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Emergency Management Plan

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  • 1. Emergency Management Plan CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 1 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY………………………………………………………………………. 4 - 7 I. OVERVIEW:……………….……………………………………….…… 8 Purpose……………………………………………………..……. 8 Background ……………………………………………………. 8 Assumptions……………………………………………..………. 8-9 Mission…………….……………………………………..………. 10 Scope……………………………………………………..………. 10 Plan Components..………………………………………………. 11 - 12 Important Notes…..………………………………………..……. 13 II. COMMAND-CONTROL-COMMUNICATION…………..…………. 14 Declaration of Campus State of Emergency..…………………. 14 Emergency Event Levels……………………….………………. 15 - 16 On-Scene Command Post………………………………………. 17 Emergency Operations Center (EOC)………..……………….. 18 - 19 Emergency Management Team………………..………………. 19 - 20 Satellite Operations Center……………………..……………… 20 Leadership Hierarchy…………………………….……………. 20 - 23 III. THREATS AND EMERGENCIES……………………………………. 24 Purpose…………………………………………………………... 24 Types (Categories) of Hazards..………………………………... 24 Impact on CNM…………………..……………………………... 24 - 27 Concern for Community………..………………………………. 27 IV. PREVENTION MANAGEMENT & PREPARATION….…………... 27 Preparation………………………………………..…………….. 27 Training…………………………………………………………. 27 Pre-Incident Management/ Reducing Risk….………………… 28 Emergency Cards………………………………..……………… 29 Area Emergency Plans………………………….………………. 29 Planning for Evacuation………………………..………………. 29 V. RESPONSE TACTICS…………………………………………………. 30 3-step Response………………………………….………………. 30 Determination of Emergency Situation………………………... 31 - 32 Building Evacuation Instructions……………..……………….. 33 Emergency Information and Communication………………… 34 - 35 Telephone Call Tree……………………………..……………… 35 - 36 VI. RECOVERY………………………….…………………………………. 37 Plan Deactivation………..………………………………………. 37 Plan Reassessment……..………………………………………... 37 Cost Recovery…………………………………………………… 37 Business Resumption…..……………………………………….. 37 CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 2 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 3. APPENDICES A. GLOSSARY OF TERMS, TERMINOLOGY & ACRONYMS….. 38 - 40 B. THREATS AND EMERGENCIES…………………………..……. 41 - 45 C. JOB RESPONSIBILITIES (JOB ACTION SHEETS FOR EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER PERSONNEL)……………..……..……. 46 – 53 Emergency Operations Center Director…………………… 45 – 47 Operations Chief……………………………………………. 48 Planning Chief………………………………………………. 49 Finance Chief………………………………………………… 50 Logistics Chief……………………………………………….. 51 Emergency Coordinator…………………………………….. 52 Risk Management & Safety Officer………………………… 53 D. TEMPLATES and TRAINING DOCUMENTS………….....……. 54 1. Emergency Preparedness Brochure……………………..……. 54 What To Do When An Emergency Occurs……….………. 55 – 56 How To Prevent Campus Emergencies, and How to Protect Your Own Safety…………………..……… 57 Possible Emergency Kit Contents…………………….….… 58 Emergency Wallet Card………………………………….… 59 - 60 CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 3 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 4. Summary of Central New Mexico Community College Emergency Management Plan The CNM Emergency Management Plan The Emergency Management Plan includes guidelines for preparedness, response, and recovery and addresses institutional priorities in an emergency event. Following an initial overview of the plan, CNM’s emergency plan includes the following components: • Command – Control - Communication • Threats and Emergencies • Prevention Management and Preparation • Response Tactics • Recovery Taken together these components provide a management framework designed to effectively respond to emergencies that could threaten the health and well-being of the CNM community, or disrupt our programs and mission-critical operations. The components are visually represented in Figure 1 (page 7) of this document. Priorities In any emergency situation, CNM’s overriding mission is to address the following priorities: • Protect physical and mental well-being of all • Secure critical infrastructure and facilities • Restore and recover programs Command – Control - Communication The Emergency Management Plan (EMP) establishes an Incident Management System (IMS) in the event of a high level emergency. Establishing specific roles and responsibilities in a defined leadership hierarchy assures clear communication, reduces duplication of effort and supports a more effective response to emergencies. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 4 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 5. An emergency event at CNM may be designated as a Level 1, 2, or 3 emergency situation. Level 2 and 3 emergencies are identified as high level emergencies and justify the use of CNM’s Incident Management System (IMS). • Level 1 – Any incident, actual or potential, which does not seriously affect the overall functional capacity of the college. Level 1 emergency are those incidents that are quickly resolved through normal internal security procedures or with limited external help. The Incident Management System (ICS) is not activated. • Level 2 – Any incident that indicates threat to life, building structures, and/or overall operations of the college or one of its campuses. Normally help from outside emergency services is required. Major policy considerations and decisions are required from administration during the crisis. In the event of a Level 2 emergency, CNM Security notifies the appropriate Vice President, who then determines whether to request that the President/Acting President activate the Incident Management System (ICS). • Level 3 – An event or occurrence that has seriously impaired or halted the operations of the college or one of its campuses and requires a coordinated effort of all campus-wide resources and outside emergency services. Major policy considerations and decisions are required from administration during and following the crisis as operational functions resume. In all Level 3 emergency situations, the President/Acting president activates the Incident Management System (ICS). Threats and Emergencies A cross-departmental Emergency Management Plan Task Team, working with subject matter experts across the college, identified a number of potential threats and emergencies and determined some hazards represent more likely threats than others. Guidelines for responding to the seven most likely hazards are contained in specific Incident Action Plans (IAP). Prevention Management and Preparation Because emergencies occur without warning and can occur at any time, CNM is committed to acquaint all members of the CNM community with their role in emergency response. The Emergency Management Plan (EMP) is communicated in a number of ways: • Website • Hardcopy • Training Materials, and • Quick Reference Guides The college maintains an education and training program to mitigate potential hazards. The intent of this program is to familiarize members of the campus community with emergency procedures. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 5 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 6. Training materials include the Emergency Action Plans (EAP) that are established for a broad range of specific threats and emergencies including bomb threats, civil disturbance, structural fire, hazardous materials release, medical emergencies, systems outage, and severe storms. An Emergency Management Plan Team reviews the planning documents annually and meets regularly to provide oversight for issues related to emergency management. CNM practices its Emergency Plan each year by holding an Emergency Management Exercise. Response Tactics During a level 3 event, the Incident Management System (IMS) is activated and an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is established. The Incident Action Plans (IAP) and Area Emergency Plans (AEP) are executed. The President mobilizes the appropriate Emergency Management Team (EMT) which operates from the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and advises the President and the Emergency Executive Team (EET). In addition, the Emergency Executive Team (EET) establishes response strategies and tactics and deploys resources with approval of the President. All campuses, departments, and units are expected to maintain an Emergency Action Plan (EAP) modeled after the CNM Emergency Management Plan (EMP). This Area Emergency Plans (AEP) protects personnel and programs and support emergency response and recovery. The CNM Emergency Management Plan (EMP) contains templates to aid departments in developing these plans. Recovery Immediately following the cessation of Level 2 or Level 3 emergency operations, a Post-Incident briefing is conducted to determine the effectiveness of the emergency response. The results of this meeting and an analysis of the Post-Incident written reports help determine whether portions of the Emergency Management Plan (EMP) must be modified. One of the final actions of the Emergency Management Team (EMT) is to appoint an “Emergency Recovery Work Group.” The function of this Group is to coordinate the business resumption procedures as laid out in departmental business resumption plans. The purpose of the business resumption plans is to safeguard essential programs and records and to establish a framework of priorities to guide efficient and effective recovery of the college. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 6 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 7. Fi gure 1: The Six Components of CNM ’s Emerge ncy Management Plan Command Thre ats Preven ti on O ve rvie w Control and Management Recov ery Communi cati on Emergen ci es & Prepara ti on Response Ta ctics CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 7 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 8. I. OVERVIEW Purpose: The CNM Emergency Management Plan (EMP) outlines the college’s approach, philosophy, and procedures for managing incidents that may threaten the safety of the campus community or disrupt programs, activities, and/or mission-critical services. It identifies individuals and departments directly responsible for emergency response and critical support services. The plan provides a management structure for coordinating and deploying essential resources and also provides institutional procedures for emergency preparation, employee training, and recovery. CNM is firmly committed to planning ahead for emergencies as a part of normal business planning; all members of the CNM community share a responsibility for preparedness. An emergency can occur anytime or anywhere on CNM’s six campuses, and a disaster will impact everyone. Background: Emergency management doctrine currently revolves around the concept of “All-Hazards” planning. This concept recognizes the impossibility of implementing a detailed emergency response to address every hazard or crisis. Instead, a foundational core response plan is created to outline effective procedures that can be used for any type of hazard. Specific plans are then added to address emergencies identified as possible threats to the organization. The CNM Emergency Management Plan serves as the foundation plan and identifies a global structure for institutional strategic and operational response. In addition, Emergency Action Plans (EAP) provide the detailed steps to address the differing needs of each of the campuses and departments as they respond to specific emergency events. Assumptions: • To facilitate the safety of CNM’s students, staff, programs and resources as well as support emergency responses and recovery, all campuses, departments/units shall maintain an Emergency Action Plan (EAP) modeled after the CNM Emergency Management Plan (EMP). These Area Emergency Action Plans shall support full involvement and compliance by all campuses, units, and departments in the ongoing process of emergency planning, response, and recovery. • While this guide does not cover every conceivable situation in planning for campus emergencies, it does supply the basic structure and guidelines necessary to respond to most emergency situations on campus. The Emergency Action Plan (EAP) shall contain procedures to handle specific types of incidents as well as outline the steps for upgrading the incident to a higher level of emergency. Emergency Actions Plans (EAP’s) are written by CNM subject matter experts and CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 8 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 9. address incidents such as medical emergencies, power (utility) outages, telecommunications outage, structural fire, terrorism, and bomb threats. • The succession of events in an emergency is not predictable. Emergency operations are conducted within the framework of the College’s emergency management system. Published support, operational Emergency Action Plans (EAP) shall serve as procedural guidelines designed to respond within the flexible organization system. On-the-spot modifications to procedures may be necessary to best meet the requirements of the emergency. Any exceptions to these procedures are conducted by, or with the approval of, the campus administrators directing and/or coordinating the emergency operations. • An emergency may occur at any time with little or no warning. In addition, an emergency may be declared if information indicates that such an incident is developing or is highly probable. • The college maintains an education and training program to mitigate potential hazards. The intent of this program is to familiarize members of the campus communities with emergency procedures on an ongoing basis. • All employees and students share a personal responsibility for knowing what they should do during and after an emergency incident to protect their health, safety, and work. • The college regularly assesses the plan’s effectiveness. Continuous evaluation is necessary because emergency management planning is an ongoing process, not an event. • The Emergency Management Plan (EMP) is reviewed for accuracy and effectiveness on a continuous basis. The Emergency Management Plan (EMP) will be available at http://www.cnm.edu/depts/safety/EmergencyOperationsPlan.php to ensure all CNM community members always have access to the current version of the document. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 9 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 10. Mission: The CNM Emergency Management Plan (EMP) outlines a process for managing emergencies by protecting, preventing, responding to and recovering from events that may threaten the health and safety of the campus and community. In any emergency situation, CNM’s overriding mission is to address the following priorities: Priorities: • Protect physical and mental well-being of all • Secure critical infrastructure and facilities • Restore and recover programs Scope: The CNM Emergency Management Plan (EMP) applies to all CNM personnel, buildings, and grounds at all campuses operated by the college. It serves as the guiding document for preparedness, response, and recovery actions. The Plan considers a broad range of threats and emergencies and may be activated during: Natural Hazards Technological/Human-related Hazards Flood/Flash Flood *Bomb Threats *Severe Storm *Structural Fires or Explosions Wildfire *Hazardous Materials Release Tornadoes *Civil Disturbance Earthquakes *Extended Power Outages/Systems Failure Landslides *Medical Emergencies Drought Dam Failure Hurricane/Tropical Storm * Emergency Action Plans(EAP) are provided for this type of emergency because they represent the most likely threats to the CNM community. The Plan may also be activated if a regional crisis occurs that impacts CNM’s campus community or business operations. Examples include but are not limited to: • a serious toxic spill on the Interstate • a brushfire in a local area • A major disaster event at a nearby educational institution. Any of these incidents may necessitate activation of CNM’s Emergency Management Plan (EMP) to communicate and coordinate emergency information or safety precautions and support services for personnel. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 10 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 11. Plan Components: The CNM Emergency Management Plan (EMP) consists of six components. A description of what is found in each component follows: 1. Overview: Discusses the mission of the Emergency Management Plan (EMP) at CNM; identifies the three priorities of emergency response and states the underlying assumptions of the plan 2. Command – Control – Communication: Defines the structure of the leadership hierarchy in the event of an emergency, including the roles of key personnel involved in emergency response, the role and function of the Emergency Operation Center (EOC) and the communication plan enacted during an emergency event 3. Threats and Emergencies: Examines the different types of hazards faced by the college and focuses on significant threats 4. Prevention Management and Preparation: Addresses the preparedness measures taken to respond to an emergency event and the structure of the training program designed to acquaint all members of the CNM Community with their roles in emergency response. 5. Response Tactics: Identifies the roles and responsibilities of all members of the CNM Community to an actual emergency event This section discusses the decisions that lead to a Plan Activation, the roles and actions of individuals during an emergency event and the steps leading to Plan Deactivation. The section focuses primarily on the operational issues associated with response to an emergency event. The concepts covered in this section provide the framework for the Emergency Preparedness Training Program (All CNM personnel are required to attend this training) 6. Recovery: This section carries forward the discussion in Response Tactics and addresses actions necessary for business resumption following an emergency event. Figure 2 (page 12) visually presents components and subcomponents of the plan. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 11 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 12. Figure 2: Components and Subcomponents of CNM’s Emergency Ma na gement Plan (EMP) Command Threats P revention O vervi ew Con tr ol And Managemen t Recov ery Emergencies & Pre paration Commun icati on Resp onse Tactics Pu rpose Emergency Ty pes of Threats Preparati on & Pl an Event L ev els Training D eac ti vation Assumptions Im pac t on CN M On-Scene Pre-Inc ident Command Post Management – 3-Step Pl an Mission R es pons e Reassess ment Reducing Ris k Em ergenc y Concern for Scope Comm uni ty Operati ons C os t Cent er Emergenc y Com ponents Ev ac uation R ec overy Cards Instructions Em ergency Managem ent Area Em ergency Team (E MT) Emergenc y Bus ines s Plans Inform ation & R es umption Satell ite Comm uni cati ons Operati ons Planning for Cent ers Ev ac uation T elephone Call Tree Leadershi p Hierarchy CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 12 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 13. Important Notes: • This Emergency Management Plan (EMP) pertains to high level emergencies (Level 2 and Level 3) only. • Only the President/Acting President and/or the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Director make the declaration of a major emergency level. • The designation of an emergency level may change as conditions intensify or decrease. • Evacuations or campus closures are authorized by the Emergency Operations Director (Vice President for Administrative Services), and are announced from the Marketing and Communications Office. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 13 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 14. II. COMMAND – CONTROL – COMMUNICATION CNM coordinates its emergency procedures planning with the City of Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, and other agencies and organizations to ensure that campus procedures are consistent with current government practice, and that CNM is able to maintain efficient and effective emergency communications and coordination during an emergency event. The organization of the Incident Management System discussed in this section is based upon a proven emergency management model recommended by FEMA and used by New Mexico state, county, and municipal agencies. The purpose of the Incident Management System is to provide clear command and control, coordination and effective utilization of resources to protect life, property and educational programs immediately following a major emergency, i.e. a natural, technological, or accidental disaster on one or more of our campuses. An Emergency Management Team (EMT) drawn from CNM’s senior administration, coordinates the campus response to emergencies through the activation of the Incident Management System (IMS). This system is activated when a state of campus emergency is declared. The Incident Management System (IMS) is comprised of key individuals organized by function into policy, operations, planning, logistics and finance groups. The Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Director serves as the Emergency Management Team (EMT) Leader and is responsible for the operational direction of the response. The Emergency Operations Center Director is the Vice President for Administrative Services. Declaration of Campus State of Emergency: During any campus emergency, the CNM Security Department places into immediate effect procedures necessary to best meet the emergency requirements. These procedures protect the well-being of all persons, property and educational facilities. The Security department immediately consults with the President and the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Director (Vice President for Administrative Services) regarding the emergency and the possible need to declare a level 2 or level 3 emergency. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 14 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 15. Emergency Event Levels: CNM classifies emergencies at three levels. The appropriate response depends upon how much of the campus community is involved, what type of resources are required to mitigate the emergency, and the potential negative impact from resolution of the emergency. The following definitions are provided as guidelines to assist CNM employees in determining the appropriate response. • Level 1 Any incident which will not seriously affect the overall functional capacity of the college Level 1 emergency are those incidents that our Security Department handles routinely through normal security procedures. The Incident Management System (IMS) outlined in “Response Tactics” (page 6 of this document) is not activated. • Level 2 Any incident that indicates threat to life, building structures, and/or overall operations of the college or one of its campuses Normally help from outside emergency services is required. Major policy considerations and decisions are required from administration during the crisis. In the event of a Level 2 Emergency, CNM Security notifies the appropriate Vice President, who then determines whether to request that the President/Acting President activate the Incident Management System (IMS). • Level 3 An event or occurrence that has actually taken place and has seriously impaired or halted the operations of the college or one of its campuses. A coordinated effort of all campus-wide resources and outside emergency services is required. Major policy considerations and decisions will be required from administration during and following the crisis as operational functions resume. In all cases of a Level 3 Emergency, the President or Acting President will activate the Incident Management System (IMS), an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is established, and the appropriate Emergency Action Plans (EAP) will be executed. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 15 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 16. The purpose of the Emergency Event Matrix is to define the levels of emergency that CNM may encounter and offer examples of each to indicate the appropriate institutional response. Emergency Event Matrix Incident Definition Examples Action Level Level 1 A minor incident that may • Confrontation between The Incident Management be resolved with internal two students System is not activated. resources or very limited • Student intoxication help from outside • Minor chemical spills agencies. • Water line breakage in confined area • Systems outage for limited time period Level 2 A mid-level emergency • Domestic related • President/Acting President that impacts a portion of violence involving are notified. one campus and requires physical abuse • Appropriate Vice President help from outside • Weapon possession in consultation with agencies. • Bomb threat Emergency Executive • Major gas leak Team will make The incident may threaten • Fire in a confined area determination whether or life safety and/or affect not the Incident mission-critical functions. Management System (IMS) is activated. Level 3 A major emergency that • Building(s) fire • President/Acting President impacts a sizable portion • Riot conditions are notified. of one or more campuses. • Major chemical spill • Systems outage longer • The Incident Management The incident is life than 3 days System (IMS) is activated. threatening and/or affects • Terrorist attack mission critical functions. • Bomb threats in • The Emergency multiple locations Management Team (EMT) May require tapping into • Biohazard is mobilized. external disaster response • Complete systems services. outage A disaster that involves the entire college or one of its campuses and possibly the surrounding community and requires tapping into external disaster response services. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 16 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 17. On-Scene Command Post: As a high level emergency situation unfolds at the college, an On-scene Command Post should be set up in a safe area nearby or adjacent to the physical location of the emergency. This is the location from which emergency responses activities and decisions are made. The person in charge is called the Incident Manager. The Incident Manager may not always be linked directly to CNM. The decision as to who is the Incident Manager depends upon the type of emergency. For example, in the event of a structural fire, the Incident Manager would probably be the Albuquerque Fire Department. In addition, this position may change from one organization to another. For example, in the event of a hostage situation, the Incident Manager would probably start out as the CNM Security Department, switch to the Albuquerque Police Department and conceivably end up with the FBI as the Incident Manager. The goals of the Incident Manager at the On-scene Command Post are tactical in nature, as the immediate on-scene needs are handled. If CNM is not the Incident Manager, contact must be maintained with the CNM Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Director (Vice President for Administrative Services) in order to relay and receive information. Regardless of these On-Scene Command Post scenarios, the CNM Incident Management System (IMS) structure remains basically the same. The goals of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Director are more strategic in nature, as more long-term needs and decisions are addressed. The authority to declare a campus state of emergency rests with the President or the Emergency Operations Center Director (Vice President for Administrative Services). During a Level 3 event, an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is established, and the appropriate Emergency Action Plans (EAP) are executed. The Vice President for Administrative Services mobilizes the appropriate Emergency Management Team (EMT) at the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and advises the President and the Policy Group. In addition, the Emergency Management Team (EMT) establishes response strategies and tactics and deploys resources. Following the emergency event, the President or the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Director (Vice President for Administrative Services) will declare a deactivation of the Incident Management System (IMS). The President then directs an assessment of the emergency event and response in order to further support continuous improvement of the Emergency Management Plan (EMP) at CNM. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 17 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 18. Emergency Operations Center (EOC): Immediately upon declaration of an emergency by the President or Acting President, the Incident Management System (IMS) will be instituted. The entire management of the emergency event shall be under the purview of the Incident Management System (IMS). The purpose of the EOC (Emergency Operations Center) is to centralize all relevant information and organize the information into an utilizable format to facilitate the coordination of resources needed to respond to the emergency event. The EOC (Emergency Operations Center) will: • be located away from the areas of highest activity to avoid interference with operations, yet close enough to have reasonable access to information as it becomes available • have the capacity to operate on a 24-hour basis if required • have multiple forms of communication available • be secured from unauthorized access • Have a recommended primary and back-up location. Following the activation of the Incident Management System (IMS), Emergency Management Team (EMT) members report to a central EOC (Emergency Operations Center) to coordinate decisions, communication, and resources When appropriate, the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is located at the CNM Security Department (901 Buena Vista SE). The alternative EOC (Emergency Operations Center) site (if conditions at the Security Department are unsafe) will be located at CNM Westside. An Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Directory of critical contacts and resources including databases, maps, identification vests, job action checklists and critical communication supplies are stored at the Emergency Operations Center (EOC). Emergency Operations Center (EOC) equipment and supplies are maintained at both locations. Supplementary materials will be kept at the Physical Plant Department (PPD) at Main Campus and can be transported to any appropriate location if emergency conditions affect the functionality of either designated Emergency Operations Center (EOC) location or if other campuses require such supplies. The CNM Security Director is responsible for maintaining the emergency-related supplies necessary for these three locations. When the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Director (Vice President for Administrative Services) activates the Incident Management System (IMS) and convenes the Emergency Management Team (EMT), the senior security officer on duty (or a CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 18 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 19. designee) opens the EOC facility, arranges all equipment and supplies, and coordinates its continued operation. When the Emergency Management Team (EMT) is assembled, the responsibilities include the following: • Determine the scope of the emergency and monitor the impact on the college • Prioritize emergency actions and prepare an emergency action plan • Deploy and coordinate resources, personnel, and equipment • Communicate critical information and instructions • Re-evaluate conditions on an on-going basis • Coordinate with government agencies • Document all emergency actions The Emergency Management Team: (see pg.47) The Incident Management System (IMS) partitions decision-makers into functional groups that comprise the Emergency Management Team (EMT). These groups have been modified to reflect CNM’s organization and the expertise within our academic community. Personnel and Responsibilities This Team consists of the following campus personnel grouped according to function: (see page 47) Policy Function Group President (Emergency Operations Center Director – see pg. 48) Vice President for Academic Affairs Vice President for Student Services Vice President for Administrative Services Vice President for Planning & Budget Chief Communications Officer (see Emergency Communications Plan) Risk Management and Safety Officer (Pg.54) Operations Function Group (Pg. 49) Manages tactical response Planning Function Group (Pg. 50) Prioritizes reports & plans strategies Finance Function Group (Pg.51) Tracks expenses & manages claims process Logistics Function Group (Pg.52) Obtains & stages resources Job Action Checklists for members of each of these groups can be found in Appendix D (Pages 47-54). CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 19 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 20. During an emergency, the Operations Group drafts action plans based upon evolving emergency conditions. The action plans are communicated to all members of the Emergency Management Team (EMT) and to the Satellite Operations Centers. These action plans become part of the public information announcements released through the Marketing and Communications Office and contain instructions to the campus community. Satellite Operations Centers (SOC's): Satellite Operations Centers (SOC's) are located in the administrative offices of all CNM Deans and Directors. These centers serve as critical communication conduits between the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and the campus community during a high level emergency event. Satellite Operations Centers (SOC) gather emergency impact data from their areas, account for their personnel, equipment and facilities, transmit that information to the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), and disseminate emergency instructions and information to constituent groups. Satellite Operations Centers (SOC) are also responsible for department preparedness, emergency response, and recovery planning. Satellite Operations Centers (SOC) communicate Assembly Points used during emergency evacuations, and recruit Emergency Coordinators (EC) for each building within their area. Emergency Coordinators (EC) ensure all key personnel regularly assigned to their building are trained in proper evacuation routes and the correct emergency assembly points and serve as the communication liaison to the Emergency Operations Center (EOC). Job Action Checklists for the Emergency Coordinators (EC) can be found at Appendix C (Pg. 53). Leadership Hierarchy: The following graph illustrates the leadership hierarchy for CNM emergency events: Figure 3, page 21 reflects both Level 2 and Level 3 emergencies, while Figure 4, page 22 presents the leadership structure for a Level 3 emergencies Figure 5, page 23 shows how the various teams communicate during an emergency. The gray arrows indicate the flow of communication; the red arrows denote decisions. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 20 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 21. On-Sit e Det erm ination F igure 3: Leadership Hierarchy f or IMS (Inciden t Management System) EXECUT IVE TEAM If Level If Level Presiden t or 22 Presi dent o r Vi ce Presi dent Vice Presiden t Acting g Vice Presiden t Vice Presi dent Notif ic at ion Actin Acad emi c Stud ent Presiden t Academic Studen t Pre si dent Han dled by Affairs Affairs Servi ces Services Appropri ate Notif ic at ion Vice Presiden t Cons ultati on Vice Presiden t Vice Presi dent Vice Presi dent Admi nistrative Vice Presiden t Admin istra tive Pl annin g &, Servi ces Plann ing &, Services Budget If Level Bud get If Level 33 Notif ic at ion EMERGENCY EXECU TIVE T EAM Vice Presid ent Vice Presiden t Vice Presiden t Vice Presiden t Marketin g & Risk R isk Vice President Vi ce Presi dent Vi ce Presi dent Vice Presi dent Marketi ng & Ma nage men t Preside nt M obi liz es Academi c Ad mi nistrative Stud ent Pl annin g & Communic ati ons Mana gement P olic y Group Aca demic Admini strative Studen t Plan ning & C ommu nication s & Safety Affairs Servi ces Servi ces Bu dget Officer & Safety Affairs Services Services Budge t Offic er Di recto r Director Appoints Emergency Op erati ons Center DDi recto r Emerge ncy Operations Cen te r irector (Vice President fo r Admin istrative Services (Vic e Presi dent for Administrative Services EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT TEAM OPERATIONS PLANNING LOGISTICS FIN AN CE OPERATIONS PL AN NIN G LOGISTICS FINANCE Tracks Tra cks expenses Manag es Prio ri ti ze s Obta ins expe nses Ma nages ta ctica l Prioritizes reports & stagess Obtain & manage s tactical rep orts & sta ges & mana ges response & plan s reso urces clai ms process re sp onse & pl ans resources cl aims p rocess stra teg ies strategi es CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 21 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 22. Fi gur e 4: L ead er shi p H er ar ch y f r Le vel 3 Em e r geni ce s: i o A t vat i on o f t he I S ( I nci den t M an agem en t S yst em ) c i M EE T ( EM ER G EN C E XE C TI VE T EA M ) Y U O Si t n- e D er m nat n et i o i N i f at i n ot i c o M ar ket ng & i R k s i V i e Pr esi ent Vi cePr esi dent Vi cePr esi dent Vi cePr esi dent M ar ket ng & c d i R k s i Vi cadem i en A cePr esi dent Vi St Pr esi dent Vi cePr esi dent C om m uni - M anagem e nt A Pr esi ce d c t Vi i i st at i e dm n r v ce dent u C m uni c a- M anagem t om ca en Pr esi ent d M oi l es b iz Academ i c Adm i i st at i e n r v St dent u Pl anni ng Pr esi en t d A f f ai s f f ai r A rs S er vi ces vi ces S er Ser vi ces ces Ser vi Pl u dget &B anni ng t t i ns o i o ns & Saf et y & Saf y et & B dget u O f cer fi D r ect r i o O f cer fi D r ect r i o E M T ( M ER G N Y M A A G M EN E E C N E T TEA M ) E m er gency O per at i n sC ent er D i r c t r o e o E m er gency O per at i n sC ent er D r c t r o ie o O R PE ATI O S N PLA N I N N G LO I STI C G S FI A N E N C O R PE ATI O S N PLA N I N N G LO I STI C G S FI A N E N C Tr acs k Tr ack expensess M anages Pr i or t es ii z O bt i ns a expenses M anages Pr i or t es iiz O bt i ns a & m ana ges t act cal ii t act cal r epor t t e s r por s &&st ges aages st cl & spr ocess ai m ages m an r espones & pl ans e r sou r es c cl i spr ocess am r espones r &pl ians st at eges e r so ur es c st at eges r i CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 22 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 23. Figure 5: Emergency Response Teams (ERT) and Locations Tac ti ca l Re sp on se Le ve l 1 – TV I S ecu rity Op er atio n al R esp o nse L ev el 2 or 3 S tr ateg ic R es po ns e L e vel 2 or 3 E me rge ncy Oper ati on s Ce nter Ta cti cal Re spo ns e (Ce ntralize d Institution al Loc ati on) Emergen cy Le vel 2 or 3 Executive Team Em erg en cy Ope rat ion s Ce nt er Dir ect or - Presiden t Operati ons Planning Logisti cs Financ e (Vari able Lo cati on) Incident O n-Scene Command P ost – Satell ite I nciden t O peration Commande r Center (D epartm ental ( Adjacent L oc ation) Locati on) CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 23 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 24. III. THREATS AND EMERGENCIES Purpose: To identify possible hazards which provide CNM with valuable information to determine current institutional capabilities when handling and preparing for emergencies. The following section presents a comprehensive list of foreseen hazards. The list includes the 20 hazards included in the New Mexico All Hazards Plan but has been augmented to consider other possible hazards. Clearly some hazards represent more likely threats to our campus community than others. A careful and comprehensive vulnerability analysis pointed to a number of hazards requiring specific guidelines. These guidelines are contained in the Emergency Action Plans (EAP) and incorporate the procedures for handling these specific types of incidents. The Emergency Action Plan (EAP) contains guides for upgrading the incident to a Level 3 emergency where the Incident Management System (IMS) is activated and additional procedures and other resources will be invoked. Types (Categories) of Hazards: Natural Hazards Technological/Human-related Hazards Flood/Flash Flood *Bomb Threats *Severe Storm *Structural Fires or Explosions Wildfire *Hazardous Materials Release Tornadoes *Civil Disturbance Earthquakes *Extended Power Outages/Systems Failure Landslides *Medical Emergencies Drought Dam Failure Hurricane/Tropical Storm Subsidence * Emergency Action Plans (EAP) are provided for this type of emergency Impact on CNM: BOMB THREATS AND SUSPICIOUS PACKAGES See Appendix D4 (Pg.65): A bomb threat condition exists when a suspected bomb/explosive device has been reported, but not located. A bomb threat emergency exists when there is an apparent threat to life or property. CIVIL DISTURBANCE A civil disturbance emergency exists when a condition of civil unrest poses a threat to the loss of life, college assets, the conducting of normal business, the delivery of services to the college community or restriction of safe movement of CNM community members on or in proximity to a CNM facility. The proximity of Main CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 24 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 25. Campus to the UNM campus increases the chances of spill over to CNM. As CNM does not have research laboratories or high profile researchers, terrorism against targeted facilities is unlikely. Domestic violence and stalking are occasional happenings at CNM facilities. Major civil disturbance events in the area could cause closure of some CNM sites. Specific plans to counteract and respond to civil disturbance incidents should not be generally accessible as that may lead to circumvention. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS RELEASE See Appendix D4 (Pg.66): A hazardous materials emergency exists when the release of hazardous material either planned or unplanned has adverse effects on lives or property. • HAZMAT – FIXED FACILITY: CNM does not store hazardous materials above their Reportable Quantity (RQ) to the Environmental Protection Association (EPA) on any facility. • TRANSPORT INCIDENT – AIR/RAIL: None of the CNM sites are adjacent to a rail line. The Main and South Valley campuses are on military and commercial flight paths. The CNM Workforce Training Center is adjacent to I-25 and could be directly impacted by a transport incident. • RADIOLOGICAL – TRANSPORTATION: Many small radiological shipments, primarily medical, are moved around Albuquerque every day. WIPP shipments do pass through Albuquerque; however, the material is transported as large solids and is of concern only if it is ingested. Should traffic be on a detour, WIPP shipments are delayed until their approved routes are again open. A Department of Energy radiological emergency response team is headquartered in Albuquerque. • HAZMAT – TRANSPORTATION: The CNM Workforce Training Center has the greatest exposure to a hazardous materials transportation accident due to its proximity to I-25. The transportation flow studies of the Albuquerque area show that the majority of large shipments are on the railroad and the interstates. Deliveries within the city and county are generally made by smaller vehicle. University Avenue and Isleta Boulevard are sometimes used as I-25 detours. WIPP shipments do pass through Albuquerque; however, the material is transported as large solids and is of concern only if it is ingested. Should traffic be on a detour, WIPP shipments are delayed until their approved routes are again open. MEDICAL EMERGENCIES See Appendix D4 (Pg.65): A medical emergency exists when a person or persons unexpectedly require assistance as a result of an injury, accident, or sudden onset of symptoms due to an illness. Examples: difficulty breathing; heart palpitations; tightness of the chest; severe bleeding; fractures; sprains; choking; burns; poisoning; overdose; unconsciousness. Individuals may be severely injured, having a seizure, not breathing, or have no heartbeat. Seizures and injuries are the medical emergencies most frequently reported at CNM. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 25 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 26. SEVERE STORM See Appendix D4 (Pg.67): A severe storm weather emergency exists when storm conditions threaten the safety of employees, students and visitors. In Albuquerque, winter storms rarely last more than a day or two. The topography of the campuses makes each one unique in snow accumulation. Extraordinary accumulation of snow may cause roof collapse of the flat roofed buildings. The impact of the storm on CNM would depend upon the response of the city and county to the storm effects. STRUCTURAL AND URBAN FIRE See Appendix D4 (Pg.66): A structural fire emergency exists when the fire has adverse effects on lives or property. The CNM facilities are separated by streets and open space from concentrated building groups. It is unlikely that fire would spread from other structures to CNM structures. There is the possibility that internal fires could spread from one CNM building to another, but this is remote. However a major urban fire would potentially impact transportation flow, electrical distribution, and emergency services response time. This category would also include structural fires. The loss of all or part of any CNM building could have a major impact on the operations of the school. SYSTEMS FAILURE (Technological Emergencies) See Appendix D4 (Pg.66): A systems outage exists when major telephone, network, or server systems are not available. Historically, interruptions of power service, HVAC, natural gas, sewer systems, and telecommunications and network capability have been infrequent and short-term, inflicting minimal damage on college operations. • POWER FAILURE: Long-term power failure would require the closing of the buildings or campuses involved. At this time, there is insufficient power generation capability to maintain operations over the long haul. • NATURAL GAS DISTRIBUTION DISRUPTION: CNM uses natural gas for heating buildings and water. All CNM kitchens cook with gas. CNM has both regular and high pressure lines. Some of the lines are CNM’s and some belong to PNM. • SEWER SYSTEM: All CNM facilities are on municipal sewer systems. Breakage in the system could render facilities on the sites unusable. • TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORK CAPABILITY: Long-term outages could potentially result in high impacts for internal systems that could not be readily transferred to a manual mode (such as course registration through Banner during peak registration times). CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 26 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 27. FLOOD/FLASH FLOOD Only the South Valley facility (located on a flood plain) has the potential to be impacted directly by flooding. However, flooding would potentially interrupt transportation routes and electrical power. Flooding which destroys any of the Rio Grande bridges would interrupt services between CNM facilities. Concern for the Community The Plan may also be activated during a regional crisis that may impact CNM’s personnel or business operations. Examples of such occurrences include but are not limited to, a serious toxic spill on the Interstate, a brushfire in a local area, or a major disaster event at a nearby educational institution. Any of these may necessitate a Plan activation to coordinate emergency information or safety precautions and support services for personnel. A major emergency in the local community that affects students, faculty, and staff is a CNM emergency. IV. PREVENTION MANAGEMENT & PREPARATION Preparation Emergencies can occur at any time usually without warning. When an emergency occurs, the safety and prompt recovery of our college community depends on the preparedness and careful response of our students, staff, faculty, and visitors. To this end CNM is committed to an education and training program, preparation of area emergency plans, widespread distribution of emergency preparedness information, and the ongoing exercise of the emergency plans across the college. Training The structure of the annual training program is designed to acquaint all members of the CNM community with their roles in emergency response. All CNM personnel are required to attend this training. The framework of the training includes: • Overview of the CNM Emergency Management Plan • 3-Step Response to an Emergency • Emergency Preparedness • Emergency Communication Plan Additional training is required for potential and/or identified members of: • Policy Group • Finance Group • Operations Group • Logistics Group • Planning Group • Emergency and Deputy Emergency Coordinators CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 27 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 28. Pre-Incident Management - Reducing the Possibility of Risks and Hazards In addition to preparation and training, an important part of pre-incident management is taking preventative measures to prevent emergencies and mitigate their effects should they occur. It is recommended that CNM community members do the following: FIRE PREVENTION • Be aware of building exits & assure that they are never blocked • Know the location of Safe Areas in multi-story buildings • Note the location of alarms and extinguishers & know how to use them • Leave fire doors closed at all times • Extension cords must not be used as permanent wiring • Multiple outlets must contain surge protection • Use only grounded electrical plugs • Clear all obstructed corridors, aisles, and room exits • Do not use mechanical rooms, electrical rooms, or utility rooms for storage • Comply with no smoking regulations in all CNM buildings BEFORE A POWER EMERGENCY • Store back-up and duplicates of critical data offsite • Prevent overload of surge protective power strips • Locate emergency power outlets in your area (designated for priority functions only) • Determine if there is emergency lighting in your area. • Know where flashlights are stored in every area • Identify and prioritize vital power-dependent functions, operations, and equipment LABORATORY AND LIVE WORK AREA SAFETY • Maintain a clean work environment • Post safety work rules, train all personnel • Follow all posted safety documents • Inventory and label chemicals, submitting inventory to the safety office yearly • Store chemicals properly & secured • Keep eyewashes, showers, and fire extinguishers accessible & working properly • Keep copies of Material Safety Data Sheets on site & originals in main office • Know emergency power shutdown options • Avoid high storage of heavy items, follow OSHA Guidelines • Chain compressed gas cylinders at 1/3 and 2/3 points • Dispose of chemical waste properly WINTER STORM SAFETY • Keep an emergency kit handy in your car • Know the location of first aid kits at work • Keep flashlights in every area • Know safe alternative routes between home and campus • Listen to local media reports for storm and traffic updates • Call the CNM Snowline (224-4766) for notice of schedule changes or classes and for other information relative to the storm emergency CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 28 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 29. Emergency Cards All CNM employees should be provided with wallet-sized emergency cards. These cards list all emergency contact phone numbers. Additional cards may be obtained by contacting the CNM Marketing & Communications Office. Emergency Action Plan (EAP) Each department and unit at CNM is required to maintain an Emergency Action Plan. Every Emergency Action Plan (EAP) is patterned after the college Emergency Management Plan (EMP) but may contain additional information as required for a specific campus or unit. The following section contains a template for this Emergency Action Plan (EAP). Each Emergency Action Plan (EAP): • Designates Emergency Coordinators for each CNM building. Their responsibilities are contained in a Job Action Checklist found in Appendix C (Pg.53). • Includes evacuation procedures for each building • Designates a Satellite Operations Center location. This location is patterned after the Institute’s Emergency Operations Center. Planning for Evacuation Each Emergency Action Plan (EAP) includes evacuation procedures specific to the campus and each building. Each Emergency Action Plan (EAP) will designate an Assembly Point (AP). CNM has adopted signage with this symbol to denote Emergency Assembly Point locations: A Assembly Point locations are safe outdoor destinations, located at a safe distance from buildings where CNM personnel meet to notify “Emergency Coordinators” of their safety and get emergency information and assistance. All CNM buildings have a designated Assembly Point. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 29 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 30. V. RESPONSE TACTICS 3-Step Response: The basic emergency procedures outlined in this section of the Emergency Management Plan (EMP) are designed to enhance the protection of lives and property through an effective use of campus resources and the reaction of CNM employees trained in emergencies. CNM has devised a 3-step reaction as the foundation of the basic emergency plan. These reaction tactics form the basis for the Emergency Management Plan (EMP) training. Often CNM personnel are the first to become aware of an actual or potential emergency. This training prepares employees to react appropriately by following these 3-steps: recognize, strategize, and react Step 1: CNM personnel recognize & gather the following information: o What do you see? o Where are you? o What is being said? o What do you think is happening? o Are people and resources being threatened? o Has anyone been injured? Step 2: Employees strategize by determining more specific information about the incident and formulating a response plan including: o Who is involved (student, employee, public)? o What is their demeanor (compliant, threatening)? o What is my role? o Can I handle this situation or should I contact the next level of authority? o Who do I notify? o What is my plan? Step 3: Employees are trained to react: o What Level (1, 2, or 3) of risk response is most appropriate? o Contact appropriate personnel at this time. o Assist if possible, per role responsibilities and if trained to do so. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 30 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 31. Determination of Emergency Situation Report the Incident Depending on the emergency level deemed reasonable for the situation, employees should report an incident first to their supervisor. In situations requiring immediate reporting – e.g. a health emergency – employees should first call 911 on a campus phone, then their supervisor. Incidents should be reported to CNM Security using the questions on the 3-Step Reaction Tactics on page 30 above as guidelines for conveying the situation in detail. Using the information provided, CNM Security will assess the level of risk and initiate the appropriate emergency management process. Level 1 Emergency o Level 1 risk's are minor incidents that may be resolved with internal resources or very limited help from outside agencies. o Level 1 risk's will not engage the Incident Management System (IMS). Level 2 Emergency o Level 2 risks will require Security to notify the President/Acting President who will notify the Vice President of Administrative Services. o Because Level 2 situations are considered of moderate risk to the College, the Vice President of Administrative Services, in consultation with the Emergency Executive Team (EET), will work with CNM Security and the appropriate members of the (Emergency Management Team (EMT) to resolve the situation. Level 3 Emergency o Level 3 risks require Security to notify the President/Acting President, who will mobilize the Emergency Executive Team (EET). The Incident Management System (IMS) is activated and the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Director appoints the appropriate Emergency Management Team (EMT). o Level 3 risks are considered major emergencies or disasters that impact a sizeable portion of the College and compromise operations. The Emergency Management Team (EMT) will work with the Marketing and Communications Office to arrange release of information. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 31 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 32. 3-St ep Response t o an Incident S tep 1 S tep 2 Re cognize Str ate gize Ga ther th e info rmat i n: o Incident Reaction and Incident Reaction and • What is t he inciden t? • Wh at do you see ? • Wh ere are yo u? Reporti ng at CNM Reporti ng at CNM • Who is in v lv d ( s dent, o e e mploye e, pub li ) ? c tu • Wh at is be i g said? n • What is t heir d emean or • Wh at do you th i k is n ( comp li nt, th reat ening)? a ha ppenin g? • What is m y role ? S tep 3 • Ar e peo ple and resou rces be ing thr eaten ed? Re spond • Can I handle this situat i n or o sh ould I contact th e ne x level of t • Has anyon e be en injur ed? a utho rity? •Wha t Level (1, 2, or 3 ) of r isk is • Who d o I not i y? f most appr opr i te? a • What is m y plan ? t •Con tact app rop riate p erson nel en Inci d at th is time. M aj o or r Inc n •Assist if po ssi le, pe r role b Mi resp onsibilities. Wh at ide docu ment ation is ne eded? nt Le ve l 1 L ev el 2 Le vel 3 A m i n i nci de n th at ma y b e res o v e or t l d A m i d ev e e me rg en cy th i mp ac t a cam pu l l at s s A m aj r e m e rg nc y th at i m p a ts a o e c w i h i n rna l re s o u es o v ery l i mi te d t te rc r an d re i re s h el fro m o uts i e a en c i s qu p d g e s i za bl po rti n o f 1 or m o re c a mp us es e o h l p fr o o u i de ag en i e s e m ts c o r a d s aster tha t i nvol ve s th en ti e i e r c ampu s a po ss i b y the su rro un di g nd l n c om mu n i y . t What shou ld you do? What s hould you d o? Em pl o e e o n s i e : y t Emp l oyee on s i te: What should you d o? Im m e i a l y C o ta ct C NM S e u ri ty at 9 11 d te n c Imm ed a te l Con a t CNM Se c u ty a 9 11 - on i y t c ri t Emp l o yee o n s i te: - on any CNM ph ne o r22 4-30 01 i f u i n g a o s a y C NM p h ne or 22 4 -3 00 1 i f u i ng a ce l l n o s Imm ed i tel con ta ct CN M Sec uri y a y t c el ph e on p on e h a 91 1 - on an CN M p ho n o r t y e Ca l l s up e i sor rv 224-30 0 1 i f u i n g a cel l p h e s on Se c u ri y Empl oye e o n si te : t Secu ri ty Em pl y e e on si te : o Wh t i s m y rol e? a M e a te th e si tu at o n usi n g th e 3-Ste di i p Contac t P re i de t/Ac ti g Pre si d en t s n n Wh re s h ul d I g o? e o pro c e s to p l a th s trat gy yo u de el pe d s n e e v o Securi ty Em p l y ee on si te : o to reso l ve i n i d e c nt. Us e area gu de l n es i i an c ol e ge ’ po l c i s a p ro e du re to d l s i e nd c s Contac t P re i de n s t/Ac ti g Presi d en t n di ffu e t e i n i d e t. Con ta t n xt l v e l of s h c n c e e s u erv i i on i f yo u do n ot fee c o mforta e p s l bl ha n i n the si tua on dl g ti L eve l 1 : L eve l 2 or 3 : In te rna l Vi c e P re i d t s en Em gency er *La w * Exte nal r Se curi ty a nd of Management Team Enforce m ent Em ergen y c Sa fety A d i ni tra v e m s ti Re spon e s Serv i es c Ha d e L vel 3 i n ci d n a d i n ti a s re o n l s e e t n i te c very acti ons Ha d e s L vel 1 n l e Ha n l s L e e 2 i n i en de v l cd t n I ci d ent On -Sc en e C omm and *Con t cte fo su p r t a n a si sta ce a d r po d s n Po s t - In c i en t d * R o n g p ro t co l a l y to a l 3 l e e s ep rti o s pp v l C o m a d er m n CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 32 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 33. Building Evacuation Instructions The building should be evacuated whenever: • The fire alarm sounds • Security requests the building to be evacuated • In the opinion of Department Heads and/or supervisors a need exists • When asked to do so by the Emergency Coordinator designated for the building. Once the order to evacuate is given, verbally or by the alarm system, all occupants are to leave. This includes CNM staff, students, and visitors in the building. Representatives of CNM Security, Safety, and Maintenance Departments may remain in the building to verify that the evacuation is complete and that the building is secure. A. When the building is evacuated, occupants shall leave immediately and should: • Take purse/wallet, keys, medications (DO NOT bring other people’s things) • Take other items which are personally critical • Assist those in need to safe areas • Turn off coffee pots and other heating devices Time Should NOT be taken to: • turn off any office equipment such as computers, printers, and copy machines • remove personal possessions other than essentials from the building • remove bicycles from the building • complete telephone calls • forward telephone lines • use the elevators Classes or work groups should assemble outside the building at the appropriate Assembly Point (AP) so that verification of complete evacuation can be made. Instructors or group leaders should account for people in their group and report this information and receive instructions. B. Report to the assigned assembly point. Remain at assembly point until given the “all clear” from authorized personnel. C. The Emergency Coordinator reports any missing students or personnel to the Emergency Operations Center (EOC). Building re-opening and continuation of function information will be available on the CNM telephone information line, 224-4766 if the building will be closed for an extended period of time. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 33 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 34. Emergency Information and Communication Release of Information The Marketing and Communications Office is responsible for the release of all information regarding emergencies at CNM. Employees are directed to refer requests for information regarding incidents, emergencies or disasters at CNM to the Marketing and Communications Office at extension 4667. A complete copy of the CNM Emergency Communication Management Plan will be made available on the CNM Web Site. Information will be released internally to CNM employees, students and stakeholders as soon as possible within the constraints of the situation. Factors contributing to the delay of information dissemination may include an immediate shortage of information or breakdown or destruction of equipment. Should internal communication be impossible, and depending on the gravity of the situation, employees should monitor the news media for additional information. In situations involving Level 2 or 3 incidents, accidents or disasters, the following steps are taken by the Marketing and Communications Office in conjunction with the Emergency Management Team (EMT) and/or designated College individual or department: • Gather situation facts. • Verify information. • Coordinate necessary equipment and personnel as determined by CNM’s Emergency Action Plan. Relocate if necessary. • Disseminate information to employees, students and other internal stakeholders at first available opportunity. Information to be disseminated via email or broadcast voicemail, if available. • Disseminate information to public via news media. • Continue steps 1-5 as needed throughout situation. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 34 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 35. Area Emergency Communication CNM is committed to prompt dissemination of accurate information in the event of an emergency at or near any of its sites. To assure the prompt, adequate, and accurate flow of communication during a disaster, CNM departments must send emergency impact reports to their Satellite Operations Center (SOC) and the Satellite Operations Center (SOC) transmits the information to the CNM Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The Chief Communications Officer gathers the information from the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and is responsible for the release of all information regarding emergencies. The Emergency Operations Center (EOC) serves as the central coordination point for deploying information. The flow of disaster information is shown graphically below: Department 1 Emergency Management Team (EMT) Department 2 Director or Dean at the (SOC) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Department 3 Telephone Call Tree: In the event of a Level 3 emergency, the following call tree will assure rapid communication to all administrative level personnel. It is recommended that each department/unit include a similar telephone call tree in their Emergency Action Plan. CENTRAL NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY COLLEGE 35 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN Last Updated: February 18, 2008
  • 36. SECURITY President Governing Board TELEPHONE CALLING Vice President for TREE Marketing & Administrative Services Communications Vice President for Vice President For Executive Director Vice President for Planning & Academic Affairs of Physical Plant Student Services Budget Executive Executive Executive Director Executive Associate Vice Fiscal Academic Director Dean of Special Director of Construction for Planning, Budget Director ‘s President for Operations Schools Organizational Students Services Human Services & Institutional for Enrollment Comptroller Applied Learning Resources Research Academic Management Technologies Affairs Accounting Workforce Student Life Job HR Represen - Accounts Director Tax Help Enrollment Mechanical Training & Student Connection tatives Payable NM Academic Services Services Center Discipline Center Quality Business & Improvement Information Accounts Executive Director Employee Receivable Project Technology Information Office of Academic Center for Relations Cashiers TRIO Grant Operations Technology Economic Advisement & Community Manager Services Learning Development Career Programs & Resources Candelaria Development Partnerships Payroll Center Campus Policies & Contracts & Food Grants Audit & Safety Procedures Maintenance Director Services Officer Instructional Education Assessment Media Communication Partnership Services Resources Humanities & Academic Safety & Purchasing Social Sciences Bookstore Technology Security Campus Support Services Distance Special Management : School of Financial Aid Learning Projects Montoya, South Adult & Student Materials & Applications General Health Valley, Westside Safety Support Services Inventory Control Education Center Recruitment K-12 Orientation & Relations IT Support Health, Transitional Academic Key Duplicating & Services Services Wellness & Security Postal Center Public Safety Post Secondary School Records Retention Infrastructure Math , Science Relations & Property Support Services & Parking Engineering Control
  • 37. VI. RECOVERY Plan Deactivation Following stabilization of the conditions that caused the emergency plan to be activated, the Vice President for Administrative Services, in consultation with outside agencies and the members of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), will discontinue activities under the plan. A formal announcement will be made and disseminated to the college community by the Marketing and Communications Office. Any modifications to normal activities of the college will be included in this announcement. Plan Reassessment As soon as possible after termination of Level 2 or Level 3 operations, the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) members, departmental responders, and constituent groups will meet to evaluate the effectiveness of the emergency plan implementation. The Vice President for Administrative Services will issue a written “After-Action Summary Report”. The Vice President for Administrative Services will coordinate appropriate Emergency Management Plan (EMP) revisions with the Emergency Management Plan Task Team. Cost Recovery: Prior to closing the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), the Vice President for Administrative Services, in consultation with the Emergency Executive Team (EET) and the Emergency Management Team (EMT), shall appoint an ERWG (Emergency Recovery Work Group), to recover the college costs due to the emergency. This task group will include as a minimum: • Vice President for Academic Affairs • Foundation Director • Vice President for Student Services • Comptroller • Vice President Administrative Services • Director of Risk Manager & Safety • Vice President for Planning & Budget • Legal Counsel • Executive Director, Physical Plant • Purchasing Departments need to prepare internal cost and loss documentation summaries as soon as feasible after an emergency to enable this task group to complete their charge. Business Resumption: All college departments are expected to develop business resumption plans that identify their essential programs and records. CNM financial officers should be included in the process. (Much of this information will be similar to plans developed to meet the contingencies identified in Y2K planning.) This business continuity planning is dependent upon the following core activities: • Identification of department mission critical processes • Development of procedures for restoring critical processes given the parameters of the incident and externally dictated time lines • Level of process needed and facility requirements • Level of participation needed from the local business community • Interim procedures to supply department mission critical processes • Criteria for determining return to normal business
  • 38. APPENDICES A: GLOSSARY OF TERMS: Emergency Management Plan (EMP) Outlines the college’s procedures for managing incidents that may threaten the safety of one or all of its facilities and/or their communities, or disrupt programs, activities, and/or mission-critical services Emergency Levels Establishes emergencies at three levels as follows: Level 1 Any incident which will not seriously affect the overall functional capacity of the college shall be handled routinely through normal security procedures. Level 2 Any incident which affects an entire building, or buildings, and which may threaten life safety and the overall operations of the college or one of its campuses. Normally help from outside emergency services is required. Level 3 An event or occurrence that has actually taken place and has seriously impaired or halted the operations of the college or one of its campuses. A coordinated effort of all campus-wide resources and outside emergency services is required. Incident Management System (IMS) Coordinates CNM’s emergency procedures planning with the City of Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, and other agencies and organizations to ensure that CNM procedures are consistent with current government practice Emergency Action Plans Established for a broad range of specific threats and emergencies including bomb threats, civil disturbance, fire, hazardous materials release, medical emergencies, systems outage, and severe storms. Incident Management Team (IMT) Is mobilized by the President during an incident, operates from the Emergency Operations Center and advises the President and Executive Team. On-Scene Command Post Provides a safe area nearby or adjacent to the physical location of the emergency from which response activities and decisions are made. Emergency Management Team (EMT) Is a policy group mobilized by the President to address Level 3 emergencies. Composed of: President; Vice Presidents of Academic Affairs, Administration, Student Services, Planning & Budget; Marketing & Communications; Risk Management & Safety
  • 39. Appendices A: GLOSSARY OF TERMS, continued Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Established during a Level 3 event where the appropriate Emergency Management Team (EMT) advises the President and the Executive Emergency Team (EET), to establish response strategies and tactics, and deploy resources.
  • 40. Appendices Acronyms AEP (Area Emergency Plan) are executed DEC (Deputy Emergency Coordinator) Area Emergency Plan EAP (Emergency Action Plan) contains guides for upgrading the incident to a level 3 emergency where the IMS is activated & additional procedures & other resources will be invoked. see page 25 for categories that are to be provided on the EAP EC (Emergency Coordinator) Area Emergency Plan o Ensures that all key personnel regularly assigned to their building are trained in proper evacuation routes o Ensures the correct emergency assembly points, & o Serves as the communication liaison to the EOC. See Appendix for EC checklist page 52 ECMP (Emergency Communication Management Plan) EET (Emergency Executive Team) pg.5 EME (Emergency Management Exercise) each year EMP (Emergency Management Plan) EMPT (Emergency Management Plan Team) pg.5 EMPTT (Emergency Management Plan Task Team) EMS (Emergency Management System) pg.8 EMT (Emergency Management Team) pg.5 o Drawn from senior administration o Coordinates campus response to emergencies o President mobilizes, operates @ EOC, advises EET EOC (Emergency Operations Center) at established, locations: o Security (901 Buena Vista) o Westside o Mobile Unit EPTP (Emergency Preparedness Training Program) pg. 10 ERT (Emergency Response Team/s) Fig.5, page 23 ERWG (Emergency Recovery Work Group) departmental business resumption plans, appointed by EMT IAP (Incident Action Plan) or EAP IM/IC (Incident Manager / Incident Commander) IMS (Incident Management System) activated, comprised of policy, operations, planning, logistics & finance IMT (Incident Management Team) JAC (Job Action Checklist) RQ (Reportable Quantity) SOC’s (Satellite Operations Centers), located at offices of Deans & Directors WTC (Workforce Training Center)
  • 41. Appendices B. THREATS AND EMERGENCIES: The following section presents a comprehensive list of foreseen hazards. The list is built upon the 20 hazards included in the New Mexico’s All Hazards Plan but has been augmented to better reflect hazards faced by our college. Clearly some hazards represent more likely threats to our campus community than others. A careful and comprehensive vulnerability analysis pointed to a number of hazards requiring specific guidelines. These guidelines are contained in the Emergency Action Plans (EAP). In addition to the procedures for handling these specific types of incidents, the EAP contains guides for upgrading the incident to a Level 3 Emergency where the Incident Management System (IMS) is activated and additional procedures, resources etc. will be invoked. Types (Categories) of Hazards Natural Hazards Technological/Human-related Hazards Avalanche Bomb Threats Drought Civil Disturbance Earthquakes Dam Failure Flood/Flash Flood Extended Power Outages/Systems Failure Hurricane/Tropical Storm Hazardous Materials Release Landslides Hazmat – Fixed Facility (Check EAP) Severe Storm Medical Emergencies Tornadoes Natural Gas Distribution Disruption Volcano Radiological – Fixed Facility Wildfire Radiological Transportation Sewer System Structural Fires or Explosions Subsidence System Failure Transportation Incident – Air/Rail
  • 42. Appendices AVALANCHE No CNM sites are in avalanche zones. BOMB THREATS AND SUSPICIOUS PACKAGES A bomb threat condition exists when a suspected bomb/explosive device has been reported, but not located. An emergency exists when there is an apparent threat to life or property resulting from a bomb threat. CIVIL DISTURBANCE The proximity of Main Campus to the UNM campus increases the chances of spill over to CNM. As we do not have research laboratories or high profile researchers, terrorism against targeted facilities is unlikely. Domestic violence and stalking are occasional happenings at our sites. Major civil disturbance events in the area could cause closure of CNM sites. Specific plans to counteract and respond to civil disturbance incidents should not be published as that may lead to circumvention. Bomb threats could also be considered in this category. DAM FAILURE No CNM sites are immediately downstream from dams with impounded water. Dam failure upstream on the Rio Grande would cause flooding in the area. DROUGHT Drought conditions would probably result in water restrictions. Landscaping would be impacted, although recent plantings have been chosen with water usage considerations. At least three instructional programs would be impacted: Semiconductor Manufacturing, Cosmetology, and Culinary Arts. CNM would be governed by the restrictions placed by local government. EARTHQUAKE New Mexico’s geology does not produce the massive earthquakes of single fault line geology. Numerous small quakes are recorded every day, generally below 3.0 on the Richter scale. EXTENDED POWER OUTAGES/SYSTEM FAILURE Long-term power failure would require the closing of the buildings or campuses involved. At this time, there is insufficient power generation capability to maintain operations over the long haul. FLOOD/FLASH FLOOD Only the South Valley Campus (located on a flood plain) has the potential to be impacted directly by flooding. However, flooding would potentially interrupt transportation routes and electrical power. Flooding which destroys any of the Rio Grande bridges would interrupt services between campuses.
  • 43. Appendices HAZARDOUS MATERIALS RELEASE CNM Workforce Training Center (WTC) has the greatest exposure to a hazardous materials transportation accident due to its proximity to I-25. The transportation flow studies of the Albuquerque area show that the majority of large shipments are on the railroad and the interstates. Deliveries within the city and county are generally made by smaller vehicle. University Avenue and Isleta Boulevard are sometimes used as I-25 detours. WIPP shipment material is transported as large solids and is of concern only if it is ingested. Should traffic be on a detour, WIPP shipments are delayed until their approved routes are again open. HAZMAT – FIXED FACILITY CNM does not store hazardous materials above their Reportable Quantity (RQ) on any campus. HURRICANE/TROPICAL STORM Unlikely in the Albuquerque area LANDSLIDE No CNM buildings are located where they would be in the path of a landslide. MEDICAL EMERGENCY A medical emergency exists when an individual is severely injured, having a seizure, not breathing, or has no heartbeat. Seizures and injuries are the medical emergencies most frequently reported at CNM. NATURAL GAS DISTRIBUTION DISRUPTION CNM uses natural gas for heating buildings and water. All of the kitchens cook with gas. CNM has both regular and high pressure lines. Some of the lines are CNM’s and some belong to PNM. RADIOLOGICAL – FIXED FACILITY No radiological materials in other than household quantities (smoke detectors and other detection devices) are known to be on campus. RADIOLOGICAL – TRANSPORTATION Many small radiological shipments, primarily medical, are moved around Albuquerque every day. WIPP shipments do pass through Albuquerque; however, the material is transported as large solids and is of concern only if it is ingested. Should traffic be on a detour, WIPP shipments are delayed until their approved routes are again open. A Department of Energy radiological emergency response team is headquartered in Albuquerque.
  • 44. Appendices SEVERE STORM In Albuquerque, winter storms rarely last more than a day or two. The topography of the campuses makes each one unique in snow accumulation. Extraordinary accumulation of snow may cause roof collapse of flat-roofed buildings. The impact of the storm on CNM would depend upon the response of the city and county to the storm effects. SEWER SYSTEM All of the campuses are on municipal sewer systems. Breakage in the system could make some facilities on the campuses unusable. STRUCTURAL FIRES or EXPLOSIONS CNM facilities are separated by streets and open space from concentrated building groups. It is unlikely that fire would spread from other structures to CNM structures. There is the possibility that internal fires could spread from a CNM building to another one, but this is remote. However a major urban fire would potentially impact transportation flow, electrical distribution, and emergency services response time. This category would also include structural fires. The loss of all or part of any CNM building could have a major impact on the operations of the school. SUBSIDENCE Subsidence of proportion to collapse a building is very unlikely. Water line leakages could cause parking lot, street and walkway collapse. As water bills are monitored, significant leakage in a line would be flagged due to increased usage. SYSTEMS FAILURE (Technological Emergencies) Historically, interruptions of power service (as discussed above), HVAC, telecommunications and network capability have been infrequent and short-term, inflicting minimal damage on college operations. Long-term outages could potentially result in high impacts for internal systems that could not be readily transferred to a manual mode such as course registration through Banner during peak registration times. TORNADO Occurrence is about every 25 to 30 years in the area. It is highly unlikely that all sites would be in the path of tornados from the same storm. TRANSPORT INCIDENT – AIR/RAIL None of the CNM sites are adjacent to a rail line. Main Campus and South Valley Campus are on military and commercial flight paths. The Workforce Training Center (WFT) is adjacent to I-25 and could be directly impacted by a transport incident. VOLCANO No CNM sites are adjacent to dormant volcanoes.
  • 45. Appendices WILDFIRE None of the CNM facilities are at risk from wildfire. However, wildfires could impact significant numbers of students and disrupt electrical service and traffic flow. We will address the impact of wildfire in the discussion of traffic flow and electrical service.
  • 46. C. JOB RESPONSIBILITIES (JOB ACTION CHECKLISTS) Central New Mexico Community College Incident Management System (IMS) Job Action Sheet Emergency Operation Center Personnel FOR: EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER (EOC) DIRECTOR MISSION: • Coordinates the collection of information to determine the severity of the emergency. • Develops a working group of specialists to assist with the assessment and inspection of damaged areas. • Implements the inspection and closing of damaged campus areas. • If applicable, assists CNM Security with the search and closing of damaged campus buildings. • Conducts inspections of campus facilities, emergency construction or repairs, and debris clearance from roadways. • Makes provisions for temporary utilities services. REPORTS TO: CNM President and Policy Group TASKS: Appoint the Following Primary Operations Group Staff: Deputy, EOC Director Risk Management & Safety Officer Security Officer Legal Officer Chief Communications Officer Liaison Officer Logistics Function Group Operation Function Group Planning Function Group Finance Function Group
  • 47. During Incident: • Report to the designated Emergency Operations Center (EOC) location • Get situation briefing from Incident Commander (IC) at the On-Scene Command Post • Ensure that each Emergency Operations Center (EOC) function is covered and represented in the decision-making processes • Delegate a liaison to the Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) • Provide oversight for strategic response to the emergency event • On an ongoing basis: o Advise Policy Group, Emergency Executive Team (EET) of changing conditions o Communicate Policy Group decisions and actions to Incident Management Team (IMT) o Coordinate with Marketing and Communications Office regarding internal and external emergency bulletins o Communicate with Operations Group (Emergency Operations Center Personnel) and monitor changing conditions o Inform Logistics and Finance Group of resource requirements o Ensure Planning Group priorities are communicated to entire Incident Management Team (IMT) Activate the following advisory groups, as necessary: Policy Group (President, etc.) Technical Group Student Group Health Group Post incident: • Inform President of situation status, request deactivation of the Incident Management System (IMS) • Assemble the appropriate team for "incident debrief" (i.e. President, Emergency Management Steering Team, representatives from each Emergency Management Team function) • Prepare Post-Incident Report evaluating the effectiveness, efficiency, appropriateness, and adequacy of the emergency response • Appoint Emergency Recovery Work Group (ERWG) to address cost recovery and coordinate business resumption procedures as laid out in business resumption plans
  • 48. Central New Mexico Community College Incident Management System (IMS) - Job Action Sheet Emergency Operation Center Personnel ROLE: OPERATIONS CHIEF MISSION: • Responsible for developing the operations portion of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) “Emergency Action Plan (EAP)” • Organizes and directs the tactical response relating to operations including supervising operations, assigning personnel, and determining the needs for additional resources. • Overall, this functional group coordinates tactical operations and carries out directives of the Emergency Operations Center Director (EOCD). REPORTS TO: Emergency Operations Center Director (EOCD) TASKS: Appoint the Following Primary Staff: Deputy Operations Chief During Incident: • Report to the designated Emergency Operations Center location • Get situation briefing from Emergency Operations Center Director; assess current CNM status • Review Operations Chief responsibilities • Ensure that there is a liaison to interface with the Planning Group, the Logistics Group and the Finance Group • Assign an aide to document all actions and events related to the tactical response • On an ongoing basis: o Brief Emergency Operations Center Director on all actions and events related to tactical response o Assess the need for further evacuations if appropriate o Authorize emergency response, repair and remediation activities o Determine whether to activate additional personnel working with Logistics Group o Establish special services as needed and provide appropriate security as necessary o Obtain updates regularly from all affected departments and units; maintain current status as appropriate o Communicate supply, equipment, and service requests to the Logistics Group o Monitor staff for fatigue and stress and provide staff with rest and relief periods Post Incident: • Document all actions and retain • Prepare the After-Action Report as part of the Post-Incident Report evaluating the effectiveness, efficiency, appropriateness, and adequacy of the tactical emergency response
  • 49. Central New Mexico Community College Incident Management System - Job Action Sheet Emergency Operation Center Personnel ROLE: PLANNING CHIEF MISSION: • Responsible for preparation and documentation of the Emergency Operations Center “Action Plan.” • This functional group collects, evaluates, and disseminates information related to the incident or emergency and maintains information on the current and forecasted situation. REPORTS TO: Emergency Operations Center Director TASKS: Appoint the Following Primary Staff: Deputy Planning Chief Information Liaison During Incident: • Report to the designated Emergency Operations Center location • Get situation briefing from Emergency Operations Center Director; assess current CNM status • Review Planning Chief responsibilities • Ensure that there is a liaison to interface with the Operations Group, • Assess and prioritize tactical planning priorities based upon Policy Group directives • Assess and prioritize emergency reports and develop an EOC “Action Plan” based upon Emergency Management Team strategic policies • Assign an aide to document all actions and events related to tactical planning priorities • On an ongoing basis: o Brief Emergency Operations Center Director and Operations Chief on all Policy Group planning priorities related to tactical response o Regularly reassess and modify “Action Plan” and communicate need for modifications to the Emergency Operations Center Director o Obtain updates regularly from Operation Chief Post incident: • Document all actions and retain • Prepare the After-Action Incident Planning Report as part of the Post-Incident Report evaluating the effectiveness, efficiency, appropriateness, and adequacy of planning during the tactical emergency response
  • 50. Central New Mexico Community College Incident Management System - Job Action Sheet Emergency Operation Center Personnel ROLE: FINANCE CHIEF MISSION: responsible for monitoring procurements, costs, contracts and other financial and administrative considerations. This functional group documents emergency expenditures and losses and implements insurance claims. REPORTS TO: Emergency Operations Center Director TASKS: Appoint the Following Primary Staff: Deputy Finance Chief During Incident: • Report to the designated Emergency Operations Center location • Get situation briefing from Emergency Operations Center Director and Operations Chief; assess current CNM status • Review Finance Chief responsibilities • Ensure that there is a liaison to interface with the Planning Group, Operations Group and the Logistics Group • Assign an aide to document all actions and events related to purchasing and procuring additional resources • On an ongoing basis: o Assist Logistics Chief with purchase and procurement of additional CNM resources o Work with Logistics Chief to assure appropriate procedures are followed and documented o Work with the Logistics Chief to ensure that damage impacts are recorded before repairs are made and resources purchased and that photographic evidence is maintained, etc. Collect copies of all appropriate notes, tapes, photographs, videos and any other existing records of damage from affected departments, programs, and units. o Prepare estimates of emergency’s impacts and anticipated recovery times. Provide summary reports to Operations Chief. o Begin the documentation of insurance and emergency assistance claim forms. Post incident: • Coordinate ongoing coordination of damage claims process
  • 51. • Prepare the Damage Impact Report as part of the Post-Incident Report evaluating the financial impact of the emergency. Central New Mexico Community College Incident Management System - Job Action Sheet Emergency Operation Center Personnel ROLE: LOGISTICS CHIEF MISSION: Obtains resources to implement the operational response. REPORTS TO: Operations Chief TASKS: Appoint the Following Primary Staff: Deputy Logistics Chief During Incident: • Report to the designated Emergency Operations Center location • Get situation briefing from Emergency Operations Center Director and Operations Chief; assess current CNM status • Review Logistics Chief responsibilities • Ensure that there is a liaison to interface with the Operations Group and the Finance Group • Assign an aide to document all actions and events related to obtaining additional resources • On an ongoing basis: o Assist Operations Chief with activation of additional CNM resources o Work with Finance Chief to assure appropriate procedures are followed and documented o Obtain supplies, equipment, or services to support emergency response o Identify and contract with external experts, contractors or vendors, or local area mutual aid responders as requested by the Operations Chief o Working with the Operations Chief, arrange and stage the delivery of incoming resources o Report recovery resource needs to the Operations Chief o Regularly reassess and modify resource recovery need Post incident: • Summarize and document space, facility, and personnel needs to achieve full program resumption and institutional recovery
  • 52. • Prepare the Resource Recovery Response Report as part of the Post-Incident Report evaluating the effectiveness, efficiency, appropriateness, and adequacy of the tactical resource response Central New Mexico Community College Incident Management System - Job Action Sheet ROLE: Emergency Coordinator TASKS: • Maintain current and accessible list of employees regularly assigned to the building (assigned personnel groups) • Maintain current and accessible list of employees with special needs in the event of a building evacuation. Determine routes of evacuation and areas of rescue assistance for special needs personnel. Regularly designate an employee (and alternate) to assist employees with special needs in the event of an evacuation • Insure all key personnel are trained in the proper evacuation routes and the correct assembly points for the building • Participate in ongoing institutional safety and emergency response training • Initiate and maintain emergency response training for assigned areas of responsibility assuring all employees are aware of CNM’s Emergency Management Plan and their specific Area Emergency Management Plan. Most importantly assure that all assigned personnel groups have information concerning roles and responsibilities in the event of a building or campus emergency • Annually participate in CNM Emergency Management Plan drill and/or exercise and submit the post-exercise report to the to Emergency Operations Center Director (EOC), Vice President for Administrative Services • In the event of a building evacuation, insure personnel are responding to the alarm, and that the Emergency Coordinator or Alternate (if present) assists in the timely evacuation of all personnel. During evacuation, insure you and your Alternate are wearing the appropriate Emergency Coordinator Vest and report to the “Emergency Assembly Point” and account for personnel • Once the building evacuation is complete, relay this personnel information to the Emergency Operations Center by phone if possible or by runner • Maintain all personnel in the Assembly Area until ordered by the Incident Commander, or the EOC Director, to either return to the building or leave the campus • Participate in Post-Incident debriefing as requested and relay information and experiences to the Emergency Management Team. Participate in the critique and offer suggestions for improvement when appropriate. Debrief your assigned personnel after the Post Incident Debriefing and share information and operation changes if any.
  • 53. Central New Mexico Community College Incident Management System - Job Action Sheet Emergency Operation Center Personnel ROLE: RISK MANAGEMENT & SAFETY OFFICER MISSION: Responsible for monitoring and assessing hazardous and unsafe situations and developing measures for assuring ongoing personnel safety during an emergency. A member of the Policy Group, the Safety Officer, maintains an awareness of developing situations, liaisons with the Emergency Operations Center Groups and includes safety messages in each “Action Plan.” REPORTS TO: Emergency Operations Director TASKS: During Incident: • Obtain an incoming briefing from the Incident Commander (at the On-Scene Command Post) • Get situation briefing from Emergency Operations Center Director; assess current CNM status • Ensure that there is a liaison to interface with the Operations Group, Planning Group and the Finance Group and advise these personnel in matters relating to personnel safety • Participate in planning meetings with the Planning Group with respect to hazardous situations associated with the emergency and exercise emergency authority to prevent or stop unsafe actions • Assign an aide to document all actions and events related to personnel safety • On an ongoing basis: o Regularly reassess and modify “Action Plan” with regard to personnel safety o Identify potentially unsafe situations o Review reports to identify hazardous environmental and operational situations Post incident: • Summarize and document personnel safety needs to achieve full program resumption and institutional recovery • Prepare the Safety Response Report as part of the Post-Incident Report evaluating the effectiveness, efficiency, appropriateness, and adequacy of the tactical safety response