Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management
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Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management

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Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management Presentation Transcript

  • Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management Natural Hazards Workshop What’s Happening in Higher Education? July 15, 2002 Gregory L. Shaw Institute Program Manager Research Scientist Certified Business Continuity Professional
  • The George Washington University Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management Home School and Department School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering (EMSE) Focus Provide an interdisciplinary graduate level education with strong research support for persons engaged in or seeking professional careers in crisis and emergency management in the private business, government, or not-for-profit sectors
  • Graduate Programs
    • Engineering Management Doctor of Science (D.Sc.)
    • Master of Science (M.S.) in Engineering Management
    • Graduate Certificate in Crisis and Emergency Management
    • Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management and Public Health
  • The George Washington University Crisis, Emergency and Risk Management Curriculum
    • Emphasis
    • Fourteen Crisis, Emergency and Risk Management concentration courses
    • A systems approach to management of complex events and organizations
    • A strong technological foundation
    • Inclusion of core Engineering Management and Systems Engineering courses in the Master of Science Degree Program
    • EMSE M.S. CORE COURSES
    • EMSE 212 - The Management of Technical Organizations
    • EMSE 260 - Survey of Finance and Engineering Economics
    • EMSE 269 - Elements of Problem Solving and Decision Making
    • for Managers
    • EMSE 283 - Systems Engineering
    • CRISIS, EMERGENCY AND RISK MANAGEMENT M.S. CORE COURSES
    • EMSE 232 - Crisis and Emergency Management
    • EMSE 233 - Information Technology in Crisis and Emergency
    • Management
    • EMSE 234 - Management of Risk and Vulnerability for Natural
    • and Technological Hazards
    • EMSE 256 - Information Management and Information Systems
  • Additional Crisis, Emergency and Risk Management Concentration Courses EMSE 218 - Information Security EMSE 238 - Issues in International Crisis and Disaster Management EMSE 239 - Health and Medical Issues in Emergency Management EMSE 240 - Terrorism Preparedness, Critical Infrastructure Protection, and Emergency Management EMSE 256 - Information Management and Information Systems EMSE 298 - Directed Studies EMSE 298A - Disaster Mitigation and Recovery (Fall 2002) EMSE 298B - Crisis Communication (Fall 2002) EMSE 332 - Crisis Management, Disaster Recovery, and Organizational Continuity EMSE 334 - Environmental Hazard Management PPSY 205 - Political Violence and Terrorism
  • Questions 1 & 2 - New perspectives and the Impact of 9/11
    • EMSE 232 - Crisis and Emergency Management
    • Comprehensive Emergency Management
    • All hazards approach
    • Terrorism emphasizes the importance of consequence management and adaptive response management
    • EMSE 332 - Crisis Management, Disaster Recovery, and Organizational Continuity
    • Realization that 9/11, particularly the WTC, was an attack on corporate America
    • NSF supported research - Terrorism and Corporate Crisis Management: The Strategic Effect of the September 11 Attacks
    • Functional model stressing risk management
    • Need for strong private, public partnerships
  • Questions 1 & 2 - New perspectives and the Impact of 9/11
    • EMSE 233 -Information Technology in Crisis and Emergency
    • Management
    • IT/IM is becoming more central to CM and EM
    • Requirements should determine the technologies
    • Students need to be able to analyze the potential for technologies as they emerge and not just memorize the benefits, limitations and costs of current technologies
    • The hands on Information Technology Laboratory is essential to the course and the overall program
    • The expanded Enabling Technology Laboratory will allow increased interface with technology providers and practitioners
    • EMSE 239 - Health and Medical Issues in Emergency Management
    • Integration of Emergency Management, Public Health and Medical Operations
    • Sloan Foundation funded research - Regional Planning for Mass Casualty Care: A Medical Model
    • Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management and Public Health
  • Question 3 - Balance between academic education and practical training
    • Position - The role of graduate education does not include vocational training.
    • Qualifier - We provide an interdisciplinary graduate education for persons engaged in or seeking professional careers in crisis and emergency management in the public, private and not-for-profit sectors.
  • Question 4 - Challenges/Opportunities
    • Distance Learning
    • Our classes are entirely in the resident mode.
    • The location of GWU and the scheduling of graduate courses results in a unique student body.
    • Research is an essential component of our programs.
    • Internships and Co-Ops
    • Again, the location of GWU and the scheduling of graduate courses results in unique opportunities for our students.
    • Employment
    • Networking opportunities abound.
    • Our graduates are actively sought for employment.
    • Tuition and Living Expenses
    • GWU is expensive.
    • University tuition assistance is limited.
  • Question 5 - Meeting Future Educational Requirements
    • Course evaluation
    • Students provide input from the practitioner perspective
    • Case study approach provides ideas
    • Access to recognized experts
    • Networking opportunities (EM Forum)
    • Guest lecturers
    • Research agenda for the faculty and students
    • Co-Op and Internships
    • Partnerships with private sector companies
    • Enabling Technology Laboratory
    • Expanded educational and research capabilities
    • Bringing technology providers and practitioners together
  • Questions?/Comments!
    • Greg Shaw - 202-994-6736
    • [email_address]
    • http://www.seas.gwu.edu/~icdm