SYLLABUS

                Disaster & Extraordinary Events Management
                                            P AD 6600...
I understand the time demands on the non-traditional student, but missing a full day in a compressed class format makes it...
Class Participation: Obviously you have to be in class in order to participate so; again, attendance is important to the h...
“It is a bad plan that admits of no modification.” - Publilius Syrus (~100 BC)


Class Assignments:


BRIEFING PAPERS: The...
“Let's look at this thing from a standpoint of status. What do we got on the spacecraft that's good? - Gene Kranz, Flight ...
Class Schedule: (Actual schedule may vary depending instructor’s prerogative, time and current circumstances.)

          ...
“Did we make a difference?” - Captain James T. Kirk, USS Enterprise, Star Trek-Generations




Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & ...
APPENDIX - A
                                                        Briefing Paper Projects

This project makes up 25% of...
“We can be sure that the greatest hope for maintaining equilibrium in the face of any situation rests within ourselves.” -...
APPENDIX “C”
                       Team Research Project, Paper and Class Presentation

This project is your final paper ...
the alternatives; logical flow of the paper; the practical reality of the recommendation; and, the oral presentation of th...
APPENDIX “C”
         Critical Elements and Language of Local Government in Colorado

“Critical Elements” of Disaster Mana...
“In an emergency, it’s not so much what you know; but how well you know each other that will determine your success.”
    ...
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Instructor: Aden Hogan, Jr., MPA, CM, CRM

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Transcript of "Instructor: Aden Hogan, Jr., MPA, CM, CRM"

  1. 1. SYLLABUS Disaster & Extraordinary Events Management P AD 6600 – Fall Semester 2006 University of Colorado at Colorado Springs Graduate School of Public Affairs - Western Slope Program Instructor: Aden Hogan, Jr., MPA, CM, CRM 10631 Tucson Way, CommerceCity, CO 80022 303.655.9308 (work) 303.437.0438 (cell/home) Email: aehogan@comcast.net Class Dates: Saturday, 8:00 am-5:00 pm; Sunday, 8:00 am-2:30 pm, September 16th & 17th October 7th & 8th November 4th & 5th Venue/Classroom: Mesa State College, Grand Junction, Colorado as follows: September 16th Wubben #140; September 17 th Houston #215 October 7th Wubben #140; October 8th Houston #215 November 4th & 5th Houston #215 Textbooks: Crisis Management; Fink; ISBN 0-595-09079-6 Introduction to Emergency Management; 2nd Edition; Haddow & Bullock; ISBN:0750679611 (Additional readings, materials and excerpts will be distributed in class as needed) Class Objective: The objective of this course is to study the practical problems and issues when dealing with extraordinary events in the local government arena. Successful responses to extraordinary events require a combination of many disciplines (such as public administration, law enforcement, fire services, emergency medical services, public works and others). How well these disciplines communicate, coordinate and cooperate is the key to a successful event response. We will identify the “critical elements”of each of these disciplines and their techniques as well as examine a variety of actual extraordinary events to see what Topics to be covered will include emergency response planning, emergency response, risk management, disaster response, crisis management, and public administration’srole in the emergency management process. Learning will be accomplished through lecture/presentation, classroom discussion and a limited research project. The briefing papers, in-class activities, and final exam Grading: Final gradeswill be determined using the following criteria. 35% Attendance, class participation in discussion and group activities 25% Briefing Papers and class presentations as assigned 40% Team Research Project, Limited Research Paper, and Class Presentation As this is a graduate level class, a high level of performance is the standard in class presentations and assignments. You can gauge your final performance by your interim grades. A “C” grade means your work is not at a graduate level and you will need to work harder or, you may want to consider dropping the class and taking it again at a later date. A “B” grade indicates satisfactory graduate level work. An “A” grade is reserved for exemplary performance and product. Class Attendance: When an extraordinary event occurs, it’spretty important for you to show up. You have to be there to make a difference. It is also true for this class. Attendance and promptness demonstrates the level of respect you have for the instructor, your classmates, and yourself as a student. Your attendancealso makes up a significant portion of your grade. Syllabus - Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management
  2. 2. I understand the time demands on the non-traditional student, but missing a full day in a compressed class format makes it almost impossible to make up and will affect your grade. Missing a weekend translates into one-third of the class (as much as a full grade reduction). If it becomes absolutely necessary for you to miss a class, you must notify me in advance, or as soon as practically possible, that you will be absent. You can contact me by phone or email. We can discuss what type of make-up "A goal without a plan is just a wish." –Antoine de Staint-Exupery (1900-1944) Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management – Fall 2006 2
  3. 3. Class Participation: Obviously you have to be in class in order to participate so; again, attendance is important to the health of your final grade. I expect active involvement from the entire class in discussions and class activities. In our discussions, we will respect all opinions and allow people to speak them without interruption. Freedom of opinion and expression are foundations of a learning environment, however, I reserve the right to bring discussion to closure to maintain the class focus. Remember, attendance and participation makes up 35% of your final grade. Instructor’s Philosophy: This class deals with the application of various public administration specialties to manage dynamic, extraordinary events, emergencies and disasters. I will utilize current methodologies, public administrators and public safety practitioners to share their experiences and knowledge with you. We will also draw on your experiences and perceptions in the discussions and conduct some in-class exercises to focus on our topic. This is a graduate level program. Thus, I expect that you’vebeen exposed to the underlying theories of public administration and criminal justice that will be the foundation and basis for the applications we will be discussing. Much of our class activity will be drawn from case studies and we will be dealing with application more than theory. However, if you feel we are working I like to employ a variety of methodologies to accomplish learning. I also like to have some fun. Humor is a key component for maintaining sanity during an event response, and is a useful survival tool in this professional arena. Also, our class discussions may, from time to time, draw us away from our scheduled topic. That’sOK. We often find learning opportunities where we least expect them and, during an extraordinary event, you won’tend up working on the item that was on your scheduler for that Class Notes and Handouts: Taking notes can be critical to your successin this class. It is also an excellent way of learning be reinforcement. I will post the syllabus, lecture PowerPoint’s, and other important materials in an online file folder. You will receive the login and password the first time we meet. General Course Policies: The following policies and codes of UCCS will be followed: • UCCS Student Conduct Code. • UCCS policies regarding Accommodations for Students with Disabilities. NOTICE: If you have a disability for which you are requesting an accommodation, you are encouraged to contact the Disability Services Office within the first week of classes. The UCCS Disability Services Office is located in Main Hall #105. (Phone No. 719.262.3354) • No partial cre dit will be giv e n on any assig n m e n t s and no late or miss e d assig n m e n t s will be acc e p t e d . After con s u ltin g with the instr u c t o r, an “I” (Inc o m p l e t e ) gra d e ma y • be issu e d dep e n d i a d oon the circ u m s t a ris ms and an agre e d upo n co m p l e ti o n pla n. Univ e r s it y of Color n g polic y on pla gi a n c e Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management – Fall 2006 3
  4. 4. “It is a bad plan that admits of no modification.” - Publilius Syrus (~100 BC) Class Assignments: BRIEFING PAPERS: There will be two “Briefing Papers” required during the course. They are designed to help bring focus to a specific topic, activity or concept in extraordinary event planning and response. The instructor will determine the topic. These papers replicate the type of brief summary, of a larger research and analysis effort, that is often required during an event response, or when making requests of elected officials for funding, support, etc. The instructor may read or have the student read some of the papers as part of the class discussion and analysis of the topic. Briefness and concisen s are important elements of this writing assignm nt, as are es e capturingall the relevantfactsand alternatives. The purpos of this activity is to help you e gainan understandingof howto conducttopicspecificanalysisandreduce yourfindingsinto a short“exe cutive overview. It will alsoserveto showhowimportantthewrittensumm ” ary report is as a comm cation tool. Writing skills are often the weake of all the uni st comm cationtechnique The preparationof this assignm ntis focuse on helping hone uni s. e d yourwritingskills. This assignment represents 25% of your final grade. (SeeAppendixA) LIMITED RESEARCH PROJECT AND CLASS PRESENTATION: You will needto workin groupsof at leasttwoandno more thanfourpeople. Selectaneventin disaster emerg n planningor respons andclearthetopicwiththeinstructor. or e cy e Developa summ paperdocum ntingyour rese ary e archand analysis. Look at the underlying proce s s s e and structurethat are contributingto theissue,situationor event. Relateyouranalysisto thevariousarea wewill coverin this course. Identify the s “criticalelements thatwereprese in yourtopicareaor event. Identify howtherespons succe d d, ” nt e e e failedor fell shortof the desiredoutcom Offerrecom e d tions howa futurerespons to a similareventcouldbeimprovedby employingspecific e. mna on e “critical elements or by usingtechnique andmethodologiescovered this class. Finally, summ ” s in arizeany key pointsyou feel canbeif useto disaster andemerg n planners e cy andrespond ser thatmayhaveto dealwithsimilareventsin thefuture. The team will prese the resultsof their rese s nt archandanalysisin classin a 15-minutepresentationwith an opportunity for questionsfrom the classon the final weekendof classe This assignment represents 40% of your final grade. (See s. AppendixB). Wecanlearnourlessonsfromtheexperienc s others… e of Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management – Fall 2006 4
  5. 5. “Let's look at this thing from a standpoint of status. What do we got on the spacecraft that's good? - Gene Kranz, Flight Controller for Apollo 13 Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management – Fall 2006 5
  6. 6. Class Schedule: (Actual schedule may vary depending instructor’s prerogative, time and current circumstances.) Classes One & Two, September 16-17, 2006 September 16th Wubben #140; September 17th Houston #215 – Mesa State College Prior Reading Assignment: Pages 1-113 in Haddow and Pages 1-70 in Fink Briefing Paper One Due: Beginning of class on Sunday (overnight assignment) Guest Speaker and Case Study: Hilary Fletcher-Smith, Pitkin County Manager; 2001 Avjet charter airliner crash at Aspen Airport (Saturday) Class Activities and Topics: IntroductionsandHouseke ping e Items;Plannedtopicsfor lectureandclassdiscussioninclude:An overview of extraordinary events; Defining crises and preparing and planning to manag them; History of emerg n e e cy manag m n Overviewof risksandhazards;Disciplinesof emerg n mana e e t,emerg n respons andrecovery. Class e e t; e cy gmn e cy e, Case AnalysisandDiscussion;Selectionof Team for Final Project;BriefingPaperOne(overnightassignm nt)instructionsand s e BriefingPaperTwo(dueOctober th) instructions 7 ================================================= Classes Three & Four, October 7-8, 2006 October th Wubben 7 #140; October th Houston#215 – Mesa 8 StateCollege Prior Reading Assignment: Page 115-199 in Haddo andPage 71-167 in Fink s w s Briefing Paper Two Due: Beginning of class on Saturday Research Project and Presentation Topics Due to Instructor - Startof classonSunday Case Analysis: 1989 United Airliner Crash in Sioux City, Iowa Class Activities and Topics: Planned topics for lecture and class discussion to include: NIMS Certifications; Emergency Preparedness; Communications; International disaster management; Crisis identification; Isolation, management of, and recovery from a crisis; Crisis communications; Decision-making under stress; Class activity-ICS Application: Tabletop Exercise (Sunday) ================================================= Classes Five and Six, November 4-5, 2006 Novem er th & 5 Houston#215 – Mesa b 4 th StateCollege Prior Reading Assignment: Page 201- s 267in Haddo andPage 169- w s 225in Fink Research Project and Presentation Topics Due to Instructor - Startof classonSunday Team Research Project Paper w/Executive Summary Due: Beginningof classonSaturday(Class5) Case Study: 1995 Oklahoma City Bombing Response and Lessons Learned (Saturday) Class Activities and Topics: Plannedtopics for lectureand classdiscussionto include: The future of crisis manag m n e e t; Terrorism;Thefutureof emerg n manag m nt;Course e cy e e summ andwrap- p; Instructorevaluations- Onestudentvolunteer ary u will collectandreturnevaluations Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management – Fall 2006 6
  7. 7. “Did we make a difference?” - Captain James T. Kirk, USS Enterprise, Star Trek-Generations Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management – Fall 2006 7
  8. 8. APPENDIX - A Briefing Paper Projects This project makes up 25% of your final grade. It is intended to allow you the opportunity to combine the elements of technical writing with the elements of local government and administration, as discussed in class and the textbook, into a written product that simulates an assignment typical in a local government setting. Project Checklist: Briefing Papers (Two Papers)  You will be given the topic or scope for each of your papers.  Format: SHORT; No more than three to five (3-5) pages, not including any exhibits, references, etc. (The format and structure of this assignment will be discussed in the first class.)  Produce the Briefing Paper - Concise, ordered, single-spaced, normal business-style protocols and format. (The instructor will suggest some formats if desired. This paper must briefly convey all the information needed to understand the issue, know the alternatives available (including their impacts) if assigned, summarize your analysis and findings, and/or provide a supported recommendation if called for. Students need to bear in mind the demands placed on executive staff with regard to reading material…they have too much to read already! Make your point and close the deal.)  Briefing Paper One due at the beginning of class on: Sunday, September 17th (overnight assignment), Briefing Paper Two due at the beginning of class on Saturday, October 7th.  Papers may be discussed in class on their due dates depending on time constraints. Notes - This project will be done in a format common to that of a staff report or executive summary intended for the entity’s executive staff. The purpose of this assignment is to gain an understanding of how important summary report writing is as a communication tool. You will also learn some techniques on how to structure a brief written document to make the most of your communication opportunity with decision-makers (which is often limited). Hint – While this class takes an application and practice perspective, one need also know and understand the underlying theory associated with this assignment. In addition, academic skills such as writing, logical analysis and progression, and a scholarly product are critically important. Therefore, for this assignment, soundness and explanation of the issue or problem; ranking of the findings; relevance and trade-offs of the alternatives; the practical reality of the recommendation; and, the overall conciseness of presentation of the final paper will be the success measures… not simply length or volume. We will discuss this project in class, but if you have questions…Ask! Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management – Fall 2006 8
  9. 9. “We can be sure that the greatest hope for maintaining equilibrium in the face of any situation rests within ourselves.” - Francis J. Braceland (1900-1985) Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management – Fall 2006 9
  10. 10. APPENDIX “C” Team Research Project, Paper and Class Presentation This project is your final paper for the class. It makes up 40% of your final grade. It is intended to test and develop your skills in research, producing a detailed, logical work product that will support a recommendation, and measure your oral presentation skills. It is expected that this paper be produced with both technical and academic quality in format, content and presentation. Project Checklist: Group Research Project and Class Presentation  Form your teams and advise the instructor of the members  Select an emergency, crisis or disaster event to research  Advise Instructor of your topic by October 7th – Class Three  Project Products (Four elements):  Detailed research and analysis effort of the chosen event  Research & Analysis Paper (Minimum 15 pages, not including exhibits, references, etc.)  Executive Summary of the class presentation (3-5 pages)  15-minute class presentation with handouts and an opportunity for questions  Project Paper: Concise, detailed, logical and done in accepted academic-style. (MLA or comparable standard, double-spaced, footnotes, bibliography, etc. This paper’s focus is to convey all the detailed research information needed to support a recommendation to decision-makers. It should be done to the highest academic standards. This paper will also serve as “practice” in preparing to develop any required capstone or thesis papers for your ultimate degree. The paper should have a logical flow and connection. You must explore the issue in enough detail for the reader to understand it, know the alternatives available (including their impacts), and to see your reasons for making the findings and/or recommendations at the end of your paper. Students should draw on the Critical Elements in this syllabus and discussed in class and include them in your analysis. Support your facts, findings, statements, recommendations and conclusions. I will look close at this area.  The Project Products are due at, or before, the beginning on Class Five, November 4th. Team presentations will take place on both Saturday and Sunday. (Note: The Project Products in this assignment will not be returned) This project will be done in a “thesis” or “term paper” format. The simulated audience is the professionals of the emergency management field. This project is designed to be a learning tool to produce more effective written and oral presentations in the future. Its purpose is to help you gain an understanding of how important technical writing is as a communication tool. You will also learn some techniques on how to structure a detailed technical written document to support your position on an issue. Lastly, this project is done in a team format because in planning for and responding to disasters and emergencies, you’ll do it in a group (and often with people you aren’t familiar with). Hint – This paper can draw both on the underlying theory and the practical application associated with the field of emergency management. Any of the elements of the Critical Elements we discussed in class can be used in this assignment, and at least three should be referenced. In addition, academic skills such as writing, logical analysis and progression, and a scholarly product are critically important. Therefore, for this assignment, completeness of the analysis; soundness and explanation of the underlying theory or theories; depth and scope in the findings; relevance of Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management – Fall 2006 10
  11. 11. the alternatives; logical flow of the paper; the practical reality of the recommendation; and, the oral presentation of the Final Project will be the success measures. Don’t guess about the format and content of this important assignment. The dumb question is the one that never got asked…So ask! "Plans are only good intentions unless they immediately degenerate into hard work." – Peter Drucker (1909-2005) Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management – Fall 2006 11
  12. 12. APPENDIX “C” Critical Elements and Language of Local Government in Colorado “Critical Elements” of Disaster Management:  Organizational Structure  Policies, Procedures, Guidelines  Ethics  Tactical and Strategic Planning  Human Resources  Economic Development  Internal Processes (The 4-Cs)  Programs and Capital Projects  Employee Unions  Emergency Preparedness  Operations Planning and Implementation  Public Managers  Public Policy  Decision-Making  Reporting  Citizen Participation/Information  Public Finance  Prioritization  Risk Management  Performance Measurement  State Government  Department of Homeland Security  Citizens, Employees, Elected Officials  Local Control  Accountability  Leadership  Form of Government  Mission, Goals, Objectives  Elected Officials  Politics  Intergovernmental Relations  Federal Government  Regulation Language and Terms of Colorado Local Government: NRP NIMS EMS VA WMD FBI USFA DHS EOC PIO IC ICS EOP IGA NFPA MAA MPO USCIS TABOR USFA NIMBY CAVE HAZ-MAT Community Policing Constitutional Law Council-Manager Form Home Rule City Integrated Command Infrastructure Risk Management Recovery Mandate Master Plan Matrix Management Metro Districts Off-the-Record Public Hearing Paradigm/Paradigm Shift Paradigm Paralysis Regulatory Agencies Red Flag Warning Statutory Law Strategic Planning Tactical Planning George Holliday Response Time First Responder Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management – Fall 2006 12
  13. 13. “In an emergency, it’s not so much what you know; but how well you know each other that will determine your success.” - Gary Brown, Chief of Disaster Services, Woodbury County, Iowa Syllabus – GSPA Disaster & Extraordinary Event Management – Fall 2006 13

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