Media, PR and Crisis Management

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Media, PR and Crisis Management

  1. 1. Media, PR and Crisis Management February, 2010
  2. 2. Introduction
  3. 3. Exercise: Introductions Speed dating! Individual Meet at least five new people • Name and role • What would you 5 Minutes rescue from your office in a crisis? © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  4. 4. Today is about … Understand the Develop an basic ground rules understanding of about how media crisis operates communication Give you basic Give you capability tools & techniques to manage an to manage crisis escalating incident communication with the media Give you an To help you build understanding of effective capability the threat from into your role and “new” media within your team © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  5. 5. Agenda for the day 1 hour Introduction and principles 1¼ hours Traditional and new media ½ hour Managing crisis communications Lunch 2¼ hours Crisis simulation exercise ¼ hour Wrap up © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  6. 6. Practicalities House- Safety keeping notices No mobiles Start or laptops on time Engage and challenge © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  7. 7. Crisis Management Communication Principles
  8. 8. What we mean by a crisis Serious untoward incident No harm incident An incident occurred, but with no (SUI) An adverse or near-miss event, act or harm caused to the patient or omission which has produced (or has member of staff the potential to produce) serious injury or death, poses a serious risk to the objectives of the Trust and which has produced (or has the Adverse incident potential to produce) significant An incident that has caused loss or legal/media or other interest harm Crisis A crisis is an incident that escalates out of your control. The speed and scope of an incident does not necessarily define a crisis – it is loss of control that is the key differentiator © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  9. 9. Different levels of incident NO HARM INCIDENT An incident occurred, but with no harm caused to the patient • Complaint by a NGO or pressure or member of staff group reference the cleanliness or efficiency of an NHS unit © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  10. 10. Different levels of incident ADVERSE INCIDENT An incident that has caused loss or harm • Credible media report of an ambulance being involved in serious road traffic incident © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  11. 11. Different levels of incident SERIOUS UNTOWARD INCIDENT (SUI) An adverse or near-miss event, act or omission which has produced (or has the potential to produce) serious injury or death, poses a serious risk to the • Malpractice around the protection objectives of the Trust and which of patient data being downloaded has produced (or has the and sold to commercial concerns potential to produce) significant that would benefit from the legal/media or other interest content © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  12. 12. Different levels of incident CRISIS A crisis is an incident that escalates out of your control. The speed and scope of an incident does not necessarily define a crisis – it is • The reporting of institutionalised misinterpretation of patient data, loss of control that is the that has resulted in misdiagnosis of a critical illness to a wide key differentiator number of patients © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  13. 13. Tool: Definitions risis e mean by a c Tool: What w rm incident No ha or member of staff to the patient no harm caused is… is… curred, but with What the tool An incident oc en t Gives definiti ons of Adverse incid loss or harm different type s of at has caused the An incident th incident that can incident (SUI) us untoward Incident’ is defined as an adversesor ne shared ar- occur, to give Serio e unders tanding of Untoward od uced (or ha th • A ‘Serious which has pr ychological in jury or what each te rm near- t or omission ry, serious ps An adverse or miss event, ac e) serious inju Trust and which potential to pr oduc of the mea ns s event, act or the objectives mis serious risk to uce) significan t ch has omission whi s the death, pose a tential to prod (or has the po has produced her interest. ion on wrong … pr oduced (or ha ot nts, e.g. operat When to use it it… oduce) legal/media or involving patie potential to pr – Serious in cidents nal death t to a or ug error, mater r of staff, As an inpu serious injury limb, serious dr lving a membe is or incident ry or unexpe cted death invo om the organisation cris death, poses a – Serious in ju r person to wh management the ctor or anothe when serious risk to visitor, contra re; salmonella, pr otocol, and ives of the owes a duty of ca fection such as to object ch has th risk, e.g. outbreak of in deciding how Trust and whi s the – Major heal ts; about incident diation inciden e of concerns handle any produc ed (or ha legionella or ra health professional becaus ise oduce) n of a that might ar potential to pr – Suspensio al activity; or actice or crimin cant legal/ professional pr y. signifi ch of securit vernance r – Major brea relating to information or go How to use it… it… media or othe Major breach st – all those likel y intere Ensure to be involved in Crisis and scope of an dents l. The speed handling inci calates ou t of your contro at is the key are clear how each is cident that es ss of control th A crisis is an in crisis – it is lo defined , and what th e not necess arily define a implications are in incident does differentiator ns to be terms of actio taken © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  14. 14. Exercise: Incident to crisis Call out What might take an incident out of 2 Minutes control? © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  15. 15. What takes an incident out of control? External dimensions • Patients • Politicians • Insurance companies • Media • Regulators • General public • Non government • Social media organisations • Etc.......... Internal dimensions • Employee revelations • Poor alignment • Trade union issues • Another NHS entity © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  16. 16. Key incident management communication principles • Clear protocol • Simple robust approach • Dual path strategy for alignment • Clear accountabilities • Investment into building capability • Anchored in values © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  17. 17. Protocols exist within the NHS © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  18. 18. Incident management model Crisis Management Out of your control Issues can escalate into a crisis at any time – Becoming bigger in scale and long standing and consequences - SUI usually ‘slow burn’ t en ag e Incident an Issu em Based on escalation Management principle – every crisis M has to start as an Threat Categories incident – some just • People • Services accelerate more quickly • Facilities than others Risk Management Protecting the Business from Disruption in day to day activities and programs e.g. Risk Strategy, Quality, HACCP, H&S © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  19. 19. Dual path model Communication strategy The dual path communication model Communication External Audiences Internal Audiences Issue Resolution Action Align what we do (Action) with what we say (Communication) through our communication strategy and tools © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  20. 20. Escalation model Written Commun- Complete Identify an report and icate with thorough investigation action plan Report Incident is patient, investigation lead and available issued to recognised patient’s within 4-8 team within within 12 relevant family, staff, weeks of one working weeks of parties external incident day serious agencies being incident and media identified occuring © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  21. 21. Tool: Escalation model l Tool: Escalation mode Extract is… What the tool is… rent , Sets out the diffe t, Complete Written report & Report to PS&E Clinical Risk stag es of an inciden Identify an Communication thorough investigation action plan Quality with patient, ilable and what needs to Immediately Investigation patient’s family within 4-8 weeks ava within 12 weeks Operational Lead and team Committee staff, external of incident being happen at each serious within working of SUI date untoward day or at the agencies & identified, MDT stage, with incident (SUI) is media learning event latest the next recognised working day timescales Finalise report , • RCA • IR1 and lessons learned The Decision completed, • Incident StEISS to log making Team chronology to it… Checklist be completed Identify When to use it… followed confirm SUI (latest next be verified dissemination of of Investigation working day) and all Build a version • Inform Quality Team in place evidence report any crisis or and Standards • Communicati Agree monitoring this into inc Lead, HR, collated within ng and department ons Manager of action plan incident planni • Out of hours non-exec, to agree 8 weeks and the steps if an Union rep, • Draft report follow 221 bleep press release recommendation patient/ using template incident occurs holder governor where and • MDT learning s via Q&S • Out of hours messages to Review monthly appropriate ev ent when report on Q& S staff and meeting • Go through appropriate to it… Hotline phone external Share report- How to use it… next day SUI incident agencies identify Trust, Coroner ry checklist solutions You’ll need to va • Being Open NHSLA etc as fit • Chronology the exact steps to must policy appropriate your ow n situation, be available to be e this deployed but you can us at first • Formal letter as a te mplate from meeting to patient/ build • DT as which you can appropriate family your own escalation model © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  22. 22. Key learning points There are different levels of incident with agreed accountabilities to trigger Ensure you know what protocol exists and linked to a clear escalation model Act within agreed timeframes, aligning internal and external communication © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  23. 23. Crisis Communication Dynamics
  24. 24. Crisis management and the role of communications Maintaining alignment between the executive decisions and the communication surrounding the incident or crisis Managing the release of all authorised policies, strategies and statements Ensuring all content is factually correct Track and monitor the impact of communications Prepare all aspects of the communication hierarchy – see figure 1 © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  25. 25. Crisis management and the role of communications Maintaining alignment between the executive decisions and the communication surrounding the incident or crisis Managing the release of all authorised policies, strategies and statements Ensuring all content is factually correct Track and monitor the impact of communications Prepare all aspects of the communication hierarchy – see figure 1 © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  26. 26. Misalignment Words too far ahead of actions Communication Issue Resolution Action © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  27. 27. Dual path model Communication Issue Resolution Action Action too far ahead of words © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  28. 28. Dual path model Words and actions/decisions are aligned Communication Issue Resolution Action © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  29. 29. Crisis management and the role of communications Maintaining alignment between the executive decisions and the communication surrounding the incident or crisis Managing the release of all authorised policies, strategies and statements Ensuring all content is factually correct Track and monitor the impact of communications Prepare all aspects of the communication hierarchy – see figure 1 © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  30. 30. Protocols © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  31. 31. Crisis management and the role of communications Maintaining alignment between the executive decisions and the communication surrounding the incident or crisis Managing the release of all authorised policies, strategies and statements Ensuring all content is factually correct Track and monitor the impact of communications Prepare all aspects of the communication hierarchy – see figure 1 © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  32. 32. Crisis management and the role of communications Maintaining alignment between the executive decisions and the communication surrounding the incident or crisis Managing the release of all authorised policies, strategies and statements Ensuring all content is factually correct Track and monitor the impact of communications Prepare all aspects of the communication hierarchy – see figure 1 © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  33. 33. Crisis management and the role of communications Maintaining alignment between the executive decisions and the communication surrounding the incident or crisis Managing the release of all authorised policies, strategies and statements Ensuring all content is factually correct Track and monitor the impact of communications Prepare all aspects of the communication hierarchy – see figure 1 © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  34. 34. Hierarchy of the communications task force role Give interview Issue statement Carry out rehearsal Identify questions and answers Agree talk points Create communication strategy Figure 1 Find the facts © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  35. 35. Crisis management and the role of communications Maintaining alignment between the executive decisions and the communication surrounding the incident or crisis Build Managing the release of all authorised policies, strategies and statements capability and Ensuring all content is factually correct sustainability Track and monitor the impact of communications Prepare all aspects of the communication hierarchy – see figure 1 © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  36. 36. Tool: Top ten tips d cident an ips for in ions Tool: T m municat crisis co it y tainabil uildin g & Sus Crisis cident & is the Cap abilit y B in the In ith approac h tegral w tion is in -The Dual path munica l 1. Com ement protoco e Manag d by Th nt release key to alignme be formally ns must r unicatio e Leade tion 2. A ll comm tion Task Forc munica munica ur Com Com pa ct of yo k the im and trac should be 3. Monitor n team Strate gy mm unicatio red , the co igge possible e Protocol is tr factors – 4. W here when th uccess reinfo rced are critical s control nd and 5. Comma tra ct before sted and con ldom wa decide n ing is se on plan e spent xity fails gy 6. Tim comple d strate imple – e agree 7. Ke ep it s l within th ear u contro nce a y what yo imum o – includ e 8. Control ears e – min lanning ctice and reh cc ession p 9. Pra y and su tainabilit n in sus on 10. Pla ducti in staff in © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  37. 37. Exercise: What are the Open Forum challenges that you face in putting crisis communication 10 Minutes “theory” into practice? © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  38. 38. The challenges • Counter to matrix culture • Needs early decision or trigger • Requires discipline at every level • Organisation buy-in • Invest in training and sustainability © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  39. 39. Duty of care Trusts have a duty of Trusts have a duty to care to take all report incidents to reasonable steps to the appropriate ensure the safety of Strategic Health its staff, patients and Authority in a timely the general public on matter Trust property NOTE: This should include services commissioned by a Trust © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  40. 40. The voice of reason? • All law is tested sooner or later against reasonableness – creating precedents • Public opinion and patients/consumers have expectations that are sometimes unreasonable • Incident and crisis communication is about resetting this expectation and winning the reasonable argument • Time will always be against you – not fair but true!! © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  41. 41. Key learning points Communication has clear roles to play in a crisis – these need to be set up and established before a crisis ever takes place This doesn’t come easy – there are challenges to be overcome and real commitment is vital before a crisis Trusts have a clear duty of care, and this needs to be clearly reflected in the way any crisis is handled based on NHS VALUES © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  42. 42. How traditional media works
  43. 43. Exercise: Interviewing 3 minutes to Teams of 4 interview your colleagues about a headline from today’s paper 30 seconds to 10 Minutes present a “piece to camera” © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  44. 44. How people traditionally assimilate news Basic Passive Active Opinion External awareness assimilation gathering forming challenge Surface Multi-media Seeking more Establishing Evaluation of acknowledge- exposure, information, personal your perception ment of a story resulting in detail and perception and in the light of wider understanding opinion other opinion understanding Five step process (Jennie Beck TNS Media) © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  45. 45. Features of traditional media PRESS • Most opinionated • Editorially driven • Set a ‘news agenda’ • Analysis, comment, position • Detail of yesterday’s story • Spin on the story © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  46. 46. Features of traditional media TV • Breaks the news • Edits the images • Hosts opinion • Facilitates discussion, debate & commentary • Specialist brands – BBC News24, Sky News, CNN © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  47. 47. Features of traditional media RADIO • Breaks the news • Edits the content • Host has opinion • Facilitates discussion, debate, commentary • Specialist brands – BBC Radio Four, Local FM, Regional FM, Radio Five Live © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  48. 48. Features of traditional media INTERNET NEWS - spin-off from traditional media • Dominant news media 24/7 • Continually develops stories • Links to in-depth stories • Archive of history • Anywhere, anytime, anybody © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  49. 49. Traditional media cycle © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  50. 50. Traditional media cycle IDENTIFY POTENTIAL STORY Direct Contact: • Source • Letter to Editor • Competitor • Researched Article © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  51. 51. Traditional media cycle VERIFICATION & RESEARCH • Phone or meeting contact/source • Research experts • Photo opportunity • Write article • Traditional research library © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  52. 52. Traditional media cycle PRESENTATION OF THE STORY • Copy checked by news desk • Legal scrutiny • Editorial sign off © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  53. 53. Traditional media cycle SHARING THE STORY • Newspaper sold on streets • 12 hour life cycle • Media may reinforce story • Readers discuss © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  54. 54. Traditional media cycle FOLLOW ON • In depth reporting • Readers letters • Editorial © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  55. 55. Communication components For use with traditional media Give interview Issue statement Carry out rehearsal Identify questions and answers Agree talk points Create communication strategy Find the facts Figure 1 © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  56. 56. Traditional media statements Holding Core Update Closure Statement Statement Statements Statement Acknowledge the State the facts Keep people Definitive version situation informed of the incident Outline your To gain time intentions Tell the facts as Emphasizes they unfold positive elements Demonstrate Basis for future commitment communications Thanks people © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  57. 57. Top tips in toolkit Tool: Tips for dealing with traditional media Tool: Incident m anagement 1. Build relationships before a crisis with traditional 2. Don’t play favourites with the media media 3. Be proactive 4. Make their job easy – develop good pre- 1. Based actions prepared photos, fact sheets, briefing on the Dual Pa alignment th Strategy - packs 2. Always tell the 5. Understand their agenda and editorial truth and stick 3. Reinforced thro to the facts position ugh the NHS va 4. Show concern lues 6. Never treat them as ‘the enemy’ be human – pu 5. or cooper t safety first 7. The facts will always come out – sooner Be ative and deliv promises – do er on your later so you control them not make false commitments 8. Don’t trickle the story out to the media - 6. prolongs the attention the crisis receives Take accountability incident for resolving th 9. Anticipate the worst-case scenario e 7. Focus on what 10. Accept the counsel of professionals you’re doing ab solution out the 8. Present the cr isis in a larger 9. IF WRONG, AP context OLOGISE (und public dimensio erstand n vs. legal dim 10. Think – Sp ension) eed, Accuracy Consistency , Credibility an d © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  58. 58. Exercise: Holding statement Tables Develop a Holding Statement for an allegation of malpractice – see 10 Minutes worksheet © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  59. 59. Example of holding statement The Conway Trust have been recently made aware of allegations surrounding Professor John Amhurst, the head of Neurology at the Carrick Children’s Holding Hospital. As a matter of urgency, the Trust has initiated an investigation, that is due to report its initial findings on Tuesday 12 March 2010. Subject to these Statement findings we will be in a better position to comment more fully. Acknowledge the Professor Amhurst has cooperated fully with the Trust and is keen to ensure situation all parties concerned, including himself, are kept fully informed. He has offered, and is taking annual leave until the Trust meets to consider the issue on 13 To gain time March 2010. We feel at this stage, it would be premature to pre judge the outcome of this Demonstrate investigation. However we do appreciate the urgency and concerns raised commitment around this matter and will ensure that we do not delay, in publishing its findings. In the meantime, an apology to the parents of Chelsea James has been offered by the Trust’s CEO, David Mason, in a personal phone call, supported by a formal letter. We will of course ensure, if there are any future significant developments, we keep all interested parties informed. In the meantime if you have any questions please contact Susan Rees, Head of PR the Conway Trust @ srees@conwaytrust.gov or tel:0123456789 © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  60. 60. Key learning points Different media channels deal with news in different ways – we need to understand their agendas The news cycle dictates what’s needed at what point in a story – this is reflected in the different types of statement that you can issue © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  61. 61. How new media works
  62. 62. How people are changing to assimilate news Basic Passive Active Opinion External awareness assimilation gathering forming Alliances Often starts with Multi-media Search engines Establishing Virtual groups traditional media exposure, and social dialogue on line align and create channels resulting in media and with additional wider Special Interest challenges understanding Groups © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  63. 63. Comparing media strengths and weaknesses TV Press Radio Internet i Mobile Basic Awareness Passive Assimilation Active Gathering Opinion Forming External Challenge © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  64. 64. Features of new media Internet • Rapid • Uncontrolled • Uncensored • Generates urban myths • Interactive • 24x7 • Creating a culture of sharing • Open format BBC iPlayer topped 100m • Based on dialogue programme downloads in December © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  65. 65. New media coverage © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  66. 66. New media coverage © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  67. 67. Traditional media cycle Remember Remember this cycle ? this cycle? © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  68. 68. Traditional versus new media IDENTIFY POTENTIAL STORY TRADITIONAL NEW MEDIA Direct Contact: • Newspaper’s web forum • Source • RSS feed news – to email • Letter to Editor • Twitter • Competitor • Blog search • Research Article • Email • Facebook • YouTube • Podcast • Live stream video • On line forum © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  69. 69. Traditional versus new media VERIFICATION & RESEARCH TRADITIONAL NEW MEDIA • Phone or meeting • Multiple sources via social contact/source networks • Research experts • Blog searches • Photo opportunity • Global expert consultation • Write article • Own blog for suggestion/input • Traditional research library • Links to Facebook/MSN • Specialist message boards • Social bookmarking tools • Telephone interviews for podcast • Digital video reports • Use of photo – sharing websites © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  70. 70. Traditional versus new media PRESENTATION OF THE STORY TRADITIONAL NEW MEDIA • Copy checked by news desk • Copy checked • Legal scrutiny • Email, phone, blog • Editorial sign off • Keywords tagged • GEO tagging • Video report • Image slideshows • Download • Podcast • Updates posted on social networks • Upload to youtube channel • Images on newspapers • Flicker group • Reporter hosts readers Q & A • Update bulletins • Googlemap locator • Internal/External links to associate items © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  71. 71. Traditional versus new media SHARING THE STORY TRADITIONAL NEW MEDIA • Newspaper sold on streets • On line news hourly update • 12 hour life cycle • Streamed on Media • Media may reinforce story • RSS subscribers direct links • Readers discuss • Links to all channels • Twitter feed • Facebook embedded • Blogs • Invitations to email to readers own networks © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  72. 72. Traditional versus new media FOLLOW ON TRADITIONAL NEW MEDIA • In depth reporting • Blog traffic • Readers letters • Tweets • Editorial • Social network engagement • Alerts • Message boards © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  73. 73. New media channels •What is in your protocol? •What is the policy for comments on your Trust through new media channels? •Can you monitor the impact of new media in a crisis? © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  74. 74. Exercise: Twitter Tables See your laptops for the challenge 10 Minutes © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  75. 75. The challenges • How to harness new media? • Can you influence the users? • Do you have the specialist resources? • Do you have the human capability? • When will new media be traditional? • How do you monitor the impact? • How do you keep alignment – traditional and new media? • What is the role with your staff? – SMS, blog, YouTube? © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  76. 76. Key learning points New media has changed the ground rules – now the expectation is dialogue Different issues at every step in the news cycle Need to ensure your policy & protocols keep up to date © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  77. 77. Managing crisis communication
  78. 78. Extracts from Trust incident management protocols • Most have ‘one liners’ on media management or external communications ct tra Ex 6.8.5 Where an incident occurs which could result in a significant impact on the Trust of a legal, media or other interest, it is important to ensure that the situation is managed appropriately to safeguard patients, staff and the organisation. This means that any person affected by the incident, i.e. staff, patient, relative, member of the public, should where possible be notified prior to the media. 6.8.6 The Chief Executive must be informed of all incidents that may involve or attract the attention of the media. © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  79. 79. Extracts from Trust incident management protocols Ext ra ct CONSEQUENCE A B C Actual or potential impact on No. of people affected or potentially OF THE INCIDENT patient, staff or visitor(s) affected at one time Actual or potential impact on the Trust National adverse publicity Severe loss of confidence in the organisation CATASTROPHIC Death Over 50 Litigation expected >£1M Extended service closure National adverse publicity Major loss of confidence in the Trust MAJOR Major permanent harm 16-50 Temporary service closure (> 1 week) Litigation £50K - £500K Local adverse publicity Semi-permanent harm (up to 1 year) including: Moderate loss of confidence in the Trust MODERATE Known or suspected health care-associated 3-15 Temporary service closure (up to 1 week) infection which may result in semi-permanent harm Increased length of stay 8-15 days Increased level of care 8 – 15 days Non-permanent harm (up to one month) Litigation <£50K including known or suspected health care MINOR associated infection which may result in non 1-2 Increased length of stay 1-7 days Increased level of care 1-7 days permanent harm Minimal impact INSIGNIFICANT No obvious harm 1-2 No service disruption • Some have more guidance © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  80. 80. Extracts from Trust incident management protocols Ext ra ct ADDITIONAL ACTIONS FOR RED/SUI INCIDENT INVESTIGATION TEAM ONLY 27 Have you made sure the patient/family/carers have been informed as per Being Open Policy? 28 Has the Incident Decision Tree been completed if appropriate by divisional HR lead? 29 Have all relevant chiefs of divisions, clinical directors, senior managers DPSSMs been informed? Does the incident need reporting to HSE? 30 Does the incident meet the definition of Memorandum of Understanding requirements? 31 Have NHS Rotherham been informed and incident reported on STeISS (Quality and Standards department will do this) 32 Do any other external agencies need to be informed? 33 Have all staff been identified for statements and/or interviews? 34 Has the communications manager been informed? 35 Has a communication briefing been developed to share with trust and/or media? 36 Have all staff been given the appropriate support and advice e.g. Occupational Health referrals 37 Has the Investigation team been identified and roles and responsibilities clarified? ALL OTHER ACTIVITY WILL BE DOCUMENTED IN THE LEARNING LESSONS LOG A different approach using checklists © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  81. 81. Escalation model Flow chart Approach for a SUI Written Commun- Complete Identify an report and icate with thorough investigation action plan Report Serious patient, investigation lead and available issued to incident is patient’s within 4-8 team within within 12 relevant recognised family, staff, weeks of one working weeks of parties external incident day serious agencies being incident and media identified occuring © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  82. 82. Extracts from Trust incident management protocols ct Using action lists with prompts: tra Ex Completed Work area Actions Lead Timescale Notes (tick) Family of X has requested a Supervised report written apology (see Family reading with family of X Basic Correspondence) Awareness Supervised report reading with family of Y Letter of apology and hard copy investigation report to be Passive delivered to family of X Assimilation Letter of apology and hard copies of report to be given to family of Y Offer of media support to family of X Prepare statement with family of X Active Gathering Provide family of Y with copies Statement will be provided in of statement to issue to media packs to be provided at reporters calling in person the press conference Arrangements in Family of X to refer any place for telephone telephone media enquiries enquiries to family of X Opinion Inform Local Authority • Communications Lead Forming • Director of Social Services External Arrange meeting between report authors and Trust & Challenge Provider Trust Chief Execs To summarise the findings External Draft and send letter in advance and include a newspaper report Challenge of report publication as a reminder of the case © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  83. 83. Trust incident management protocols Ensure your Trust It must : – Illustrate how Communication links to the Incident Incident Management Organization - the dual Management path approach – Illustrate how communication supports the Protocol has an incident management escalation system – green effective Annexure – amber - red = Clear guidance between Trust actions/decisions and the communication to cover media and consequences external – State the mandatory ‘Triggers’ for the communications Communication Team – State ‘release procedures’ with single and it links to the accountability main body of the – Deliver 24 x 7 coverage protocol – Include built in sustainability – training and rehearsal through simulation annually © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  84. 84. Protocols © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  85. 85. Protocol typical content PRE-AMBLE • Associated policies, strategies, documents • Document Control • Distribution • Update procedure • Review frequency © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  86. 86. Protocol typical content CONTENT • Purpose • Accountabilities • Objectives • Structures with report lines • Values and behaviours • Definitions • Review & update procedure • Incident & crisis model © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  87. 87. Protocol typical content PROCEDURES DURING AN INCIDENT • Reporting and escalating incidents • Managing incidents • Authority levels • Corporate Governance • Legal & regulatory dimension • Incidents involving third party authorities • Management Communication • Media Management • Stakeholder interaction © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  88. 88. Protocol typical content ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS • Informing patients and relatives • Investigating incidents • Storage & retention of incident management documents • External reporting within NHS • Disciplinary action • Equality impact assessment • Learning & development of incident management • Monitoring compliance • Standards • Performance Management • References with other associated protocols © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  89. 89. Managing crisis communications principles You can do everything right and still be badly damaged You can’t stop people talking…but you can influence what they say Assume everything will get into the public domain It’s never too early to centralize communication in an incident or crisis What you say internally has to be aligned to your external messages Crisis communication is a full time job in an SUI or crisis © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  90. 90. Scenario planning before a crisis Develop a clear strategy framework and pre-prepared position statements for any scenario Develop your links with any relevant communication team members in DH & SHA Identify your key audiences in advance Decide the most effective communication channel for each audience Use a communication matrix to keep track of the communication plan Know your critical time plan for each audience © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  91. 91. Key considerations when planning Your Goal There are four key The goal of crisis elements to crisis communication is to move communications: ‘bad news’ through the • Speed media and public attention • Accuracy expeditiously, with • Credibility credibility and openness • Consistency and within your NHS values © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  92. 92. Media communication strategy A sound media crisis communication strategy should incorporate the following: Provide all assistance possible to the media. They will cover the story Inform the public frequently and regardless of the extent to which you accurately in lay language through cooperate, and will get information from the media from the outset. If not done, outside sources (disgruntled employees, the information vacuum will be filled by competitors, outsiders) if they cannot get rumours far worse than the real situation it from you Provide information from the Always be candid and timely in viewpoint of the public interest, rather responding to the media than from the Trust’s interest Keep the media fully informed. Don’t Assume a ‘worst-case’ position for wait for them to call planning purposes © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  93. 93. Key learning points Different protocols take different approaches. No “right answer”, but understand your own protocol and maintain it by regular review All crisis communication benefits from adherence to some basic principles – check that you are following these © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  94. 94. Crisis communication simulation
  95. 95. Exercise: Communication strategy simulation Tables 3 part Simulation 1. Door-stepping 2. Strategy & Plan 2 hours 3. Review © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  96. 96. Crisis communication simulation This Simulation is designed to develop: • The fact find Give interview • Understanding of the Dual path Approach • Developing a Communication Strategy Issue • Defining the Talk Points statement • Developing Holding & Core Statements Carry out • Developing the Q&A rehearsal • Releasing Statements Identify questions • Rehearsing for a media statement and answers It will be in three parts Part 1 – Door-stepping Agree talk points Part 2 – Developing a measured response Part 3 – Review & Discuss Create communication strategy Find the facts © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  97. 97. Crisis communication action plan
  98. 98. Exercise: Action planning What I’m Individual going to do differently when I get 5 Minutes back to my desk © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  99. 99. Other courses for communicators and leaders Introduction Marketing & High See To Effective Communication Performance Strategic Communication For Behaviour Change Marketing and Communication website Strategic for details Introduction Media, PR Management of To Media and Crisis Reputation and and PR Management Relationships Internal Effective Introduction Communication Workforce To Internal and Managing Engagement and Communication Change Why it Matters © Oxford Strategic Marketing
  100. 100. Course evaluation Cause evaluation Please give us some objective feedback! © Oxford Strategic Marketing
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