Administration Section When the college/university’s emergency operations center (EOC) is activated, there should be coordination between the EOC manager and the incident commander to ensure a consistent response: • EOC follows the ICS structure, and • The ESFs should be aligned with ICS staff. The diagram on the next page is an example of an EOC staff. More detail should be provided in the ESF annexes. This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-17
  • Emergency Coordinator PIO External Affairs Finance/ Operations Planning Logistics Administration Section Section Section Section Emergency Services Situation Coordination/ Personnel Branch Unit Planning Unit Unit Human Services Plans Resource Management Administration Branch Unit Unit Unit Infrastructure Technical Communications Finance Branch Specialists System Unit Unit State Warning GIS/Mapping Procurement Point Unit Unit Local Liaison Mission/Assignment Tracking This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-18
  • Operations Section Operations Section Chief ESF #17 Emergency Services Human Services Infrastructure ESF #16 Volunteers & Branch Branch Branch Military Support Donations Emergency Services ESFs EMERGENCY SERVICES BRANCH ESF #4 Firefighting ESF #8 Health & Medical ESF #9 Search & Rescue ESF #10 Oil & HAZMAT ESF #13 Public Safety & Security Human Services ESFs HUMAN SERVICES BRANCH ESF # 6 Mass Care ESF # 11 Agriculture & Natural Resources This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-19
  • Infrastructure Support ESFs INFRASTRUCTURE SUPPORT ESF #1 Transportation ESF #2 Communications ESF #3 Public Works/Engineering ESF #12 Energy Planning Section ESFs PLANNING SECTION ESF #5 Emergency Mgmt Logistics Section ESFs LOGISTICS SECTION ESF #7 Resource Mgmt This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-20
  • Command Staff COORDINATOR ESF #15 Deputy Coordinator Public Affairs/Information ESF #14 Long Term Recovery This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-21
  • V. Roles and Responsibilities A successful college/university emergency management program involves certain designated personnel to organize the emergency response plan. A successful emergency management program involves all parties including the college officials, departments, students, faculty and staff, private sector and non-profit organizations. The following are examples of positions or organizations that are common to most college/universities and have a role in the emergency management program, but the plan for your institution should Examples: Board of Visitors • Protect the lives of students, faculty and staff and the property and assets of the college/university; • Establish the college/university emergency management program; • Designate the administrator ultimately responsible for emergency management (President); and • Adopt and promulgate the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP). President (Designee) • Work with law enforcement, other emergency responders and the Coordinator of Emergency Management to determine the need to evacuate an endangered area; • Working with the same officials, consider the need to alter the normal business or class schedule of the institution, including delayed openings, early closings or total closings; • Exercise direction and control from the EOC during disaster operations; • Hire and support the Coordinator of Emergency Management; and • Hold overall responsibility for the maintaining, exercising and updating the plan. Emergency Planner or Emergency Manager (College/University) • Maintain the EOC in a constant state of readiness; • Develop and maintain the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP); • Assume relevant duties as directed by the president or their designee; • Develop and implement a test, training, exercise and drill schedule to assure all involved parties for emergency response and recovery are fully prepared to fulfill their tasks. A relevant exercise should be held at least annually; and • Ensure that the EOP is reviewed, revised and adopted every four years. Emergency Coordination Officer (ECO) – Serves as the communication liaison between the Office of Commonwealth Preparedness, VDEM and each agency. Pursuant to Executive Order 65 (2004), the ECO is assigned the following responsibilities which may have been delegated to others within the organization: This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-22
  • • Coordinate with the Department of Emergency Management on emergency preparedness, response, and recovery issues; • Prepare and maintain designated parts of the COOP plan for which the institution is responsible. • Prepare and maintain internal plans and procedures to fulfill the responsibilities designated in the plan; • Maintain a roster of institution’s faculty and staff to assist in disaster operations and ensure that persons on the roster are accessible and available for training, exercises and activations of the plan; • Coordinate appropriate training for institution’s faculty and staff assigned to disaster operations; • Prepare and maintain internal emergency preparedness, response, and recovery plans for the institution’s resources (facilities, faculty, staff and assets) that outline a comprehensive and effective program to ensure continuity of essential state functions under all circumstances; • Assure the State Coordinator of Emergency Management that preparedness plans for its facilities are coordinated with the applicable local emergency management agency. Local Emergency Manager: County Administrator/Board of Supervisors Member/City Manager. The day-to-day activities of the emergency preparedness program have been delegated to the Coordinator of Emergency Management. The Director, in conjunction with the Coordinator of Emergency Management, will direct and control emergency operations for the local government in time of emergency and issue directives to other services and organizations concerning disaster preparedness. Emergency Coordinator (Local Government Role) develops and maintains a primary Emergency Operations Center (EOC) from which to direct operations in time of emergency. The local government will appoint an individual by title to serve as a point of contact to the institution of higher education within its jurisdiction. This position will contact the VEOC with requests for resources on behalf of the institution. This operational policy to channel resource requests through the local government is consistent with the Code of Virginia §44-146.18, and §23-9.2:9, which mandates a state institution of higher education to maintain an EOP, keep it current and integrate it with the local emergency operations plan. Emergency Support Functions (ESFs) An ESF is a grouping of college/university departments and certain private-sector capabilities into an organizational structure to provide support, resources, program implementation, and emergency services that are most likely to be needed during incidents. Operating departments and programs participate in the Emergency Support Functions (ESF) structure as coordinators, primary response agencies, This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-23
  • and/or support agencies and/or as required to support incident management activities. Examples of ESF functions • Develop and maintain detailed plans and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) to support their functional requirements; • Identify sources of emergency supplies, equipment and transportation; • Maintain accurate records of disaster-related expenditure and documentation; • Continue to be responsible for protection and preservation of records essential for continuity of business for the college/university; • Establish a line of successions for key emergency personnel; and • Negotiate and maintain mutual aid agreements which are identified in the plan; The matrix provided in Appendix 4 of this template can be used in the plan development process to identify the departments and programs that are typically involved in an emergency response. Student, Staff and Faculty Involvement The Citizen Corps Council implements the Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) such as • Medical Reserve Corps (MRC), • Neighborhood Watch, • Volunteers in Police Service, • Fire Corps. • Other organizations that provide opportunities for special skills and interests. Colleges/university have ### Campus CERT teams, with approximately ### volunteers available to assist with emergency preparedness, response and recovery activities. In Colleges/University, Campus CERT teams have responsibility to: • Develop and maintain a listing of trained CERT volunteers; • Provide initial first-responder response to events as requested by the Emergency Manager; and • Assist in additional emergency response activities as requested by the Emergency Manager. Also, there are multiple organizations on the college/university campus that assist the community through multiple services. These groups should be researched, approached and tasked if willing if they can provide assistance within any portion disaster scenario. Private sector The private sector may take on many different functions. Examples of private sector actions This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-24
  • • Private owners of critical infrastructure (either a facility that could be impacted by a disaster or used as a resource); • A response organization (e.g. private ambulance services, environmental clean- up services); • A regulated or responsible party: owner operators of certain regulated facilities may have responsibility under law to prepare for and prevent incidents from occurring; or • A local emergency organization member. • Have knowledge of local emergency response plans and procedures; and • Implement protective actions as requested or required by the Emergency Manager. VI. Administration, Finance and Logistics The following should be addressed in this section: • References to Mutual Aid Agreements; • Authorities for and policies on augmenting staff by reassigning staff and faculty and soliciting volunteers, along with relevant liability provisions; • General policies on keeping financial records, reporting, tracking resource needs, tracking source and use of resources, and acquiring ownership of resources. All assets (human resources and facility and equipment resources) of the university will become the purview of the President of the College/University to direct in any way to respond to an emergency on campus. The President may also appoint this authority to his designee or the Coordinator of Emergency Management as written in a formal Delegation of Authority statement on file. Identify policies and procedures for tracking and reporting of any costs due to an emergency. In many cases, normal procurement and financial policies will remain in effect, but in extraordinary events, additional provisions must be followed to increase the speed of which these actions can take place. Identify required tracking and record-keeping procedures that will be put in place to assure all emergency costs are easily identified. These items are most thoroughly discussed in the ESF #5 Emergency Support Function Annex Tab 1. If the emergency exceeds the college/university’s capability to handle, the college/university must be aware of the outside resources availability through their locality, nearby localities, state, and or federal assists. The college/university has This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-25
  • worked with external localities, agencies and non-profits to address those needs that may overwhelm the internal capability to respond. • Memorandums of Understanding and Memorandums of Agreement should be written with these organizations to identify the resources that will be addressed by each Memorandum and any policies, procedures or administrative, legal and financial issues that must be addressed for each. • Identify the appendix (or other location in the plan where the MOUs, MOAs and Mutual Aid Agreements are located. Plan Development and Maintenance This section describes the overall approach to planning, the participants included in the planning process, and the way in which the plan will be maintained and updated. One individual should be assigned to coordinate these processed and provisions and to address regular reviews, testing and revisions. The Code of Virginia Title 23 and Title 44, as amended, require public institutions of higher education to develop, adopt, and keep current a written crisis and emergency management plan; Every four years, each institution shall conduct a comprehensive review and revision of its crisis and emergency management plan to ensure the plan remains current, and the revised plan shall be adopted formally by the board of visitors or other governing body. Such review shall also be certified in writing to the Department of Emergency Management. Drafting an emergency plan is a community effort and relies heavily on the college/university’s administrators and experts to provide comprehensive guidance to the college/university’s president on hazard analysis, exercise design, evacuation planning, emergency management, mitigation, recovery, emergency preparedness, and educational awareness. Examples of plan participants: • President of College/University • Coordinator of Emergency Management • College/University Security or Police • College/University Grounds and Facility Maintenance • Representatives from internal groups: o Department of Finance, o Department of Human Resources, o Department of Purchasing, and o Student organization This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-26
  • • Representatives from external groups: o Locality Emergency Management, o Locality Emergency Medical Services, o Locality Fire Department, o Locality Police Department, o Locality Sheriff’s Department, o Local Hospitals, o Red Cross, and o Add more here. The Coordinator of Emergency Management will update the Emergency Operations Plan annually. The Coordinator will coordinate with each emergency resource organization and assure the development and maintenance of an appropriate emergency response capability. It is the responsibility of the Coordinator or Emergency Management to assure that the plan is tested and exercised on a scheduled basis. Examples of an exercise schedule: It is planned that a functional drill for some portion of the plan will be held monthly; a tabletop exercise of the plan will be held semi-annually; and a full-scale exercise will be held annually. The Coordinator will maintain the schedule and assure that the appropriate resources are available to complete these activities. After each drill, exercise or actual event, a hot wash and/or after-action review will take place. Any findings from these post-event reviews will be incorporated into an update of the plan. This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-27
  • VII. Authorities and References This section provides the legal basis for emergency operations and activities. It includes the following: • Provisions for the continuity of operations (e.g. the succession of decision making authority and operational control) to ensure that critical emergency functions can be performed. • Lists of laws statutes, ordinances executive orders, regulations and formal agreements relevant to emergencies. • Specification of the extent and limits of the emergency authorities granted to the, including the conditions under which these authorities become effective and Succession of Authority Continuity of emergency operations is critical to the successful execution of emergency operations. The following are examples of positions at an institution that would typically have a role in emergency management Organization/ Service Function Authority in Line of Succession Direction and Control 1. President of the College/ University 2. President’ s Designee 3. Coordinator of Emergency Management Emergency Public Information 1. Director of Emergency Management 2. Human Resources Manager (or designated individual for the College/ University) This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-28
  • 3. Coordinator of Emergency Management 4. PIO Campus Security/ Police 1. Chief Security Officer 2. Chief Deputy Security Officer 3. Senior Deputy Security Offices Fire Department 1. Fire Chief 2. Assistant Chief 3. Captain Rescue Squads 1. Captain 2. First Lieutenant 3. Second Lieutenant Grounds/ Facility’ s Manager 1. Director 2. Assistant Director Campus Health Department 1. Campus Health Director 2. Administrator 3. Campus Nursing Supervisor Authorities Federal 1. The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, Public Law 93-288, as amended 2. The Homeland Security Act 3. National Response Framework 4. Local and Tribal NIMS Integration: Integrating the National Incident Management System into Local and Tribal Emergency Operations Plans and Standard Operating Procedures, V. 1, Department of Homeland Security State This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-29
  • 1. Commonwealth of Virginia Emergency Services and Disaster Law of 2006, as amended. 2. The Code of Virginia, Title 1 Chapter 23 and Chapter 44. 3. The Commonwealth of Virginia Emergency Operations Plan, December 2007 4. Executive Order 44 University/College 1. Insert any college/university policies or regulations that affect this plan here. References Local 1. Regional or Local Hazard Mitigation Plan 2. Local Emergency Operations Plan University/College 1. Disaster Resistant University Plan 2. College/University Comprehensive Plan 3. Continuity of Operations Plan (by Executive Order 44) 4. Annual Agency Preparedness Assessment 5. Pandemic Flu Plan 6. Terrorism and Security Awareness Orientation 7. SEC 2001 and SEC501 Security Audit Review and Checklist 8. VITA Risk Management 9. Information Technology Contingency Planning 10. Information Technology Systems Security 11. Logical Access Controls 12. Data Protection 13. Facilities Security 14. Personnel Security 15. Threat Management 16. Information Technology Asset Management 17. Agency Risk Management and Internal Control Standards (ARMICS) 18. CFATS: Critical Facility Anti-terrorism Standards Appendix A – Glossary of Key Terms Accessible Having the legally required features and/or qualities that ensure entrance, participation and usability of places, programs, services and activities by individuals with a wide variety of disabilities. Agency A division of business or government with a specific function offering a particular kind of assistance. ICS agencies are defined either as jurisdictional (having statutory responsibility for incident management) or as assisting or cooperating (providing resources or other assistance). This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-30
  • American Red Cross An organization charged by statue and agreements with the responsibility of helping meet the human needs of disaster victims. Catastrophe (catastrophic incident) Any natural or manmade incident, including acts of terrorism, that results in extraordinary levels of mass casualties, damage or disruption severely affecting the population, infrastructure, environment, economy and/or government functions. Command Post That location at which primary Command functions are executed; usually collocated with the Incident Base. Also referred to as the Incident Command Post. Command Section One of the five functional areas of the Incident Command System. The function of command is to direct, control, or order resources, including people and equipment, to the best possible advantage. Continuity of Operations A process of identifying the essential functions - including staff, systems and procedures that ensure the continuation of the agency’s ability to operate. Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) In the context of Virginia state government, the Governor has required all executive branch agencies to complete and exercise a plan that identifies essential functions and provides the resources to ensure the agency’s ability to continue those operations. Essential functions for VERT agencies include their ability to perform their VERT roles. Coordination The process of systemically analyzing a situation, developing relevant information, and informing appropriate personnel of viable alternatives for selection of the most effective combination of available resources to meet specific objectives Crisis Management A predominantly law enforcement function that includes measures to identify, acquire and plan the use of resources needed to anticipate, prevent, and/or resolve a threat or act of terrorism. (See also Consequence Management) Declaration of Emergency Whenever, in the opinion of the college/university’s president or designated personnel, feels the safety and welfare of the people of the college/university require the exercise of extreme emergency measures Decontamination The process of making people, objects, or areas safe by absorbing, destroying, neutralizing, making harmless, or removing the Hazardous Materials/HAZMAT Emergency This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-31
  • As defined by the Code, “any occurrence, or threat thereof, whether natural or man- made, which results or may result in substantial injury or harm to the population or substantial damage to or loss of property or natural resources”. Emergency Alert System (EAS) A network of broadcast stations interconnecting facilities authorized by the Federal Communications Commission to operate in a controlled manner, according to the State EAS Plan to inform the public of needed protective actions in the event of an emergency or disaster situation. Emergency/Disaster/Incident An event that demands a crisis response beyond the scope of any single line agency or service and that presents a threat to a community or larger area. An emergency is usually an event that can be controlled within the scope of local capabilities; a major emergency or disaster usually requires resources beyond what is available locally. Emergency Coordinating Officer (college and university) An individual appointed by the president of the university as directed by Executive Order # 44 actively plans, trains and acts in the interest of the protection of the institution’s community and coordinates with the Office of Commonwealth Preparedness. Emergency Management The preparation for and the carrying out of functions (other than functions for which military forces are primarily responsible) to prevent, minimize, and repair injury and damage resulting from natural or manmade disasters. These functions include fire- fighting, police, medical and health, rescue, warning, engineering, communications, evacuation, resource management, plant protection, restoration of public utility services, and other functions related to preserving the public health, safety, and welfare. Emergency Operations Center A facility from which government directs and controls its emergency operations; where information about the status of the emergency situation is officially collected, assimilated, and reported on; where coordination among response agencies takes place; and from which outside assistance is officially requested. Emergency Operations Plan A document which provides for a preplanned and coordinated response in the event of an emergency or disaster situation. Emergency Responder Includes local, state and federal emergency services public safety, law enforcement, emergency medical services (pre-hospital and hospital), search and rescue, fire services, and related personnel, agencies and authorities. Emergency Services The preparation for and carrying out of the functions to prevent, minimize and repair injury and damage resulting from natural or man-made disasters, together with all other activities necessary or incidental to the preparation for and carrying out of the forgoing functions. (Code §44-146.16 for list of included services.) This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-32
  • Emergency Support Function A function which takes agencies to provide or to coordinate certain resources in response to emergencies or disasters. Evacuation Assisting people to move from the path or threat of a disaster to an area of relative safety. Exercise An activity designed to promote emergency preparedness; test or evaluate emergency operations plans, procedures, or facilities; train personnel in emergency response duties, and demonstrate operational capability. There are three specific types of exercises: tabletop, functional, and full scale. Federal Disaster Assistance Aid to disaster victims and/or state and local governments by federal agencies under provisions of the Booker T. Stafford Relief and Emergency Assistance Act of 1988 (PL 93-288) . First Responder Skilled personnel who in the early stages of an incident are responsible for the protection and preservation of life, property, evidence and the environment, such as government and non-governmental police, fire, emergency medical, search and rescue, emergency management, public health, public works and authorities. Geographic Information System A computer system capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e.-data identified according to their locations. Hazardous Materials Substances or materials which may pose unreasonable risks to health, safety, property, or the environment when used, transported, stored or disposed of, which may include materials which are solid, liquid, or gas. Hazardous materials may include toxic substances, flammable and ignitable materials, explosives, or corrosive materials, and radioactive materials. Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Plan The plan was developed in response to the requirements of Section 303 (a) of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III) of Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. It is intended to be a tool for our community’s use in recognizing the risks of a hazardous materials release, in evaluating our preparedness for such an event, and in planning our response and recovery actions. This plan is separate from the county’s Emergency Operations Plan. Incident An occurrence or event, natural or human-caused, that requires an emergency response to protect life or property. Incident Action Plan (IAP) This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-33
  • An oral or written plan containing general objectives reflecting overall strategy for managing an incident. Incident Command System A model for disaster response that uses common terminology, modular organization, integrated communications, unified command structure, action planning, manageable span or control, pre-designed facilities, and comprehensive resource management. In ICS there are five functional elements: Command, Operations, Logistics, Planning and Finance/Administration. Incident Commander The individual responsible for the management of all incident operations. Initial Damage Assessment Report A report that provides information regarding overall damage to public and private property, thereby providing a basis for emergency declaration and/or disaster assistance. Integrated Communications Plan This plan coordinates the use of available communications means and establishes frequency assignments for certain functions. Joint Information Center A facility established to coordinate all incident-related public information activities. It is the central point of contact for all news media at the scene for the incident. Public information officials from all participating agencies should collocate at the JIC. Joint Field Office (JFO) A temporary federal facility established near a declared disaster area to provide a central point for federal, state, voluntary and local officials with responsibilities for incident oversight, direction and assistance. Local Emergency The condition declared by the local governing body when, in its judgment, the threat or actual occurrence of a disaster is or threatens to be of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant coordinated local government action to prevent, or alleviate loss of life, property damage, or hardship. Only the Governor, upon petition of a local governing body, may declare a local emergency arising wholly or substantially out of a resource shortage when he deems the situation to be of sufficient magnitude to warrant coordinated local government action to prevent or alleviate the hardship or suffering threatened or caused thereby. Major Disaster Any natural catastrophe (including any hurricane, tornado, storm, high water, wind- driven water, tidal wave, tsunami, earthquake, volcanic eruption, landslide, mudslide, snowstorm, or drought) or, regardless of cause, any fire, flood, or explosion in any part of the United States that, in the determination of the President, causes damage of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant major disaster assistance under the Stafford Act to supplement the efforts and federal warning centers or other federal agencies to the state warning points. This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-34
  • Mitigation Activities that actually eliminate or reduce the chance occurrence or the effects of a disaster. Examples of mitigation measures include, but are not limited to, the development of zoning laws and land use ordinances, State building code provisions, regulations and licensing for handling and storage of hazardous materials, and the inspection and enforcement of such ordinances, codes and regulations. Mutual Aid Agreement A written agreement between agencies and/or jurisdictions in which they agree to assist one another, upon request, by furnishing personnel and equipment in an emergency situation. National Incident Management System (NIMS) A system mandated by the federal Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD) #5 that provides a consistent, nationwide approach for governments(federal, state and local), voluntary agencies and the private sector to work effectively and efficiently together to prepare for, respond to, and recovery from incidents, regardless of cause, size or complexity. NIMS uses a core set of concepts, principles and terminology. National Response Framework Establishes a process and structure for the systematic, coordinated, and effective delivery of federal assistance to address the consequences of any major disaster or emergency. Preparedness The development of plans to ensure the most effective, efficient response to a disaster or emergency. Preparedness activities are designed to help save lives and minimize damage by preparing people to respond appropriately when an emergency is imminent. Preparedness also includes establishing training, exercises and resources necessary to achieve readiness for all hazards, including Weapons of Mass destruction incidents. Recovery Activities that address the short-term and long-term needs and the resources to assist, restore, strengthen and rebuild affected individuals and communities. Response Activities that address the short-term, direct effects of an incident. Response includes immediate actions to save lives, protect property and meet basic human needs. Threat Any indication of possible violence, harm or danger. Volunteer Any individual accepted to perform services by any agency that has authority to accept volunteer services when the individual performs services without promise, expectation, or receipt of compensation for services performed. Washington Area Warning System (WAWAS) – A regional warning system that serves Northern Virginia, the District of Columbia, selected federal agencies, and certain southern Maryland jurisdictions in the National Capital Region (NCR). This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-35
  • Unified Command Shared responsibility for overall incident management as a result of a multi-jurisdictional or multi-agency incident. In the event of conflicting priorities or goals, or where resources are scarce, there must be a clear line of authority for decision-making. Agencies contribute to unified command by determining overall goals and objectives, jointly planning for tactical activities, conducting integrated tactical operations and maximizing the use of all assigned resources. This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-36
  • Appendix B – List of Acronyms and Abbreviations ARC American Red Cross CONOPS Concept of Operations CONPLAN Concept of Operations Plan COOP Continuity of Operations Plan ECO Emergency Coordinating Officer EOC Emergency Operations Center EAS Emergency Alert System EMS Emergency Medical Services EOP Emergency Operations Plan ESF Emergency Support Function EPZ Emergency Planning Zone (Radiological term) HAZMAT Hazardous Material(s) IAP Incident Action Plan IC Incident Commander ICS Incident Command System ICP Integrated Communications Plan IDA Initial Damage Assessment IDAR Initial Damage Assessment Report JFO Joint Field Office JIC Joint Information Center MAA Mutual Aid Agreement MACC Multi-Agency Coordination Center MACS Multi-Agency Coordination System This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-37
  • MOU Memorandum of Understanding NGO Nongovernmental Organization NIMS National Incident Management System NRF National Response Framework NWS National Weather Service OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration PDA Preliminary Damage Assessment RACES Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Services SAR Search and Rescue SOP Standard Operating Procedure UC Unified Command This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-38
  • Appendix C – Maps and Charts Matrix of Responsibilities Emergency ManagementESF #5 Mass CareESF #6 Agriculture & Natural ResourcesESF #11 EnergyESF #12 Public SafetyESF # 13 Long-Term RecoveryESF #14 External AffairsESF #15 TransportationESF # 1 CommunicationsESF # 2 Public WorksESF # 3 Resource SupportESF #7 Health & MedicalESF #8 Search & RescueESF #9 Hazardous MaterialsESF #10 Fire FightingESF #4 Emergency Management Fire Student Health Services Campus Police & Security Physical Plant Institution Administration/ Leadership Residential Life Information Technology Campus Dining Finance Transportation/Auto- Transit Dept. Board of Visitors Ground Department Public Affairs VOAD This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-39
  • This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-40
  • Appendix D – Memorandums of Understanding/Agreement and Mutual Aid Agreements This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-41
  • Appendix E – Distribution List This is only a template and can be edited to match the needs of each individual institution as needed. Basic Plan-42