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  • 1. Safe, Secure Schools Committee Membership: Chris Bitner Bill Heisel Kathleen Mackaman Julie McArdle Cathy Powell Ellen Smith Perry Soldwedel Becky Walker
  • 2. Safe Inviting Respectful GOAL FIVE: We will provide a safe, respectful inviting learning environment. Behavior/ Attitude Expectations/Consequences Partnerships Climate Access Security Crisis Preparedness Alternatives
    • Maintenance
    • Custodial Services
    • Life/Safety
    • Long Range Plans
    • Upgrades
    • Efficient Use
    • Space Needs
    • Health Needs
  • 3. Safe, Secure Schools
    • FOUR MAJOR AREAS OF STUDY:
    • SECURITY
    • VIOLENCE PREVENTION/ INTERVENTION
    • CRISIS/ SAFETY MANAGEMENT
    • CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT AND TRAINING
  • 4. Process for Issues
    • Current Situation
    • Data Sources
    • Collection Activities
    • Assessment of current situation
      • What is working . . .
        • What is not working . . .
    • Display of data
    • Recommendations
    • Hypothesis, further study . . .
  • 5. Security
  • 6. What is the current security situation?
    • Buildings have a sound security system.
    • The system has provided few incidences of theft as compared to data prior to the system.
    • There is no surveillance equipment.
    • There are no keys to lock classrooms.
    • There is a check out system for keys to get into buildings after hours.
    • There is a lockdown procedure in place for all buildings.
    • Visitors report to the office.
    • There are no student or staff identification cards.
    • There are procedures and policies related to security issues.
    • Junior High Schools share a police liaison officer; the officer is on-call to other buildings in emergency.
  • 7. What are the security data sources?
    • Sonitrol sound security records.
    • Board policies
    • School procedures
    • Illinois School Safety Resource Center on-line school and district surveys
    • Safe at School: A Resource Manual for Self-Assessment, Planning and Training to Improve School Safety
    • PSA architect plans for security in Wilson and Washington
  • 8. How was the security data collected?
    • Principals completed the on-line survey; principals were interviewed.
    • Committee complied school data from the survey and interviews
    • Committee reviewed the Safe at School: A Resource Manual for Self-Assessment, Planning and Training to Improve School Safety
    • Committee reviewed policies and procedures related to security issues
  • 9. What is working?
    • Sound security system is effective.
    • Police liaison officer is effective.
    • Lockdown procedure is effective in some buildings.
    • Some security policies and procedures are effective.
  • 10. What is not working?
    • Identification cards for visitors, staff and students would be beneficial.
    • Surveillance equipment in entry ways and on some buses would be beneficial.
    • A liaison officer for each junior high would be optimal.
    • Some policies and procedures need to be updated.
    • Keys to lock classroom doors would be beneficial.
    • Security procedures need to be well communicated to students, staff and parents.
  • 11. Site Security Audits
  • 12. Security Personnel
  • 13. Access Control
  • 14. Security Presence
  • 15. Safe School Committee
  • 16. Recommendations:
    • Use Identification cards for visitors, staff and students.
    • Purchase surveillance equipment for entry ways and on some buses.
    • Hire a police liaison officer for each junior high.
    • Update board policies and procedures for security.
    • Obtain keys to lock classroom doors.
    • Communicate security procedures to students, staff, parents and emergency personnel.
    • Improve building signage.
    • Conduct systematic security audits.
  • 17. Hypotheses:
    • Study identification cards for which levels- primary, intermediate,
    • junior high?
    • Study purchase of surveillance equipment.
    • Develop Communication strategies to enhance security
    • Update On-line survey from each school safety team.
    FURTHER STUDY
  • 18. Violence Prevention and Intervention
  • 19. What is the current violence prevention and intervention situation?
    • There are some truancy problems; lack of collaboration with community agencies is evident.
    • Bullying issues exist at all levels; sexual harassment issues exist at junior high.
    • Drug and alcohol problems exist at junior high levels.
    • Data shows some violence issues and police intervention in 7-8.
    • Project Success offers good after school activities at the intermediate level; junior high level needs some attention.
    • Counselors provide excellent support for at-risk students.
    • Mentoring programs are successful at the junior high level.
    • BD programs at 4-6 and 7-8 are effective.
    • There are many other students who display behavior and attitude problems about school and school work.
    • There are few alternatives available for those students.
    • The STAT process is effective in some buildings.
  • 20. What are the prevention and intervention data sources?
    • Student disciplinary records.
    • Suspension data
    • Attendance data
  • 21. How was the prevention and intervention data collected?
    • Principals completed the 0n-line survey.
    • Committee complied school data from the survey.
    • Counselors, Learning Consultants, Admin. Interns and Principals were interviewed.
    • Committee reviewed the Safe at School: A Resource Manual for Self- on Assessment, Planning and Training to Improve School Safety
    • Committee reviewed policies and procedures related to violence prevention/ intervention issues
  • 22. What is working?
    • The DARE and VEGA curricula is being taught at the intermediate levels.
    • Project Success offers good after school activities at the intermediate level; junior high level needs some attention.
    • Counselors provide excellent support for at-risk students.
    • Mentoring programs are successful at the junior high level.
    • BD programs at 4-6 and 7-8 are effective.
    • The STAT process is effective in some buildings.
    • There are few gang problems.
    • There is accurate incident profiling.
    • There are few weapon problems.
    • Regional Alternative School is available for expelled students.
  • 23. What is not working?
    • There are some truancy problems; lack of collaboration with community agencies is evident.
    • Bullying issues exist at all levels; sexual harassment issues exist at junior high.
    • Drug and alcohol problems exist at junior high levels
    • Data shows some violence issues and police intervention in 7-8.
    • There are many other students who display behavior and attitude problems about school and school work.
    • There are few alternatives available for those students.
    • The STAT process needs improvement in some buildings.
    • Incident profiling data needs to be accessible and shared with appropriate personnel.
  • 24. Problem Analysis
  • 25. Incident Profiling
  • 26. Intervention/ Prevention
  • 27. Bullying Assessment
  • 28. Gangs
  • 29. Drugs and Alcohol
  • 30. Weapons
  • 31. Recommendations:
    • Address truancy problems through improved cooperation with Project Stay, Juvenile officers and States Attorney’s office.
    • Address bullying and sexual harassment issues through instruction and training.
    • Seek improved police collaboration/ court services through shared information and processes (SHOWCAP).
    • Provide alternatives for students who display behavior and attitude problems within the classroom and school.
    • Make accessible incident profiling to all necessary personnel.
  • 32. Hypotheses:
    • Study SAP model for alternative
    • intervention for junior high
    • students.
    • Study strategies to improve STAT process in all buildings
    • Explore safe school student councils, crime watch, monitors, patrols, etc.
    FURTHER STUDY
  • 33. Crisis/ Safety Management PRINCIPAL
  • 34. What is the current crisis/ safety management situation?
    • The district crisis preparedness manual is in need of revision. Not all buildings make use of the document.
    • Some buildings have procedures in place to address crisis preparedness issues.
    • There has been some training for crisis management teams under the direction of school counselors.
    • There are board policies in place for crisis preparedness. They need updating.
    • The Discipline Handbooks have been recently revised and are effective.
    • Bomb threats have been rare, but procedures are in place to address the threats effectively.
    • Media coordination is done through central office.
  • 35. What are the crisis/ safety management data sources?
    • Board Policies
    • Crisis Preparedness Manual
    • Discipline Handbooks
    • Building Crisis Emergency Procedures
    • Crisis Preparedness workshop
    • Illinois School Safety Resource Center on-line school and district surveys
    • Safe at School: A Resource Manual for Self-Assessment, Planning and Training to Improve School Safety
  • 36. How was the crisis/ safety management data collected?
    • Principals completed the on-line survey.
    • Counselors and principals were interviewed.
    • Committee complied school data from the survey.
    • Committee reviewed the Safe at School: A Resource Manual for Self-Assessment, Planning and Training to Improve School Safety
    • Committee reviewed policies, procedures, handbooks, related to crisis management issues.
    • Two members of committee attended crisis management training workshop.
  • 37. What is working?
    • Discipline Handbooks
    • Counselor training for crisis management
    • Media coordination of crisis events is effective.
    • Bomb threat procedures are effective.
    • Counselors provide effective post-crisis management.
  • 38. What is not working?
    • Board policies need revision.
    • District Crisis Preparedness Manual needs updating.
    • Building procedures need to be revised to address Crisis Preparedness Manual revisions.
    • Procedures need to be well communicated.
    • Crisis Management Teams need additional training.
  • 39. Crisis Management
  • 40. Post-Crisis Management
  • 41. Media Coordination
  • 42. Bombs/Suspicious Devices
  • 43. Recommendations:
    • Update Board crisis management policies.
    • Revise District Crisis Preparedness Manual.
    • Revise Building procedures for crisis management to address District Crisis Preparedness Manual revisions.
    • Communicate Crisis management procedures to parents, staff, students and community.
    • Require crisis management team in each building and provide training.
    • Maintain good media relations.
  • 44. Hypotheses:
    • Study communication strategies for crisis management.
    • Study training strategies for crisis management teams.
    • Study crisis management policies in other districts.
    FURTHER STUDY
  • 45. Classroom management and Training TRAINING
  • 46. What is the current classroom management and training situation?
    • Primary schools have effective school-wide management programs- “I CARE”; some are more effective than others.
    • Washington has an effective RESPECT management program.
    • Wilson, and both junior high schools have no school-wide management programs.
    • Teachers have classroom management programs, some more effective than others. Some do not relate to the school management program. Most buildings do not have a safe schools committee.
    • The DARE and VEGA curricula is being taught at the intermediate levels.
    • Most behavior problems occur during unstructured times- recess, lunch, before and after . . .
    • There is some training for playground supervisors but it is not as effective as it should be.
    • There is need for classroom management training for some non-tenured and some tenured staff.
    • There is need for classroom management training for support staff.
  • 47. What are the classroom management and training data sources?
    • Board Policies
    • Discipline Handbooks
    • School-wide management programs
    • Classroom management plans
    • Illinois School Safety Resource Center on-line school and district surveys
    • Safe at School: A Resource Manual for Self-Assessment, Planning and Training to Improve School Safety
  • 48. How was the classroom management and training data collected?
    • Principals completed the on-line survey.
    • Committee compiled school data from the survey.
    • Committee interviewed principals, counselors, learning consultants.
    • Committee reviewed the Safe at School: A Resource Manual for Self-Assessment, Planning and Training to Improve School Safety
    • Committee reviewed school-wide management programs.
    • Committee reviewed current training programs.
  • 49. What is working?
    • Primary school-wide management programs.
    • Washington RESPECT program.
    • Teacher classroom management programs that are aligned with school-wide programs.
    • DARE and VEGA instructional programs at intermediate schools.
    • Family Living instructional program at intermediate and junior high schools.
    • District Discipline Handbooks
    • Board policies related to management programs and discipline.
  • 50. What is not working?
    • Schools that do not have school-wide management programs.
    • Classroom management plans not aligned to school-wide programs.
    • Training programs for some beginning and tenured teachers.
    • Training programs for support staff, playground supervisors, bus drivers, etc.
    • Parent involvement and support for school and classroom management plans.
    • Partnership with community agencies available to assist with school and classroom management issues.
  • 51. In-service Training
  • 52. Curriculum/ Instruction
  • 53. School Climate
  • 54. Commitment to Civility
  • 55. Parents as Partners
  • 56. Community Partners
  • 57. Recommendations:
    • Ensure all teachers have classroom management and aggression training.
    • Ensure all support staff and ancillary personnel have similar training.
    • Promote school-wide management plans and ensure staff commitment to civility at all times.
    • Promote classroom management plans aligned with school management plans.
    • Enlist parent support for school and classroom management plans.
    • Improve communication regarding school and classroom management plans to parents and community.
  • 58. Hypotheses:
    • Study school-wide management programs for intermediate and junior highs.
    • Study training programs to improve management skills for teachers, support staff and ancillary personnel.
    • Develop surveys to periodically assess student, parent and staff perceptions related to school and classroom climate.
    FURTHER STUDY