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  • 1. 
 
 
 
 Crisis
&
Emergency
Management
Plan
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Revised:
November
21,
2008
 
 
 


  • 2. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 Table
of
Contents:
 
 Emergency
Contact
List
 ..................................................................................................................... 4
 









Crisis
&
Emergency
Response
Team
Personnel ........................................................................ 
5
 









Internal
Resource
List ................................................................................................................ 5
 









Additional
Resource
Numbers ................................................................................................... 6
 









Continuity
of
Administration ..................................................................................................... 7
 College
Map
and
Building
Directory
 .................................................................................................. 8
 Assault
 ............................................................................................................................................... 9
 Bomb
Threat
 .................................................................................................................................... 11
 Designated
Shelter
Areas ................................................................................................................. 15
 Disturbances
and
Demonstrations ................................................................................................... 16
 Earthquake ....................................................................................................................................... 20
 Emergency
Alert
System
.................................................................................................................. 21
 Fire.................................................................................................................................................... 22
 First
Aid
Kits
&
AED........................................................................................................................... 23
 Hazardous
Materials......................................................................................................................... 24
 Medical
Emergency
–
Injury,
Illness,
First
Aid .................................................................................. 25
 Severe
Weather ................................................................................................................................ 30
 Utility
Emergencies........................................................................................................................... 32
 Weapons
in
the
Building................................................................................................................... 33
 Appendix
A
–
Checklist/Forms
 









Assault/Rape
Checklist .......................................................................................... Appendix
A‐1
 









Bomb
Threat
Checklist........................................................................................... Appendix
A‐2
 









Incident
Report
Form............................................................................................. Appendix
A‐3
 








Medical
Refusal
Form ............................................................................................. Appendix
A‐4
 Appendix
B
–
Class
Cancellation
Procedure.................................................................... Appendix
B‐1

 Appendix
C
–
Special
Considerations/Disabilities........................................................... Appendix
C‐1
 
 
 
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
2


  • 3. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 
 Purpose:
The
Crisis
&
Emergency
Management
Plan
outlines
the
college’s
procedures
for
managing
 major
emergencies
and
incidents
that
may
threaten
the
health,
safety,
and
welfare
of
the
campus
 community
or
disrupt
its
programs
and
activities.
This
plan
places
a
strong
emphasis
on
prevention,
 intervention/response,
and
post‐emergency/incident
activities.

Further,
this
plan
identifies
 departments
and
individuals
who
are
directly
responsible
for
emergency
responses
and
critical
support
 services
that
are
aimed
at
addressing
the
specific
events/incidents
outlined
in
this
document.

It
also
 provides
a
management
structure
by
delineating
the
roles
and
responsibilities
of
college
employees
so
 that
the
coordination
and
deployment
of
essential
resources
are
facilitated
in
the
event
of
an
 emergency
or
incident.

 
 Specifically,
this
plan
includes
provisions
for
pre‐planning,
intervention/response,
and
post‐emergency
 activities,
including
the
establishment
or
designation
of
the
following:
 1. Explicit
procedures
for
each
crisis
incident.
 2. Crisis
headquarters
and
command
post
outside
the
school
facility
in
the
event
evacuation
is
 necessary.
 3. Chain
of
command
in
the
event
a
key
administrator
is
not
available;
 4. Spokesperson
to
the
media.
 5. Network
of
key
communicators.
 6. Communication
plan
within
the
college
and
to
the
community.
 7. Critical
Incident
Management.
 8. Arrangement
for
support
services.

 9. Bringing
closure
to
a
crisis.
 10. Evaluation
of
the
crisis
plan.
 
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
3


  • 4. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 Emergency
Contact
Information
 Emergency/Incident
 Contact
 Assault
(Do
Not
Disturb
Scene)
 911
 Fairfield
Police
Department
–
(618)
842‐2151
 Wayne
County
Sheriff
–
(618)
842‐6631
 President
–
ext.
4001
 Interim
Dean
of
College
–
ext.
4007
 O
&
M
Team
Leader
–

(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430
 Bomb
Threat
(Do
Not
Disturb
Scene)
 911
 Fairfield
Police
Department
–
(618)
842‐2151
 Wayne
County
Sheriff
–
(618)
842‐6631
 President
–
ext.
4001
 Interim
Dean
of
College
–
ext.
4007
 O
&
M
Team
Leader
–
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430
 Disturbances
&
Demonstrations
 O
&
M
Team
Leader
–
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430
 President
–
ext.
4001
 Interim
Dean
of
College
–
ext.
4007
 Earthquake
(Do
Not
Disturb
Scene)
 O
&
M
Team
Leader
–
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430
 President
–
ext.
4001
 Interim
Dean
of
College
–
ext.
4007
 Fire
(Do
Not
Disturb
Scene)
 911
 Fairfield
Fire
Department
–
(618)
842‐2102
 O
&
M
Team
Leader
–
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430
 President
–
ext.
4001
 Interim
Dean
of
College
–
ext.
4007
 Hazardous
Materials
(Do
Not
Disturb
Scene)
 911
 Fairfield
Police
Department
–
(618)
842‐2151
 Environmental
Protection
Agency
–
(800)
424‐8802
 O
&
M
Team
Leader
–
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430
 President
–
ext.
4001
 Interim
Dean
of
College
–
ext.
4007
 Medical
Emergency
–
Injury,
Illness,
First
Aid
 911
 Wayne
County
Ambulance
Service
–
(618)
842‐9121
 President
–
ext.
4001
 Interim
Dean
of
College
–
ext.
4007
 O
&
M
Team
Leader
–
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430
 Severe
Weather
 O
&
M
Team
Leader
–
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430
 President
–
ext.
4001
 Interim
Dean
of
College
–
ext.
4007
 Coordinator
of
Public
Information
&
Marketing
–
ext.
4018
 Violence
&
Terrorism
(Do
Not
Disturb
Scene)
 911
 Fairfield
Police
Department
–
(618)
842‐2151
 Wayne
County
Sheriff
–
(618)
842‐6631
 President
–
ext.
4001
 Interim
Dean
of
College
–
ext.
4007
 O
&
M
Team
Leader
–
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
4


  • 5. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 Emergency
Contact
Information
–
Continued
 Emergency/Incident
 Contact
 Weapons
in
the
Building

 911
 (Do
Not
Disturb
Scene)
 Fairfield
Police
Department
–
(618)
842‐2151
 Wayne
County
Sheriff
–
(618)
842‐6631
 President
–
ext.
4001
 Interim
Dean
of
College
–
ext.
4007
 O
&
M
Team
Leader
–
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430
 Utility
Emergencies
(Do
Not
Disturb
Scene)
 O
&
M
Team
Leader
–
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430
 President
–
ext.
4001
 Interim
Dean
of
College
–
ext.
4007
 (Gas)
–
(618)
842‐9736
 (Electric
Power)
–
(618)
842‐3445
 (Water)
–
(618)
842‐7015
 
 Crisis
&
Emergency
Response
Team
Contact
Information

 Name
 Title
 Ext.
 Home
 Cell
 Dr.
Timothy

L.
Taylor
 President
 4001*
 (618)
842‐5134
 N/A
 Bob
Boyles
 Dean
of
College
 4005*
 (618)
842‐4185
 N/A
 LaVonna
Miller
 Director
of
Business
 4009*
 (618)
842‐3893
 (618)
521‐6091
 Galen
Dunn
 O
&
M
Team
Leader
 4430*
 (618)
897‐2145
 (618)
516‐2857
 Jervaise
McGlone
 Associate
Dean
of
Adult
&
 4003*
 (618)
395‐1122
 (618)
843‐1122
 Continuing
Education
 Merna
Youngblood
 Director,
Learning
Resource
Center
 4510*
 (618)
755‐9373
 N/A
 Karen
Bryant
 Coordinator
of
Public
Information
&
 4018*
 (618)
842‐6011
 N/A
 Marketing
 Wes
Weber
 Program
Director,
Emergency
 4428*
 NA
 (618)
599‐6028
 Preparedness
&
Ind.
Quality
Mgt.
 Janet
Kent
 Coordinator
of
Human
Services
 4316*
 (618)
842‐3223
 N/A
 Rodney
Maxey
 Faculty
 4416*
 (618)
895‐1473
 N/A
 *If
you
are
calling
from
an
off‐campus
location,
you
will
need
to
dial
(618)
842‐3711
and
then
the
 extension
number.
 
 Internal
Resource
List
 Name
 Title
 Ext.
 Tara
Farleigh
 Administrative
Assistant
to
the
President
 4002*
 Denise
Hilliard
 Administrative
Assistant
to
the
Dean
of
College
 4006*
 Janie
Lake
 Administrative
Assistant
,
Adult
&
Cont.
Ed.
 4004*
 Janet
Kinkade
 Nursing
Coordinator
 4522*
 Julie
Crawford
 Administrative
Assistant,
Nursing
 4520*
 Judy
Hudson
 Nursing
Faculty
 4524*
 Hollie
Kelly
 Nursing
Faculty
 4523*
 *If
you
are
calling
from
an
off‐campus
location,
you
will
need
to
dial
(618)
842‐3711
and
then
the
 extension
number.
 
 

 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
5


  • 6. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 Other
Resource
Numbers
 Frontier
Center
Newton
–
(618)
783‐3399
 Frontier
Center
(Flora)
–
(618)
662‐5646
 Fairfield
Memorial
Hospital
–
(618)
842‐2611
 Wayne
County
Ambulance
Service
–
(618)
842‐9121
 Wayne
County
Emergency
Management
Agency
–
(618)
842‐3884
 Southeastern
Illinois
Counseling
Center/Crisis
Prevention
–
(618)
842‐2125
(day)
 
 
 
 




(After
Hours)
Crisis
Prevention
–
(618)
395‐5026
(24
hrs)
 
 Federal
Bureau
of
Investigation
(FBI)
–
(217)
342‐2367
or
(217)
522‐9675
 Illinois
Department
of
Human
Services
(Wayne
County)
–
(618)
842‐2621
 Illinois
Department
of
Public
Health
–
(618)
392‐6241
 Illinois
Emergency
Management
Agency
–
(618)
662‐4474
 Illinois
Poison
Center
–
1‐800‐222‐1222
 Illinois
State
Police
–
Effingham
–
(217)
347‐2677
(emergency)
or
(217)
347‐2711
(non‐emergency)
 Illinois
State
Police
–
Carmi
–
(618)
382‐1911
(emergency)
or
(618)
382‐4606
(non‐emergency)
 National
Response
Center
(Toxic
chemicals,
oil
spills)
–
1‐800‐424‐8802
 Wayne
County
Health
Department
(618)
842‐5166
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
6


  • 7. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 CONTINUITY
OF
ADMINISTRATION
 
 In
the
case
of
a
college
crisis
or
emergency
situation,
the
decision
will
be
made
by:
 
 President
–
Dr.
Timothy
Taylor

















 School
Telephone

(618)
842‐3711
Ext.
4002
 Home
Telephone
(618)
842‐5134
 
 In
the
absence
of
the
college
president,
the
following
administrators,
in
sequence,
will
be
contacted
for
 decision‐making
purposes:
 
 Dean
of
the
College
–
Bob
Boyles

 School
Telephone
(
618)
842‐3711
Ext.
4006
or
4008
 Home
Telephone
(618)
842‐4185


 
 Director
of
Business
–
LaVonna
Miller
 School
Telephone
(
618)
842‐3711
Ext.
4009
 Home
Telephone
(
618)
842‐3893
 
 Maintenance/Groundkeeper/Team
Leader
–
Galen
Dunn
 School
Telephone
(
618)
842‐3711
Ext.
4430
 Home
Telephone
(
618)
897‐2145
 Cell
(618)
516‐2857
 
 Associate
Dean
of
Adult
&
Continuing
Education
–
Jervaise
McGlone

 School
Telephone
(618)
842‐3711
Ext.
4004
 Home
Telephone
(618)
395‐1122
 
 Program
Director,
Emergency
Preparedness
&
Industrial
Quality
Management
–
Wesley
Weber
 School
Telephone
(618)
842‐3711
Ext.
4426
 Cell
(618)
599‐6028
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
7


  • 8. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
8


  • 9. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 Campus
Map
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
9


  • 10. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 ASSAULT/RAPE
 When
the
College
is
notified
that
a
rape
has
occurred
to
a
student
or
staff
member,
the
Crisis
&
 Emergency
Response
Team
and
the
College
must
protect
the
identity
and
right
to
privacy
of
the
rape
 survivor
and
the
alleged
perpetrator.

News
of
the
incident
should
be
contained
as
much
as
possible.
 Appropriate
response
by
College
staff
will
be
directed
at
minimizing
the
fear
of
fellow
students
and
 preventing
the
spread
of
rumors.


Any
services
provided
to
the
victim
and
her/his
family
should
be
kept
 confidential
and
coordinated
with
outside
providers
–
such
as
a
rape
crisis
team
or
Fairfield
Memorial
 Hospital’s
Emergency
room.


 
 RAPE
ONLY
BECOMES
A
CRISIS
TO
BE
MANAGED
BY
COLLEGE
STAFF
WHEN
ONE
OR
MORE
OF
THE
 FOLLOWING
CONDITIONS
EXIST:
 • A
rape
occurs
on
campus.
 • A
member
of
the
rape
survivor's
family
requests
College
intervention.
 • A
friend
of
the
rape
survivor
requests
an
intervention.
 • Rumor/myth
about
a
rape
is
communicated.
 • Students
witness
police
action
or
emergency
services
response.
 
 When
one
or
more
of
the
above
conditions
exists,
the
following
should
be
implemented:
 
 Determine
if
the
rape
survivor
needs
emergency
medical
attention,
if
so
call
the
Wayne
County
 Ambulance
Service
at
911
(or
842‐9121).

 
 
 
 If
the
rape
occurred
on
campus,
secure
the
crime
scene.
 
 
 
 Direct
the
person
(or
people)
providing
the
information
not
to
repeat
it
elsewhere
on
campus.
 
 
 
 If
the
rape
occurred
on
campus,
dial
911
(or
842‐2151)
and
notify
the
Fairfield
Police
Department
 and/or
Fairfield
Memorial
Hospital
(618)
842‐2611,
Beth
Wilson,
RN,
SANE,
Emergency
Room.
 
 
 
 If
any
Frontier
employee
heard
the
report,
tell
them
not
to
repeat
or
give
out
any
information
 within
or
outside
the
College
unless
they
are
specifically
told
to
do
so.
 
 
 
 Designate
a
Crisis
&
Emergency
Response
Team
member
to
talk
with
the
rape
survivor
about
the
 types
of
support
he
or
she
and
the
closest
friends
need,
and
the
person(s)
the
rape
survivor
would
 like
to
provide
that
support.
 
 
 
 Provide
space
in
the
school
for
the
rape
survivor
and
identified
peers
to
receive
support
services.
 
 
 
 Release
student
from
class,
as
appropriate.
 
 
 Rape
is
a
crime
of
violence. For
the
rape
survivor,
it
often
is
an
experience
of
fear,
loss
of
control,
 humiliation,
and
violence.
Rape
survivors
may
experience
a
full
range
of
emotional
reactions.

It
is
 extremely
beneficial
for
rape
survivors
to
seek
emotional
support
regarding
the
assault.

Monitor
any
 school
intervention
in
a
rape
incident
with
the
following
checklist:
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
10


  • 11. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 ASSAULT/RAPE
–
CHECKLIST
 College
involvement
in
incident
due
to:
 Rape
occurrence
on
campus Rumor/myth
about
a
rape
is
communicated
 Survivor's
family
requests
intervention
 
 
 Students
witness
police/emergency
services Survivor's
friends
request
intervention Complete
the
following
steps
protect
survivor's
identity
and
right
to
privacy:
 
 Determine
if
the
rape
survivor
needs
emergency
medical
attention,
if
so
call
the
Wayne
County
 Ambulance
Service
at
911
(or
842‐9121).

 
 
 
 If
the
rape
occurred
on
campus,
secure
the
crime
scene
and
provide
space
for
the
survivor
(and
 identified
peers,
if
applicable)
to
establish
an
area
where
they
may
receive
support
services.
 
 
 
 Notify
the
College’s
Administration
as
designated
in
the
Continuity
of
Administration
section,

 Page
7
of
this
plan.
 
 
 
 Direct
the
person
(or
people)
providing
information
not
to
repeat
it
elsewhere
on
campus.
 
 
 
 If
the
rape
occurred
on
campus,
dial
911
(or
842‐6631)
and
notify
the
Wayne
County
Sheriff
and/or
 local
rape
crisis
team.
 
 
 
 If
any
Frontier
employee
heard
the
report,
tell
them
not
to
repeat
or
give
out
any
information
 within
or
outside
the
College
unless
they
are
specifically
told
to
do
so.
 
 
 
 Talk
with
the
rape
survivor
about
the
types
of
support
he
or
she
and
the
closest
friends
need,
and
 the
person(s)
the
rape
survivor
would
like
to
provide
that
support.

 
 
 
 Provide
space
in
the
school
for
the
rape
survivor
and
identified
peers
to
receive
support
services.
 
 
 
 Encourage
rape
survivor
to
seek
additional
support
from
Fairfield
Memorial
Hospital

 (618)
842‐2611,
Beth
Wilson,
RN,
SANE,
Emergency
Room.
 
 
 
 Dismiss
classes,
as
appropriate.
 
 
 
 Notify
District
Office.

 
 
 
 Develop
a
communications
plan
to
stem
rumors,
protect
identify
of
rape
survivor,
and
alleged
 perpetrator,
inform
students,
and
inform
community.
 
 
 
 Document
as
much
information
regarding
the
incident
as
is
possible
(remember
that
all
clothing,
 vehicles
etc.,
could
be
considered
evidence).
 
 
 
 Complete
the
Incident
Report
documentation
(Appendix
A)
and
submit
to
the
President’s
Office
 ASAP
(This
form
must
be
processed
and
submitted
to
District
Office
within
24
hours
of
the
 occurrence.)
 
 
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
11


  • 12. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 Store
all
records
related
to
rape
incident
and
services
provided
in
a
confidential
file.
 
 BOMB
 A
bomb
can
be
made
to
look
like
anything
and
can
be
placed
anywhere.

Most
bombs
are
homemade.

If
 you
find
something
that
you
think
might
be
a
bomb,
DO
NOT
TOUCH
IT.

Instead,
notify
the
President
 (or
designee
outlined
in
the
Continuity
of
Administration
contact
list)
so
that
he/she
can
evaluate
the
 seriousness
of
the
situation;
then,
the
President
(or
designee)
will
act
in
a
manner
that
reflects
the
best
 safety
interests
of
those
under
his/her
charge.


 
 If
a
device
is
found:
 1. Contact
the
President
(ext.
4001)
or
designee
outlined
in
the
Continuity
of
Administration
 section
on
Page
7.
 2. Isolate
the
area.
 3. Do
not
attempt
to
handle
any
suspected
explosive
device
–
leave
that
to
the
experts.
 4. Evacuate
the
building.

 
 Using
fire
drill
procedures
to
evacuate
the
college
immediately
upon
receipt
of
a
bomb
threat
can
be
 dangerous
if
an
actual
explosive
device
is
involved
and,
unknowingly,
students
are
evacuated
past
its
 location.

Given
that,
the
following
evacuation
guidelines
should
be
employed:
 1. The
members
of
the
Crisis
&
Emergency
Management
Team
are
responsible
for
strategically
 evacuating
the
buildings
(or
campus).
 2. If
evacuation
is
needed,
use
personal
contact.
Evacuation
must
be
as
fast
as
possible.
 3. Evacuate
by
room,
starting
with
rooms
nearest
the
device.
 
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
12


  • 13. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 BOMB
THREATS

 Bomb
Threat
 If
you
receive
a
bomb
threat,
DO
NOT
TRY
AND
LOCATE
THE
BOMB.

Instead,
notify
the
President
(or
 designee
outlined
in
the
Continuity
of
Administration
contact
list)
so
that
he/she
can
evaluate
the
 seriousness
of
the
bomb
threat;
then,
the
President
(or
designee)
will
act
in
a
manner
that
reflects
the
 best
safety
interests
of
those
under
his/her
charge.

Bomb
and
other
threats
may
be
originated
in
 writing,
in
person,
over
the
telephone,
or
related
through
a
second
source.
 
 Receiving
a
Call
About
a
Bomb
Threat
 When
a
telephone
call
is
received,
try
to
get
two
people
to
listen
to
the
call
at
the
same
time;
stay
as
 calm
as
possible
and
remember
to
record
as
much
data
about
the
caller
as
possible.

Complete
the
 Bomb
Threat
Checklist
(Page
14
or
Appendix
A).

If
one
is
not
readily
available,
the
following
information
 should
be
collected:
 • Inform
the
caller
that
the
building
is
occupied
or
that
it
cannot
be
evacuated
in
a
short
amount
 of
time.

The
caller
may
give
more
specific
information
on
where
the
bomb
is
located
or
how
 and
when
it
will
be
detonated.
 • Keep
the
caller
on
the
phone
and
communicating
as
long
as
you
can;
the
more
the
caller
talks,
 the
more
information
you
may
receive.

Ask
the
caller
to
repeat
the
initial
message
and
attempt
 to
write
down
every
word
he
or
she
says.
 • Ask
the
caller
where
the
bomb
is
located
and
when
it
will
detonate
–
ASK!
 • Try
to
distinguish
background
sounds.

There
may
be
traffic
noises,
music
playing
or
other
noises
 that
could
help
identify
the
location
of
the
caller.
 • Pay
close
attention
to
the
voice
of
the
caller,
is
it
 o male
or
female?
 o calm
or
excited?
 o angry
or
sincere?
 • Immediately
after
the
call
is
complete,
notify
the
President
(or
designee)
who
is
responsible
for
 reporting
the
threat
to
local
emergency
response
agencies,
(e.g.

Police,
fire
department,
etc.)
 
 Receiving
a
Bomb
Threat
(Other
Than
by
Telephone)
 If
a
bomb
threat
is
received
by
any
means
other
than
telephone,
do
the
following:
 • Immediately
notify
the
President
(or
designee
outlined
in
the
Continuity
of
Administration
 contact
list)
at
ext.
4001.
The
President
will
contact
the
Crisis
&
Emergency
Response
Team
and
 inform
them
of
the
situation.
 • Any
document
that
communicates
the
threat
and/or
information
–
including
the
envelope
or
 container
–
about
a
possible
bomb
event
must
be
preserved
and
protected
as
evidence.
 • If
the
threat
is
“graffiti”
on
a
wall
or
partition,
do
not
touch
it.

Secure
the
area
so
others
are
 prevented
from
touching
it
until
law
enforcement
arrives.
 • The
President
in
collaboration
with
Crisis
and
Emergency
Response
Team
will
communicate
 appropriate
information
to
students
and
staff.
 
 What
to
do
Immediately
Following
a
Bomb
Threat
 • Evacuate
the
building
immediately.
 • Immediately
report
the
threat
to
local
emergency
personnel
and
law
enforcement
officials.
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
13


  • 14. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 • Permit
emergency
personnel
and
authorities
to
conduct
the
search
for
the
bomb.
 • Save
all
written
materials,
–
if
threat
was
written
or
mailed.
 
 What
to
do
After
a
Bomb
Threat
 • Have
trained
law
enforcement
personnel
survey
the
school
building.
 • Do
not
return
to
the
building
until
it
is
authorized
by
local
emergency
officials.
 • If
there
is
a
letter,
place
it
in
an
envelope.

Fingerprints
on
the
materials
may
be
one
of
the
few
 pieces
of
evidence.

Additional
evidence
could
be
the
handwriting
and
characteristics,
typing
 style,
type
of
paper,
and
ink
used
its
manufacturer
as
well
as
any
postmark.
 
 What
to
do
if
a
Bomb
Explodes
Within
a
Building
 • Evacuate
the
building.
 • If
you
are
qualified,
render
first
aid.

 • Call
911.
 • Notify
President
(or
designee)
at
ext.
4001.
 • Notify
District
Office
at
(618)
393‐2982.
 
 
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
14


  • 15. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 BOMB
THREAT
CHECKLIST
 Name
of
Person
Receiving
Call:
 
 Date:
 
 Time:




























 
 Length
of
Call
 
 
 Extension
at
which
call
is
received:
 
 
 Exact
wording
of
threat:
 
 
 
 Questions
to
Ask
 Caller
Demographic
 
 1.
When
is
bomb
going
to
explode?
 Gender:
 M
 F
 Ethnicity/Culture:





 
 
 
 
 
 Approximate
Age:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 2.
Where
is
it
right
now?
 General
Remarks
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 3.
What
does
it
look
like?
 Threat
Language
 Callers
Voice
 
 
Well
spoken
(educated)
 
Calm
 
 
Irrational
 
Angry
 
 
Foul
 
Slow
 4.
What
kind
of
bomb
is
it?
 
Taped
 
Rapid
 
 
Incoherent
 
Soft

 
 
Message
read
by
threat
maker
 
Loud
 
 
 
Laughter
 5.
What
will
cause
it
to
explode?
 Background
Sounds
 
Normal
 
 
Animal
Noises
 
Distinct
 
 
Booth
 
Slurred
 
 
House
Noises

 
Whispered
 6.
Did
you
place
the
bomb?
 
Local
 
Cracking
Voice
 
 
Long
Distance
 
Nasal
 
 
Motor
 
Stutter
 
 
Music
 
Raspy
 7.
Why
did
you
place
the
bomb
there?
 
Office
Machinery
 
Deep
 
 
PA
System
 
Ragged
 
 
Static
 
Clearing
Throat
 
 
Street

 
Crying
 8.
What
is
your
address?
 
Voices
 
Disguised
 
 
Other
 
Accent
 
 
 
 
 
Familiar
 
 
 
 
 
Deep
Breathing
 9.
What
is
your
name?
 
 
 
 
Other
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 *If
the
caller
does
not
answer
questions,
try
to
encourage
them
to
do
so
by
expressing
a
desire
to
save
lives.

Try
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
15


  • 16. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 to
keep
the
caller
on
the
phone
as
long
as
possible
so
that
the
call
can
be
traced.

Should
the
caller
not
give
any
 essential
information,
it
may
be
necessary
to
check
the
building
for
a
bomb.

Before
doing
so,
be
sure
to
notify
 the
president
or
to
activate
the
chain
of
command.
 DESIGNATED
SHELTER
AREAS

 Building
 Location
 Adult
Education
Building
 Restroom
–
Room
#8
 Classroom
West
 Room
#102
or

 Men’s
Restroom
–
Room
#110
or
 Women’s
Restroom
–
Room
#113
 Foundation
Hall
 Kitchen
–
Room
#102
 Learning
Resource
Center
 Storage
Room
–
Room
#111
 Richard
L.
Mason
Administrative
Building
 Conference
Room
–
Room
#209
 Student
Services
 Men’s
Restroom
–
Room
#114
or
 Women’s
Restroom
–
Room
#115
 Support
Services
 Restroom
–
Room
#1
 University
of
Illinois
–
Extension
 Men’s
Restroom
–
Room
#113
or
 Women’s
Restroom
–
Room
#114
 Workforce
Development
Center
 Room
#1
or

 O
&
M
Office
–
Room
#8
 
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
16


  • 17. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 DISTURBANCES
&
DEMONSTRATIONS
 
 What
to
do
During
a
Disturbance
 Upon
determining
a
situation
that
threatens
the
public
safety:
 • Notify
O
&
M
Team
Leader
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430.
 • Assess
the
situation
and
attempt
to
determine
its
seriousness,
 • If
situation
warrants,
O
&
M
Team
Leader
will:
 o Notify
law
enforcement
personnel
and
President.
 o Notify
all
offices
in
the
area
of
a
possible
disturbance.
 o Maintain
responsibility
for
utilities,
fire
alarm
system,
etc.
–
unless
personal
safety
is
 threatened.
 o Ensure
all
entrances/exits
are
secure
–
unless
personal
safety
is
threatened.
 • Implement
the
following
procedures:
 o Attempt
to
recognize
those
creating
the
disturbance,
record
events
that
occur
with
names,
 time
and
place
or
events
and
any
actions
taken.
 o Remain
at
your
station
unless
specifically
instructed
otherwise
by
the
administrative
staff
 member
or
Crisis
&
Emergency
Response
Team
member.
 o Keep
the
telephone
lines
clear
for
emergency
calls.
 o Maintain
normal
classroom
activities
as
much
as
possible
and
encourage
all
students
to
stay
 in
class.
 o If
disturbance
is
outside,
keep
students
away
from
windows.
 o Advise
students
of
any
potential
threat
to
their
safety
that
may
be
encountered
when
 leaving
school.
 o Inform
students
and
student
groups
not
to
try
to
calm
any
disturbance
where
physical
harm
 might
occur
or
that
would
jeopardize
their
normal
relationship
with
other
students.
 o Protect
essential
records,
unless
staff
safety
is
threatened.
 • Personnel
will
be
kept
abreast
of
the
situation
through
normal
channels
of
communication.
 • Coordinator
of
Public
Information
&
Marketing
will
address
the
media,
if
appropriate.
 
 
 What
to
do
After
a
Disturbance
 • If
evacuated,
do
not
return
to
the
building
until
it
is
authorized
by
local
emergency
officials.
 • If
the
President
decides
to
cancel
classes:
 o Inform
all
students
and
staff.
 o Inform
the
local
police
before
closing
the
school
to
prepare
them
for
any
possible
 disturbances
in
the
area
after
the
students
are
dismissed.
 o Supervise
dismissal.
 o Release
students
in
groups
rather
than
all
at
once
whenever
possible.
 
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
17


  • 18. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 DISTURBANCES
&
DEMONSTRATIONS


 STUDENTS
WHO
MAY
BE
A
POTENTIAL
THREAT
TO
OTHERS
 
 Immediate
Steps
 In
the
event
that
a
staff
member
has
reason
to
believe
that
a
student
may
represent
a
potential
threat
 to
others,
the
actions
listed
below
are
to
be
taken.
These
steps
apply
only
to
situations
in
which
the
 student
is
presenting
no
immediate
threat.
 1. Take
all
comments
about
doing
harm
to
others
seriously,
especially
if
details
about
how
the
acts
 are
to
be
carried
out
are
shared.
 2. Immediately
report
concerns
to
President
at
ext.
4001
or
designee
outlined
in
the
Continuity
of
 Administration
section
on
Page
7.
 3. Under
no
circumstances
should
an
untrained
person
attempt
to
assess
the
severity
of
the
risk;
 all
assessment
of
threats,
attempts,
or
other
risk
factors
must
be
left
to
the
appropriate
 professionals.

NOTE:
It
is
important
to
avoid
inappropriately
labeling
or
stigmatizing
individual
 students
because
they
appear
to
fit
a
specific
profile
or
set
of
early
warning
indicators.
It’s
okay
 to
be
worried
about
a
child,
but
it’s
not
okay
to
overreact
and
jump
to
conclusions.
 
 Early
Warning
Signs
 It
is
not
always
possible
to
predict
behavior
that
will
lead
to
violence.

However,
educators
and
students
 can
recognize
certain
early
warning
signs.

In
some
situations
and
for
some
people,
different
 combinations
of
events,
behaviors,
and
emotions
may
lead
to
aggressive
rage
or
violent
behavior
 toward
self
or
others.

A
good
rule
of
thumb
is
to
assume
that
these
warning
signs,
especially
when
 they
are
presented
in
combination,
indicate
a
need
for
further
analysis
to
determine
an
appropriate
 intervention.

 
 Research
indicates
that
most
people
who
become
violent
toward
self
or
others
feel
rejected
and
 psychologically
victimized.

In
most
cases,
people
exhibit
aggressive
behavior
early
in
life
and,
if
not
 provided
support,
will
continue
a
progressive
developmental
pattern
toward
severe
aggression
or
 violence.

However,
research
also
shows
that
when
people
have
a
positive,
meaningful
connection
to
 another
person
–
whether
it
is
at
home,
in
school,
or
in
the
community
–
the
potential
for
violence
is
 reduced
significantly.

 
 None
of
these
signs
alone
is
sufficient
for
predicting
aggression
and
violence.

Moreover,
it
is
 inappropriate
–
and
potentially
harmful
–
to
use
the
early
warning
signs
as
a
checklist
against
which
to
 match
individual
people.
Rather,
the
early
warning
signs
are
offered
only
as
an
aid
in
identifying
and
 referring
people
who
may
need
help.
You
should
only
use
the
early
warning
signs
for
identification
and
 referral
purposes
–
only
trained
professionals
should
make
diagnosis.
 According
to
a
report
entitled
Early
Warning,
Timely
Response:
A
Guide
to
Safe
Schools,
the
following
 early
warning
signs
are
presented
with
the
following
qualifications.
They
are
not
equally
significant
and
 they
are
not
presented
in
order
of
seriousness.
The
early
warning
signs
include:
 • Social
withdrawal.
In
some
situations,
gradual
and
eventually
complete
withdrawal
from
social
 contacts
can
be
an
important
indicator
of
a
troubled
person.
The
withdrawal
often
stems
from
 feelings
of
depression,
rejection,
persecution,
unworthiness,
and
lack
of
confidence.
 
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
18


  • 19. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 • Excessive
feelings
of
isolation
and
being
alone.
Research
has
shown
that
the
majority
of
people
 who
are
isolated
and
appear
to
be
friendless
are
not
violent.
In
fact,
these
feelings
are
 sometimes
characteristic
of
people
who
may
be
troubled,
withdrawn,
or
have
internal
issues
 that
hinder
development
of
social
affiliations.
However,
research
also
has
shown
that
in
some
 cases
feelings
of
isolation
and
not
having
friends
are
associated
with
people
who
behave
 aggressively
and
violently.
 
 • Excessive
feelings
of
rejection.
In
the
process
of
growing
up,
and
in
the
course
of
adolescent
 development,
many
young
people
experience
emotionally
painful
rejection.

People
who
are
 troubled
often
are
isolated
from
their
mentally
healthy
peers.
Their
responses
to
rejection
will
 depend
on
many
background
factors.
Without
support,
they
may
be
at
risk
of
expressing
their
 emotional
distress
in
negative
ways
–
including
violence.
Some
aggressive
people
who
are
 rejected
by
non‐aggressive
peers
seek
out
aggressive
friends
who,
in
turn,
reinforce
their
violent
 tendencies.
 
 • Being
a
victim
of
violence.
People
who
are
victims
of
violence—including
physical
or
sexual
 abuse—in
the
community,
at
school,
or
at
home
are
sometimes
at
risk
themselves
of
becoming
 violent
toward
themselves
or
others.
 
 • Feelings
of
being
picked
on
and
persecuted.
People
who
feel
constantly
picked
on,
teased,
 bullied,
singled
out
for
ridicule,
and
humiliated
at
home
or
at
school
may
initially
withdraw
 socially.
If
not
given
adequate
support
in
addressing
these
feelings,
some
people
may
vent
them
 in
inappropriate
ways
–
including
possible
aggression
or
violence.
 
 • Low
school
interest
and
poor
academic
performance.
Poor
school
achievement
can
be
the
 result
of
many
factors.
It
is
important
to
consider
whether
there
is
a
drastic
change
in
 performance
and/or
poor
performance
becomes
a
chronic
condition
that
limits
a
person’s
 capacity
to
learn.

In
some
situations
–
such
as
when
the
low
achiever
feels
frustrated,
 unworthy,
chastised,
and
denigrated
–
acting
out
and
aggressive
behaviors
may
occur.
It
is
 important
to
assess
the
emotional
and
cognitive
reasons
for
the
academic
performance
change
 to
determine
the
true
nature
of
the
problem.
 
 • Expression
of
violence
in
writings
and
drawings.
People
often
express
their
thoughts,
feelings,
 desires,
and
intentions
in
their
drawings
and
in
stories,
poetry,
and
other
written
expressive
 forms.
Many
people
produce
work
about
violent
themes
that
for
the
most
part
is
harmless
 when
taken
in
context.
However,
an
over
representation
of
violence
in
writings
and
drawings
 that
is
directed
at
specific
individuals
(family
members,
peers,
other
adults)
consistently
over
 time,
may
signal
emotional
problems
and
the
potential
for
violence.
Because
there
is
a
real
 danger
in
misdiagnosing
such
a
sign,
it
is
important
to
seek
the
guidance
of
a
qualified
 professional
–
such
as
a
psychologist,
counselor,
or
other
mental
health
specialist—to
determine
 its
meaning.
 
 • Uncontrolled
anger.
Everyone
gets
angry;
anger
is
a
natural
emotion.
However,
anger
that
is
 expressed
frequently
and
intensely
in
response
to
minor
irritants
may
signal
potential
violent
 behavior
toward
self
or
others.
 
 • Patterns
of
impulsive
and
chronic
hitting,
intimidating,
and
bullying
behaviors.
People
often
 engage
in
acts
of
shoving
and
mild
aggression.
However,
some
mildly
aggressive
behaviors
such
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
19


  • 20. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 as
constant
hitting
and
bullying
of
others
that
occur
early
in
people’s
lives,
if
left
unattended,
 might
later
escalate
into
more
serious
behaviors.
 
 • History
of
discipline
problems.
Chronic
behavior
and
disciplinary
problems
both
in
school
and
at
 home
may
suggest
that
underlying
emotional
needs
are
not
being
met.
These
unmet
needs
may
 be
manifested
in
acting
out
and
aggressive
behaviors.
These
problems
may
set
the
stage
for
a
 person
to
violate
norms
and
rules,
defy
authority,
disengage
from
school,
and
engage
in
 aggressive
behaviors
with
other
people
and
adults.
 
 • Past
history
of
violent
and
aggressive
behavior.
Unless
provided
with
support
and
counseling,
a
 person
who
has
a
history
of
aggressive
or
violent
behavior
is
likely
to
repeat
those
behaviors.
 Aggressive
and
violent
acts
may
be
directed
toward
other
individuals,
be
expressed
in
cruelty
to
 animals,
or
include
fire
setting.
People
who
show
an
early
pattern
of
antisocial
behavior
 frequently
and
across
multiple
settings
are
particularly
at
risk
for
future
aggressive
and
 antisocial
behavior.
Similarly,
people
who
engage
in
overt
behaviors
such
as
bullying,
 generalized
aggression
and
defiance,
and
covert
behaviors
such
as
stealing,
vandalism,
lying,
 cheating,
and
fire
setting
also
are
at
risk
for
more
serious
aggressive
behavior.
Research
 suggests
that
age
of
onset
may
be
a
key
factor
in
interpreting
early
warning
signs.
For
example,
 people
who
engage
in
aggression
and
drug
abuse
at
an
early
age
(before
age
12)
are
more
likely
 to
show
violence
later
on
than
are
people
who
begin
such
behavior
at
an
older
age.
In
the
 presence
of
such
signs
it
is
important
to
review
the
person’s
history
with
behavioral
experts
and
 seek
parents’
observations
and
insights.
 
 • Intolerance
for
differences
and
prejudicial
attitudes.
All
people
have
likes
and
dislikes.
 However,
an
intense
prejudice
toward
others
based
on
racial,
ethnic,
religious,
language,
 gender,
sexual
orientation,
ability,
and
physical
appearance
–
when
coupled
with
other
factors
–
 may
lead
to
violent
assaults
against
those
who
are
perceived
to
be
different.
Membership
in
 hate
groups
or
the
willingness
to
victimize
individuals
with
disabilities
or
health
problems
also
 should
be
treated
as
early
warning
signs.
 
 • Drug
use
and
alcohol
use.
Apart
from
being
unhealthy
behaviors,
drug
use
and
alcohol
use
 reduces
self‐control
and
exposes
people
and
youth
to
violence,
either
as
perpetrators,
as
 victims,
or
both.
 
 • Inappropriate
access
to,
possession
of,
and
use
of
firearms.
People
who
inappropriately
 possess
or
have
access
to
firearms
can
have
an
increased
risk
for
violence.
Research
shows
that
 such
youngsters
also
have
a
higher
probability
of
becoming
victims.
Families
can
reduce
 inappropriate
access
and
use
by
restricting,
monitoring,
and
supervising
people’s
access
to
 firearms
and
other
weapons.
People
who
have
a
history
of
aggression,
impulsiveness,
or
other
 emotional
problems
should
not
have
access
to
firearms
and
other
weapons.
 
 • Serious
threats
of
violence.
Idle
threats
are
a
common
response
to
frustration.
Alternatively,
 one
of
the
most
reliable
indicators
that
a
youth
is
likely
to
commit
a
dangerous
act
toward
self
 or
others
is
a
detailed
and
specific
threat
to
use
violence.
Recent
incidents
across
the
country
 clearly
indicate
that
threats
to
commit
violence
against
oneself
or
others
should
be
taken
very
 seriously.
Steps
must
be
taken
to
understand
the
nature
of
these
threats
and
to
prevent
them
 from
being
carried
out.
 
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
20


  • 21. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 (Source:
Early
Warning,
Timely
Response:
A
Guide
to
Safe
Schools.)
 EARTHQUAKE
 
 What
to
do
During
an
Earthquake
 • Remain
calm
and
stay
where
you
are.
 • If
indoors,
take
cover
under
a
sturdy
desk,
table,
or
bench
and
hold
on
or
sit
against
an
interior
 wall.

Avoid
glass,
windows,
outside
doors
or
walls,
and
anything
which
could
fall.


 • If
outdoors,
stay
there.

Move
away
from
buildings,
utility
poles,
wires
and
street
lamps.
 • If
driving
a
vehicle,
stop
as
quickly
as
safety
permits
and
stay
in
the
vehicle.

Avoid
stopping
near
 or
under
buildings,
overpasses,
utility
poles,
wires
or
trees;
when
shaking
stops
proceed
 cautiously
watching
for
road
and
bridge
damage.
 
 What
to
do
After
an
Earthquake
 • Be
prepared
for
aftershocks.

Secondary
shocks
can
cause
additional
damage
to
already
 weakened
structures.
 • Have
the
health
care
personnel
check
for
injuries.

Do
not
attempt
to
move
seriously
injured
 persons
unless
they
are
in
immediate
danger
of
death
or
further
injury.

If
you
must
move
an
 unconscious
person,
stabilize
the
neck
and
back
and
call
for
help
immediately.
 • Proceed
with
an
orderly
evacuation
from
the
building,
accounting
for
everyone.
 • Use
flashlights
or
battery‐powered
lanterns.

Do
not
use
candles,
matches
or
flames
indoors
 because
of
possible
gas
leaks.
 • Check
the
school
building(s)
for
structural
damage.

If
you
have
any
doubts
about
the
safety
of
a
 building,
have
it
inspected
by
a
professional
engineer.
 • Evacuate
the
building
if
gas
or
chemical
fumes
are
present
and
the
building
is
not
well‐ ventilated.
 • Visually
inspect
utility
lines
and
pipes
and
appliances
for
damage.
 • Check
for
gas
leaks.

If
you
smell
gas
or
hear
a
hissing
sound,
open
window(s)
and
evacuate
the
 building.

Shut
off
the
main
gas
valve
at
the
meter
if
possible.

Report
the
leak
to
the
gas
 company
and
stay
out
of
the
building.
 • Check
for
electrical
damage.

Switch
off
all
electrical
power
at
the
main
circuit
breaker
or
fuse
 box.
 • Check
for
water
leaks.

If
water
pipes
are
damaged,
shut
off
the
water
supply
at
the
main
valve,
 if
possible.
 • Check
to
make
sure
that
sewer
lines
are
intact.

In
the
meantime,
do
not
flush
toilets.
 • Open
cabinets
cautiously
since
objects
can
fall
off
shelves.
 • Use
the
telephone
only
to
report
emergency
situation(s).
 • Monitor
news
reports
for
emergency
information.
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
21


  • 22. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 EMERGENCY
ALERT
SYSTEM
 Illinois
Eastern
Community
Colleges
has
contracted
with
e2Campus
to
provide
alert
notification
services,
 in
the
event
of
emergency.

The
system
will
notify
students
and
employees
of
campus
emergencies
and
 closures
by
e‐mail
and/or
cell
phone
text
message
and
will
also
notify
each
classroom
on
the
Frontier
 Community
College
campus
via
the
classroom
phone.

A
message,
recorded
by
the
administration,
will
 direct
action
to
be
taken
by
faculty
and
staff
in
an
emergency
situation.
 
 This
service
is
available
through
the
college
Entrata
system.

To
activate
your
membership
go
to
Entrata
 and
click
on
the
“Emergency
Alerts”
tab
on
the
left‐hand
side
bar.

Then
follow
the
simple
instructions
 to
complete
the
registration
process.
 
 IECC
Alerts
is
an
opt‐in
service
and
while
there
is
no
direct
cost
for
signing
up
for
this
service,
you
may
 be
charged
a
text
message
fee
by
your
cell
phone
provider.

You
will
need
to
contact
your
provider
to
 determine
what
fees
if
any
are
applicable
and
any
costs
you
may
incur
using
this
service.
 
 The
IECC
emergency
alert
notification
system
will
be
used
to
send
messages
related
to
campus
 emergencies,
weather
related
closures,
and
notifications
about
when
an
e2Campus
account
is
about
to
 expire.
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
22


  • 23. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 FIRE/ARSON/EXPLOSIVES
 
 What
to
do
During
a
Fire
 • Sound
the
fire
alarm
by
pulling
the
alarm
box
nearest
to
your
location.
 • Dial
911
and
notify
Fire
Department.
 • Close
all
doors
and
windows,
including
any
doors
separating
sections
of
the
building.
 • Evacuate
building
and
ensure
occupants
are
at
least
500
feet
from
the
building(s)
and
out
of
the
 fire
department’s
way.
 • Ensure
people
with
disabilities
have
been
evacuated.
 o O
&
M
Staff
and
available
Crisis
&
Emergency
Management
Team
are
to
assist
handicapped
 individuals.
 • O
&
M
Staff
and
available
Crisis
&
Emergency
Management
Team
members
will
check
 washrooms
and
classrooms
for
students
and
staff.
 • Faculty
will
need
to
take
a
roll
call
of
each
class
or
activity
once
outside
the
building.
 • If
qualified,
render
first
aid
as
necessary.
 • Keep
access
roads
open
for
emergency
vehicles.
 • O
&
M
Team
Leader
will
notify
utility
companies
of
a
break
or
suspected
break
in
lines
which
 might
present
an
additional
hazard.
 
 What
to
do
After
a
Fire
 • Fire
department
officials
must
declare
the
area
safe
before
students/staff
can
return
to
building.
 • Make
necessary
arrangements
for
assessment
of
the
fire
damage.
 • Make
necessary
arrangements
for
debris
removal
and
cleanup.
 • The
President
will
decide
if
classes
are
to
be
dismissed
or
postponed.
 • If
classes
are
to
be
dismissed,
students
and
staff
will
be
informed.
(A
portable
bull
horn
should
 be
available
to
make
announcements
to
students
and
staff
who
have
evacuated
the
building).
 • If
a
building
is
damaged,
several
different
steps
may
have
to
be
taken.
Severe
damage
will
likely
 require
prolonged
repair
work
and
another
location
for
classes
may
have
to
be
scheduled
 through
the
Dean’s
Office.
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
23


  • 24. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 FIRST
AID
KITS
 First
Aid
Kits
are
located
in
the
following
areas:
 
 • Adult
Education
Building

 • Student
Services
 • Foundation
Hall

 • Learning
Resource
Center

 • Richard
L.
Mason
Administrative
Building

 • Support
Services

 • University
of
Illinois
–
Extension

 • Workforce
Development
Center
 
 First
Aid
Kits
should
contain
a
list
of
emergency
numbers
(i.e.,
Police,
Ambulance,
etc.)
and
the
following
 supplies:
 
 • Antiseptic
Wipes

 • Kling
Gauze
‐
2”

 
 
 
 • Antibiotic
Ointment
with
Pain
Relief
 • Non‐Latex
Gloves
 • Adhesive
Bandages
 
 
 
 • Non‐Stick
Pads
 • CPR
Instructions
 • Oval
Eye
Pad
 • Elastic
Bandage
 • Rayon
First‐Aid
Tape
 
 
 
 • First‐Aid
Guide
 
 
 
 
 • Scissors

 
 
 
 
 • Gauze
Pads
 
 
 
 • Tweezers
 
 
 Automated
External
Defibrillator
(AED)
Units
are
located
in
the
following
locations:
 
 • Learning
Resource
Center
 • Workforce
Development
Center
 
 Revised:
07/27/09
 
 Page:
24


  • 25. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 HAZARDOUS
MATERIALS
 
 What
to
do
Before
a
Hazardous
Materials
Incident
 • Contact
your
local
fire
department
to
learn
what
chemicals
are
located
near
your
school
building
 which
may
be
hazardous
to
health
if
released.
 • Develop
procedures
for
sheltering
students
and
staff
when
hazardous
conditions
could
make
it
 unsafe
to
evacuate.

Emergency
personnel
will
make
the
recommendations
to
evacuate
or
shelter
in
 place.
 • Inform
students
and
staff
of
the
potential
dangers
and
harmful
effects
of
hazardous
materials.
 • Survey
and
determine
shelter
locations
within
the
school
and
post
them
in
each
room
with
routes
to
 them.

Mark
routes
to
shelter
areas.
 • Hold
drills.

Know
what
to
do
if
the
school
cannot
evacuate
and
must
shelter
the
students
and
staff
 “in
place”.
 • Arrange
to
use
another
school
or
similar
facility
as
alternate
site
if
evacuation
becomes
necessary.
 • Provide
a
list
of
emergency
supplies
that
should
be
preassembled
for
a
quick
evacuation.
 • Preplan
evacuation
routes
with
your
local
emergency
manager.
 
 What
to
do
During
an
Outdoor
Hazardous
Materials
Incident
 Warning
of
a
hazardous
material
incident
is
usually
received
from
the
fire
or
police
department
or
from
 emergency
services
officials
when
such
incidents
occur
near
the
college
and
are
deemed
to
be
a
threat
 to
safety.

An
overturned
tanker,
either
a
truck
or
train,
a
broken
fuel
line,
or
an
incident
in
a
commercial
 establishment
that
uses
chemicals
are
all
potential
hazards
if
such
incidents
occur
near
the
college
or
if
 the
wind
could
carry
fumes
from
such
incidents
to
the
building.
If
an
outdoor
hazardous
materials
event
 occurs,
do
the
following:
 • Insure
that
all
students
are
in
the
building
and
that
they
remain
there,
only
evacuate
to
another
site
 if
instructed
to
do
so.
 • Close
doors
and
windows.
 • Turn
off
all
ventilation
and
heating
systems
which
draw
in
outside
air
or
vent
to
the
outside.
 • Report
any
missing
students
to
college
officials
and
emergency
response
personnel.
 
 What
to
do
During
an
Indoor
Hazardous
Materials
Incident
 If
a
potentially
hazardous
chemical
or
material
is
released
inside
a
building
on
the
campus,
do
the
 following:
 • Evacuate
the
area
immediately.
 • Check
the
Material
Safety
Data
Sheet
(MSDS)*
to
determine
the
urgency
of
the
situation.
 • Notify
the
O
&
M
Team
Leader
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.4430
as
soon
as
possible.
 • Notify
the
President
(ext.
4001).
 • Notify
the
Dean
of
the
College
(ext.
4007).
 • The
O
&
M
Team
Leader,
President,
or
Dean
will
call
the
fire
department
if
deemed
necessary
 for
consultation.
 
 What
to
do
After
a
Hazardous
Materials
Incident
 • Have
local
fire
department
or
HAZMAT
(Hazardous
Materials)
personnel
survey
the
school
building
 for
any
hazardous
materials
contamination.
 • Arrange
for
decontamination
if
necessary.
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
25


  • 26. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 • Do
not
return
to
the
building
until
authorized
by
local
officials. Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
26


  • 27. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 MEDICAL
EMERGENCY
–

INJURY,
ILLNESS,
FIRST
AID
 General
Guidelines
for
First
Aid/Healthcare
 • Have
the
injured
person
care
for
him/herself
whenever
possible.
 • Avoid
or
minimize
direct
contact
with
blood
or
body
fluids.
 • Use
paper
toweling
to
wipe
an
injury
or
allow
the
injured
person
to
rinse
with
running
water.
 • Place
all
soiled
materials
into
a
lined
waste
container.
 • Wash
hands
thoroughly,
with
warm
water
and
soap,
immediately
after
providing
first
aid.
 • Notify
the
O
&
M
Team
Leader
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430
to
arrange
for
clean‐up
and
 decontamination
of
areas.
 
 Minor
Injury
or
Illness
 • Assess
the
situation
and
provide
first
aid
as
appropriate
within
your
scope
of
training.
 • If
professional
medical
attention
is
necessary,
staff
members
should
not
transfer
the
person.
 • If
transportation
to
the
hospital
is
warranted,
but
not
“severe”
(sprained
ankle)
you
may
give
 the
individual
the
option
of
the
following
transportation
methods:
 o Contact
Emergency
Medical
Response
Services
(Call
911).
 o Contact
a
friend
or
family
member
to
transport.
 • The
staff
member
(s)
directly
involved
shall
complete
an
Incident
Report
form
(Appendix
A)
and
 submit
to
the
President
within
24
hours
of
the
incident.
 

 Serious
Injury
or
Illness
 • Assess
the
situation
and
provide
first
aid
as
appropriate
within
your
scope
of
training.
 • If
you
have
any
doubt
about
the
type
or
extent
of
injury
or
illness,
DO
NOT
MOVE
THE
PERSON.
 • If
transportation
to
the
hospital
is
necessary
due
to
severity
(unconsciousness,
etc.),
contact
 Emergency
Medical
Response
Service
(Call
911).
 o When
calling
911
include:
  Location
and
number
of
people
involved.
  Nature
of
injury
or
illness.
  Current
status
of
the
injured/ill
party.
 o Once
called,
designate
someone
to
direct
the
ambulance
from
the
parking
area
 • If
immediate
care
is
necessary,
contact
Allied
Health
or
Emergency
Preparedness
Program
 Director,
and
initiate
immediate
first
aid.
 o Nursing
Faculty
are
located
in
LRC
–
ext.
4522,
4523,
4524.
 o Emergency
Preparedness
Program
Director
–
located
in
the
Workforce
Development
 Center
at
ext.
4426.
 • Contact
the
President
(or
designee
outlined
in
the
Continuity
of
Administration
contact
list)
at
 ext.
4001.

 First
Aid
Kits
are
located
in
the
following
areas:
 • Adult
Education
Building

 • Richard
L.
Mason
Administrative
 • Student
Services
 Building

 • Foundation
Hall

 • Support
Services

 • Learning
Resource
Center

 • University
of
Illinois
–
Extension

 • Workforce
Development
Center
 Automated
External
Defibrillator
(AED)
Units
are
located
in
the
following
locations:
 • Learning
Resource
Center
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
27


  • 28. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 • Workforce
Development
Center

 
 MEDICAL
EMERGENCY


 STUDENTS
WHO
MAY
BE
SUICIDAL
 
 Immediate
Action
 In
the
event
that
a
staff
member
has
reason
to
believe
that
a
student
may
be
suicidal
or
represent
a
 potential
threat
to
others
the
following
action
is
to
be
taken:
 • Take
all
comments
about
suicidal
thoughts
seriously,
especially
if
details
of
a
suicide
plan
are
 shared.
 • Immediately
report
concerns
to
President
at
ext.
4001
or
designee
outlined
in
the
Continuity
of
 Administration
section
on
Page
7.
 • Under
no
circumstances
should
an
untrained
person
attempt
to
assess
the
severity
of
suicidal
 risk;
all
assessment
of
threats,
attempts,
or
other
risk
factors
must
be
left
to
the
appropriate
 professionals.
 
 Response
to
a
Suicide
Attempt
not
Occurring
at
School
 When
the
college
becomes
aware
that
a
student
or
staff
member
attempted
suicide,
the
college
must
 protect
that
person’s
right
to
privacy.

If
the
parent
or
another
family
member
notifies
the
school
of
a
 student’s
suicide
attempt,
the
family
should
be
referred
to
appropriate
community
agencies
for
support
 services.

Staff
response
should
be
focused
on
quelling
the
spread
of
rumors
and
minimizing
the
fears
of
 fellow
students
and
staff.

As
opposed
to
convening
a
Crisis
&
Emergency
Response
Team
meeting
and
 alerting
the
student
body,
any
services
provided
to
the
person
who
attempted
suicide
must
be
kept
 confidential
and
coordinated
with
outside
service
providers,
such
as
a
suicide
crisis
counselor
or
hospital
 emergency
team.
 
 A
Suicide
Attempt
Becomes
a
Crisis
to
be
Managed
by
School
Staff
Only
When
One
or
More
of
 The
Following
Conditions
Exist:
 • Rumors
and
myths
are
widespread
and
damaging.
 • Students
witness
police
action
or
emergency
services
response.
 • A
group
of
the
attempt
survivor’s
friends
are
profoundly
affected
by
the
suicide
attempt
and
 request
support.
 
 When
One
or
More
of
the
Above
Conditions
Exists,
the
Following
Should
be
Implemented:
 • Tell
the
person
providing
the
information
about
the
suicide
attempt
not
to
repeat
it
elsewhere
 in
the
college.
 • If
school
office
staff
members
heard
the
report,
tell
them
not
to
repeat
or
give
out
any
 information
within
or
outside
school
unless
they
are
specifically
told
to
do
so.
 • Have
the
Crisis
&
Emergency
Response
Team
member
closest
to
the
survivor
talk
to
the
most
 profoundly
affected
friends
and
determine
the
type
support
they
need.
 • Provide
space
in
the
school
for
the
identified
peers
to
receive
support
services.
Provide
 necessary
passes
to
release
these
students
from
class
to
receive
services.
 
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
28


  • 29. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 Re‐entry
for
a
Student
who
has
Attempted
Suicide
 Efforts
to
respond
to
suicide
attempts
and
other
traumas
should
be
focused
on
making
the
student’s
 return
to
school
a
comfortable
one.

Because
families
exposed
to
a
suicide
attempt
experience
 considerable
guilt
and
fear,
they
are
more
likely
to
disclose
that
a
daughter
or
son
has
made
an
attempt
 if
they
know
the
school
has
a
helpful,
nonthreatening
manner
of
dealing
with
suicide.
Because
a
student
 who
attempted
suicide
often
is
at
greater
risk
for
a
suicide
in
the
months
following
the
crisis,
it
is
 extremely
important
to
closely
monitor
his
or
her
reentry
into
school
and
to
maintain
close
contact
with
 parents
and
mental
health
professionals
working
with
that
student.

If
the
student
is
absent
from
one
to
 four
weeks
after
a
suicide
attempt
and
possibly
hospitalized
in
a
treatment
facility,
the
following
steps
 should
be
taken:
 
 1. Obtain
a
written
release
of
information.
This
makes
it
possible
for
confidential
information
to
be
 shared
between
school
personnel
and
treatment
providers.
 2. Inform
the
student’s
teachers
regarding
the
number
of
probable
days
of
absence.
 3. Instruct
faculty
members
to
provide
the
students
with
assignments
to
be
completed,
if
appropriate.
 4. Maintain
contact
with
the
student
to
keep
him/her
informed
of
the
latest
developments
in
the
 school,
if
appropriate.
 5. Seek
recommendations
for
aftercare
from
the
student’s
therapist.
If
the
student
has
been
 hospitalized,
a
Crisis
&
Emergency
Response
Team
member
should
attend
the
discharge
meeting
at
 the
hospital.
 6. The
Crisis
&
Emergency
Response
Team
member
should
convey
relevant
non‐confidential
 information
to
appropriate
school
staff
regarding
the
aftercare
plan.
 7. Once
the
student
returns
to
school,
a
Crisis
&
Emergency
Response
Team
member
should
maintain
 regular
contact
with
him/her.
 
 Myths
and
Facts
About
Suicide
 The
following
myths
and
facts
about
suicide
are
adopted
from
the
Association
of
California
School
 Administrators
 
 Myth:
People
who
talk
about
suicide
don’t
commit
suicide.
 Fact:
Most
people
who
commit
suicide
have
given
clues
of
some
type
of
to
one
or
more
people.

It
is
not
 safe
to
assume
that
someone
talking
about
suicide
will
not
attempt
it;
the
majority
of
those
who
 attempt
suicide
have
stated
their
intent
to
someone.
 
 Myth:
Suicide
happens
without
warning.
 Fact:
While
explicit
verbal
warnings
are
not
always
given,
there
are
clues
ahead
of
time.
The
difficulty
is
 that
not
everyone
recognizes
the
signs
and
symptoms
that
would
alert
him/her
to
the
possibility
of
 suicide.
 
 Myth:
Suicidal
people
are
fully
intent
on
dying.
 Fact:
Rather
than
specifically
wanting
to
die,
students
who
attempt/commit
suicide
often
do
so
simply
 because
they
have
exhausted
their
coping
skills
and
see
no
other
options
for
relief
from
pain.
 
 Myth:
Once
suicidal,
a
person
is
suicidal
forever.
 Fact:
Preoccupation
with
suicidal
thoughts
is
usually
time‐limited.
Most
young
people
who
work
through
 a
suicidal
crisis
can
go
on
to
lead
healthy
lives.
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
29


  • 30. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 
 Myth:
Once
a
person
attempts
suicide,
the
humiliation
and
pain
will
prevent
future
attempts.
 Fact:
Eighty
percent
of
persons
who
commit
suicide
have
made
at
least
one
prior
attempt
(Hafen
&
 Frandsen,
1986).
It
is
critical
that
concerned
adults
and
peers
monitor
a
student
who
has
attempted
 suicide
for
several
months
following
the
attempt
because
those
students
who
receive
help
for
their
 suicidal
risk
before
they
made
an
attempt
have
a
better
prognosis
than
those
who
were
intervened
 upon
following
an
attempted
suicide.
 
 Myth:
Suicidal
behavior
is
inherited.
 Fact:
As
with
other
patterns
of
behavior,
suicide
sometimes
seems
to
run
in
families.
However,
suicide
is
 not
a
genetic
trait,
so
it
is
not
inherited.
What
can
appear
to
be
a
family
trait
of
suicide
may
be
because
 family
members
share
a
common
emotional
environment
and
often
adopt
similar
methods
of
coping.
In
 a
family
where
someone
has
committed
suicide,
suicide
may
be
viewed
as
acceptable
in
times
of
 distress.
 
 Myth:
Suicide
occurs
more
often
among
the
wealthy.
 Fact:
Suicide
knows
no
socioeconomic
boundaries.
 
 Myth:
People
who
attempt
or
commit
suicide
are
mentally
ill/psychotic.
 Fact:
Many
suicidal
persons
historically
have
had
difficulty
in
working
through
problems.
Other
people
 who
attempt
or
commit
suicide
choose
it
as
an
option
when
their
previously
successful
means
of
coping
 are
not
effective,
and
they
are
unable
to
otherwise
stop
the
pain
they
are
experiencing.

A
history
of
 mental
illness
does
not
increase
the
risk
of
suicide.
 
 Myth:
Talking
about
suicide
can
encourage
a
person
to
attempt
it.
 Fact:
On
the
contrary,
initiating
a
discussion
of
suicidal
feelings
may
give
a
suicidal
person
permission
to
 talk
about
the
pain
she/he
is
experiencing
and,
by
so
doing,
provide
significant
relief.
It
is
highly
unlikely
 that
discussing
suicide
would
influence
a
non‐suicidal
person
to
become
preoccupied
with
the
idea.
 
 Myth:
People
who
attempt
suicide
just
want
attention.
 Fact:
Suicide
should
be
considered
a
“cry
for
help.”
Persons
overwhelmed
by
pain
may
be
unable
to
let
 others
know
they
need
help,
and
suicide
may
seem
the
best
way
to
relieve
the
pain.
Suicidal
behavior
 may
be
a
desperate
move
to
reach
out
for
much
needed
help.
 
 Myth:
Suicide
is
most
likely
to
occur
at
night
as
well
as
over
the
holiday
season.
 Fact:
Suicides
can
occur
at
any
time,
regardless
of
season,
time
of
day
or
night,
weather
or
holidays.
 Suicides,
however,
are
most
likely
to
occur
in
the
spring,
and
second
most
likely
to
occur
in
the
fall.

 Most
suicides
occur
at
home
on
weekends
or
between
the
hours
of
3
p.m.
and
midnight
(Eyeman,
1987;
 Indiana
State
Board
of
Health,
1985).
 
 Myth:
When
depression
lifts,
there
is
no
longer
danger
of
suicide.
 Fact:
This
is
a
dangerous
misconception.
The
lifting
of
depression
often
accompanies
the
development
 of
a
suicide
plan
and
the
final
decision
to
commit
suicide.
If
the
improvement
in
mood
is
sudden
and
 circumstances
have
not
changed,
the
risk
of
suicide
remains
high.
 
 (Source:
Association
of
California
School
Administrators)
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
30


  • 31. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
31


  • 32. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 • 
 MEDICAL
REFUSAL
FORM
 
 
 I
fully
understand
that
it
has
been
recommended
that
I
seek
immediate
professional
medical
treatment
 for
my
injuries
or
illness.

However,
I
decline
to
seek
professional
medical
attention
at
this
time.

I
 hereby
indemnify
and
save
harmless
Frontier
Community
College,
the
Illinois
Eastern
Community
 College
District,
its
directors,
its
trustees,
and
staff
from
any
liabilities
that
may
arise
from
further
illness,
 injuries
or
complicating
conditions
caused
by
my
decision
to
delay
professional
medical
treatment.
 
 
 
 
 
 (Signature
of
Injured/Ill
Person)
 
 (Signature
of
Witness)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 (Date)
 
 (Date)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 (Signature
of
Staff
on
Scene)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 (Date)
 
 
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
32


  • 33. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 SEVERE
WEATHER
 
 Blizzards
and
Ice
Storms
 
 General
Procedures
 When
severe
weather
(tornadoes,
blizzards,
ice
storms,
flooding,
etc.)
exists,
college
operations
may
be
 suspended,
cancelled,
or
delayed
upon
the
direction
of
the
President.

In
the
absence
of
the
President,
 the
Dean
of
the
College
will
make
the
decision
to
suspend
operations
including
day
and
evening
 activities.
 
 When
the
safety
of
anyone
is
threatened
due
to
severe
weather,
college
operations
will
be









 suspended
or
classes
delayed.

In
the
event
it
become
necessary
to
cancel
or
delay
classes,
the
 PRESIDENT
(or
designee)
will
send
a
message
via
the
E2Campus
emergency
alert
system
and
broadcast
 the
announcement
on
the
College’s
web
page
and
broadcast
over
area
radio
stations
and
television
 networks,
as
designated
in
the
class
cancellation
table
in
Appendix
B.
The
announcement
to
cancel
or
 delay
classes
will
be
made
by
the
President
prior
6:00
a.m.,
when
possible.

Closure
of
day
classes
does
 not
necessarily
mean
that
evening
classes
will
be
cancelled.

If
evening
classes
are
to
be
cancelled,
the
 announcement
will
be
made
over
the
stations
listed
above.

Students
should
exercise
sound
judgment
 as
to
whether
they
will
be
able
to
attend
classes.

All
work
must
be
made
up
with
individual
instructors
 when
classes
are
missed
due
to
inclement
weather.
 In
the
event
severe
weather
necessitates
seeking
shelter
or
evacuation,
the
President
or
his/her
 designee
will
notify
personnel.

If
a
storm
occurs
near
the
end
of
a
normal
work
day,
the
President
or
 his/her
designee
may
recommend
employees
remain
in
secure
shelter
areas
until
danger
has
passed.

If
 an
employee
leaves
against
the
advice
of
the
President,
then
that
employee
assumes
all
liability
for
their
 own
personal
safety
and
cannot
hold
the
college
responsible
for
any
injury
occurred
from
the
weather
 related
event.
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
33


  • 34. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 Tornado
&
Severe
Thunderstorms
 
 What
to
do
During
a
Tornado
Watch
 • Be
alert
for
approaching
storms.

Post
“spotters”
as
prearranged.


 • Be
ready
to
take
shelter.
 • Monitor
the
weather
warning
receiver
and
local
radio
and
television
station.


 • Avoid
use
of
telephones
if
lightning
is
occurring.


 
 What
to
do
During
a
Tornado
Warning
 • When
the
city’s
storm
warning
system
is
activated.
 • Begin
moving
to
shelter
if
revolving
funnel
cloud(s)
are
seen
and,
if
possible,
report
the
sighting
to
 the
local
police
department
or
sheriff’s
office.
 • Proceed
with
students
to
pre‐designated
tornado
shelter
areas.

Stay
away
from
windows,
doors,
 and
outside
walls.

Assume
the
squat
position
with
head
protected.

Remain
there
until
the
tornado
 has
passed.


 • Stay
inside
the
building.

If
outside
and
unable
to
get
to
a
building,
lie
flat
in
the
nearest
ditch,
 ravine,
or
culvert
with
your
hands
shielding
your
head.
 • O
&
M
personnel
will
turn
off
utilities
at
the
direction
of
the
President
and
the
O
&
M
Team
Leader.
 • Remain
in
shelter
areas
until
the
warning
has
been
terminated.
The
President
or
designee
 (Continuity
of
Administration
section
on
Page
7)
will
declare
the
emergency
to
be
over.
 
 What
to
do
After
a
Tornado
has
Passed
 • Check
for
injuries.

Do
not
attempt
to
move
seriously
injured
persons
unless
they
are
in
immediate
 danger
of
death
or
further
injury.

If
you
must
move
someone,
first
stabilize
the
neck
and
back,
then
 call
for
help
immediately.
 • Use
great
caution
when
leaving
a
damaged
building.

Look
out
for
broken
glass
inside
and
outside.

 Be
alert
for
downed
power
lines
and
treat
all
wires
as
though
they
are
hot.
 • Implement
procedures
to
resume
school,
dismiss
or
keep
students
as
warranted.
 • Monitor
local
radio
or
television
stations
for
official
information
or
instructions.
 • Do
 not
 return
 to
 the
 building
 until
 authorized
 by
 local
 officials. Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
34


  • 35. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 UTILITY
EMERGENCIES 
 Power
Outage

 In
case
of
power
failure,
the
following
procedures
should
be
implemented:
 • Notify
the
O
&
M
Team
Leader
at
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430.


 • The
O
&
M
Team
Leader
will
notify
the
President.


 • The
O
&
M
Team
Leader
will
also
notify
City
of
Fairfield
Power
company
at
(618)
842‐3445
 • Remain
where
you
are.

 • If
notified
by
the
President,
or
designee,
night
classes
may
be
cancelled,
if
the
power
outage
 lasts
a
long
period
of
time.
During
day
time
hours,
classes
should
continue
as
planned.

 
 Gas
Leak

 Natural
gas
leaks,
with
order
in
the
building,
may
occur
and
bring
danger
of
explosion.
Natural
gas
rises
 and
will
often
be
outside
because
most
gas
lines
are
outside
the
building.
Natural
gas
is
mixed
with
 Mercaptan
to
give
it
odor.

The
gas
goes
up
and
the
odor
goes
down.

If
you
smell
a
leak
or
if
a
leak
is
in
 or
near
the
building,
the
following
procedures
should
be
implemented:
 • Go
to
the
nearest
building.
 • Notify
the
O
&
M
Team
Leader
at
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430.


 • The
O
&
M
Team
Leader
will
notify
the
President.


 • The
O
&
M
Team
Leader
will
also
notify
City
of
Fairfield
Gas
company
at
(618)
842‐9736
 • The
O
&
M
Team
will
evacuate
the
building
immediately.

Students,
faculty
and
staff
will
use
the
 nearest
exit.
No
one
is
permitted
to
re‐enter
the
building
until
notified
by
the
President,
or
 designee,
that
it
is
safe
to
do
so.
 • The
O
&
M
Team
will
ensure
that
students
and
staff
are
a
safe
distance
from
the
building.
 • The
O
&
M
Team
will
turn
off
the
main
gas
valve
 
 Water
Outage

 In
case
of
water
failure,
the
following
procedures
should
be
implemented:
 • Notify
the
O
&
M
Team
Leader
at
(618)
516‐2857
(cell)
or
ext.
4430.


 • The
O
&
M
Team
Leader
will
notify
the
President.


 • The
O
&
M
Team
Leader
will
also
notify
City
of
Fairfield
Water
company
at
618)
842‐7015
 • Students,
faculty,
and
staff
will
be
notified
by
the
President,
or
designee,
if
the
classes
are
 cancelled.
 
 Water
Boil
Order

 College
will
remain
open.
All
faculty,
staff,
and
students
will
be
notified
that
the
water
is
undrinkable.
 
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
35


  • 36. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 
 WEAPONS
SITUATION
 
 General
Guidelines
 In
general,
if
confronted
with
the
possibility
that
someone
may
have
a
weapon
on
campus
the
following
 guidelines
should
be
followed:
 
 • Assess
the
situation.
 • Notify
police
(call
911).
 • Gather
information.
 • Isolate
individual
or
suspect.
 • Do
not
use
force
or
touch
the
person
or
weapon.
 • Remain
calm.
 • Notify
another
administrator,
faculty
member,
staff
member,
and/or
trusted
student
what
the
 situation
is.
 • Invoke
the
e2Campus
emergency
system
to
notify
employees
and
students
of
the
threatening
 situation
and
institute
lockdown
procedures
until
all
is
clear.
 • Notify
President,
or
designee
outlined
in
the
Continuity
of
Administration
section
on
Page
7.
 • Refer
media
questions
to
the
President,
or
designee.
 
 Level
1
Threat:
A
Rumor
That
Someone
has
a
Weapon
 • Staff
member
hearing
the
rumor
about
a
weapon
or
suspecting
a
person
of
carrying
a
weapon
will
 notify
the
President
at
ext.
4001
or
designee
outlined
in
the
Continuity
of
Administration
section
on
 Page
7.
Limit
information
to
staff
and
students
on
a
need
to
know
basis.
 • The
President,
or
designee,
will
Invoke
the
e2Campus
emergency
system
to
notify
employees
and
 students
of
the
threatening
situation
and
institute
lockdown
procedures,
if
necessary.
 • Call
911
explaining
your
suspicions
or
the
nature
of
the
threat.

Calmly
describe
the
person’s
actions
 and
appearance.
 • Staff
should
keep
the
individual(s)
rumored
to
be
in
possession
of
a
weapon
under
surveillance
until
 law
enforcement
arrives.
 • Be
prepared
to
act
as
a
resource
and
liaison
between
school
and
police.

If
possible,
have
a
map
of
 the
building
available
for
police.
 • Confer
with
police
when
they
arrive.
They
will
advise
you
how
they
intend
to
proceed.
 • If
interaction
with
the
individual
is
imminent,
do
not
use
force
or
touch
the
person
or
weapon.

 Avoid
sudden
moves
or
gestures.

Try
not
to
raise
your
voice
–
but,
if
this
becomes
necessary,
do
so
 decisively
and
with
clarity.
Your
tone
and
demeanor
will
strongly
influence
the
outcome
of
the
crisis.
 • Keep
a
written
log
of
events.
 • The
President
may
call
an
emergency
staff
meeting
to
ensure
that
staff
members
leave
with
 accurate
information
about
the
incident
and
subsequent
actions
to
be
taken,
if
necessary.
 • 
The
President,
or
designee,
is
the
only
party
authorized
to
speak
to
the
media
about
the
event.
 
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
36


  • 37. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 Level
2
Threat:
Weapon
Witnessed,
but
no
Immediate
Danger • Notify
another
staff
member
to
call
the
President
at
ext.
4001
or
designee
outlined
in
the
Continuity
 of
Administration
section
on
Page
7.

The
President
will
notify
the
Crisis
&
Emergency
Management
 Team.

Limit
information
to
staff
and
students
on
a
need
to
know
basis.
 • The
President,
or
designee,
will
Invoke
the
e2Campus
emergency
system
to
notify
employees
and
 students
of
the
threatening
situation
and
institute
lockdown
procedures
until
all
is
clear.
 • The
person
reporting
the
incident
should
describe
as
accurately
as
possible:
 o Identify
of
individual,
if
known.
 o Detailed
description
of
individual(s).
 o Where
the
individual
is
located
(i.e.
room
number).



 o What
led
to
the
incident.
 o Number
of
persons
involved.































 o Number
&
type
of
weapon(s).
 o Any
pertinent
background
information
on
individual,
including
possible
reason
for
carrying
a
 weapon
that
might
have
led
up
to
event.
 • Be
prepared
to
act
as
a
resource
and
liaison
between
school
and
police.

If
possible,
have
a
map
of
 the
building
available
for
police.
 • Isolate
individual
or
suspect.
(If
weapon
is
in
a
locker
or
elsewhere,
prevent
access
to
it.)
 • Confer
with
police
when
they
arrive.
They
will
advise
you
how
they
intend
to
proceed.
 • If
interaction
with
the
individual
is
imminent,
do
not
use
force
or
touch
the
person
or
weapon.

 Avoid
sudden
moves
or
gestures.

Try
not
to
raise
your
voice
–
but,
if
this
becomes
necessary,
do
so
 decisively
and
with
clarity.
Your
tone
and
demeanor
will
strongly
influence
the
outcome
of
the
crisis.
 • If
it
is
safe
to
do
so,
students
and
staff
should
leave
the
area
immediately.
REMAIN
CALM
–
DO
NOT
 PANIC.
 • If
staff
and
students
must
remain
in
the
classroom,
they
should:
 o Lock
the
door,
if
possible.
 
 o Turn
off
lights.
 o Take
attendance,
specifically
noting
students
not
in
class.
 o Move
everyone
out
of
sight
and
onto
the
floor.
 
 o Close
blinds
or
pull
shades,
cover
windows.
 • Keep
a
written
log
of
events.
 • The
President
will
call
an
emergency
staff
meeting
to
ensure
that
staff
members
leave
with
accurate
 information
about
the
incident
and
subsequent
actions
to
be
taken.

 • The
President,
or
designee,
is
the
only
party
authorized
to
speak
to
the
media
about
the
event.
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
37


  • 38. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 • 
 Level
3
Immediate
Action:
Weapon
Use
Threatened
or
Carried
Out
 • A
staff
member
who
is
made
aware
of
the
possible
use
of
a
weapon
or
actual
use
of
a
weapon
will
 notify
another
staff
person
to
Contact
911
from
a
cell
phone
or
campus
phone.

If
no
other
staff
 member
is
present,
discreetly
inform
a
trusted
student
to
call
the
campus
switchboard
to
notify
the
 police.

If
it
is
safe
to
do
so,
maintain
surveillance
of
the
suspected
individual
at
all
times
until
law
 enforcement
arrives.
However,
no
one
should
place
themselves
or
their
students
in
danger.
 • The
President,
or
designee,
will
Invoke
the
e2Campus
emergency
system
to
notify
employees
and
 students
of
the
threatening
situation
and
institute
lockdown
procedures
until
all
is
clear.
 • The
person
reporting
the
incident
should
describe
as
accurately
as
possible:
 o Identify
of
individual,
if
known.
 o Detailed
description
of
individual(s).
 o Where
the
individual
is
located
(i.e.
room
number).


 o What
led
to
the
incident.
 o Number
of
persons
involved.

































 o Number
&
type
of
weapon(s).
 o Any
pertinent
background
information
on
individual,
including
possible
reason
for
carrying
a
 weapon
that
might
have
led
up
to
event.
 o If
medical
assistance
is
needed
and
the
number
of
persons
injured.
 • Be
prepared
to
act
as
a
resource
and
liaison
between
school
and
police.

If
possible,
have
a
map
of
 the
building
available
for
police.
 • If
needed,
administer
first‐aid
until
medical
assistance
arrives.

Be
sure
to
use
personal
protective
 equipment
whenever
possible.
 • A
competent
designee
will
notify
staff
in
rooms
in
the
vicinity
of
the
situation.

If
it
is
safe
to
do
so,
 students
and
staff
should
leave
the
area
immediately.

If
vacating
the
area
safely
is
a
problem,
staff
 and
students
should
remain
in
the
room
until
they
can
be
escorted
to
safety
by
law
enforcement
 authorities.
 • If
staff
and
students
must
remain
in
the
classroom,
they
should:
 o Lock
the
door,
if
possible.
 
 o Take
attendance,
specifically
noting
students
not
in
class.
 o Move
everyone
out
of
sight
and
onto
the
floor.
 
 o Close
blinds
or
pull
shades,
cover
windows.
 o Turn
off
lights.
 • If
interaction
with
the
individual
is
imminent,
do
not
use
force
or
touch
the
person
or
weapon.

 Avoid
sudden
moves
or
gestures.

Try
not
to
raise
your
voice
–
but,
if
this
becomes
necessary,
do
so
 decisively
and
with
clarity.
Your
tone
and
demeanor
will
strongly
influence
the
outcome
of
the
crisis.
 • The
President,
or
designee,
will
establish
a
command
post
to
handle
the
load
of
the
Crisis
&
 Emergency
Management
Team
and
to
direct
information
to
the
press
and
concerned
members
of
 the
community.
 • The
President
will
identify
a
place
where
a
log
of
all
significant
events,
actions,
and
individuals
that
 are
involved
in
the
event
is
to
be
kept.

 • Keep
a
written
log
of
events.
 • Once
law
enforcement
arrives,
law
enforcement
officials
will
confer
on
the
course
of
action.
If
 evacuation
is
necessary
it
will
be
conducted
under
the
leadership
and
direction
of
the
law
 enforcement
officials.


REMAIN
CALM
–
DO
NOT
PANIC.
 • Confer
with
police
when
they
arrive.
They
will
advise
you
how
they
intend
to
proceed.
 • The
President,
or
designee,
is
the
only
party
authorized
to
speak
to
the
media
about
the
event.
 • The
President
will
call
an
emergency
staff
meeting
to
ensure
that
staff
members
leave
with
accurate
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
38


  • 39. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 information
about
the
incident
and
subsequent
actions
to
be
taken.
 WEAPONS
SITUATION


 TERRORISM
 
 What
to
do
During
a
Terrorist
Incident
 • Contact
local
law
enforcement
officials,
(dial
911).
 • Contact
the
President,
or
designee
outlined
in
the
Continuity
of
Administration
section
on
Page
7.
 • Keep
students
in
their
classrooms
until
law
enforcement
officials
issue
instructions.
 • Begin
evacuation
if
recommended.
 
 
 What
to
do
After
a
Terrorist
Incident
 • Do
not
return
to
the
building
until
authorized
by
local
emergency
officials.
 • Establish
Crisis
Debriefing
Program
for
students
and
staff
if
necessary.
 • The
President,
or
designee,
is
the
only
party
authorized
to
speak
to
the
media
about
the
incident.
 
 
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
39


  • 40. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 ASSAULT/RAPE
–
CHECKLIST
 College
involvement
in
incident
due
to:
 Rape
occurrence
on
campus Rumor/myth
about
a
rape
is
communicated
 Survivor's
family
requests
intervention
 
 
 Students
witness
police/emergency
services Survivor's
friends
request
intervention Complete
the
following
steps
protect
survivor's
identity
and
right
to
privacy:
 
 Determine
if
the
rape
survivor
needs
emergency
medical
attention,
if
so
call
the
Wayne
County
 Ambulance
Service
at
911
(or
842‐9121).

 
 
 
 If
the
rape
occurred
on
campus,
secure
the
crime
scene
and
provide
space
for
the
survivor
(and
 identified
peers,
if
applicable)
to
establish
an
area
where
they
may
receive
support
services.
 
 
 
 Notify
the
College’s
Administration
as
designated
in
the
Continuity
of
Administration
section,
Page
 7
of
this
plan.
 
 
 
 Direct
the
person
(or
people)
providing
information
not
to
repeat
it
elsewhere
on
campus.
 
 
 
 If
the
rape
occurred
on
campus,
dial
911
(or
842‐6631)
and
notify
the
Wayne
County
Sheriff
and/or
 local
rape
crisis
team.
 
 
 
 If
any
Frontier
employee
heard
the
report,
tell
them
not
to
repeat
or
give
out
any
information
 within
or
outside
the
College
unless
they
are
specifically
told
to
do
so.
 
 
 
 Talk
with
the
rape
survivor
about
the
types
of
support
he
or
she
and
the
closest
friends
need,
and
 the
person(s)
the
rape
survivor
would
like
to
provide
that
support.

 
 
 
 Provide
space
in
the
school
for
the
rape
survivor
and
identified
peers
to
receive
support
services.
 
 
 
 Encourage
rape
survivor
to
seek
additional
support
from
Fairfield
Memorial
Hospital
(618)
842‐ 2611
Emergency
Room.
 
 
 
 Dismiss
classes,
as
appropriate.
 
 
 
 Notify
District
Office.

 
 
 
 Develop
a
communications
plan
to
stem
rumors,
protect
identify
of
rape
survivor,
and
alleged
 perpetrator,
inform
students,
and
inform
community.
 
 
 
 Document
as
much
information
regarding
the
incident
as
is
possible
(remember
that
all
clothing,
 vehicles
etc.,
could
be
considered
evidence).
 
 
 
 Complete
the
Incident
Report
documentation
(Appendix
A)
and
submit
to
the
President’s
Office
 ASAP
(This
form
must
be
processed
and
submitted
to
District
Office
within
24
hours
of
the
 occurrence.)
 
 
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Page:
40


  • 41. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 
 Store
all
records
related
to
rape
incident
and
services
provided
in
a
confidential
file.
 BOMB
THREAT
CHECKLIST
 Name
of
Person
Receiving
Call:
 
 Date:
 
 Time:




























 
 Length
of
Call
 
 
 Extension
at
which
call
is
received:
 
 
 Exact
wording
of
threat:
 
 
 
 Questions
to
Ask
 Caller
Demographic
 
 1.
When
is
bomb
going
to
explode?
 Gender:
 M
 F
 Ethnicity/Culture:





 
 
 
 
 
 Approximate
Age:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 2.
Where
is
it
right
now?
 General
Remarks
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 3.
What
does
it
look
like?
 Threat
Language
 Callers
Voice
 
 
Well
spoken
(educated)
 
Calm
 
 
Irrational
 
Angry
 
 
Foul
 
Slow
 4.
What
kind
of
bomb
is
it?
 
Taped
 
Rapid
 
 
Incoherent
 
Soft

 
 
Message
read
by
threat
maker
 
Loud
 
 
 
Laughter
 5.
What
will
cause
it
to
explode?
 Background
Sounds
 
Normal
 
 
Animal
Noises
 
Distinct
 
 
Booth
 
Slurred
 
 
House
Noises

 
Whispered
 6.
Did
you
place
the
bomb?
 
Local
 
Cracking
Voice
 
 
Long
Distance
 
Nasal
 
 
Motor
 
Stutter
 
 
Music
 
Raspy
 7.
Why
did
you
place
the
bomb
there?
 
Office
Machinery
 
Deep
 
 
PA
System
 
Ragged
 
 
Static
 
Clearing
Throat
 
 
Street

 
Crying
 8.
What
is
your
address?
 
Voices
 
Disguised
 
 
Other
 
Accent
 
 
 
 
 
Familiar
 
 
 
 
 
Deep
Breathing
 9.
What
is
your
name?
 
 
 
 
Other
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 *If
the
caller
does
not
answer
questions,
try
to
encourage
them
to
do
so
by
expressing
a
desire
to
save
lives.

Try
 to
keep
the
caller
on
the
phone
as
long
as
possible
so
that
the
call
can
be
traced.

Should
the
caller
not
give
any
 essential
information,
it
may
be
necessary
to
check
the
building
for
a
bomb.

Before
doing
so,
be
sure
to
notify
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Appendix
A‐2
 

  • 42. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 the
president
or
to
activate
the
chain
of
command.
 ILLINOIS EASTERN COMMUNITY COLLEGES Incident Report Form should be completed by Supervisors
 This form should be completed for all personal injury accidents, criminal incidents, damage to or theft of college property, gross violation of Board Policy or personnel procedures and fire or intrusion incidents. Reports should be completed and turned into the Chief Financial Officer within 24 hours of the incident. 
 Date of Incident
 
 
 Time of Incident
 
 
 Reason for Report (Nature of Incident)
 
 
 
 
 Names, addresses and social security numbers of all persons involved in incident:
 
 
 
 
 
 Description of incident (use additional sheet if necessary):
 
 
 
 
 
 Follow-up activities required:
 
 
 
 
 
 How person completing report was contacted:
 
 
 
 
 
 Name and title of person completing report:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Name
 
 
 College
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Title
 
 
 
 
 Signed
 
 Time
 
 Date
 
 
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Appendix
A‐3
 

  • 43. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 MEDICAL
REFUSAL
FORM
 
 
 I
fully
understand
that
it
has
been
recommended
that
I
seek
immediate
professional
medical
treatment
 for
my
injuries
or
illness.

However,
I
decline
to
seek
professional
medical
attention
at
this
time.

I
 hereby
indemnify
and
save
harmless
Frontier
Community
College,
the
Illinois
Eastern
Community
 College
District,
its
directors,
its
trustees,
and
staff
from
any
liabilities
that
may
arise
from
further
illness,
 injuries
or
complicating
conditions
caused
by
my
decision
to
delay
professional
medical
treatment.
 
 
 
 
 
 (Signature
of
Injured/Ill
Person)
 
 (Signature
of
Witness)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 (Date)
 
 (Date)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 (Signature
of
Staff
on
Scene)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 (Date)
 
 
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Appendix
A‐4
 

  • 44. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 Class
Cancellation
Procedure
for
FCC
 
 
 • Follow
the
FCC
calendar
for
closings.
 For
classes
meeting
on
FCC
Campus:
 • Weather
Cancellations
for
the
college
will
 be
announced
on:
 Fairfield
–
WFIW
104.9
 Flora
–
WNOI
103.9
 Mt.
Carmel
–
WVJC
89.1
 Mt.
Vernon
–
WMIX
94.1
 Newton
–
WIKK
103.5
 Olney
–
WVLN
92.9
 and
posted
on
www.iecc.edu/fcc
website.
 • All
individual
class
cancellations
should
be
 communicated
to
students
and
the
Dean
 by
the
instructor.
 
 
 • Follow
the
FCC
calendar
for
closings.
 For
classes
meeting
at
locations
other
than
FCC
or

 • Weather
cancellations
for
the
college
will
 public
schools:
 be
announced
on:

 




 Fairfield
–
WFIW
104.9
 Flora
–
WNOI
103.9
 Mt.
Carmel
–
WVJC
89.1
 Mt.
Vernon
–
WMIX
94.1
 Newton
–
WIKK
103.5
 Olney
–
WVLN
92.9
 and
posted
on
www.iecc.edu/fcc
website.
 • All
individual
class
cancellations
should
be
 communicated
to
students
and
the
Dean
 by
the
instructor.
 
 • Follow
the
public
school’s
calendar
for
 For
classes
meeting
at
public
schools:
 closings.
 • If
the
public
school
has
a
weather
 cancellation,
then
the
FCC
class
will
also
be
 cancelled.
 • All
individual
class
cancellations
should
be
 made
by
the
Dean
and
communicated
to
 the
students
by
the
instructor
and/or
the
 college.
 

 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Appendix
B‐1
 

  • 45. Crisis
&
Emergency
Plan
 SPECIAL
CONSIDERATIONS
FOR
STUDENTS
AND
STAFF
WITH
DISABILITIES
 
 • Individuals
with
mobility
impairments
should
have
two
or
more
individuals
assigned
to
assist
 them
in
an
emergency.

It
is
important
for
the
assigned
assistants
to
become
familiar
with
the
 extent
of
the
disability
and
how
to
best
facilitate
getting
the
individuals
to
safety.
 • Individuals
with
hearing
disabilities
will
require
school
personnel
that
can
communicate
with
 them.


 • Students
with
developmental
disabilities
may
become
upset
if
routine
patterns
of
activity
are
 disrupted.

Hysteria
should
be
firmly
and
promptly
addressed
to
avoid
spreading
it
to
others.

 Give
firm
and
clear
directions
and
isolate
the
student
if
necessary.

If
possible,
divert
the
 student’s
attention.
 • Debris
encountered
during
an
evacuation
may
make
it
difficult
for
individuals
that
are
visually
 and
mobility
impaired
to
evacuate
safely.

Consider
the
accessibility
of
evacuation
routes
when
 developing
evacuation
procedures.
 
 Revised:
11/21/2008
 
 Appendix
C‐1