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  • Hello and welcome to the HB 2639 Risk Management Education Program online training series. This module is part of the University of Texas at Austin’s state-mandated safety education program for leaders, advisors and members of registered student organizations. The purpose of this module is to provide you with information and tips to guide your organization in planning safe and effective events. You are required to complete all of the online training modules and attend an in-person workshop. The module will take approximately twenty (20) minutes to complete and will include a ten-question quiz at the end. The questions are multiple choice and true/false. You must score an 80% or better (8 out of 10 questions) correctly to receive credit for this module. If you do not pass the test on the first try, you can retake the module as many times as you need to until you achieve a passing score. To advance to the next slide, please read all of the information on each page and then click on the “Next Page” button when it becomes available.
  • The Behavior at Parties and Other Events Module will cover the following learning objectives: Identify factors to consider when planning safe and effective events Discuss risks associated with alcohol at parties and other events Discuss the importance of a crisis management plan for events Review the laws, University policies and procedures associated with student organization events held on and off campus Identify resources available to assist you and your student organization with event planning Take as many notes as required and write down any questions you may have over things that were or were not covered in this module. Program Safety Education Services in the Office of the Dean of Students is ready to assist you and your student organization with any safety and risk management questions associated with this topic.
  • Section 1: Choosing and Planning Successful Events In this section, we review key questions to consider in choosing an event and completing the pre-event planning process. Just as there are many different types of student organizations on the UT campus, there are also a variety of events that you and members of your student organization may host or attend throughout the year. Each event offers unique opportunities and challenges especially when it comes to event planning and ensuring everyone’s health and safety – both invitees and guests.
  • It is important as an organization to identify the types of events you will be conducting and their purpose – social, professional, intellectual, recreational, competitive, etc. Make sure you are asking whether the event is important to your organization’s mission and goals. The following are examples of different types of events that your organization may conduct both on- and off-campus: Parties Social Mixers Philanthropy related Events Talent Show/Entertainment Events Sports related Tournaments Professional Social Gatherings Panels and workshops Conferences
  • There are many factors that must be considered when deciding to conduct an event or activity. Consider these questions with your organization members before you begin planning: What is the purpose of the event? How will this event reflect the values of your organization? Who are you inviting? When is the event going to take place? Where is the event going to take place (on- or off-campus)? Who is organizing the event? Who is in charge of the event? Will alcohol be served at the event? If yes, who will be serving it? How much will the event cost? Do you have a budget in place? Will you be signing contracts? Do you have an emergency or crisis plan in place?
  • As mentioned in the previous slide, there are many factors to consider when deciding on an event or activity. Theme parties are a popular social event for organizations. However, some theme parties have created controversy, in recent years, particularly culturally-based theme parties. Organizations choosing to have a culturally-based theme party should consider these questions before planning to host a culturally-based theme party: Why this theme? Is it about a living culture? Is it about a current subculture? Have you consulted either people from that community or with recognized “experts” (community leaders or faculty) about the theme? Are the people whose culture is being represented adequately empowered in society? Think and talk about what you are planning to do!
  • A risky and potentially offensive event some organizations choose to host to raise money is the “Date” or “Slave” Auction. While most organizations do this type of event with good intentions, the result can be damaging to the organization and participants. “Date” or “Slave” auctions involve “bidding” on a human being for their services or the ability to spend time with a certain person. This process devalues a human being to the level of merchandise and involves a comparison of the relative “value” of each person being auctioned. This process has the appearance of actual slave auctions, which are a real and tragic part of this country’s history. In addition, it is important to consider safety concerns that arise as a result of “Date” auctions. When a person “wins” the ability to spend time with another person, there is no way of discerning their true motives. Given the prevalence of sexual assault in our culture, safety concerns exist if you allow a member of your organization to be compelled to spend time alone with someone that she/he may not know. At UT Austin, equality, openness, and sensitivity are strongly held values. For this reason and ALL of the reasons mentioned before, we encourage student organizations to engage in more imaginative and feasible alternatives to these activities.
  • It is important to know and understand what University policies and procedures apply when planning either on on-campus or off-campus events. Are you familiar with all the university rules and policies that may affect an event your organization is planning (or know who to go to with questions)? It is important that you and the other officers of your organization carefully review the Registered Student Organization Manual and Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities. Another useful planning tool is the Event Planning and Reservation Form available online at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sald/downloads/EventPlanningForm07.pdf. If you continue to have questions or just want to check yourself, feel free to contact the Student Organization Center (SOC) at 512-471-3065 or stop by their office located on the fourth floor of the Student Services Building (SSB). They can connect you to numerous staff members in the Office of the Dean of Students trained to help student organizations with risk management and event planning.
  • In addition to expectations you or the University may have regarding events hosted by your organization, it is important to consider the potential for criminal or civil liability. There are both federal and state laws that can govern both how a party or other event should be conducted as well as the conduct expected of participants. In choosing what events to schedule during the year, make sure you are considering the following questions: How will you ensure that members of the organization will not violate the law (e.g., underage drinking, driving while intoxicated, not wearing a seatbelt)? What are some potential legal issues that might emerge from your event and how can you prevent this? Will you or your organization be liable for any damages? (property damage, breaching terms of a contract, accidents, etc.) Are you aware of the types of liabilities? (e.g. negligence, foreseeability, premise liability, contracts) How can you reduce these liability issues?
  • Section 2: Tips for Successful Events In this section, we will discuss several tips that can make each activity safe, fun, and enjoyable for everyone. Whether you are conducting a simple event such as a happy hour or putting on a weekend leadership conference, your organization’s social events have the potential to benefit everyone. They can help define what type of organization you are in and whether or not a UT student should become or remain a member of the group.
  • Alcohol can have a place at organization events, but there are important safety tips to consider to make sure its presence does not create a dangerous situation for attendees. Make sure that you invite only people that you and other members of your organization know. Do not serve alcohol to anyone under 21. IT’S THE LAW! Use wristbands to distinguish between those who can and cannot drink. Consider safer and alternative ways of getting to and from the event (e.g., designated drivers, cabs, and shuttle service). Make sure that the facility you are using is authorized to serve alcohol. Make sure your risk management plan covers what to do if an attendee is coming to your event after a pre-party. Finally, it is highly recommended that your organization have a Texas Alcohol and Beverage Commissions (TABC) certified, third-party vendor serve all alcohol at your events.
  • Student organization events like many other activities such as conferences, award ceremonies, and competitions can be quite complex to manage. Events can involve numerous tasks including budgets, event schedules, seating arrangements, training for volunteers, etc. An essential component to creating successful events requires selecting an officer, other organization member, or committee/team to take the lead (i.e., the event planners). Selecting the planner for your organization’s events is an important decision. Qualities of good event planners (or event planning teams) include: experience within the organization; excellent organizational, communication and time management skills; ability to handle stressful, fast-paced situations; and passion and a strategic vision.
  • Another important person that can help make your events safe and successful is a Risk Management Officer. A Risk Management Officer is a member of your executive team who serves as the point of contact for your organization on risk management issues. This officer will work with your advisor(s), the Office of the Dean of Students, and other organization leaders to identify risk and safety issues for your organization and develop appropriate responses. Some of the job functions of this position may include: Raising awareness of risk issues Coordinating training and education on risk management Facilitating discussions on risk management Developing policies and procedures to address risk issues Producing and/or maintaining an operations manual Connecting leaders with risk management resources A Risk Management Officer may be a new officer position that you create or it may be a responsibility that you add to an existing officer position. It is important that this officer be an active member of your organization’s executive or leadership team with the recognition and authority over risk management issues for your organization. They should also be listed as an authorized representative for your organization. Your Risk Management Officer does NOT need to be a risk management “expert”. However, there are a few skills you may want your Risk Management Officer to possess: Basic familiarity with operations, policies, and procedures of the organization Superior communication and conflict management skills Experience leading meetings or discussions Ability to lead change Motivation, creativity, and flexibility In addition to the HB 2639 Risk Management Education Program online training series, the Office of the Dean of Students, your advisor, and other officers can help provide training and other forms of support once this officer is selected.
  • Section 3: Appropriate Behavior for Organization Events In this section, we will discuss appropriate behavior for organization events and how to respond to inappropriate behavior. As a leader of a UT student organization, you are responsible not only for your conduct but that of your fellow organization members. Ignoring, condoning, or engaging in inappropriate behavior at parties and other events can place both you and your organization at risk. It is important to continually educate and discuss appropriate behavior with your membership or guests and respond right away when a person becomes disruptive.
  • The Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities (Appendix C of the General Information Catalog ) outlines the standards of conduct expected of all students at the University of Texas at Austin. Whether a student or student organization is on- or off- campus, all Longhorns are expected to abide by these standards. You and the members of your organization should be aware that the following behaviors violate these rules: Engaging in harassment or discrimination against another student or University employee; Damaging, defacing, destroying, altering, or taking UT property without authorization of the University; Impeding or interfering with an authorized University function including teaching, research, or disciplinary; Endangering the health or safety of another student or University employee; Failing to identify oneself/providing false information to an institutional representative; Unauthorized entry into university buildings or fountains; and Engaging in conduct that violates federal; state; and or local laws such as theft, hazing, DWI, or underage drinking. While the above list is not exhaustive, additional information about inappropriate conduct is discussed in other modules of the HB 2639 Risk Management Education Program online training series. In addition, you can obtain a copy of the Institutional Rules on Students Services and Activities by visiting http://registrar.utexas.edu/catalogs/index.html or contacting the Student Organization Center (SOC) at 512-471-3065.
  • Not every event is a party or happy hour. Many UT student organizations are engaged in academic or professional endeavors such as conferences, corporate recruiting fairs, and professional association meetings. It is just as important during these professional events to address risk, set expectations, and represent the organization well. Tips for etiquette at professional events include: Show up on time, do not leave early! Do not use laptops or cell phones Ask appropriate questions Dress appropriately Let each person have a chance to speak Eat and drink in moderation Do not monopolize people’s time – know what the purpose of the event is and come prepared
  • It is important as leaders of a student organization to set expectations for members about their behavior at events and activities. Any inappropriate behavior at your event is a reflection on you as a leader and on your organization. It is important to reinforce these expectations throughout the year whether during a membership drive, new member/pledge education processes, trip orientation meeting, event dry-run, etc. If a member of your organization or a guest is behaving inappropriately at a party or other event, it is important to address the situation right away. Find ways to address the inappropriate behavior in a private and discrete manner that causes the least amount of disruption of the event. When you are addressing the behavior, it is also important to do it in a manner where the situation will not escalate or get worse. Go STRAIGHT TO THE SOURCE: Address the issue directly with the person/s who are acting inappropriately. Remember that IT’S ABOUT THE BEHAVIOR AND NOT THE PERSON. Involve your advisor and/or other sponsors (if present). An advisor and/or sponsor serves as a neutral party that can help mediate a situation and prevent it from escalating. Explain clearly the behavior that is inappropriate and why. If you feel like the situation is becoming dangerous or uncontrollable, seek assistance if needed (e.g. UT or Austin Police, etc).
  • Section 4: The Importance of a Crisis Management Plan In this section we will discuss the importance of having a crisis management plan for an event in case of emergency. Remember as a student leader and officer of your organization, you are primarily responsible for ensuring everyone’s safety. The most important steps you can take in an emergency are recognize the emergency, call 911 for help, render assistance to organization members, and then access the appropriate university resources.
  • In a crisis, the steps you and other leaders of your organization take are essential in resolving the incident and ensuring everyone’s safety. Make sure to designate an officer who will be in charge in the event of a crisis (e.g., President, Chair, or Social Chairperson). During the crisis, all of the officers should get together to discuss next steps and how to handle the crisis. Assess the situation and decide on short-term and long-term steps to resolve the crisis. Both during and after the emergency make sure to contact key people or offices as needed (e.g., EMS, Student Emergency Services, organization advisor, your national office if applicable).
  • If an emergency situation occurs at your event, follow the steps as appropriate to the situation: 1. Stop immediately and call 911 or local police 2. Assess the situation and render aid as appropriate 3. Fill out a police report 4. Obtain the names and addresses of all witnesses 5. Contact your advisor 6. Avoid making statements as to who is at fault, nor should you make offers to pay for damages 7. Contact one of the following areas in the Office of the Dean of Students: Student Emergency Services: 512-471-5017 Student Activities and Leadership Development: 512-471-3065
  • If a member of your organization or participant is injured at your organization event, it is important to take the following steps: Call 911 and obtain medical attention Render aid as appropriate. Contact your advisor Contact one of the following areas in the Office of the Dean of Students: Student Emergency Services: 512-471-5017 Student Activities and Leadership Development: 512-471-3065
  • Section 5: Conclusion and Review This section will summarize key points in preparation for the end-of-module quiz.
  • In review, when planning an event your organization should consider taking the following planning tips: Choose events that reflect the values and beliefs of your organization and members. Invite people and groups you know. Appoint or designate “event monitors” to handle emergencies and other event details. Appoint “designated drivers” if hosting an event where alcohol will be served. Confront inappropriate behavior quickly and firmly. Be sure to have a emergency/crisis management plan in place and review it with all of your member prior to the event. Remember that the type of events you host are a reflection of your organization’s values.
  • Planning an event requires a lot of planning, work and thought. Event planning can help to build and enhance your leadership skills. Events are a reflection on not just you but your entire organization. Your social events have the potential to benefit all members of your organization.
  • This module is just one of many educational programs available at The University of Texas at Austin to help you and your student organization manage the potential risks associated with student organization events. If you have questions about planning student organization events, you should contact your sponsoring department/college or one of the following areas in the Office of the Dean of Students: Student Activities and Leadership Development (SALD) at 512-471-3065 or http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sald/; Greek Life and Intercultural Education (GLIE) at 512-471-9700 or http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/glie/; OR Program Safety Education Services (PSES) at 512-471-5017 or http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/pses/.
  • We recommend that you discuss ways to manage the risks associated with holding events with your organization’s risk management officer and other officers, faculty/staff advisor, and alumni members. You can also contact the Program Safety Education Services area in the Office of the Dean of Students with your risk management or safety concerns. Our website is deanofstudents.utexas.edu/pses/. Our phone number is 512-471-5017 and our e-mail address is SafetyEducation@austin.utexas.edu.
  • We would like to extend a special thanks to the student, faculty, and staff members of the HB 2639 Risk Management Education Program Planning Committee: Adrienne Mackenzie, Office of the Dean of Students (SALD) Bobby Jenkins, U T Student Organization Safety Board Chad McKenzie, Division of Recreational Sports Christa Lopez, Office of the Dean of Students (SES) David Cronk, Office of Campus Safety and Security Diane Ginsburg, College of Pharmacy Erik Malmberg, Office of the Dean of Students (PSES) Heather Davies, Counseling and Mental Health Center Kathy Chung, Office of the Dean of Students (PSES) Kevin Prince, University Health Services Linda Álvarez Alcántara, Office of the Dean of Students (SJS) Marilyn Russell, Office of the Dean of Students (GLIE) Manuel Gonzalez, Office of the Dean of Students (PSES)
  • This concludes our presentation on behavior at parties and other events. Following are ten questions to review your knowledge of the information presented in the module. You must answer 8 of the 10 questions correctly to receive credit for completing this module. Just click the “Go To Review” button when you are ready.

Transcript

  • 1. Behavior at Parties and Other Events Online Training Module HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Program Safety Education Services ∙ Office of the Dean of Students ∙ Division of Student Affairs ∙ The University of Texas at Austin
  • 2. Learning Objectives
    • Identify factors to consider when planning safe and effective events
    • Discuss risks associated with alcohol at parties and other events
    • Discuss the importance of a crisis management plan for events
    • Review the laws, University policies and procedures associated with student organization events held on and off campus
    • Identify resources available to assist you and your student organization with event planning
  • 3. Behavior at Parties and Other Events Online Training Module SECTION 1: CHOOSING AND PLANNING SUCCESSFUL EVENTS
  • 4. Examples of Organization Events
    • Parties
    • Social Mixers
    • Philanthropy related Events
    • Talent Show/Entertainment Events
    • Sports related Tournaments
    • Professional Social Gatherings
    • Panels and workshops
    • Conferences
  • 5. Factors to consider
    • What is the purpose of the event? How will this event reflect the values of your organization?
    • Who are you inviting?
    • When is the event going to take place?
    • Where is the event going to take place (on- or off-campus)?
    • Who is organizing the event? Who is in charge of the event?
    • Will alcohol be served at the event? If yes, who will be serving it?
    • How much will the event cost? Do you have a budget in place? Will you be signing contracts?
    • Do you have an emergency or crisis plan in place?
  • 6. Theme Parties
    • Why this theme?
    • Is it about a living culture?
    • Is it about a current subculture?
    • Have you consulted either people from that community or with recognized “experts” (community leaders or faculty) about the theme?
    • Are the people whose culture is being represented adequately empowered in society?
    • Think and talk about what you are planning to do!
  • 7. Factors to consider before planning a “Date” or “Slave” Auction
    • Involves “bidding” on a human being
    • The process devalues a human being
    • This country’s real and tragic history
    • Safety concerns
    • For ALL of these reasons, we encourage student organizations to engage in more imaginative and feasible alternatives to these activities.
  • 8. Managing Risk: Understanding University Policies
    • Are you familiar with all the university rules and policies regarding events?
      • Review the Registered Student Organization Manual and Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities
      • Use the Event Planning and Reservation Form available at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sald/downloads/EventPlanningForm07.pdf
    • Will and university rules or policies being violated by this event?
      • Contact the Student Organization Center (SOC) at 512-471-3065
      • Talk with other officers and/or your organization’s advisor
  • 9. Liability: Federal and State Laws
    • How will you ensure that members of the organization will not violate the law (e.g., underage drinking, driving while intoxicated, not wearing a seatbelt)?
    • What are some potential legal issues that might emerge from your event and how can you prevent this?
    • Will you or your organization be liable for any damages? (property damage, breaching terms of a contract, accidents, etc.)
    • Are you aware of the types of liabilities? (e.g. negligence, foreseeability, premise liability, contracts)
    • How can you reduce these liability issues?
  • 10. Behavior at Parties and Other Events Online Training Module SECTION 2: TIPS FOR SUCCESSFUL EVENTS
  • 11. Tips for Alcohol at Events
    • Only invite people you know
    • Do not serve alcohol to anyone under 21
    • Consider providing safer and alternative ways of transportation (designated drivers, cabs, shuttle service)
    • If you will be providing alcohol make sure the facility is authorized to serve alcohol
    • Will people be attending any “pre-parties” before coming to your event? If yes, have a risk management plan to address this.
    • Use a third party vendor or wristbands to manage alcohol
  • 12. The Event Planner(s)
    • Student organization events can be quite complex to manage (budgets, schedules, seating arrangements, training for volunteers, etc.).
    • Select an officer, other organization member, or committee/team to take the lead (i.e., the event planners).
    • Qualities of good event planners (or event planning teams) include:
      • experience within the organization;
      • excellent organizational, communication and time management skills;
      • ability to handle stressful, fast-paced situations; and
      • passion and a strategic vision.
  • 13. A Risk Management Officer
    • A member of your executive team – may be a new officer position that you create or it may be a responsibility added to an existing officer position.
    • Serves as the point of contact for your organization on risk management issues, but does NOT need to be a risk management “expert”.
    • This officer must be an active member of your executive team with the recognition and authority over risk management issues for your organization.
  • 14. Behavior at Parties and Other Events Online Training Module SECTION 3: APPROPRIATE BEHAVIOR FOR ORGANIZATION EVENTS
  • 15. University Code of Conduct
    • Engages in harassment or discrimination against another student or University employee
    • Damages, defaces, destroys, alters, or takes UT property without authorization of the University
    • Impedes or interferes with an authorized University function (e.g., teaching, research, or disciplinary)
    • Endangers the health or safety of another student or University employee
    • Failure to identify oneself/provides false information to an institutional representative
    • Unauthorized entry into university buildings or fountains
    • Engages in conduct that violates federal; state; and or local laws (e.g., theft, hazing, DWI, underage drinking)
  • 16. Tips for Etiquette at Professional Events
    • Show up on time, do not leave early!
    • Do not use laptops or cell phones
    • Ask appropriate questions
    • Dress appropriately
    • Let each person have a chance to speak
    • Eat and drink in moderation
    • Do not monopolize people’s time – know what the purpose of the event is and come prepared
  • 17. Addressing Inappropriate Behavior
    • Any inappropriate behavior at your event is a reflection on your as a leader and on your organization.
    • Find ways to address the inappropriate behavior in a private and discrete manner that causes the least amount of disruption of the event.
    • Address the behavior in a manner where the situation will not escalate or get worse.
    • Go STRAIGHT TO THE SOURCE: Address the issue directly with the person/s who are acting inappropriately.
    • Remember IT’S ABOUT THE BEHAVIOR AND NOT THE PERSON: Explain clearly the behavior that is inappropriate and why.
    • Involve your advisor and/or other sponsors (if present)
    • Seek assistance if needed (e.g. UT or Austin Police, etc).
  • 18. Behavior at Parties and Other Events Online Training Module SECTION 4: THE IMPORTANCE OF A CRISIS MANAGEMENT PLAN
  • 19. Tips for Handling a Crisis
    • Always know who is in charge in the event of a crisis (e.g., President, Social Chairperson etc).
    • Get all of the officers together to discuss next steps and how to handle the crisis.
    • Assess the situation and decide on short-term and long-term steps to resolve the crisis.
    • Contact key people/offices as needed (e.g., EMS, Student Emergency Services, organization advisor, or national office) .
  • 20. General Emergency Procedures
    • If an emergency situation occurs at your event:
    • Stop immediately and call 911 or local police
    • Assess the situation and render aid as appropriate
    • Fill out a police report
    • Obtain the names and addresses of all witnesses
    • Contact your advisor
    • Avoid making statements as to who is at fault, nor should you make offers to pay for damages
    • Contact one of the following areas in the Office of the Dean of Students:
      • Student Emergency Services: 512-471-5017
      • Student Activities and Leadership Development: 512-471-3065
  • 21. General Emergency Procedures
    • If someone is injured at your event:
    • Call 911 immediately and obtain medical attention
    • Render aid as appropriate
    • Contact your advisor
    • Contact one of the following areas in the Office of the Dean of Students:
      • Student Emergency Services: 512-471-5017
      • Student Activities and Leadership Development: 512-471-3065
  • 22. Behavior at Parties and Other Events Online Training Module SECTION 5: CONCLUSION AND REVIEW
  • 23. Planning Tips to Remember
    • When planning an event make sure to:
    • Choose events that reflect the values and beliefs of your organization and members
    • Invite people and groups you know
    • Appoint or designate “event monitors” to handle emergencies and other details
    • Appoint “designated drivers” if hosting an event where alcohol will be served
    • Confront inappropriate behavior quickly and firmly
    • Be sure to have a emergency/crisis management plan in place and review it with all of your members prior to the event
    • Remember that the type of events you host are a reflection of your organization’s values
  • 24. Conclusion
    • Planning an event requires a lot of planning, work and thought.
    • Event planning can help to build and enhance your leadership skills.
    • Events are a reflection on not just you but your entire organization.
    • Your social events have the potential to benefit all members of your organization.
  • 25. University Resources for Event Planning
    • Student Activities and Leadership Development (SALD)
        • http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sald/
        • (512) 471-3065
    • Greek Life and Intercultural Education (GLIE)
        • http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/glie/
        • (512) 471- 9700
    • Program Safety Education Services (PSES)
        • http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/pses/
        • (512) 471-5017
    • Your Organization’s Sponsoring Department (if applicable)
  • 26. Additional Questions
    • Discuss with your organization’s leadership
      • Faculty/staff advisor
      • Risk Management Officer (or other officer)
      • Alumni members/organization
    • Contact Program Safety Education Services (PSES) in the Office of the Dean of Students
      • Phone: 512-471-5017
      • Email: [email_address]
      • Web site: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/pses/
  • 27. HB 2639 Risk Management Education Program
    • A special thanks to the student, faculty, and staff members of the planning committee:
    • Adrienne Mackenzie, Office of the Dean of Students (SALD)
    • Bobby Jenkins, U T Student Organization Safety Board
    • Chad McKenzie, Division of Recreational Sports
    • Christa Lopez, Office of the Dean of Students (SES)
    • David Cronk, Office of Campus Safety and Security
    • Diane Ginsburg, College of Pharmacy
    • Erik Malmberg, Office of the Dean of Students (PSES)
    • Heather Davies, Counseling and Mental Health Center
    • Kathy Chung, Office of the Dean of Students (PSES)
    • Kevin Prince, University Health Services
    • Linda Álvarez Alcántara, Office of the Dean of Students (SJS)
    • Marilyn Russell, Office of the Dean of Students (GLIE)
    • Manuel Gonzalez, Office of the Dean of Students (PSES)
  • 28. Review Your Knowledge
    • This concludes our presentation on behavior at social events.
    • Following are ten questions to review your knowledge of the information presented in the module.
    • You must answer 8 of the 10 questions correctly to receive credit for completing this module.
    • Just click the “Go To Review” button.