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Disaster Science and Management: DSM 4996
Disaster Science and Management: DSM 4996
Disaster Science and Management: DSM 4996
Disaster Science and Management: DSM 4996
Disaster Science and Management: DSM 4996
Disaster Science and Management: DSM 4996
Disaster Science and Management: DSM 4996
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Disaster Science and Management: DSM 4996

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  • 1. Disaster Science and Management DSM 4996 – Directed Readings “Crisis Management” Summer 2002 Introduction Crisis management is a function of all public, private and non-profit organizations, supporting their fundamental strategic objective of ensuring survivability and economic viability. Crisis management decisions must reflect business reality if a private sector organization is to survive. In some organizations, crisis management is viewed and supported as an integrated strategic function—these are the “crisis-prepared” organizations, the characteristics of which will be covered in subsequent sessions. Other organizations approach crisis management in a non- comprehensive and fragmented manner which can threaten their very survival should crises occur. These are “crisis-prone” organizations, the characteristics of which will be covered in subsequent sessions. Competitiveness especially in the private sector can inhibit cooperation and sharing of ideas between organizations. This is unlike the public sector, where cooperation between all levels of government and municipalities is essential to effective emergency management and encouraged. This class provides an introduction to crisis management as it is applied in public, private and non-profit organizations. The approach of typical business organizations to the many facets and problems inherent in effective crisis management, disaster recovery, and organizational continuity has been fragmented. Financial departments have dealt with loss control and risk management. Operational and facility managers have been responsible for contingency planning, first responder training, and emergency management for industrial accidents. Information department heads have created disaster recovery procedures and business continuity plans. Most companies have developed crisis management teams and procedures based on their industry type and perceived vulnerabilities. For example, many petrochemical companies see crisis management as a part of the environmental safety and health function. Crisis management in food product companies is often the domain of the legal and corporate communications departments. In financial institutions, crisis management is closely linked to computer system security and recovery. This course identifies, examines, and integrates the diverse crisis management, disaster recovery, and organizational continuity issues facing organizations. Basic crisis management, contingency planning, disaster recovery, business continuity/resumption, and emergency management skills and knowledge elements will be identified, discussed, developed, and integrated according to the crisis management, disaster recovery, and organizational continuity model. The strategic importance of crisis management, disaster recovery, and organizational continuity to private sector organizations will be emphasized throughout the course. Instructional methodologies, including case studies, small-group activities, and student-led presentations are used to actively involve each student in the learning process. When possible and practical, processing of learning activities to include not only “what” was learned, but the “so what” and “now what” to complete the learning cycle will be followed to the maximum extent possible. Course Objectives: The purpose of the course is reflected in the overall objectives set forth below:
  • 2. 1. Understand the similarities and differences between governmental emergency management and crisis management in the non-profit and private sectors. 2. Understand the concepts of crisis management, disaster recovery, and organizational continuity. 3. Clarify the characteristics of an organization which indicate crisis preparedness (or crisis proneness) and the process of business area impact analysis.. 4. Identify risk management and loss control strategies (including crisis communications) that can be implemented to reduce the adverse impact of a disaster on organizations. 5. Compare and contrast contingency, response, business recovery, and crisis management plans that lead to business resumption and recovery.. Student Assessment: Grades for the class will be based on student performance in completing six (6) class assignments, article reviews, and a course project. During the semester, students will be asked to complete assignments related to the section of the class. Assignments will be completed and submitted to the course instructor for review. All class assignments will be graded and returned to the student for review. Class assignments will comprise 50% of the course grade. The class project will be a research report comprising at least ten pages with references. The report will be a detailed examination of one of the class topics with a special emphasis on technology in emergency management. The final element of a student’s assessment involves reviews of articles. The review will average 2 to 3 pages and will address three areas including: the content of the article; an analysis of the article; and an evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of the text. The articles will relate to topics addressed in sessions of the class and must be currently available. The instructor will provide a list of articles for review. The review will count 10% of the final grade. Content: How is the article organized? What is the purpose? Who is the intended audience? Analysis: Did the article achieve the author’s intended goals? Evaluation: What are the strengths and weaknesses of the article? Who could use it? Would you recommend this reading? If so, why? Class Project Students are required during the first three weeks of the semester to identify an individual project topic. During the semester, the student will review the class materials on the topic and identify issues, or a specific application of the topic for detailed analysis. The project report will be a detailed examination of the issue or application and its contribution to business and crisis management (ten pages double spaced). The topic for the class project must be reviewed by the instructor. A one-page project status report must be provided to the instructor by the middle of the semester. The project report will form the basis of a class presentation during the last two weeks of the class. The project will count for 15% of the final grade. Grading Class Assignments 50% Class Project / Papers 40% Book Review 10%
  • 3. Total 100% This 4000-level class will be available for both undergrad and grad credit. Undergraduate students will be expected to meet the requirements as noted in the Student Assessment of the following course description. Graduate students will be assigned additional readings and have additional questions on all assignments, tests and the final exam. Undergraduate students will be asked to complete five class assignments, one class project / paper and a book review. The nature of the assignment questions, scope of the class project and papers and exam questions will differ from those given to graduate students. Graduate students will be asked to complete six class assignment, one class project / papers and a book review. As previously notes, graduate students may be given a different set of questions for a class assignment, and the scope of the class paper will be more complex – reflecting additional reading assignments for graduate students. Class Sessions This class will meet once a week for group discussion of the class assignments and readings. For the summer 2002 and Fall 2002 offerings of this course class sessions will be for one and one- half hours once a week. Class assignments will be submitted electronically using the LSU Blackboard. Topics 1. Definition of Key Terms and Identification of Crisis Events A Strategic Framework for Corporate Crisis Management. John R. Harrald, Institute for Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management, The George Washington University Washington, D.C. Dr. Harrald is a former faculty member of the LSU Ports and Waterways Institute. As a retired Coast Guard officer you will notice his interest and professional association with the maritime industry. 2. Crisis Events Grouping and Vulnerability Drivers - Overview of the Crisis Management and Business Continuity Model James R. Chiles. Inviting Disaster: Lessons from the Edge of Technology. Harper Business (2001) – An excerpt provided by the author. An Interview with James R. Chiles. Thursday, August 23, 2001 Guest Host: Frank Stasio. 12:00 - James R. Chiles: Inviting Disaster (HarperBusiness). Listen in RealAudio! Three Mile Island. The Challenger explosion. The Exxon Valdez. In our increasingly high-tech world, the slightest mechanical defect or human error can sometimes lead to catastrophe. Join us as look at recent disasters, why they happen, and the lessons they can teach us about our use of technology. http://www.wamu.org/pi/shows/piarc_010820.html Ask the Author from Darwin Magazine - http://www.darwinmag.com/read/ An Interview with James R. Chiles – Inviting Disaster – Harper Business (2001). 3. Vulnerability Analysis and Risk Assessment, Risk Management, and Risk Communications – Business Area Impact Analysis (BAIA)
  • 4. Risk Mitigation in Passenger Vessel Operations. John R. Harrald and Martha Grabowski. Disaster Recovery Journal. Vol. 7, #3. Note the description of the "causal chain" described on p. 2. You will be asked to use this framework in your analysis of the Texas A & M bon-fire incident. 4. Risk Perception and Risk Communications Uniting the Aggie Spirit. Since 1909 Texas A&M University students have worked together each year to build a massive bonfire. The stack of several thousand logs collapsed early morning on November 18, 1999, killing twelve students and injuring at least 27 others. Bonfire was cancelled that year. It was to have been ignited on Thanksgiving evening as a prelude to Texas A&M's November 26 morning football game with The University of Texas. Assignment: A. Read "A strategic framework for corporate crisis management," Harrald and "Risk mitigation in passenger vessel operation" by Harrald and Grabowski. B. Review the Final Report of the 1999 Texas A & M Bonfire Collapse. The mission of the Special Commission on the 1999 Bonfire is to determine the cause of the Bonfire collapse and report its findings to the university. Bonfire Commission Report. 2000. Texas A & M University. Other Reports and Information concerning the disaster. http://www.tamu.edu/bonfire-commission/reports/ See Blackboard for Assignment questions. Written response due June 20, 2002. Class session 11:00 Room 45 Atkinson Hall - LSU Baton Rouge for discussion. 5. Risk Management, Safety, and Security Management Organizations at Risk. Daniel J. Alesch, Holly, Mitter, & Nagy. (2001) Public Entity Risk Institute. Fairfax, VA http://www.riskinstitute.org presents a detailed study of the perceived impact of natural disasters on small private and not for profit enterprises. Read this study - and especially note the following Sections: Introduction and overview; Recovery - robustness resiliency & compex systems; Findings; Conclusions Written response due July 3, 2002. 6. Crisis Management, Communication and Decision Making “Principles of Risk-Based Decision Making.” Lt. Duane Boniface/ U.S. Coast Guard Written response due July 10, 2002. 7. Crisis Management Team “Cross-departmental Cooperation and the Politics of Planning.” by Jeff Marinstein February, 1998. Contingency Planning and Management. Vol. 3 pp. 12 – 15. Post Accident Audit of an Industrial Accident: 8. Post Audit Crisis Assessment Assignment: Questions developed by Dr. John R. Harrald and Gregory Shaw The George Washington University Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management
  • 5. 9. Business Contingency Planning Federal Emergency Management Agency. 1996. Emergency Management Guide for Business and Industry. Washington, DC: Federal Emergency Management Agency. http://www.fema.gov/library/bizindex.html 10. Crises of Skewed Management Values, Deception, Management Misconduct, and Business Ethics: A Framework for Ethical Decision Making (This assignment is for Graduate Students and only a reading assignment for undergraduate students) “The Unanticipated Consequences of Technology.” The Ethics Connection – Tim Healy http://www.scu.edu/SCU/Centers/Ethics/Publications/submitted/healy/consequences.html Ethics or morality poses questions about how we ought to act and how we should live. It asks, "According to what standards are these actions right or wrong?" It asks, "What character traits (like honesty, compassion, fairness) are necessary to live a truly human life?" It also asks, "What concerns or groups do we usually minimize or ignore? And why might that be?" Admitting our blindness is the beginning of vision. References: “A Framework for Ethical Decision Making.” The Ethics Connection. Santa Clara, CA: Markula Center for Applied Ethics, Santa Clara University. [1999.] http://www.scu.edu/ethics/practicing/ decision/framework.html Barton, Laurence (2000). Crisis in Organizations: Managing and Communicating in the Heat of Chaos. Cincinnati, OH: South-Western Publishing Co. Chiles, James R. (2001). Inviting Disaster : Lessons from the Edge of Technology. Harper Business. Doughty, Ken (2000). Business Continuity Planning: Protecting your organization’s life. Auerbach Publishers, Incorporated. Emergency Preparedness Canada, with the Disaster Recovery Information Exchange. 1995. Business Resumption Planning – A Guide. Fredericton, NB, Canada: Minister of Supply and Services. cominfo@epc-pcc.x400.gc.ca or http://hoshi.cic.sfu.ca/epc/pub/manuals/en_busresume.html. Federal Emergency Management Agency. 1996. Emergency Management Guide for Business and Industry. Washington, DC: Federal Emergency Management Agency. http://www.fema.gov/library/bizindex.html Fischhoff, Baruch. 1995. “Risk Perception and Communication Unplugged: Twenty Years of Process.” Risk Analysis. Vol. 15, No. 2. Pages 137–144. Greening, Daniel W., and Johnson, Richard A. 1997. “Managing Industrial and Environmental Crises.” Business and Society. Vol. 36, No. 4. Pages 334–361.
  • 6. Hale, Joanne. 1997. “A Layered Communication Architecture for the Support of Crisis Response.” Journal of Management Information Systems. Vol. 14, No. 1. Armonk, NJ. Harvard Business School (2000). Harvard Business Review on Crisis Management. Harvard Business School Press. Kleinrichert, Denis. 1998. Contingency Planning for Business and Industry. Institute of Emergency Administration and Fire Science, St. Petersburg Junior College. St. Petersburg, Florida: Institute of Emergency Administration and Fire Science. http://eam- fire.spjc.cc.fl.us/eam/bus_rec/index.htm. Lerbinger, Otto. 1997. The Crisis Manager – Facing Risk and Responsibility. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Lynch, James R. 1996. “Quantitative Risk Assessment: Application to Industry.” Disaster Recovery World III. St. Louis, MO: Disaster Recovery Journal. Pages 100–101. (Vol. 7, No. 2). Marinstein, Jeff. 1998. “Cross-Departmental Cooperation and the Politics of Planning.” Contingency Planning and Management Vol. 3, Feb. 1998. Pages 12–15. Flemington, N.J. http:// www.contingencyplanning.com Mitroff, Ian I., Pearson, Christine M., Harrington, L. Katharine 1996. The Essential Guide to Managing Corporate Crises. New York: Oxford University Press. Mitroff, Ian I. And Gus Anagos (2000). Managing Crises before they happen: What every executive and manager needs to know about crisis management. AMACOM. Moore, Pat. 1997. “How to Plan for Enterprise-Wide Business and Service Continuity.” In Disaster Resource Guide. Santa Ana, CA: Emergency Lifeline Corporation. http://www.disaster-resource.com/articles/97moore.htm. Myers, Kenneth N. (1999). Disasters 2ND. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1999. Naylis, Gerard J. 1996. “Corporate Terrorism: Managing the Threat.” Risk Management. Vol. 43, No. 6. New York. Pauchant, Thierry C., and Mitroff, Ian I. 1992. Transforming the Crisis-Prone Organization. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers. Sample Disaster Recovery Plan. 1996. St. Louis, MO. Disaster Recovery Journal. On Disaster Recovery Journa.l http://www.drj.com/drpol/drp.html. Sellnow, Timothy L., Ulmer, Robert R., and Snider, Michelle. 1998. “The Compatibility of Corrective Action in Organizational Crisis Communication.” Communication Quarterly.. Vol. 46, No. 1. University Park, MD. Slovic, Paul. 1987. “Public Perception of Risk.” Journal of Environmental Health. May 1997. Pages 22–23.
  • 7. Toigo, Jon William Toigo (1995). Disaster Recovery Planning: For Computers and Communication Resouces. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Traverso, Debra K. 1993. “How to Develop a Crisis Communication Plan.” Occupational Hazards. Vol. 55, No. 3. Cleveland. “Unethical Workers and Illegal Acts.” 1999. Society. Vol. 36, No. 4. Wold, Geoffrey, H. 1992. “Disaster Recovery Planning Process – Part I of III.” Disaster Recovery World III. St. Louis, MO: Disaster Recovery Journal. Pages 15–18. al (Vol. 5, No. 1). http://www.drj.com/new2dr/w2_002.htm Wong, Bo K., Monaco, John. A., and Sellaro, C. Louise. 1994. “Disaster Recovery Planning: Suggestions to Top Management.” Journal of Systems Management.” Vol. 45, No. 5. Pages 28– 32.

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