Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
International Crisis Management Simulation: Stabilizing ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

International Crisis Management Simulation: Stabilizing ...

334
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
334
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. International Crisis Management Simulation: Stabilizing Afghanistan    From 13 to 17 July YATA – in cooperation with Queen’s University, the Atlantic Council of  Canada and the Universities of Heidelberg and Mannheim – organized the fourth  international Crisis Management Simulation (CMS) in Kingston. The main theme of the  simulation consisted of the stabilization of Afghanistan.    During the first part of the conference, several high‐level speakers from various fields of  work connected to the current situation in Afghanistan held interesting briefings in order to  update participants on the situation in this war‐torn country. Participants – consisting of  graduate students in related subjects like international relations and political science and  coming from a range of countries from Canada to Latvia – were informed by academics, and  military and political people to provide them with first‐hand knowledge on the current  situation to enable them to participate well‐informed in the simulation. All speakers  emphasized the issue of ‘Afghanization’: the governance of the country and the task of  making it secure, stable and democratic must be delegated to the Afghan people in order to  make Afghanistan a long‐lasting success. Moreover, the fight against narcotics trade must be  strengthened, as revenues from drugs trade provide counter‐insurgency groups with  financial means to continue fighting the coalition forces. The presidential elections of this  August are definitely going to be very important for the future of Afghanistan. NATO’s  upcoming new Strategic Concept must and most probably will contain clauses related to the  conflict in Afghanistan.    After a thorough analysis of the current situation in Afghanistan, the second part of the  conference was dedicated to the simulation. All participants were given a certain role within  a delegation, ranging from representing states to NGOs and international institutions that  are involved in this conflict. After a short time of preparation and writing a paper containing  the minimum and maximum goals of each delegation, participants were to update others on  their stance during a press conference. Thereafter, delegations could work together to  search for common ground on their policy objectives. However, certain shocks during the  simulation took most participants off‐guard and led to a major adjustment of their goals. The  most remarkable shock was the coup d’état committed by the Defence Minister of  Afghanistan. In the end, Afghanistan became a confederation of three provinces under the  authorization of a central government. As the organizers of the simulation pointed out, this  was the first time in their history of organizing simulations that there was no need for them  to initiate any shocks to the system, as participants managed to initiate shocks to the system  themselves.    Except for the briefings and the simulation, participants were also able to visit interesting  sites in Canada, like the Peace Support Training Centre in Kingston, the Canadian War  Museum and the national parliament in Ottawa. To conclude, the CMS was a very interesting  experience, providing participants with a wide range of knowledge about the current  situation in Afghanistan, as well as enabling them to bring this knowledge in practice during  the simulation.    Christa Verhoek, University of Amsterdam, Commissioner of the Dutch YATA