Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan

1,789

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,789
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Maricopa Community Colleges Education Abroad Crisis Management Plan revised 3/10
  • 2. Table of Contents What is Crisis Management? ................................................................................................1 Crisis Management Planning.................................................................................................1 Crisis Management Team Contact Information ................................................................2 Assigned Roles ........................................................................................................................2 Risk Reduction ........................................................................................................................4 Major Medical & Accident Insurance ...................................................................................5 Types of Crisis or Critical Incidents......................................................................................5 State Department Warnings & Alerts ...................................................................................6 Procedures for Response to Crisis.........................................................................................7 Action Plans • Student Misconduct .......................................................................................................8 • Mental Health ..................................................................................................................9 • Injury, Major Medical .................................................................................................. 10 • Unexplained Absence of a Student............................................................................. 12 • Arrest of a Student ........................................................................................................ 13 • Natural Disaster, Civil Unrest, or Terrorism ............................................................. 14 • Crimes Against a Participant ...................................................................................... 16 • Physical or Sexual Assault ........................................................................................... 17 • Death of a Student ....................................................................................................... 18 • Kidnapping / Hostage .................................................................................................. 19 • Death or Serious Illness of Family Member.............................................................. 20 • Pandemic or Regional Health Threat ......................................................................... 21 • Late Cancellation of Education Abroad Program .................................................... 23 Appendices • Appendix I–24/7 Contact Information for Crisis Management Team ................ 26 • Appendix II–Forms: Assumption of Risk, Behavioral Expectations Contract .... 27 • Emergency Contact, Permission to Release Information ....................................... 30 • Appendix III–MCCCD Sexual Harassment and Assault Policies.......................... 32 • Appendix IV–Incident Report Form ......................................................................... 34 • Appendix V–Precautions Against Theft Overseas ................................................... 36 • Appendix VI–Lost or Stolen Passport ....................................................................... 37 • Appendix VII–American Consulate Emergency Services ...................................... 40 • Appendix VIII–Crises Abroad: What the State Department Does ....................... 41 • Appendix IX–Medical Evacuation Procedures ……..…….……….………….… 44
  • 3. What is Crisis Management Incident – Any event which has implications for safety and liability. Emergency – An event that may require an urgent response on the part of the organization, but which is manageable by the organization’s resources and does not threaten the organization’s ability to operate. Crisis – An event that is a turning point for an organization. A crisis may overwhelm the organization’s available staff/ resources and impact an organization’s ability to operate “Crisis Management is the process of preparing for, mitigating, and responding to and recovering from a crisis situation. It requires (1) an organized plan to ensure the safety and survival of self and community, and (2) an understanding of the human response to stress. Crisis management is a dynamic process that begins well before the critical event and extends beyond its conclusion. As all those in the field know, there are many kinds of crises, from natural disasters to accidents and injuries to civil unrest, riots, and military coups. Each stage before, during and after a crisis presents special challenges and requires different strategies for effective management.” –USC Center for Global Education, SAFETI Adaptation of Peace Corps Resources Going abroad to study is an experience that students carry with them throughout their lives. Most students returning home from an education abroad program say that it was the most valuable part of their college experience. While the majority of them enjoy a positive and rewarding stay, some are forced to deal with unanticipated events. When in an unfamiliar country, unanticipated events such as suicides, traffic accidents, natural disasters, or multiple injuries or deaths can quickly escalate into a group catastrophe if not dealt with immediately and effectively. Knowing what to do if a crisis occurs will minimize the chaos, rumors, and impact of the event on the other students, staff and chaperons. For the purposes of this manual, crisis is defined as: A sudden, generally unanticipated, event that profoundly and negatively affects a study abroad participant(s) and has the potential to result in serious injury or death. Crises shall also include but not be limited to situations involving illness; substance misuse/abuse; accident; natural disaster; taking of hostages; and the death of a student, staff member, or a member of a participant’s immediate family. Crisis Management Planning Every Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) education abroad program should establish and main- tain crisis management procedures with college-specific contact information and process. Crisis response procedures are intended to guide staff in responding to a crisis, such as the illness or death of a student or faculty and other traumatic events which can affect the study abroad program. These procedures are intended to be time-sensitive, problem-focused interventions designed to identify and resolve the crisis, restore equilibrium, and support productive responses. This document should serve as the basis for crisis management procedures for study abroad programs for both the Program Directors and the college crisis management team that has been established. The on-site Program Director/ lead faculty, International Education Programs Office and host institution/country representatives should work jointly to incorporate this plan as they address specific country’s needs and issues prior to program departure. The on-site education abroad Program Director/faculty lead is the “first contact” in dealing with in-country program management, including any crisis which may occur. When a crisis does occur, the Program Director/lead faculty should contact the college International Education Director (or designee, i.e. the Education Abroad Advisor), and/or the College/ Public Safety to convene the Crisis Management Team (See telephone list in Appendix VII). 1
  • 4. Emergency action by the Program Director and Crisis Management Team should include the following: • Full identification of emergency and all related information. • Development of a recommended action sequence. The Crisis Management Team uses crisis response procedures to help administrators who will: • Gather information; • Establish communication with the family; • Disseminate accurate information to faculty, students, and media; • Intervene directly with students most likely to be affected; and • Increase the available support for students and staff. Guiding Principles for emergency procedures: • Prevent life threatening situations. • Provide a climate of safety. • Maintain confidentiality where important. • Maintain communication with appropriate personnel. Crisis Management Team Crisis management college team members will include the following persons: Director of International Education Program, Education Abroad Advisor, College President, Vice President of Student Affairs, College Safety/Public Safety Director, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Counseling Department Chair, Director of Public Relations, Vice President of Administrative Affairs, District Legal Counsel, District Risk Management. See Appendix I for individual college names and contact information. Additional resources may include On-site Program Director and on-site Host Facilitator, Host country support services (medical, police, rescue, consulate), Insurance representative, and U.S. Embassy or Consulate representatives in the country where the education abroad program is held. Assigned Roles for Responding to an Education Abroad Emergency Program Director will: • Serve as a resource for utilizing the district’s supplemental travel insurance (iNext). • Respond to perceived and real emergencies. • Defuse threat if possible and ensure health and welfare of participants. • Report to incident site if situation warrants. • Evaluate initial response needs (emergency medical attention, police report). • Notify and consult with International Education Program personnel, College Safety, and State Department officials as needed. • Attend to needs of the group. • Take meticulous notes recording of all incidents and keep an event log with written documentation of all situations. 2
  • 5. International Education Director (or designee) will: • Serve as first line of communication from the on-site Program Director, faculty, or student. • Gather information from all sources for use in making appropriate decisions about the management of the emergency. • Coordinate with VP of Student Affairs in the management of the emergency. • Determine if additional off-campus resources are needed — or are needed to “stand by” — to effectively manage the crisis, and notify them if appropriate. • Stay in contact with the leaders of the emergency service agencies and the law enforcement agencies working with the emergency. • May serve as a clearinghouse of information for family. • Make assignments to resources (persons and offices) for specific response needs. • Contact appropriate persons/offices and College Crisis Management Team (Pages 4-5). • Maintain lines of communication between the college and the emergency site. • Notify district risk management and legal office of emergency. • Arrange for the payment of monies needed to respond to emergency situations; authorize purchases and payments for such resources. • Maintain a roster of all education abroad participants with their emergency contact information in an electronic form that is accessible 24/7. Vice President of Student Affairs will: • Meet and talk with the parents of students and spouses of adults as appropriate. • Notify next of kin in case of participant death. • Coordinate any student code of conduct issues. • Work collaboratively with Public Relations on dissemination of information. • Inform the College President and Vice Presidents of Academic Affairs and Administrative Affairs of the emergency situation and ongoing status. Vice President of Academic Affairs will: • Coordinate academic and/or financial issues resulting from cancellation of program, dismissal of student, or grade dispute. Director of Public Relations will: • Approve information to be shared with appropriate college personnel during and after the crisis. • Communicate with President, the Vice Presidents, International Education Director or designee, and MCCCD General Counsel Offices for authorization to release information. • Be aware of the requirements of the Freedom of Information Act and privacy requirements (FERPA) and provide all appropriate information based on those requirements. • Prepare formal statement and disseminate press release. • Plan and coordinate press interviews. • Maintain communication with the Vice Presidents, International Education Director or designee, and Program Director. • Establish and maintain a clearinghouse for calls and requests from families, the community, and the media and refer those if appropriate. 3
  • 6. Risk Reduction For the ultimate health and welfare of all participants on education abroad programs, it is necessary to take steps in the program planning process for risk reduction. The following are suggested for each education abroad program: Risk audit (programmatic and on-site) • location • transportation • facilities • staffing • field trips and activities • application screening process • promotional information • local medical facilities, mental health and legal resources Staff training • legal liability • crisis response • sexual harassment • regional expertise Mandatory pre-departure orientation for participants • discussion of conditions of participation: assumption of risk, academic and behavioral expectations, and emergency contact information • forms (Appendix II) signed that acknowledge discussion and acceptance of conditions • health and safety • cultural transition • awareness that laws may differ in other countries Mandatory on-site orientation (supplemental to pre-departure orientation) • local contact information for students and faculty which includes Program Director and on-site Service Provider • local contact information (hotels, host families, etc.) • emergency services / facilities • local risks/cautions • transportation • facilities • money • phone • how to contact local law enforcement • review of most relevant local laws • contingency plan if Program Director is unable to fulfill duties Crisis response plan • Crisis Management Handbook • contingency meeting site for students • College Student Handbook 4
  • 7. Major Medical and Accident Insurance Every student and faculty participating in one of the MCCCD education abroad programs is required to carry health, acci- dent, and repatriation insurance. It is expected that the iNext insurance (administered by AIG Travel Guard) purchased by the Maricopa Community Colleges supplements personal insurance and provides coverage for the costs of accidents, routine sickness, and travel-related mishaps while on education abroad programs. Policy number is #008078 P2 06/07. After the Program Director or International Education Director has submitted the names on the program roster to iNext, participants will be sent an email with directions for registering online and uploading a photo to obtain a personalized iNext card. Benefits • The insurance coverage includes medical expenses, sickness and hospital benefit, emergency medical transport, repatriation of remains, accidental death & dismemberment, travel and/or baggage delays, travel documentation replacement, and 24-hour assistance services. • Pre-approval to see a doctor is not required, but participants are expected to pay the doctor, get prescription filled, and submit claim for reimbursement. Participants must keep receipts for the doctor and prescriptions and copies of diagnosis for submitting claims, first to the primary insurance and then to iNext. If participants are to be admitted to hospitalcall to get authorization from the insurance provider first, unless it is an emergency and a call is not possible. Direct pay to the hospital can often be arranged. A 24-hour, toll-free Help-Line • Traveling students can call AIG Travel Guard (number is on the back of their iNext Travel Card) to get assistance for medical referrals, emergency medical payments, obtaining prescriptions and legal advice, and replacement and reporting of missing travel documents. Types of Crises or Critical Incidents Real emergency: A genuine or imminent risk to participants or a disturbance that has occurred. Examples: • Serious physical/emotional illness or accident • Trauma or physical assault • Missing student for unknown reasons • Death of a student or other program member • Political coup or civil unrest • Natural disaster • Terrorism • Incarceration • Kidnapping • Pandemic Perceived emergency: no immediate significant risk, but perceived as threatening by student, family, college officials, or others. Examples: • Sensationalized media reporting of overseas event • Distortion of information provided by a participant • Anxiety of family member or other with little or no international experience NOTE: Perceived emergencies can affect students, family members, staff, as strongly as real emergencies. These need to be treated seriously and responses should be made in a timely manner. 5
  • 8. Critical Incident: situations involving threats of harm to students, faculty, or facilities. In addition, academic or conduct violation, disruption of group, and potentially dangerous situations are considered critical incidents. Examples: • Tardiness • Missing class or group functions • Drug/alcohol misuse; belligerence • Cultural inappropriateness • Sexual harassment • Questionable facilities or transportation • Academic misconduct, cheating, plagiarism, copyright violationsTardiness • Missing class or group functions • Drug/alcohol misuse; belligerence • Cultural inappropriateness • Sexual harassment State Department Warnings and Alerts The Department of State issues current travel warning, travel alerts, and country-specific information on its web site: http://travel.state.gov/travel Travel Warnings Travel Warnings (as well as Country Specific Information) are issued when the State Department recommends that Americans avoid travel to a certain country. Travel Alerts Travel Alerts disseminate information about terrorist threats and other relatively short-term and/or trans-national condi- tions posing significant risks to the security of American travelers. Travel Alerts are made when there is a specific threat that cannot be countered. In the past, Travel Alerts have been issued to deal with short-term coups, violence by terrorists, and anniversary dates of specific terrorist events. It is the policy of MCCCD that if a travel alert is issued for the AREA/REGION in which the education abroad program has been granted approval, permission to travel must be reassessed by the Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs and/or Chancellor. Country Specific Information Country Specific Information, available for every country of the world, includes such information as location of the U.S. embassy or consulate in the subject country, unusual immigration practices, health conditions, minor political distur- bances, unusual currency and entry regulations, crime and security information, and drug penalties. If an unstable condi- tion exists in a country that is not severe enough to warrant a Travel Warning, a description of the condition(s) may be included under an optional section entitled “Safety/Security.” Country Specific Information presents information in a factual manner so decisions concerning travel to a particular country can be made in the absence of a warning or alert. 6
  • 9. Procedures for Response to Crisis This section is intended to provide recommendations for general procedures to be followed in the case of a crisis. Each incident will vary and may require the use of only a portion of the recommended action or may require steps that are not included. • The in-country Program Director will most likely be the first person notified. The on-site contact should begin a careful process of gathering and reporting information which includes the following information: • Describe the imminent risk • Describe current status of affected participant(s) (location, physical condition, etc.) • Describe what monitoring/assistance affected participant(s) is receiving • Describe what impact this incident has on the entire group/program • Report on others who may have already been notified of the incident (students, parents, local police, media, etc.) • Describe urgent need or expected response • Call the primary contact person at the college (see Appendix I). Considerations in response actions/decisions: • On-site assessment of the situation and advice by the on-site Program Director. • International Education Programs’ Office recommendation. • Determination of real or perceived risk. • Reliability/accuracy of information. • Health and welfare of participants. • On-site host involvement and considerations. • Academic credit and consequences • College services impacted (faculty, counseling) • Family involvement and recommendation. • Available on-site contingency plans. • Evacuation feasibility. • Implications of return to U.S. • Refund policy of the program. • Refund, accountability, compensation for damage, legal issues, hospitalization, transportation to the hospital and/or airport • Financial aid consequence to the student • News Media • College responsibility 7
  • 10. Action Plans The following action plans are intended to assist Program Directors as they are planning education abroad programs and to provide a guide for their “Action if Necessary” in case emergencies arise while traveling with students. A parallel section, “Information to Gather,” enables the Program Directors to answer critical questions as they begin to respond to the situation or emergency and/or consult with the International Education Director. Completion of the “Follow-up” section will benefit future programs by suggesting possible modifications to the Action Plans. Student Misconduct Definition: Student behavior that results in sufficient disruption to the educational process such that disciplinary action is warranted. Students may be issued a probationary warning or dismissed from an education abroad; the choice should be determined in consultation with the International Education Director and the Vice President of Student Affairs. This is intended to be an interim solution to deal with an urgent situation and does not neces- sarily impact overall student status. College policies, procedures, and due process for suspension must be consid- ered in any such action. Examples: Substance or alcohol misuse, tardiness, missing class or group activities. Preventative Measures • Mandatory pre-departure orientation: establish clear alcohol policies; explain differences in attitude toward drunkenness; encourage students to watch out for each other. • Acknowledgement and acceptance forms signed by student (Appendix II). Information to Gather • Describe behaviors/actions at issue. • Describe consequences of behavior/actions to program. • Describe warnings or sanctions imposed. • Describe proposed logistics of student exiting program and transportation issues. Action if Necessary • Begin an event log by gathering background information and reporting developments and responses. • Discuss issue with student by explaining how actions/behaviors are incompatible with success of program. • If circumstances permit, the student can receive disciplinary probation. If possible, the warning will be issued with another program administrator or faculty member present and signed and dated by the student and Program Director. A warning should include: -written document of warning. -description of behavior that warrants dismissal or correction. -clear expectation that misconduct is not to reoccur. -clear indication of probationary status action to take place if student is dismissed (no academic credit, financial cost borne by student, escort to airport, etc.). • The student may decide to terminate the program and return home at own expense. • Depending on the severity of issue, student may be dismissed without a probationary warning although it is advisable that Program Director get a second opinion from appropriate contacts at the college before taking such action. The following warnings must be given by the suspending official: -You are hereby given disciplinary suspension. This action means you will be barred from the program and must return to the U.S. at your own expense. -You may request an appeal hearing from the Vice President of Student Affairs or his/her designee according to the Code of Conduct in the Student Handbook. -You will be assisted with housing and travel arrangements for leaving the program. 8
  • 11. Follow-up • Complete an Incident Report (Appendix IV) and recommend to the Vice President of Student Affairs any further disciplinary action. • If student is dismissed from program, consult with college personnel to ensure student is met at the airport by family to be transported home. • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Mental Health Definition: Student exhibits behaviors symptomatic of mental illness and with sufficient severity to cause concern or is disruptive to others; behaviors symptomatic of alcohol or drug misuse. Examples: Student threatens, attempts, and/or acknowledges ideation of homicide or suicide; student is UNABLE to participate in class or group activities; behavior causes other participants to fear his/her actions. Preventative Measures • Mandatory pre-departure orientation discussion on culture shock and psychological strain caused by new environment. • Students are encouraged to get a thorough mental and physical health screening prior to participation. • Requirement for health insurance with international emergency coverage. • Program Director has 24/7 contact information for college administration (Appendix I). Information to Gather • Description of student behavior (continuing or single incident). • Description of discussion with student about behavior. • Discuss nature of concern. • Ask what the issue may be. • Determine if student is risk to self or others. • Response to the request that student voluntarily talk to a counseling professional. • Determine the student’s support network. • Obtain input / observations from others who have been interacting with the student. • Refer media inquiries to the Public Relations Director. Action if Necessary • Begin an event log: gather background information and report crisis developments and responses. Focus on behavior; do not add personal comments. • Ensure student is monitored and not left alone. • Notify International Education Director. • Get advice on appropriate medical treatment through consultation with Counseling Department or other mental health professional and/or local hospital or licensed psychologist. • Obtain consent of family if necessary. • If student will not voluntarily talk to Program Director (and does NOT appear to be an immediate threat to self or others), clearly state behavioral expectations, keep a log of all communications with student and related incidents, and continue encouragement to seek assistance. • If disruptive behavior persists, contact the International Education Director for consultation on student dismissal. 9
  • 12. International Education Director will • Gather pertinent information from on-site Program Director. • Coordinate the college and/or local response to situation. • Contact Counseling Department. • Request the college counselor to call student and/or on-site Program Director for assessment. • Counselor will make recommendation: -If determined to be necessary by college counselor, student should remain in touch with professional until mental health issue is sufficiently resolved. -If determined to be appropriate by professional counselor, student should be discharged to care of on-site mental health facility or professional. • Inform college administration as appropriate. • Determine if emergency contact should be notified. • Assist with any follow-up needed, such as locating on-site counselor, transportation home (U.S. Embassy and AIG Travel Guard can assist with referrals to medical facilities.) • If care provided locally, with student’s permission, arrange to have written summary of the student’s condition and treatment. Follow-up • Provide written summary to mental health profession. • Complete Incident Report (Appendix IV). • Consult with Counseling Department to determine if referral to community mental health provider is warranted. • International Education Director debriefs with Program Director, Counselors, and Vice President of Student Affairs and college staff to assess problem, responses, and make program modifications if needed. • Determine if Code of Conduct was violated and refer to Vice President of Student Affairs for potential disciplinary action. • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Injury, Major Medical Definition: An actual or potentially life threatening event or any situation where a loss of consciousness, exces- sive loss of blood, or an altered breathing pattern occurs. Examples: Auto/transportation accident, recreational injury, serious illness, drug or alcohol overdose. Preventative Measures • Mandatory pre-departure orientation instruction on avoiding injury and illness while abroad and Code of Conduct behavioral expectations (Appendix II). • Requirement of health insurance with international emergency coverage. • Students are encouraged to undergo physical and mental health screening prior to program for assessment by Inter national Education Program staff about participation. • Center for Disease Control web address www.cdc.gov/travel provided. • Familiarize students with the host country’s auto/accident policies/rules to avoid unwarranted consequences, such as vehicle confiscation. 10
  • 13. Information to Gather • Describe details of how/when illness/injury occurred? • Where is student currently? • What medical treatment was received? • When and where was medical treatment obtained? • Who was attending physician? • Does attending physician speak English? • What is the diagnosis? • What is the prescribed treatment? • What is the prognosis? • Has student’s insurance company been contacted (primary and/or iNext)? • Are other participants at risk (physical or psychological)? • Does victim want to return to U.S.? If so, when? • What are the consequences of returning to U.S. (medical, academic and financial)? • Has anyone else been notified of incident (family, college )? • Is evacuation necessary? Action if Necessary • Get student appropriate emergency medical treatment (call for local ambulance or transport to local hospital). • Seek assistance from relevant Embassy for referral to appropriate medical facilities that meet U.S. standards of care. • Begin an event log: gather background information and report crisis developments and responses. • Ensure that student’s primary or secondary (iNext) medical insurance can be used with the provider chosen. • Contact phone number on back of iNext card (AIG Travel Guard). • Contact International Education Director. • Provide student with coaching or assistance in contacting family if desired by student. • Monitor student condition, ensure student has translator if medical care providers do not speak English. • Continue communication with International Education Director. • Refer media inquiries to Public Relations Director. Circumstances in which the Vice President of Student Affairs will contact family • Inability of student to make the decision about calling family(i.e., unconscious or incoherent). • Student’s life in jeopardy. • Death of student. Seek guidance/advice from the Embassy and/or AIG Travel Guard on evacuation decisions • Establish a central communications contact, coordinating communications with all agencies involved. • Identify student responsibilities and provide them with descriptions of specific emergency evacuation conditions and plans. • Communicate specific instructions to students and staff (in writing where appropriate). • Coordinate in-country transport of students and their belongings where conditions permit such travel. • Arrange lodging and support services at pre-disembarkation points. 11
  • 14. • Coordinate planning and travel arrangements with appropriate Embassy. • Limit movement of personnel to essential travel associated with emergency. • Emphasize the importance of staying in familiar territory during an emergency. Follow-up: • Complete Incident Report (Appendix IV). • Monitor the student’s return home and/or recovery. • Refer to appropriate Vice President(s) for resolution of financial and academic issues. • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Unexplained Absence of Student Definition: Student is absent from class or lodging without permission and/or notification of absence. Examples: Student has not returned to lodging at expected time and did not notify roommate or host family. Preventative Measures • Mandatory pre-departure discussion includes importance of letting Program Director, host family, and/or other participants of plans and timeframe and the importance of reporting any change in those plans. • Students will know that attendance at classes and cultural events is mandatory. • Program Director will have photo and physical description (height, weight, eye and hair color, gender, race, nationality, etc) of each student. • Students have emergency card with local contact information. Information to Gather • When and where was the missing person last seen? • Was she/he seen with someone else? • Who was the last contact? • Did the person tell anyone of plans to be absent? • Does anyone know or have an idea about where the person went? • How was the person traveling (alone, by train, etc.)? • What, if any, search efforts have been initiated? • Has a missing person report been submitted with local police? If so, what agency, what is case number? • Are there search/rescue services available locally? • Has U.S. State Department (or student’s home country embassy/consulate) been contacted? If so, State Department contact (name, title, phone number)? • Has anyone else been notified? Action if Necessary • Begin an event log: gather background information and report developments and responses. • Ask EVERY student if they have any information about the missing student’s whereabouts. • Contact host family or dormitory residence manager. • Contact local police, if determined necessary, through consultation with on-site director. • Provide police with student’s photograph, description, passport number, and last known whereabouts. 12
  • 15. • Notify other faculty and students. • Determine if rest of group is safe and accounted for. • Contact the U.S. Embassy. • Seek assistance from International Education Director and notify appropriate college contacts. • Consider having the International Education Director contact the student’s emergency contact and/or family. • Refer any media inquiries to the college Public Relations Director. Follow-up: • Complete Incident Report (Appendix IV). • Depending on reason for absence, refer to Vice President of Student Affairs for possible Code of Conduct disciplinary action. • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Arrest of a Student Definition: Student has been legally incarcerated by local authorities. Examples: Drug or alcohol misuse, sexual misconduct. Preventative Measures • Mandatory pre-departure orientation discussion that Student Code of Conduct applies while on an education abroad program (Appendix II). • Familiarize students with the host country’s auto/accident policies/rules to avoid unwarranted consequences, such as vehicle confiscation. • Participants are informed during orientation that they are completely subject to the legal jurisdiction of the host country. International Education Director or designee discusses the laws and customs of destination countries during orientation. • Students report if they were subject to disciplinary action at any college attended. • International Education Program Office determines if students should participate in program through consultation with college faculty and administrators. • Students are told to contact the Program Director immediately if an incident occurs. Information to Gather • Describe nature of incident leading to participant’s legal incarceration. • Has the participant been detained or arrested? • What agency has made arrest / detention? (Name, phone number) • Have charges been filed? • What are the charges? • What is the case number? • Were there witnesses? • What rights have been granted? • Has the U.S. Embassy/consulate been notified? If yes, name, title, and phone number? • What advice has the U.S. Embassy/consulate given? • Is a representative from the Embassy/consulate able to talk to participant? If so, name and phone number? • Has the participant been given legal representation? If so, name and phone number? 13
  • 16. • What is the process and timeline? • Has anyone else been notified of the incarceration (family, media)? • Does the student want coaching or assistance in contacting family? Action if Necessary • Begin an event log: gather background information and report developments and responses. • Obtain as much information as possible from local authorities. • Contact the U.S. Embassy/Consulate to obtain legal representation for student and to guarantee student’s rights and humane treatment according to internationally accepted standards (If student is non-U.S. citizen, contact student’s home country Consulate). • Contact International Education Director. • Contact host staff. • Verify that student is obtaining legal representation with the U.S. Embassy. • Assist the student in contacting family. • Refer family to Vice President of Student Affairs. • Assist the student in contacting appropriate Embassy. • Visit student if possible and appropriate. • Refer any media inquiries to college Public Relations director. Follow-up • Complete Incident Report (Appendix IV). • Evaluate whether student should continue to be enrolled in education abroad program. • Evaluate with Vice President of Student Affairs whether student should be referred for possible Code of Conduct disciplinary action. • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Natural Disaster, Civil Unrest or Terrorism Definition: Activity that causes the program to be cancelled because of safety and/or health reasons. Examples: Hurricane, flooding, earthquake, fire, volcanic eruption, rioting, or terrorism. Preventative Measures • Monitor international security news and ensure that no travel alert or warning has been posted for the host country http://travel.state.gove/travel. • Hold mandatory pre-departure orientation discussion of potential risks and steps taken to mitigate such risks. • Emergency contact information for all students and college administration maintained by the Program Director. • Requirement of health insurance with international emergency coverage. Information to Gather • What is the nature of the unrest / disaster? • Is the group directly threatened or in imminent danger? • Where is the group currently located? • Are all participants accounted for and aware of risk? • What advice have participants been given for response/precaution? 14
  • 17. • What advice has the host institution given? • Has the U.S. Embassy been notified? If so, date and time? Contact person and phone number? • What advice has U.S. Embassy given? • Have local authorities imposed protections and/or restrictions? • Is travel restricted? • Is evacuation desirable? If so, when, where, how? Action if Necessary • Begin an event log: gather background information and report crisis developments and responses. • Contact all students to determine needs of each. • Determine local emergency plan (listen to news, meet at contingency location and seek advice from host institution, and call U.S. and relevant embassies). • Contact International Education Director and College/Public Safety to determine next steps. • Monitor the U.S. Embassy and State Department home pages for current information. http://travel.state.gove/travel. Seek guidance/advice from the Embassy and/or iNext (AIG Travel Guard) on evacuation decisions • Establish central communications contact. • Identify student responsibilities and provide them with descriptions of specific emergency evacuation conditions and plans. • Communicate specific instructions to students and staff (in writing where appropriate). • Coordinate in-country transport of students and their belongings where conditions permit such travel. • Arrange lodging and/or support services at pre-disembarkation points. • Coordinate travel arrangements to safe haven countries/regions with U.S. Embassy. • Limit movement of personnel to essential travel associated with emergency. • Emphasize the importance of staying in familiar territory during an emergency. • Maintain a detailed log of actions taken. • Refer media inquiries to the Public Relations Director. International Education Director • Contact Program Director and clarify emergency plan. • Contact students to offer direct support if appropriate. • Contact U.S. Consulate / State Department. • Contact Crisis Management Team. • Serve as the clearinghouse of communication. Vice President of Student Affairs • Communicate with family of students and determine if referral to the State Department’s Office of American Citizens Services is helpful. • Coordinate communication with Public Relations Director. 15
  • 18. Public Relations Director • Approve information to be shared with college personnel during and after the crisis. • communicate with International Education Director, college President and General Counsel for authorization to release information. • Prepare formal statement and disseminate press release. • Plan and coordinate press interviews. • Maintain communication with Vice Presidents of Student and Academic Affairs. • Establish and maintain a clearinghouse for calls and requests from families, the community and the media and refer those to the appropriate person or place. Follow-up • Provide needed counseling services to students; EAP for faculty/staff. • Complete Incident Report (Appendix IV). • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Crimes Against Participant Definition: Program participant is victim of crime. Examples: Pick-pocketing or robbery. Preventative Measures • Mandatory pre-departure orientation providing crime and security information for destination country. • Encourage students to be aware of surroundings and not to display cash, wear expensive jewelry, and set down pack ages but to carry cash, credit cards, plane tickets, and passport in front pockets or in Velcro-closing bags. • Encourage students to take limited amount of credit cards, cash, jewelry, etc. • Encourage participants to make copies of passport, credit cards, and flight information and leave with responsible family member or friend. • Encourage participants to store copies of travel documents electronically in the iNext Document Store and Travel Vault. • Check Department of State website prior to departure for up-to-date safety and security information. (http://www.travel.state.gov) • Know location of nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for passport replacement. • Familiarize students with the host country’s auto/accident policies/rules to avoid unwarranted consequences, such as vehicle confiscation. Information to Gather • Police report information and any necessary follow-up action. Action if Necessary • Get student medical attention if necessary. • Begin an event log. Gather background information and report developments/responses. • Submit notification/report to local law enforcement. • Make appropriate contacts to report/replace stolen items (passport, credit cards, tickets). 16
  • 19. • Report stolen passport and or other travel documents to U.S. (or relevant) embassy/consulate. • Seek assistance from AIG Travel Guard to replace passport and/or other travel documents as soon as possible, before leaving the host country. • Provide appropriate emotional and financial support to student. • Notify other students and staff as needed. • Refer media inquiries to Public Relations Director. Follow-Up Action • Complete Incident Report with outcome of event (Appendix IV). • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Physical or Sexual Assualt Definition: Physical assault or sexual harassment and/or assault by fellow participant or local citizen. Preventative Measure: Mandatory pre-departure orientation includes: • Information on local culture, customs, religious and moral standards, safety and security, and crime statistics. • MCCCD policies on sexual harassment and assault and Code of Conduct. • Statement that such crimes will be reported to local police. • Discussion on local legal system. • Website address for victim assistance programs in 20 countries. http://www.vaonline.org Information to Gather: • What are known details of incident? • Has person obtained medical assistance? If so, where, what? • Has incident been reported to local law enforcement? If so, what agency and case number? • Is counseling available? In English? If so, contact name, and phone number? • Are there witnesses? If so, have they reported, do they need counseling? • Does victim want to return to the United States? If so, when? • What are consequences of leaving the program (academic and financial)? • Has anyone else been notified of this incident (family, media, insurance company, etc.)? • Is the person allegedly responsible an MCCCD student, faculty or staff member? Action if Necessary • Get victim immediate medical treatment at local hospital. (contact AIG Travel Guard) • Report attack to local police. • Begin an event log: gather background information and report crisis developments and responses. • Seek assistance from the relevant Embassy or Consulate. • Address safety concerns of victim and provide emotional assistance. • Inform International Education Director who will work with college officials as appropriate. • Assist in contacting family if desired. • If another program participant contributed towards the injury, review section on student dismissal and/or consult with International Education Director about employee sanctions. 17
  • 20. • Determine who else in the program needs to know and provide information and support to other program partici pants affected as appropriate. • Continue with necessary medical and/or mental health treatment. • Determine if victim wants to leave the program early and assist with any necessary travel arrangements. • Refer media inquiries to Public Relations Director. Follow-up • Complete Incident Report (Appendix IV). • Verify that victim returned home safely. • Refer victim for additional counseling. • Report alleged criminal behavior to appropriate Vice President for potential discipline. • Refer victim to State Department website for possible compensation and victim assistance. www.nacvcb.org • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Death of Student Preventative Measures • Mandatory pre-departure orientation includes discussion on: -Avoidance of injury and illness while abroad. -Filling prescriptions and carrying adequate medication. -Taking copies of essential prescriptions. • Requirement of health insurance with international emergency coverage. • Ensure that no U.S. Department of State travel warnings or alerts posted for host country (http://travel.state.gov/travel). • Students are encouraged to get mental and physical health screening prior to trip for assessment of ability to participate and/or secure appropriate on-site resources. Action if Necessary • Begin an event log: gather background information and report crisis developments and responses. • Confirm status through local agency. (police, hospital, consulate) • Immediately report to International Education Director. • Seek assistance from U.S. Embassy/Consulate and iNext (AIG Travel Guard) to arrange repatriation of remains. • Complete forms for an interim death certificate. • Request names of funeral homes that facilitate international repatriation. • Coordinate the repatriation of remains, collect the deceased’s personal belongings, and serve as centralized contact person. • Collect deceased’s belongings and return to U.S. • Contact college Counseling Department to determine counseling needs of other students and staff on program. • Refer media inquiries to Public Relations Director. 18
  • 21. College Response The International Education Director will • Notify the college President, all members of the Crisis Management Team. • Coordinate repatriation of remains. • Serve as centralized contact person. • Offer assistance to family members who may travel abroad to handle arrangements. The Vice President of Student Affairs will • Confirm with the U.S. Embassy who is responsible for notifying the emergency contact and notify the family. • Notify the family if the Embassy has not yet done so. • Put into place the college bereavement protocols. • Offer counseling to other participants and staff. Follow-up • Complete Incident Report (Appendix IV). • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Kidnapping/Hostage Definition: A participant is verified to be a victim of kidnapping or hostage-taking. Preventative Measures • Ensure that the host country does not have a travel warning or alert.http://www.travel.state.gov • Mandatory pre-departure orientation discusses the potential risks to students and faculty/staff. • Kidnap & ransom insurance purchased by MCCCD. • Familiarize students with the host country’s auto/accident policies/rules to avoid putting student in a volatile situation while traveling. Information to Gather • What verification do you have that a kidnapping has taken place? • Have kidnappers identified themselves? • Have the kidnappers made ransom request? If yes, what? • Has the U.S. (or relevant) Embassy been notified? If so, when, contact person, phone number? • What is the U.S. Embassy response/advice? • Has local law enforcement been notified? If so, when, contact person and phone number? • Is negotiation support available on-site? Action if Necessary • Verify that the student has been kidnapped or held as hostage. • Assess risk to other program participants. • Immediately contact the International Education Director. • Contact on-site host, if appropriate. • Begin an event log. Gather background information and report crisis developments and response. 19
  • 22. • Contact the U.S. (or relevant) Embassy/Consulate. • Contact local police and other law enforcement authorities in the country. • Provide emotional support to other students in the group. • Refer any media inquiries to the Public Relations director. College Response • International Education Director notifies the College President, Director of College/Public Safety, and Vice President of Student Affairs. • Follow-up with Program Director and relevant Embassy/Consulate as needed. • Notify Vice Presidents of Academic and Administrative Affairs. • Notify the Public Relations Director. • Notify other Crises Management Team members as needed. • Notify family and/or emergency contact. • Determine if MCCCD should work with private crisis management organizations. • Determine if other participants need to return to US immediately. • Determine if additional college personnel are needed on site. Follow-Up • Provide needed counseling services to students; Employee Assistance Program for faculty/staff. • Complete Incident Report (Appendix IV). • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Death or Serious Injury/Illness of Family Member Definition: A family emergency that may warrant a return to home country. Responses will differ, depending on whether the participant or the International Education Director is notified of the situation first. Examples: Death or serious injury/illness of a family member Preventative Measures • Contact information for all program participants is maintained by the International Education Director. • Participants are asked to tell family to direct any concerns first to the International Education Director. Information to Gather • Who is family member? What relation to student/staff? • What is family issue? • Is counseling available locally for student/staff? Is on-phone counseling desired? • Does participant want to return to U.S.? • What are consequences of returning to U.S. (academic and financial)? 20
  • 23. Action if Necessary: • Begin an event log: gather background information and report developments and responses. • Discuss details privately with involved person. • Offer options: return home immediately, receive counseling support, monitor situation daily. • Monitor student/staff ’s mental health and offer on-phone or local counseling. • Consult with International Education Director on effect of news and choices made. • If necessary, assist in making travel arrangements and complete travel change form. (Appendix V) • Determine how student/staff will be transported to desired destination. Follow-up • Complete Incident Report (Appendix IV). • Verify that person was safely delivered to the desired destination. • Consult with Vice President of Academic Affairs on possible academic impact. • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Pandemic or Regional Health Threat Definition: A serious, widespread viral or bacterial outbreak that causes severe illness or death. To slow the spread, countries may bar entry or require quarantine after arrival. Examples: H1N1 flu virus, cholera, etc. Preventative Measures • Requirement of health insurance with international emergency coverage. • Contingency policy and plans for late cancellation of trip, quarantine after arrival, or if entry into country is prohibited. • Procedures in place for accessing funds through ProCard or ATM access to U.S. bank account. • Students are encouraged to undergo physical and mental health screening before traveling prior to program for assessment by International Education Program staff about participation. • Mandatory pre-departure orientation discussion on –preparing for possible quarantine, –avoidance of illness, –availability of prescription medication, –awareness of sanitary conditions of lodging and food –preventative behaviors of washing hands, avoiding others’ sneezes and coughs, using hand sanitizers. • Monitoring of State Department (www.travel.state.gov) and Center for Disease Control (www.cdc.gov/travel)websites for travel warnings and alerts. Situation A: If quarantined upon arrival and no one is ill. Information to Gather • Where are you required to stay? For how long? • How will group be monitored for symptoms? • What lodging and food accommodations must be provided? By whom? • Are there serious health concerns if participants share rooms? 21
  • 24. Action if Necessary • Begin an event log; gather information; report situation development and responses. • Contact the International Education Director immediately. • Notify the relevant Embassy/Consulate and iNext. (AIG Travel Guard) • Notify on-site hosts of situation. • Make necessary decisions about lodging and providing food for group. • Remain in contact with local authorities and update the International Education Director and on-site host of ongoing situation. • Depending on length of quarantine, consult with International Education Director for decision on continuation of program once quarantine is lifted. • Monitor physical and mental/emotional health of participants. • Refer media inquiries to college Public Relations Director. College Response • International Education Director notifies the Crisis Management Team. • International Education Director notifies family and acts as clearinghouse for further updates. • The college provides unanticipated lodging and food costs. • The Crisis Management Team determines if program should continue or be aborted. Follow-up • Complete Incident Report (Appendix IV). • Refer to Vice Presidents of Academic and Student Affairs for resolution of financial and academic issues. • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Situation B. Upon arrival, entry into host country is prohibited. Information to Gather • Reason for barring entry. For how long? • What can group do in meanwhile? Stay at airport? Stay in nearby hotel? What meal accommodations can be made? • What return flight arrangements can be made? Additional expenses incurred? Action if Necessary • Contact and consult with the International Education Director immediately. • Begin an event log; gather information; report situation development and responses. • Contact the U.S. Embassy/Consulate and AIG Travel Guard for assistance. • Contact on-site host. • Make travel arrangements to return home or secure lodging and food for group if denial of entry is anticipated to be short. • Refer media inquiries to Public Relations Director. 22
  • 25. College Response • International Education Director notifies the Crisis Management Team. • Decision is made to wait out the delayed entry or to have group return home. • Financial arrangements are made for lodging and meals and/or surcharges on early flight home. Follow-up • Complete Incident Report (Appendix IV). • Refer situation to Vice Presidents of Academic and Student Affairs for resolution of financial and academic issues. • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. Late Cancellation of Program Definition: The decision to cancel the program is made after refund deadlines or a travel warning/alert is issued after the program has begun. Examples: Natural disaster, regional health or security threat. Preventative Measures • Monitor the situation in the host county closely (http://travel.state.gov/travel). • Establish a contingency plan if decision to cancel is made after refund deadlines. • Work with travel agency to get group rates, but students buy, and subsequently own, tickets in their name. • Verify that student health insurance is in effect in case of a travel warning. Information to Gather • Why has travel warning or alert been issued? • What is the anticipated timeline of travel warning or alert? • Is safety of the group an immediate concern? • Has the U.S. Embassy/Consulate been contacted? What advice given? Action if Necessary • Begin an event log; gather information; report situation development and responses. • Consult with International Education Director for decision making. • Evaluate security and consider ability of program to provide a safe, educational, and positive experience to students. • Make decision to continue or cancel program. • If evacuation is needed, contact the U.S. Embassy for recommendations on safest and fastest way for participants to leave the country. • Arrange travel plans for group, if not an emergency evacuation. • Refer media inquiries to Public Relations Director. College Response • Provide emergency funds if needed for changes in travel plans after trip has started. Follow-up • Complete Incident Report (Appendix IV). • Refer participants to Vice Presidents of Academic and Student Affairs for resolution of academic and financial issues • Evaluate the efficacy of the action steps with those involved and recommend modifications as needed. 23
  • 26. Appendices Appendix I................. 24/7 Contact Information for Crisis Management Team Appendix II................ Forms: Assumption of Risk, Behavioral Expectations Contract, Emergency Contact, and Permission to Release Information Appendix III .............. MCCCD Sexual Harassment Assault Policies Appendix IV .............. Incident Report Form Appendix V ............... Travel Change Form Appendix VI .............. Precautions Against Theft Overseas Appendix VII ............. Lost or Stolen Passport Appendix VIII ............ American Consulate Emergency Services Appendix IX .............. Crises Abroad: What the State Department Does Appendix X ............... Medical Evacuation Procedures 25
  • 27. Appendix I 24/7 Contact Information PositioN/NAmE Work PhoNE CEll PhoNE EmAil ADDrEss Int’l Ed Director College Safety Ed Abroad Advisor VP of Student Affairs VP of Academic Affairs VP of Adm. Affairs College President College Spokesperson (Institutional Effectiveness, PR) Counseling Dept. Chair District General Counsel 011-480-731-8878 lee.combs@domail.maricopa.edu District Risk Manager 001-480-731-8879 ruth.unks@domail.maricopa.edu iNext Insurance (AIG Travel Guard) collect: 1-715-295-5452 from USA: 1-866-385-4839 U.S. Embassy or Consulate Special Notes: 26
  • 28. Appendix II – Forms MCCCD Education Abroad Assumption of Risk Form MARICOPA COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT VOLUNTARY ASSUMPTION OF RISK AND RELEASE OF LIABILITY FOR INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL CAUTION: THIS IS A RELEASE OF LEGAL RIGHTS. READ AND UNDERSTAND IT BEFORE SIGNING. _______________________________________ College is a non-profit educational institution. References to _____________________College (“College”) include _______________College, the Maricopa County Community College District (“MCCCD”), its officers, officials, employees, vol- unteers, students, agents, and assigns. I (print your name)__________________________________________, freely choose to participate in the ______________________________(henceforth referred to as the Program). In consideration of my voluntary participation in this Program, I agree as follows: SPECIFIC HAZARDS OF TRAVEL: (Specific dangers endemic in this Program’s area of travel.) RISKS OF TRAVEL/STUDY/WORK ABROAD: I understand that my participation in the College Program specified above involves risk not found in activities at College or within the MCCCD. These risks include traveling to and within and returning from one or more foreign countries; foreign, political, legal, social, trans- portation, health and economic conditions; different standards of design, safety, and maintenance of buildings, public places, and conveyances; local medical facilities and providers; and local weather conditions. INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS: I understand that College is not an agent of, and has no responsibility for, any third party which may provide any services including food, lodging, travel, or other goods or services associated with the Program. I understand that College is providing these services only as a convenience to participants and that accordingly, College accepts no responsibility, in whole or in part, for delays, loss, dam- age or injury to persons or property whatsoever, caused to me or others prior to departure, while traveling or while staying in designated lodging. I further understand that College is not responsible for matters that are beyond its control. I acknowledge that College reserves the right to cancel the trip without penalty or to make any modifications to the itinerary and/or academic program as deemed necessary by College. I also acknowledge that College is not obligated to refund any Program fees if College cancels the trip as a result of a United States Department of State travel advisory for the country of the Program or as a result of any other safety or health related issues as deemed necessary by College. INDEPENDENT ACTIVITY: I understand that College is not responsible for any loss or damage I may suffer when I am traveling independently or I am otherwise separated or absent from any College activity. In addi- tion, I understand that any travel that I do independently on my own before, during or after the College spon- sored Program is entirely at my own expense and risk. HEALTH AND SAFETY: I have been advised to consult with a medical doctor with regard to my personal medical needs. I state that there are no health-related reasons or problems that preclude or restrict my par- ticipation in this Program. I have obtained the required immunizations, if any. 27
  • 29. I understand that I may be required to pay up front for my medical expenses that I incur while traveling and in the host country. Further, I understand that I am responsible to submit any medical receipts to my insurance carrier upon my return. I recognize that College is not obligated to attend to any of my medical or medication needs, and I assume all risk and responsibility therefore. In case of a medical emergency occurring during my participation in this Program, I authorize in advance the representative of the College to secure whatever treatment is necessary, including the administration of an anesthetic and surgery. College may (but is not obligated to) take any actions it considers to be warranted under the circumstances regarding my health and safety. I agree to pay all expenses relating thereto and release College from any liability for any actions. STANDARDS OF CONDUCT: I understand that each foreign country has its own laws and standards of ac- ceptable conduct, including dress, manners, morals, politics, drug use and behavior. I recognize that behav- ior which violates those laws or standards could harm College’s relations with those countries and the institu- tions therein, as well as my own health and safety. I will become informed of and will abide by all such laws and standards for each country to or through which I will travel during the Program. I realize that any violation of the foregoing or any disciplinary disturbances may constitute grounds for my expulsion from College and referral of any violations to the Vice President of Student Affairs. I will attend to and assume responsibility for any legal issues or problems I encounter with any foreign nation- als or government of the host country. College is not responsible for providing any assistance under such circumstances. TRAVEL CHANGES: If I become separated from the Program group, fail to meet a departure airplane, bus, or train, or become sick or injured, I will, to a reasonable extent, and at my own expense seek out, contact, and reach the Program group at its next available destination. ASSUMPTION OF RISK AND RELEASE OF LIABILITY: Knowing the risks described above, and in volun- tary consideration of being permitted to participate in the Program, I agree to release, indemnify, and defend College and their officials, officers, employees, agents, volunteers, sponsors, and students from and against any claim which I, the participant, my parents or legal guardian or any other person may have for any losses, damages or injuries arising out of or in connection with my participation in this Program. SIGNATURE: I indicate that by my signature below that I have read the terms and conditions of participation and agree to abide by them. I have carefully read this Release Form and acknowledge that I understand it. No representation, statements, or inducements, oral or written, apart from the foregoing written statement, have been made. This Release Form shall be governed by the laws of the State of Arizona which shall be the forum for any lawsuits filed under or incident to this Release Form or to the Program. If any portion of this Re- lease Form is held invalid, the rest of the document shall continue in full force and effect. _________________________________ _______________________________ Signature of Program Participant Date _________________________________ _______________________________ Signature of Parent or Legal Guardian Date (if student is a minor) 28
  • 30. Participant Off-Campus Study Agreement Form 29
  • 31. Participant Vital Data Forum and Emergency Information 30
  • 32. Permission to Release Information PERMISSION TO RELEASE INFORMATION Under the provisions of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), we are unable to release any information about you to anyone without your permission. But at times you may want us to release information regarding program arrangements and program changes, financial aid or other financial issues, health insurance or other health matters, travel arrangements and personal safety. If you would like us to share any information about you with a parent, guardian or your emergency contact while you are abroad, please indicate below the full names and addresses of those con- tacts. Please include restrictions on the information to be shared, if any. If you do not wish to desig- nate anyone, please indicate this at the bottom. Please sign and date the form. Full name: _________________________ Email address:_______________________ Relationship: _____________________ Is this your emergency contact?(circle) yes/no Address: _______________________________________________________________ Phone numbers (work, home, cell): _________________________________________ Restrictions: __________________________ _____ (initial) Do not release any information about me to anyone ***************************************************************************************************************** Education Abroad Program: _______________________ Semester/term:_____________________ Name: (print) _______________________________ Student ID #:________________________ Your signature: ______________________________ Date:______________________________ Date this release expires and is no longer valid: 31
  • 33. Appendix III MCCCD Sexual Harassment and Assault Policies Sexual harassment is a form of unlawful sex discrimination. Like other forms of illegal discrimination, sexual harassment against either employees or students is prohibited under policy of the Maricopa Community Colleges Governing Board. The Maricopa Community Colleges vigorously enforces that policy. Studies show that many people who commit acts of sexual harassment on the job or on campus do not mean to harass or discriminate. The policy of the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) is to provide an educational, employment, and business environment free of unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal and/or physical conduct or communications constituting sexual harassment as defined and otherwise prohibited by state and federal law. Sexual harassment by and between, employees; students; employees and students; and campus employees, is prohibited by this policy. Violations of this policy may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination for employees; sanc- tions up to and including suspension or expulsion for students; and appropriate sanctions against campus visitors. This policy is subject to constitutionally protected speech rights and principles of academic freedom. Questions about this policy may be directed to the MCCCD EEO/Affirmative Action Office. Examples of Policy Violations: It shall be a viola- tion of MCCCD’s Sexual Harassment Policy for any employee, student or campus visitor to: • Make unwelcome sexual advances to another employee, student, or campus visitor; • Make unwelcome requests for sexual favors, whether or not accompanied by promises or threats with regard to the employment or academic relationship; • Engage in verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature with another employee, student or campus visitor, that may threaten or insinuate, either explicitly or implicitly, that the individual’s submission to, or rejection of, the sexual advances will in any way: • Influence any personnel decision regarding that person’s employment, evaluation, wages, advancement, assigned duties, shifts or any other condition of employment or career development; or • Influence his or her grades, participation in or access to academic programs, class standing or other educational opportunities; Engage in verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature that: • has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an employee’s ability to do his or her job; or with a student’s ability to learn or participate in a class; or which creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive work or academic environment; • Commit any act of sexual assault or public sexual indecency against any employee or student whether on MCCCD property • Continue to express sexual interest in another employee, student or campus visitor after being informed or on notice that the interest is unwelcome (reciprocal attraction is not considered sexual harassment); • Engage in other sexually harassing conduct in the workplace or academic environment, whether physical or verbal, including, but not limited to, commentary about an individual’s body (or body parts), sexually degrading words to describe an individual, sexually offensive comments, sexually suggestive language or jokes, innuendoes, and sexually suggestive objects, books, magazines, computer software, photographs, cartoons or pictures. Additional Policy Violations Supervisors, managers, administrators and faculty who disregard or fail to report allegations of sexual harassment (whether reported by the person who is the subject of the sexual harassment or a witness) are in violation of this policy. Responsibility for Policy Enforcement Every MCCCD employee and student must avoid offensive or inappropriate sexual and/or sexually harassing behavior at work or in the academic environment. Employees and students are encouraged (but not required) to inform perceived offenders of this policy that the commentary /conduct is offensive and unwelcome. 32
  • 34. Amorous Relationships An amorous relationship that might be appropriate in other circumstances may be inappropriate if one of the individuals in the relationship has a professional responsibility toward, or is in a position of authority with respect to, the other, such as in the context of instruction, counseling, advisement or supervision. An element of power is often present in such a context and it is incumbent upon those with authority not to abuse that power. Complaints Students who experience sexual harassment in the academic environment (by a faculty member, administrator, campus visitor or other student) are urged to report such conduct to the Dean of Students (or equivalent) at each individual campus. A student may also contact the MCCCD EEO/AA Office to obtain the name and phone number of the college official designated to respond to sexual harassment complaints. General - Applicable To Employees And Students Complaints will be investigated according to procedures established by the MCCCD EEO/AA Office. Copies of these procedures may be obtained in the college president’s office, Dean of Students Office and the MCCCD EEO/AA Office. The college/center/MCCCD will investigate all complaints as professionally and expeditiously as possible. Where investi- gation confirms the allegations, appropriate responsive action will be taken by the college/center/MCCCD. The MCCCD EEO/AA Office phone number is 480-731-8885. Confidentiality Records will be maintained in a confidential manner to the extent permitted by law and insofar as they do not interfere with MCCCD’s legal obligation to investigate and resolve issues of sexual harassment. Violations of Law An employee or student may be accountable for sexual harassmen- tunder applicable local, state, and/or federal law, as well as under MCCCD policy. Disciplinary action by MCCCD may proceed while criminal proceedings are pending and will not be subject to challenge on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed or reduced. False Statements Prohibited Any individual who knowingly provides false information pursuant to filing a discrimination charge or during the inves- tigation of a discrimination charge, will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action, up to and including, employment termination or academic dismissal. Retaliation Prohibited Retaliation against an employee or student for filing a sexual harassment complaint, or participating in the investigation of a complaint, is strictly prohibited. MCCCD will take appropriate disciplinary action, up to and including employment termination or academic dismissal if retaliation occurs. Filing a REPORT of Sexual Harassment A student who believes that he or she is, or has been, the victim of sexual harassment as prohibited by MCCCD policy, may REPORT (either orally or in writing) the conduct or commentary to any or all of the following: • The academic or administrative official(s) responsible for the unit or department involved (i.e., department chair, department manager); • The Dean of Students or designee at each campus; The REPORT should be made within 180 calendar days of the most recent alleged incident of sexual harassment. The recipient of the REPORT will have a meeting with the alleged harasser. The meeting shall include: identifying the behavior as described in the REPORT; alerting the alleged harasser to the perception of the impact of his or her behavior; providing the individual with a copy of the MCCCD Sexual Harassment Policy; encouraging attendance at one of MCCCD’s sexual harassment workshops; and encouraging greater awareness of behaviors that may lead to perceptions of sexual harassment. The name of the complainant shall not be identified to the respondent during the REPORT process; however, complain- ants should be aware that they may be called as witnesses in subsequent disciplinary or due process proceedings, as well as in litigation. Before having this meeting, all administrative officials must consult with the appropriate Assistant General Counsel. 33
  • 35. Appendix IV Incident Report Form Please fill out this form as completely as possible. In the event of any legal action, this form will serve as the basic official college record of what transpired and what actions were taken by responsible college officials at the scene of the incident. Attach extra sheets as necessary and any documentary evidence. Fax or email a copy of your report to the International Education Director as soon as possible. (Fax number: 001-area code – XXX-XXXX) Submit the complete original report and all supporting materials to the International Education Director upon your return to the United States. Date of incident: _______________________Location of incident: _________________________________ Time of incident: _______________________Were you present? __________________________________ Name of student involved (please use a separate form for each student): ________________________________________________________________________ Names of other participants involved: __________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Brief description of what happened: ____________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Who provided this description if you were not a witness (please list all names): __________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ If you were not present, when were you informed? ________________________________ What actions did you take? __________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ If the student was transported to a hospital or clinic, please provide complete name of the facility, its phone and fax numbers, and address: ___________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ 34
  • 36. Names and phone numbers of all physicians who examined or treated the student Dr.____________________________Phone: ____________________________________ Dr.____________________________ Phone: ___________________ Exact names of any medications prescribed to the student (please have student keep all packaging/inserts): Rx: __________________________________________________________________ Rx: __________________________________________________________________ Rx: __________________________________________________________________ Was the student conscious and capable of making informed judgments about medical treatment? ___________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ If the student was not capable of making medical decisions, who made any decisions? _____________________________________________________________________________________ What, if any, follow-up care was recommended? ______________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ Were the police or legal authorities notified of the incident or present at the scene? ___________________ Names and phone numbers of responsible legal authorities in charge of the case: ______________________________________________________ Case#: ________________________ Was the U.S. or relevant embassy notified? _____________Name and number of responsible consular officials involved in this incident: ____________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ Dates/times of contact with IEP office and/or family: ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Report submitted by: ______________________________ __________________________________ Printed Name Signature Date: _________________ Time: ________________ 35
  • 37. Appendix V Precautions Against Theft Overseas Many visitors have their pockets picked, purses snatched, or valuables stolen by pickpockets and other petty thieves who frequent rail and underground stations, major shopping streets, restaurants, department stores and other crowded areas. You can reduce the possibility of this happening to you by taking the following precautions. We hope the following hints will help you to avoid having your visit here marred by the loss of your money and valuable documents. • Do not leave luggage or handbags unattended anytime, anywhere, particularly in rail and tube stations, hotel lobbies and airport terminals. • Do not carry with you more money than you are likely to need when shopping or sightseeing. Leave valuable items, such as passports, airline tickets, jewelry, credit cards and cash not immediately needed, in the safe of your hotel. • Items of sentimental value, such as family photographs, and difficult to replace items, such as driver’s licenses, social security cards and address books, should also be left at one’s hotel, although not necessarily in a safe. • It is best to leave your passport in the hotel safe. It need not be carried unless you are going to cash travelers’ checks. Then it should be kept separately from one’s wallet or handbag. This may not be feasible for women, but men, whose passports are sometimes lost when a wife’s handbag is snatched, should carry their passports in a front trouser or jacket pocket. Thieves are seldom interested in passports alone. • Purses or handbags should be kept securely fastened and shoulder bags should be held against the body. Wallets should be carried in a front trouser pocket. Consider using a money belt. • Women’s handbags are particularly at risk in crowded restaurants when placed on the floor next to the chair or under the table, or when hung over the back of a chair. Thieves are quite adept at removing these bags if you do not actually have hold of them or if you have left them while visiting the buffet or salad bar. • Don’t leave purses and handbags, or men’s jackets containing wallets, unguarded while making purchases or trying on clothing in stores. A moment’s carelessness is all that a thief requires. • Do not leave baggage or other valuable items in an unguarded car at any time, and certainly never at night. A locked car trunk can easily be broken into and often is. General Advice for all Travelers • Safeguard your money by buying travelers checks. Do not cash them all at once - that defeats the object of purchasing them at all. Only cash as much as you need for the foreseeable future, and keep a record of the check numbers you have used. • Most travelers check companies ask to see the purchase receipt if you file a refund claim. Keep it separately, NOT in the same wallet, handbag or purse as the travelers checks themselves. • Whenever possible, leave valuable items such as jewelry, travelers’ checks, credit cards, airline tickets and cash not immediately required in the hotel safe. Remember to obtain a receipt for the property you have deposited. You will find Safe Deposit centers listed in Yellow Pages. • Leave a list of your passport, credit card and travelers check numbers with a friend or relative whom you can contact easily in an emergency. • Take out travel insurance to cover the expense incurred by loss or theft of your belongings overseas. Carry details of the policy with you and leave a copy with a friend or relative. • Do not leave baggage in an unguarded car at any time. 36
  • 38. Appendix VI Lost or Stolen Passport Q. WHAT SHOULD U.S. CITIZENS DO IF THEIR PASSPORT IS LOST OR STOLEN ABROAD? A. Contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate for assistance. Phone numbers for U.S. embassies and consulates are also available in our Country Specific Information and Key Officers handbook. You will need to speak to the American Citizens Services unit of the Consular Section. If you are scheduled to leave the foreign country shortly, please provide the Consular Section with details regarding your departure schedule. Every effort will be made to assist you quickly. You will also be directed to where you can obtain the required passport photos. If you are notified by a relative or friend that their U.S. passport has been lost/stolen, you may wish to contact Overseas Citizens Services , (202) 647-5225 at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C. providing as much information about possible about the person’s who needs passport services abroad. This will assist us in trying to verify the person’s previous passport, clearing the person’s name through the Department Passport Name Check System, and relaying this information to the U.S. embassy or consulate. Your relative/friend must apply for a new passport at the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. Q. WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS TO OBTAIN A REPLACEMENT PASSPORT? A. You will need to complete a new passport application. The consular officer taking an application for replacement of a lost, stolen, or misplaced passport must be reasonably satisfied as to your identity and citizenship before issuing the replacement. In virtually all cases this can be done through examination of whatever citizenship and identity documents are available, conversations with the applicant, close observation of demeanor and replies to questions asked, and discus- sions with the applicant’s travelling companions or contacts in the United States. Please note the new requirements for passports for minors under the age of 14 and how this will change the way passport applications for minors are handled abroad. Q. WHAT INFORMATION WILL I NEED TO PROVIDE THE CONSULAR OFFICER? A. You will be asked for certain information to assist in verifying your citizenship: 1. Personal Data: (including, but not limited to) • your name • date of birth • place of birth • passport number (if available) • date and place where your passport was issued If you can provide the U.S. embassy or consulate with a photocopy of your passport identification page, that will make getting a new passport easier since your citizenship and identity information would be more readily available. 2. Affidavit regarding loss/Theft of the Passport/Police report: When you report the loss, theft, or misplacement of your passport you must execute an affidavit fully describing the circumstances under which it was lost, stolen. U.S. Department of State form DS-64 may be used for this purpose, or you may simply execute a sworn statement before the consular officer describing what happened. A police report is not mandatory but may be required when the embassy/consulate believes a problem may exist such as possible fraud. An applicant eligible to receive a passport should not be placed in circumstances to miss a plane or unreasonably delay travel to obtain a police report. 37
  • 39. 3. Citizenship Verification and Name Clearance: The U.S. embassy/consulate will confirm your previous passport issuance through our Passport Verification System or by requesting that Overseas Citizens Services , (202) 647-5225, in the U.S. Department of State retrieve the actual passport application. The consular section will also attempt to clear your name through the U.S. Department of State name check system to ensure there is nothing preventing issuance of a U.S. passport to you (for example: outstanding arrest warrant, court order, etc.) See 22 CFR 51.70. 4. Proof of identity: You will also be asked for some proof of your identity. If all your personal papers were lost or stolen with your passport, your identity can be established in a number of ways. In most cases the problem of identity is resolved quickly. It should be noted, however, that if there is any indication of possible fraud the consular officer may request additional documentation or other information. Information from Consular Interview: The consular officer may be satisfied as to your identity based on the interview with you, or may require other information. Identifying Witness: Persons traveling with a group or with friends, family or associates in the foreign country can have such a person execute an affidavit of an identifying witness before the consular officer. An identifying witness does not have to be a U.S. citizen. Information From Family, Friends or Associates in the United States: If you are travelling alone and do not know anyone in the foreign country who can attest to your identity, your family, friends, or associates in the U.S. may contact the consular officer by phone or fax confirming your identity. This is usually quite informal. In emergency situations, your contacts may also communicate with the U.S. Department of State, that Overseas Citizens Services , (202) 647-5225. Information From Previous Passport Records: If necessary, information about your identity may be obtained from your previous passport application which may have to be retrieved by Overseas Citizens Services , (202) 647-5225, in the U.S. Department of State from the Federal Records Center which is located outside of Washington, D.C. Q. WILL THE REPLACEMENT PASSPORT BE ISSUED FOR THE FULL 10-YEAR VALIDITY PERIOD FOR AN ADULT? A. Replacements for lost passports are normally issued for the full 10-year period of validity for adults. Occasionally, cases will arise in which the consular officer has some lingering doubt because of statements made by the applicant, or other circumstances, but is still reasonably satisfied as to identity and citizenship. If there is not time to request and receive the Department’s verification, a passport limited to 3 months may be issued. Limited passports may also be issued in cases in which an applicant has, by mistake, packed the passport with luggage being sent to another location, left the passport at home, perhaps in another country, but has to travel immediately, lost or been robbed of multiple passports in a short timespan, etc. When issuing a limited passport in an emergency situation, consular officers will carefully explain to the applicant that the passport is limited for the duration of the present trip only. When the applicant returns to the United States and wishes to travel again internationally, the applicant will have to apply for a replacement passport and pay the regular fee. Q. ARE FEES CHARGED FOR REPLACEMENT OF LOST/STOLEN PASSPORTS ABROAD? A. The normal passport fees are collected from applicants for replacement passports. Applicants will be asked to provide names of persons they feel would be able to assist them financially if there is sufficient time. See our information about Financial Assistance to U.S. citizens abroad and Learn About Sending Money Overseas to U.S. Citizen in an Emergency. However, if: • the applicant’s money and documents have been lost or stolen, or • the applicant is a victim of a disaster • and the applicant does not have and cannot reasonably be expected to obtain money to pay the fees before continuing travel, no passport fee will be charged and a limited validity passport will be issued. When the person applies for a full validity passport on their return to the United States the regular passport fee will be charged for the replacement passport. See the U.S.Department of State Schedule of Fees, 22, CFR 22.1. 38
  • 40. Q. CAN THE U.S. EMBASSY ISSUE A REPLACEMENT PASSPORT OVER A WEEKEND OR HOLIDAY? A. U.S. passports are not routinely issued by U.S. embassies and consulates abroad on weekends and holidays when the embassy/consulate is closed. All U.S. embassies and consulates have an after hours duty officer available to assist with life or death emergencies of U.S. citizens abroad. Contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate after hours duty officer for assistance if you have an emergency need to travel. Phone numbers for U.S. embassies and consulates are also available in our Country Specific Information and Key Officers handbook. If you are scheduled to travel directly to the United States, the duty officer may be able to assist in issuing a transportation letter to the airline and alerting U.S. Customs and Immigration to the fact that you will be attempting to enter the United States without a passport. Duty officers must focus primary attention on life or death emergencies. Depending on the circumstances and conditions in the foreign country, it is possible that a replacement passport may not be issued until the embassy/consulate reopens for business. At that time the Consular Section will be in a better position to verify your citizenship and identity and clear your name through the Department of State name check system. 39
  • 41. Appendix VII American Consulate Emergency Services replace a Passport - If someone loses a passport, a consulate office can issue a replacement, often within 24 hours. If you believe a passport has been stolen, first report the theft to the local police and get a police declaration/report. medical Assistance - If someone is sick, you can contact a consular officer for a list of local doctors, dentists, and medical specialists, along with other medical information. If someone is injured or becomes seriously ill, a consul will help you find medical assistance and inform family or friends. help Get Funds - Should someone lose all his/her money and other financial resources, consular officers can help contact family, bank, or employer to arrange for them to send emergency funds. In some cases, these funds can be wired to you through the Department of State. help in An Emergency - Family members may need to reach you because of an emergency at home or because they are worried about their student’s welfare. They should call the State Department’s Overseas Citizens Services at (202) 647-5225. The State Department will relay the message to the consular officers in the country in which you are traveling. Consular officers will attempt to locate you, pass on urgent messages, and, consistent with the Privacy Act, report back to your family. Visit in Jail - If someone is arrested, you should ask the authorities to notify a U.S. consul. Consuls cannot get you out of jail (when you are in a foreign country you are subject to its laws). However, they can work to protect legitimate interests and ensure you are not discriminated against. They can provide a list of local attorneys, visit you, inform you generally about local laws, and contact your family and friends. Consular officers can transfer money, food, and clothing to the prison authorities from your family or friends. They can try to get relief if you are held under inhumane or unhealthful conditions. make Arrangements After The Death of An American - When an American dies abroad, a consular officer notifies the Americans family and informs them about options and costs for disposition of remains. Costs for preparing and returning a body to the U.S. may be high and must be paid by the family. Often, local laws and procedures make returning a body to the U.S. for burial a lengthy process. A consul prepares a Report of Death based on the local death certificate; this is forwarded to the next of kin for use in estate and insurance matters. help in A Disaster/Evacuation - If you are caught up in a natural disaster or civil disturbance, you should let your rela- tives know as soon as possible that you are safe, or contact a U.S. consul who will pass that message to your family through the State Department. Be resourceful. U.S. officials will do everything they can to contact you and advise you. However, they must give priority to helping Americans who have been hurt or are in immediate danger. In a disaster, consuls face the same constraints you do - lack of electricity or fuel, interrupted phone lines, closed airports. A consular officer cannot: • demand immediate release of a U.S. citizen arrested abroad or otherwise cause the citizen to be released • represent a U.S. citizen at trial, give legal advice or pay legal fees and/or fines with U.S. Government funds. 40
  • 42. Appendix VIII Crisis Abroad - What the State Department Does What can the State Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs do for Americans caught in a disaster or a crisis abroad? Earthquakes, hurricanes, political upheavals, acts of terrorism, and hijackings are only some of the events threatening the safety of Americans abroad. Each event is unique and poses its own special difficulties. However, for the State Department there are certain responsibilities and actions that apply in every disaster or crisis. When a crisis occurs, the State Department sets up a task force or working group to bring together in one set of rooms all the people necessary to work on that event. Usually this Washington task force will be in touch by telephone 24 hours a day with our Ambassador and Foreign Service Officers at the embassy in the country affected. In a task force, the immediate job of the State Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs is to respond to the thousands of concerned relatives and friends who begin to telephone the State Department immediately after the news of a disaster is broadcast. Relatives want information on the welfare of their family members and on the disaster. The State Department relies for hard information on its embassies and consulates abroad. Often these installations are also affected by the disaster and lack electricity, phone lines, gasoline, etc. Nevertheless, foreign service officers work hard to get information back to Washington as quickly as possible. This is rarely as quickly as the press is able to relay information. Foreign Service Offi- cers cannot speculate; their information must be accurate. Often this means getting important information from the local government, which may or may not be immediately responsive. Welfare & Whereabouts As concerned relatives call in, officers of the Bureau of Consular Affairs collect the names of the Americans possibly involved in the disaster and pass them to the embassy and consulates. Officers at post attempt to locate these Americans in order to report on their welfare. The officer’s work with local authorities and, depending on the circumstances, may personally search hotels, airports, hospitals, or even prisons. As they try to get the information, their first priority is Amer- icans dead or injured. Death When an American dies abroad, the Bureau of Consular Affairs must locate and inform the next-of-kin. Sometimes discovering the next-of-kin is difficult. If the American’s name is known, the Bureau’s Office of Passport Services will search for his or her passport application. However, the information there may not be current. The Bureau of Consular Affairs provides guidance to grieving family members on how to make arrangements for local burial or return of the remains to the U.S. The disposition of remains is affected by local laws, customs, and facilities, which are often vastly different from those in the U.S. The Bureau of Consular Affairs relays the family’s instructions and necessary private funds to cover the costs involved to the embassy or consulate. The Department of State has no funds to assist in the return of remains or ashes of American citizens who die abroad. Upon completion of all formalities, the consular officer abroad prepares an official Foreign Service Report of Death, based upon the local death certificate, and sends it to the next-of-kin or legal representative for use in U.S. courts to settle estate matters. A U.S. consular officer overseas has statutory responsibility for the personal estate of an American who dies abroad if the deceased has no legal representative in the country where the death occurred. The consular officer takes possession of personal effects, such as convertible assets, apparel, jewelry, personal documents and papers. The officer prepares an inven- tory and then carries out instructions from members of the deceased’s family concerning the effects. A final statement of the account is then sent to the next-of-kin. The Diplomatic Pouch cannot be used to ship personal items, including valuables, but legal documents and correspondence relating to the estate can be transmitted by pouch. In Washington, the Bureau of Consular Affairs gives next-of-kin guidance on procedures to follow in preparing Letters Testamentary, Letters of Administration, and Affidavits of Next-of-Kin as acceptable evidence of legal claim of an estate. 41
  • 43. Injury In the case of an injured American, the embassy or consulate abroad notifies the task force, which notifies family members in the U.S. The Bureau of Consular Affairs can assist in sending private funds to the injured American; frequently it collects information on the individual’s prior medical history and forwards it to the embassy or consulate. When neces- sary, the State Department assists in arranging the return of the injured American to the U.S. commercially, with appro- priate medical escort, via commercial air ambulance or, occasionally, by U.S. Air Force medical evacuation aircraft. The use of Air Force facilities for a medical evacuation is authorized only under certain stringent conditions, and when commercial evacuation is not possible. The full expense must be borne by the injured American or his family. Evacuation Sometimes commercial transportation entering and leaving a country is disrupted during a political upheaval or natural disaster. If this happens, and if it appears unsafe for Americans to remain, the embassy and consulates will work with the task force in Washington to charter special air flights and ground transportation to help Americans to depart. The U.S. Government cannot order Americans to leave a foreign country. It can only advise and try to assist those who wish to leave. Privacy Act The provisions of the Privacy Act are designed to protect the privacy and rights of Americans, but occasionally they complicate our efforts to assist citizens abroad. As a rule, consular officers may not reveal information regarding an indi- vidual Americans location, welfare, intentions, or problems to anyone, including family members and Congressional representatives, without the expressed consent of that individual. Although sympathetic to the distress this can cause concerned families, consular officers must comply with the provisions of the Privacy Act. Bureau of Consular Affairs, U.S. Department of State CONSULAR REPORT OF DEATH OF A U.S. CITIZEN ABROAD FOREIGN DEATH CERTIFICATE: Foreign death certificates are issued by the local registrar of deaths or similar local authority. The certificates are written in the language of the foreign country and prepared in accordance with the laws of the foreign country. Although authenticated copies of the foreign death certificate can be obtained, since the documents are written in the language of the foreign country they are sometimes unacceptable in the United States for insurance and estate purposes. In the United States, a “Report of Death of an American Citizen Abroad” issued by the U.S. consular officer is generally used in lieu of a foreign death certificate as proof of death. REPORT OF DEATH OF A U.S. CITIZEN ABROAD: The consular “Report of Death of an American Citizen Abroad” is a report that provides the essential facts concerning the death of a U.S. citizen, disposition of remains, and custody of the personal effects of a deceased citizen. This form is generally used in legal proceedings in the United States in lieu of the foreign death certificate. The Report of Death is based on the foreign death certificate, and cannot be completed until the foreign death certificate has been issued. This can sometimes take from four to six weeks or longer after the date of the death, depending on how long it takes local authorities to complete the local form. U.S. Embassies and Consulates work with local authorities to see that this time is as short as possible. COPIES OF THE REPORT OF DEATH: The U.S. consular officer will send the family up to 20 certified copies of the Report of Death at the time the initial report is issued. Additional copies can be obtained subsequently by contacting the Depart- ment of State, Passport Services, Correspondence Branch, 1111 19th Street, N.W., Suite 510, Washington, D.C. 20522- 1705, telephone: (202) 955-0307. Submit a signed, written request including all pertinent facts along with requester’s return address and telephone number. There is a $20.00 fee for the first copy and a $10.00 fee for each additional copy, payable to the Department of State. See also the Department of State, Consular Affairs home page on the Internet at: http://travel.state.gov/ under “Passport Services” for further information about obtaining copies of Reports of Death. LEGAL AUTHORITY: U.S. insurance companies and other agencies sometimes inquire regarding the authority for issuance of Reports of Death. See 22 U.S. Code 4196; 22 Code of Federal Regulations 72.1. 42
  • 44. RETURN OF REMAINS OF DECEASED AMERICANS SUMMARY: One of the most essential tasks of the Department of State and of U.S. embassies and consulates abroad is to provide assistance to families of U.S. citizens who die abroad. The U.S. consular officer in the foreign country will assist the family in making arrangements with local authorities for preparation and disposition of the remains, following the family’s instructions in accordance with local law. The authority and responsibilities of a U.S. consular officer concerning return of remains of a deceased U.S. citizen abroad are based on U.S. laws (22 U.S.C. 4196; 22 CFR 72.1), treaties and international practice. Options available to a family depend upon local law and practice in the foreign country. Certain documents are required by U.S. and foreign law before remains can be sent from one country to another. These requirements may vary depending on the circumstances of the death. CONSULAR MORTUARY CERTIFICATE: A U.S. consular mortuary certificate is required to ensure orderly shipment of remains and to facilitate U.S. Customs clearance. The certificate is in English and confirms essential information concerning the cause of death. The U.S. consular officer will prepare the certificate and ensure that the foreign death certificate (if available), affidavit of the foreign funeral director, and transit permit, together with the consular mortuary certificate accompany the remains to the United States. AFFIDAVIT OF FOREIGN FUNERAL DIRECTOR AND TRANSIT PERMIT: The U.S. consular officer will ensure that the required affidavit is executed by the local (foreign) funeral director. This affidavit attests to the fact that the casket contains only the remains of the deceased and the necessary clothing and packing materials. The affidavit may also state that the remains have been embalmed or otherwise prepared. In addition, the U.S. consular officer ensures that a transit permit accompanies the remains. The transit permit is issued by local health authorities at the port of embarkation. U.S. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS FOR QUARANTINE AND CUSTOMS: In general, if remains have been embalmed, the docu- mentation which accompanies the consular mortuary certificate will satisfy U.S. public health requirements. If the foreign death certificate is not available at the time the remains are returned, the consular mortuary certificate will include refer- ence to the fact that the deceased did not die from a quarantineable disease and that the remains have been embalmed. The affidavit of the funeral director which is attached to the consular mortuary certificate complies with the U.S. Customs requirement that the casket and the packing container for the casket contain only the remains. If the remains are not accompanied by a passenger, a bill of lading must be issued by the airline carrier company to cover the transport. The customs house permit for entry to the United States is obtained by the airline carrier at the point of departure. SHIPMENT OF UNEMBALMED REMAINS: If the remains are not embalmed, the U.S. consular officer should alert U.S. Customs and the U.S. Public Health Service at point of entry in advance, faxing copies of the consular mortuary certificate, local death certificate (if available), affidavit of foreign funeral director, and a formal statement from competent foreign authorities stating that the individual did not die from a communicable disease. This statement generally is required even if the exact cause of death is unknown in order for unembalmed remains to enter the United States. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: For additional information concerning return of remains of a diseased U.S. citizen, contact the appropriate geographic division of the Office of American Citizens Services, Department of State, Room 4817 N.S., 2201 C. Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20520, telephone:: (202) 647-5225 or (202) 647-5226 or the consular officer in the American Citizens Services Section of the U.S. embassy or consulate in the foreign country where the death occurred. 43
  • 45. Appendix VIII Medical Evacuation Procedures 1. Consult with local doctor and International Education Program Office for recommendation for medical evacuation (medevac). 2. Contact AIG Travel Guard 24-hour hotline as soon as the recommendation for medevac is made (phone number is on back of iNext insurance card to obtain pre-approval for medical evacuation (medevac). 3. Give insurance company the following information: • patient name • age • citizenship • medical problem • medical equipment needed in transport (e.g., blood, oxygen) • medical personnel needed in transport (e.g., anesthesiologist, nurse, other specialist) • name and phone number of local attending physician • place to which you want to medevac patient • International Education Program and on-site telephone numbers and fax number • state U.S. Guarantee of payment: Fiscal Data • note whether someone will accompany the patient 4. If Insurance Company and/or local doctor concurs that medevac is necessary, determine • how soon medevac should occur • if medical or non-medical accompaniment of patient is necessary • if patient is stable enough to transport to home country/state or will need to have medical care in different country abroad that has appropriate medical facilities 5. Have iNext (AIG Travel Guard) arrange transportation/medical support. 6. Inform AIG of any special needs in itinerary such as • destination • special seating arrangements (stretcher, first class) • special airport arrangements (wheelchair, stretcher, ambulance) • special airline medevac or airline’s permission in advance to fly (Usually necessary if you want to bump another passenger, if stretcher needed, if medically accompanied, if IV necessary, or if any other visibly obvious, serious medical problems.) 7. Ensure the patient has passport and visa needed for departure from abroad and entry into USA or country en route. If passport is unavailable, contact US Embassy consulate to make another passport or arrange for proper emergency documents. 8. When patient’s travel schedule is obtained from iNext (AIG Travel Guard), follow-up with IEP Office. 9. Inform International Education Director if student wants parents or family notified and/or review pre-departure forms to see the pre-approved emergency contact(s). 10. Brief the patient about medevac procedure. 44
  • 46. 11. Have patient’s medical chart and ensure that all results are translated into English. Instruct patient to carry chart, etc in hand luggage. Include any x-ray or lab results. 12. Make sure patient has any necessary medications or supplies he/she will need along the way. 13. If patient is traveling with accompaniment, determine if patient will need to go directly to hospital upon arriving at destination. 14. If direct hospital evaluation/admission will be needed, call emergency contact or International Education Program Office to determine which hospital and consultants will be used and go there directly from the airport. 15. Keep notes of all people you speak to and document instructions given. 45

×