Microsoft Word - DJJ 8.30, Safe Crisis Management
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  • I appreciated reading this document, as a former Instructor of SCM in the Department of Health, State of New Mexico, this program is not only superb for working with troubled individuals in treatment or schools, but in the real world at large whether teens or adults.

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Microsoft Word - DJJ 8.30, Safe Crisis Management Document Transcript

  • 1. GEORGIA DEPARTMENT Transmittal # Policy # OF JUVENILE JUSTICE 09-06 8.30 Applicability: Related Standards & References: {x} All DJJ Staff ACA Standards: 4-JCF-2A-29, 4-JCF-2A-30 {x} Administration NCCHC Juvenile Health Care Standards, 2004: Y-A-10 {x} Community Services Safe Crisis Management Curriculum, 2009 {x} Secure Facilities (RYDCs and YDCs) Effective Date: 9/15/09 Chapter 8: SAFETY, SECURITY AND CONTROL Scheduled Review Date: 9/15/10 APPROVED: Subject: SAFE CRISIS MANAGEMENT Attachments: A – Employee Certification of Compliance with the Safe Crisis Management Policy B – Debriefing Conversation Guide ________________________________________________ Albert Murray, Commissioner I. POLICY: Department of Juvenile Justice staff shall use a positive approach to building healthy relationships including effective communication, making empathetic connections, and establishing a structured, consistent environment. Staff shall use the least restrictive alternative when ensuring the safety of youth in their care. Physical intervention techniques shall always be utilized in the most humane and safe manner and as the last resort. II. DEFINITIONS: Behavioral Health Evaluation: A brief mental status exam completed by a facility case manager or qualified mental health professional following an incident. Director: For the purposes of this policy, the staff member responsible for the overall operation of a Regional Youth Detention Center (RYDC), Youth Development Campus (YDC), community-based office, or other DJJ owned, operated, or contracted facility or program. First Aid: Initial treatment given by a staff member trained in providing first aid to a sick or injured youth to preserve life, prevent further injury, or promote recovery. Inappropriate Use of Physical Intervention: Use of physical intervention techniques not authorized by DJJ; use of authorized physical intervention techniques beyond that necessary to manage the behaviors of an acting-out youth; use of a physical intervention technique when it is not warranted; physical handling when the least restrictive alternative is not appropriately utilized. Injury Severity Rating: A numerical rating assigned by health care staff that indicates the extent of a youth’s injury. Least Restrictive Alternative: The least amount of restriction necessary to manage an acting- out youth. Use of the process of safe crisis management so that primary strategies are used before secondary strategies whenever possible. Lethal Force: Force that is likely to cause death.
  • 2. Chapter Subject Policy # Page SAFETY, SECURITY, AND CONTROL SAFE CRISIS MANAGEMENT 8.30 2 of 11 Mechanical Restraint Device: Any device used to completely or partially constrain a person’s bodily movement. Physical Intervention: A last resort physical action taken by staff with the intention of managing the behavior of an acting-out youth in order to ensure the safety of the youth and others. Physical interventions include holding, restraining, subduing, and the use of a mechanical restraint device. Positive Behavior Strategies: An individualized intervention plan used to determine secondary intervention strategies and/or safety procedures that will be used to defuse a youth’s behavior(s) of concern. Primary Strategies: Positive approaches to building healthy relationships including effective communication, making empathetic connections, and establishing a structured, consistent environment. Primary strategies include, but are not limited to: consistent schedules, consistency between shifts, preparation for transitions, balancing individual and group needs, being friendly, modeling appropriate behavior, teaching acceptable behavior, making random positive connections, effectively listening, etc. Qualified Mental Health Professional (QMHP): Mental health staff with education, training and experience adequate to perform the duties required in accordance with professional standards. When the QMHP is required to complete assessments or provide individual counseling to youth with mental illness, the QMHP must have at least a masters degree in a mental health related field and training and experience in the provision of mental health assessment and counseling procedures. A masters-level intern under the supervision of a QMHP may perform the functions of a QMHP. Report of Youth Injuries: The document used by health care staff of at least the level of a Registered Nurse to document the youth’s verbatim statement and physical condition following an incident, and to assign an injury severity rating to any injury sustained in the incident. Restraint: The complete or partial constraint of a person’s bodily movement through physical or mechanical means. Safe Crisis Management (SCM): The program sanctioned by DJJ to provide staff with the most professional and safest approach to managing youth behaviors of concern using the least restrictive alternative. Secondary Strategies: Verbal, non-verbal, and para verbal efforts used to correct, interrupt or adjust behavior. Special Incident Report (SIR): A report that provides details regarding an event involving youth, employees, and/or facilities/programs/offices (owned, operated, or contracted) that interrupts normal procedure or precipitates a crisis. III. GENERAL PROCEDURES: A. DJJ staff required to use physical intervention techniques in the course of their job duties will be trained, through the Office of Training, in the techniques allowed by DJJ policy.
  • 3. Chapter Subject Policy # Page SAFETY, SECURITY, AND CONTROL SAFE CRISIS MANAGEMENT 8.30 3 of 11 B. Untrained staff should only physically intervene in a life-threatening event when no other trained staff are available to respond or in non-life threatening events when the trained staff requires that level of assistance. Untrained staff will use the minimum level of intervention necessary to safely manage the situation. C. Physical intervention techniques will be used as taught by the Office of Training. Staff will refrain from carrying youth in an attempt to move them from one place to another, except as taught by the Office of Training. D. In secure facilities, in all instances where time permits and video cameras are available, the use of physical intervention techniques and other incidents involving youth will be recorded. (See DJJ 8.17, Video Cameras) E. Community Services Staff: 1. Community Services staff will use the Personal Safety techniques as taught by the Office of Training. 2. The use of physical intervention techniques by Community Services staff will be authorized only for the purposes of defense of self or others or to protect youth in cases of emergency. 3. Staff will assess the situation and make decisions based on the safest course of action for all concerned. 4. Local law enforcement or staff trained in the use of physical intervention techniques will be called at the earliest possible time when staff anticipate violent behavior by a youth or notice other signs that may be considered a danger to staff, citizens or the youth. 5. Following the use of physical intervention techniques by Community Services staff, the youth will be immediately referred for any needed medical attention. 6. Community Services staff who may use physical intervention techniques in the course of their job duties will be trained through the Office of Training. The Deputy Commissioner of Community Services and Intake will designate the specific positions that will require training. F. All employees authorized to use physical intervention techniques will receive competency-based training as outlined in DJJ 4.5, Safe Crisis Management Training. At the end of Pre-Service training, each employee will sign the Employee Certification of Compliance with the Safe Crisis Management Policy (Attachment A) affirming that they have read, understood, and will comply with the policy. The signed statement will be placed in the employee’s training record. G. Weapons: 1. Only those individuals approved by the Commissioner will be issued a firearm.
  • 4. Chapter Subject Policy # Page SAFETY, SECURITY, AND CONTROL SAFE CRISIS MANAGEMENT 8.30 4 of 11 2. No weapon of any type is authorized inside a DJJ facility/program unless specifically authorized by the Commissioner or designee. 3. In an emergency situation, the local law enforcement agency will not need prior authorization of the Commissioner for entry with weapons. (The Commissioner must be immediately notified via the chain of command.) IV. SAFE CRISIS MANAGEMENT: A. The least restrictive alternative will serve as the guideline to the response(s) authorized by DJJ to manage acting-out behavior. 1. Staff will use the appropriate strategies necessary to manage acting-out youth. 2. Inappropriate use of physical intervention is specifically prohibited. 3. Physical intervention techniques are not intended, and shall never be used as a means of punishment. 4. It is acknowledged that a youth’s escalation/resistance and/or the threat level represented may be sudden. When this occurs, the staff member will not be required to sequentially progress through the lesser to more restrictive strategies. B. The following strategies will be authorized to manage the acting-out behavior of youth: • Primary strategies; • Assessment; • Secondary strategies; and • Physical intervention (last resort). V. PRIMARY STRAGEGIES: A. Facility Directors will ensure that the environment of the facility provides for structure, clear expectations, and consistent routines and transitions from one area/activity to another. B. The Director will ensure that all staff are familiar with the contents of the DJJ policy manual and receive any training needed to implement the policies and local operating procedures within 30 days of the policy’s effective date. (See DJJ 1.4, Establishment and Maintenance of DJJ Policies) C. Secure facilities shall provide an environment that is safe, secure and orderly. Sufficient staff shall be scheduled and on duty to provide supervision of youth. The safety and well-being of youth, staff, visitors and the general public shall be the primary consideration in all decision making and planning. (See DJJ 8.1, Security Management) D. Secure facilities will have a daily schedule that is substantially followed and readily accessible by youth. (See DJJ 18.1, Program Activity Schedule) E. Each secure facility shall use a standardized behavior management system designed to promote the development of self-control and to teach and encourage positive behavior
  • 5. Chapter Subject Policy # Page SAFETY, SECURITY, AND CONTROL SAFE CRISIS MANAGEMENT 8.30 5 of 11 and interaction with others. Positive behavior shall be recognized and rewarded. (See DJJ 16.1, Youth Behavior Management) F. Staff will build positive, professional relationships with other staff, youth and their families that promote a positive and safe culture in which individuals are afforded the opportunity to thrive. G. Facility Directors will ensure consistency with daily routines/schedules, expectations, activities, etc. H. Staff will ensure that their interactions with youth are positive, even when addressing minor misbehaviors. Behavior management techniques will be used to address minor misbehavior. These techniques include, but are not limited to: • Attending • Giving positive • Attuning acknowledgement • Meeting and greeting • Being aware of events • Maintaining a positive • Making random positive affect connections • Identifying the youth’s • Teaching acceptable strengths behavior • Modeling appropriate • Recognizing normal behavior behavior • Using appropriate humor • Positively correcting • Being friendly behavior • Celebrating • Using differential achievements reinforcement VI. INTERVENTION ASSESSMENT: A. Each youth in a secure facility will have current, individualized Positive Behavior Strategies. (See DJJ 18.31, Positive Behavior Strategies) B. When youth display a behavior of concern, staff will assess the youth, their behavior, the environment and the staff’s ability to handle the situation to determine the strategy to be used. 1. In assessing the youth, staff will identify coping strengths and limitations that would be helpful in communicating with the youth and de-escalating their behavior. 2. In assessing the environment, staff will identify challenges and resources in the environment that will affect the intervention strategy to be used, such as other youth, limited space, objects, etc. 3. In assessing the youth’s behavior, staff will make an assessment of the type of acting-out behavior that is being presented. 4. In assessing themselves, staff will make a determination about the type of intervention that will be necessary. This may include assessing such areas as
  • 6. Chapter Subject Policy # Page SAFETY, SECURITY, AND CONTROL SAFE CRISIS MANAGEMENT 8.30 6 of 11 previous relationship history with the youth, physical capacity, professional experience, etc. VII. SECONDARY STRATEGIES: A. Non-physical interventions will be used to de-escalate a youth’s acting-out behavior. Non-physical interventions will include: non-verbal communication, para verbal intervention, active listening and verbal intervention. B. Non-Verbal Communication: 1. Staff will assume a calm and controlled posture and demeanor. 2. For minor misbehavior, staff will use the following non-verbal steps: (1) Planned Ignoring: Ignore nuisance behaviors and attention-seeking negative behaviors (other than self-harm behaviors and behaviors causing harm to others) (2) Affect: Staff presence (3) Signals: Give non-verbal cues to communicate the expected behavior (4) Proximity Prompt: Move closer to the youth (5) Touch Prompt: Give a slight pat on the shoulder or upper arm to send a reassuring message or to alert the youth of a poor choice. (Staff must be aware of a youth’s history prior to using touch. The youth may respond negatively to touch.) C. Para Verbal Intervention: 1. Staff will control their volume, tone and rate of speech. Staff will speak calmly and evenly. D. Active Listening: 1. Staff will use active listening to understand the youth and show interest in the youth. Ways to show active listening include head nods, paraphrasing, reflecting a feeling, eye contact, etc. E. Verbal intervention: 1. Verbal intervention techniques will include, but not be limited to: • Paraphrasing • Benign confrontation • Perception checking • Setting clear expectations • Behavior description • Positive problem solving • Open ended prompts • Redirection • Reflecting feelings • Positive correction • Summarizing • Limit setting • Directly appealing • Reminding of the consequence(s)
  • 7. Chapter Subject Policy # Page SAFETY, SECURITY, AND CONTROL SAFE CRISIS MANAGEMENT 8.30 7 of 11 VIII. PHYSICAL INTERVENTION: A. The use of physical intervention will be permitted in the following circumstances: • Defense of self; • Protection of youth, staff, or others; • In secure facilities, prevention of substantial damage to property when that damage could legitimately cause a safety hazard; • In secure facilities, escape prevention; and • In secure facilities, enforcement of lawful orders and directives, upon supervisor approval when other lesser intervention techniques have failed. B. The safety of the youth shall be the staff’s primary concern. Physical intervention is always a last resort. C. Physical intervention techniques will be used as taught by the Office of Training. The following physical intervention techniques are authorized by DJJ: • Evasion / Deflection (if used as the only physical intervention technique, this technique will not be coded as a physical intervention technique (“S” Code)) • Extended Arm Assist (Single Person) (if used as the only physical intervention technique, this technique will not be coded as a physical intervention technique (“S” Code)) • Multiple-Person Extended Arm Assist (if used as the only physical intervention technique, this technique will not be coded as a physical intervention technique (“S” Code)) • Cradle Assist (Single Person) • Upper Torso Assist (Single Person) • Multiple-Person Upper Torso Assist & Bicep Assist • Cradle and Upper Torso Assist to Seated/Kneeling Position • Hook Transport and Assist to Seated/Kneeling Position • Multiple-Person Seated/Kneeling Upper Torso Assist and Bicep Assist • Assist to a Seated Position from a Prone Position • Front Choke Escape • Rear Choke Escape • Forearm Choke Escape • Little Finger Roll (Wrist Escape) • Twist Out (Wrist Escape) • Scribe a Circle (Wrist Escape) • Two Handed Wrist Grab • Bear Hug Assist • Hair Pull Assist (front and rear) • Bite Release D. Physical intervention techniques not approved by DJJ shall not be employed except in cases of extreme emergency when other approved techniques would be ineffective. (As an example, but not limited to: self-defense against a youth or group of youth that are physically assaulting staff.) Incidents involving the use of physical intervention
  • 8. Chapter Subject Policy # Page SAFETY, SECURITY, AND CONTROL SAFE CRISIS MANAGEMENT 8.30 8 of 11 technique not approved by DJJ will be investigated and administratively reviewed to determine whether or not the situation warranted such use. E. Medical attention will be given immediately to any injuries suffered as a result of a physical intervention. If the youth is in distress and health care staff are not present, the youth will be immediately transported to the emergency room. F. Mechanical restraint devices will be used only if the youth is a clear and present danger to him/herself or others and crisis intervention techniques have been attempted and failed. Mechanical restraint devices will be used in accordance with DJJ 8.31, Restraint of Youth. IX. BEHAVIORAL HEALTH EVALUATION: A. When behavioral health staff are on site, the youth will be evaluated within the same shift as the incident as outlined in DJJ 8.5, Special Incident and Child Abuse Reporting in Secure Facilities. When behavioral health staff are not on site, the youth will be evaluated upon staff arrival, but always within 72 hours of the incident. X. MEDICAL EXAMINATION: A. Youth will receive a medical examination following any incident with a potential for injury. Medical examinations will be conducted as outlined in DJJ 8.5, Special Incident and Child Abuse Reporting in Secure Facilities. XI. REPORTING PHYSICAL INTERVENTIONS: The following procedures must be followed when any physical intervention has been used. A. The Director or Administrative Duty Officer will be verbally notified immediately when any physical intervention is used. All persons verbally notified will have their names recorded in the involvement section of the Special Incident Report. B. Staff with direct knowledge of the incident must complete a SIR in accordance with DJJ 8.5, Special Incident and Child Abuse Reporting in Secure Facilities or DJJ 8.6, Special Incidents and Child Abuse Reporting in Community Offices. An administrative review will be conducted in accordance with DJJ 8.5, Special Incident and Child Abuse Reporting in Secure Facilities. XII. DEBRIEFING CONVERSATION: Following each incident that involved a physical intervention technique, the youth and staff involved will have a debriefing conversation in an effort to discuss behaviors of concern and agree upon a plan for future behavior. A. Each facility Director will designate staff to be trained as Debriefing Facilitator. Staff will be chosen as a Debriefing Facilitator based on the following criteria: • Successfully completed Safe Crisis Management training specific to their job title; • Possess good interpersonal and communication skills;
  • 9. Chapter Subject Policy # Page SAFETY, SECURITY, AND CONTROL SAFE CRISIS MANAGEMENT 8.30 9 of 11 • Have good problem solving skills; • Have demonstrated report writing and analytical skills; • Have no history of formal disciplinary actions of Reminder 2 or above within the past 12 months; • Understands and supports the mission and vision of the Department; and • Have a minimum of one year of experience in adult/juvenile corrections or in the delivery of client-based services to at-risk youth in a community/residential setting. 1. The Debriefing Facilitator must receive a competency-based training through the Office of Training to oversee and assist with the debriefing conversation. 2. The SCM Training Officer may be a Debriefing Facilitator. 3. The Debriefing Facilitator will not serve as the disciplinary hearing officer. 4. Security staff will serve as the primary Debriefing Facilitators. In circumstances in which staffing dictates another arrangement (i.e., vacancies, extended illness, etc.), other staff (education, mental health, case management) will work collaboratively to ensure that the debriefing conversations are conducted in a timely manner. 5. The staff completing the Behavioral Health Evaluation will never serve as the Debriefing Facilitator for that incident. 6. Staff directly involved in the incident will not serve as the Debriefing Facilitator for that incident. 7. The Debriefing Facilitator will be a mandated secondary post. 8. If a Debriefing Facilitator no longer meets the criteria listed above, the Debriefing Facilitator will not serve in this capacity until meeting the criteria again. 9. A list of the staff designated and trained as Debriefing Facilitator will be posted in each control room, with a copy to the Office of Training. C. By the end of the shift following an incident involving a physical intervention technique, the Debriefing Facilitator will oversee and provide assistance with a debriefing conversation with the youth and staff involved. The debriefing conversation will be documented using the Debriefing Conversation Guide (Attachment B). D. In circumstances in which the debriefing conversation can not be held by the end of the shift, the debriefing conversation will occur as soon as possible following the incident but always within 72 hours. The Director or Administrative Duty Officer must approve any delay and the rationale for the delay must be indicated on the Debriefing Conversation Guide.
  • 10. Chapter Subject Policy # Page SAFETY, SECURITY, AND CONTROL SAFE CRISIS MANAGEMENT 8.30 10 of 11 E. If a physical intervention code is added during the administrative review of the SIR, the Director will assign a Debriefing Facilitator to oversee and assist with the debriefing conversation. F. The debriefing conversation should occur in a quiet location. The involved individuals should be in control of their emotions and the debriefing conversation must be conducted calmly. G. The debriefing conversation should result in an agreement between the involved staff and youth. If an agreement can not be reached, the debriefing conversation will be attempted again within the 72 hour period. Both debriefing conversations will be documented on the same Debriefing Guide. H. Youth must complete the Youth Witness Statement prior to the debriefing conversation. (Refusals to complete a Youth Witness Statement will not delay the debriefing conversation.) I. Staff must complete the Staff Witness Statement or SIR prior to the debriefing conversation. J. A debriefing conversation does not change the youth’s rights to file a grievance. K. Debriefing Conversation: 1. The Debriefing Facilitator will provide oversight of and assistance with the debriefing conversation with the involved staff and youth by the end of the shift. 2. The involved staff will facilitate the debriefing conversation. When more than one staff member is involved, the Debriefing Facilitator and all involved staff will decide prior to the debriefing conversation which of the staff will facilitate the conversation. 3. If the Debriefing Facilitator was involved in the incident, other than as a neutral observer, then he/she will not conduct the debriefing conversation for that incident. Another Debriefing Facilitator will conduct the debriefing conversation within the required timeframe. 4. Staff and youth will have the opportunity to share their observations of the incident in a respectful manner. 5. Allegations of child abuse, sexual abuse/exploitation, and neglect will be reported in accordance with DJJ 8.5, Special Incident and Child Abuse Reporting in Secure Facilities. L. Youth Group Debriefing: 1. When a group of youth has been negatively impacted by a physical intervention technique with one or more youth, the staff member who used the physical intervention technique will facilitate the debriefing conversation by the end of the shift.
  • 11. Chapter Subject Policy # Page SAFETY, SECURITY, AND CONTROL SAFE CRISIS MANAGEMENT 8.30 11 of 11 2. When more than one staff member is involved, the Debriefing Facilitator and all involved staff will decide prior to the debriefing conversation which of the staff will facilitate the conversation. 3. During the meeting, a discussion should occur regarding any unresolved issues. The youth involved in the physical intervention technique should be given the opportunity to address the group, as appropriate. 4. Allegations of child abuse, sexual abuse/exploitation, and neglect will be reported in accordance with DJJ 8.5, Special Incident and Child Abuse Reporting in Secure Facilities. M. Records Retention: 1. The debriefing conversation will be documented using the Debriefing Conversation Guide. 2. The Debriefing Facilitator will provide the youth and staff a copy of the completed Debriefing Conversation Guide. 3. The Debriefing Facilitator will attach a copy of the Debriefing Conversation Guide to the youth’s Positive Behavior Strategies. 4. The Debriefing Facilitator will forward the original Debriefing Conversation Guide to the facility Director to be attached to the SIR. XIII. LOCAL OPERATING PROCEDURES REQUIRED: NO