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2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon
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2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference - Nixon

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Transcript

  • 1. 2009 Oklahoma Gas Association Conference
  • 2.
    • Pipeline Emergency Management
    • - Crisis Planning
    • - Incident Command System
    • Crisis Communications – Dealing with the News Media
    • Conducting Mock Emergency Exercises – Testing Your Plan
  • 3. What is a Crisis? Webster’s : “a time of great danger or trouble, whose outcome decides whether possible bad consequences will follow” Types of Crises:
    • Pipeline incidents
    • Fires
    • Natural Disasters
    • Accidents
    • Intentional Acts
    • Financial Issues
    • Loss of Key Leaders
    • Reduction/Loss of Supply
    Crises management and emergency preparedness start with an all hazards plan.
  • 4. Crisis Plan Regulatory Implications
    • §49 CFR 192.605 Procedural manual for operations, maintenance, and emergencies (PHMSA)
    • §49 CFR 192.615 Emergency Plans (PHMSA)
    • §29 CFR 1910.38 Emergency Plans (OSHA)
    • §29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations & Emergency Response (OSHA)
    • National Incident Management System (DHS) – required for governmental entities
    Besides, it just makes good business sense!
  • 5. Identify & Analyze Exposures Establish Emergency Management Structure Develop Emergency Management Plan Train & Exercise the Plan Review Results and Implement Improvements Stages of Crisis Management Program Developmen t This is a continuous improvement cycle!
  • 6. Crisis Management Plan Operations Managemen t Support Functions – Comm, HR, Legal, Safety, etc. Engage all of the participants in the plan’s development!
  • 7. Crisis Management Plans
    • Thicker isn’t always better
    • Comprehensive, Concise, and User Friendly
    • Ensure plans are maintained and current
    • Does everyone understand their roles?
    • Does the Plan incorporate an organized structure – Incident Command System
    • Periodically review the plan. Are contact lists current? Have exposures changed?
    • Are employees trained on the Plan?
    • Do you exercise the Plan?
  • 8. Incident Command System
    • Developed in the 1970’s in California during several major wildfires
    • Developed in response to identified shortcomings:
      • Non-standard terminology
      • Too many people reporting to one supervisor
      • Lack of ability to expand and contract
      • Non standard/non-integrated communications
      • Lack of consolidated action plans
      • Lack of designated facilities
    • ICS is the foundation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) developed in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.
  • 9. Why Use ICS?
    • ICS Myths…
    • ICS takes too many people. Just look at how complicated an ICS organizational chart is!
    • ICS is just for large incidents. It’s too cumbersome for small, routine incidents.
    • ICS is just for fire departments.
    Use ICS to effectively manage an incident. ICS is a management system…not just an organizational chart. ICS will enhance accountability and bring order to an otherwise chaotic event.
  • 10. OSHA HAZWOPER Regulations 1910.120(q)(3) Procedures for handling emergency response: “ The senior emergency response official responding to an emergency shall become the individual in charge of a site-specific Incident Command System (ICS). All emergency responders and their communications shall be coordinated and controlled through the individual in charge of the ICS assisted by the senior official present for each employer.”
  • 11. NIMS & ICS
    • Homeland Security Presidential Directive -5, Management of Domestic Incidents:
    • Issued by the President on February 28, 2003
    • Directs the Secretary of Homeland Security to develop and administer the National Incident Management System (NIMS)
    • Requires all Federal departments and agencies to:
    • - Adopt NIMS
    • - Use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities.
    • Makes NIMS compliance a condition of Federal grant assistance.
    • ICS is a core component and interim compliance step.
  • 12. ICS Organization Five Major Components : Command, Operations, Planning, Logistics, & Finance/Administration
  • 13. Incident Commander
    • All incidents, regardless of size will have an incident commander.
    • First on the scene is typically the IC until relieved by a higher authority
    • On most incidents, the command activity is carried out by a single IC
    • Establishes Incident Command Post (ICP)
    • The IC has three major priorities:
    • Life Safety
    • Incident Stabilization
    • Property Conservation
  • 14. Command & Leadership
    • It’s all about Leadership:
    • Don’t be afraid to leave the “comfort zone” of performing tactical operations when asked to perform a leadership role.
    • Take charge within the confines of your scope of authority.
    • Focus on the priorities: Life Safety, Incident Stabilization, Property Conservation
    • Remember that this is a team effort.
  • 15. Command Staff Command Staff positions may be established to assign/delegate command activities that the IC cannot perform due to the complexity of the incident Safety Officer – monitors all scene safety; has authority to stop operations based on safety concern. Public Information Officer – Handles media inquires, prepares statements, establishes media area Liaison Officer – On-scene contact for other agencies Commander Safety Officer (SO) Public Information Officer (PIO) Liaison Officer (LO)
  • 16. General Staff Operations Section – responsible for managing on-scene tactical operations. Executes Incident Action Plan Planning Section – responsible for collecting, evaluating and disseminating information. Prepares Incident Action Plan Logistics Section – meets all support needs for the incident Finance/Administration Section – tracks expenditures Command Operations Planning Logistics Finance/ Administration
  • 17. ICS Span of Control
    • Span of Control – supervise no more than 3 to 7 resources with five to one being optimum
    • As resources increase, so does the organizational structure
  • 18. Designated Facilities – Command Post Command Post (CP)- the location from which the incident operations are directed. There is only one Command Post per incident. If a Unified Command structure where several agencies are involved, the responsible individuals designated by their respective agencies will be co-located at the Command Post. The Planning Function is also performed at the Command Post. How would you identify the Command Post?
  • 19. Designated Facilities – Staging Area Staging Area- the temporary location in proximity to an incident where people and equipment are kept while awaiting tactical assignment. Staging areas must be located out of line of direct hazards and should be large enough to accommodate resources.
  • 20. Operations Section
    • Operations can be organized and executed in many ways depending on the type of incident, agencies involved, and objectives and strategies of the incident management process.
    • Branches are usually required due to:
    • Span of Control
    • Need for a Functional Branch Structure
    • Multi-jurisdictional Incidents
    • Divisions are established to divide an incident geographically or by jurisdictional boundaries.
    • Groups are established to describe functional areas of operation.
    Operations Section Branches (up to 5) Divisions or Groups (up to 25 ) Strike Team Task Force Single Resource
  • 21. Planning Section
    • The Planning Section is responsible for collecting, evaluating, and disseminating information
    • The Planning Section prepares Incident Action Plans
    • The Planning Section can have up to four primary units and may include technical specialists.
    Planning Section Resources Unit Situation Unit Demobilization Unit Documentation Unit Technical Specialist(s)
  • 22. Logistics Section
    • The Logistics Section meets all of the support needs for the incident.
    • These resources include facilities, transportation, supplies, equipment maintenance and fueling, food, and medical services
    • Staging is managed by the Logistics Section
    When the incident is very large, the Logistics Section can be divided into two branches: Service and Support Logistics Section Supply Unit Ground Support Unit Facilities Unit Food Unit Communications Unit Medical Unit
  • 23. Finance & Administration Section
    • When there is a need for financial reimbursement and/or administrative services, a Finance/Administration Section is established.
    • The Section Chief must track and report incident costs to the IC.
    • In some cases, only one specific function, such as cost analysis may be needed and can be assigned in the Planning Section.
    Finance/ Administration Section Compensation/ Claims Unit Procurement Unit Cost Unit Time Unit
  • 24. Incident Commander Safety Officer Public Information Officer Liaison Officer Operations Section Planning Section Logistics Section Finance/Admin Section Branches Divisions or Groups Strike Team Task Force Single Resource Resource Unit Situation Unit Demobilization Unit Documentation Unit Technical Specialists Supply Unit Ground Support Unit Facilities Unit Food Unit Comm. Unit Medical Unit Time Unit Procurement Unit Comp./Claims Unit Cost Unit
  • 25. ICS Key Points
    • ICS is a modular concept – resources are organized into Sections. Branches, Groups, Divisions, Units or Teams when the span of control exceeds seven.
    • ICS organizations should only reflect what is required to meet tactical objectives.
    • ICS is adaptable to any type of incident regardless of complexity.
    • Public and private sector responders can operate jointly within an ICS structure.
  • 26. Unity of Command vs. Unified Command
    • Unity of Command
    • Usually implemented when only one jurisdiction is involved in the incident
    • Each person within an organization reports to only one designated individual
    • Unified Command
    • Individuals designated by their jurisdictions jointly determine objectives, strategies and priorities
    • Usually implemented when the incident is multi-jurisdictional in nature
  • 27. Incident Objectives
    • Set by Incident Commander
    • Examples:
    • Identify safety and risk management issues
    • Conduct Search and Rescue
    • Commence Firefighting operations
    • Account for and provide temporary shelter for displaced victims
    • Provide protection for environmentally sensitive areas
  • 28. Incident Action Plan
    • Every incident, large or small must have an IAP
    • May be oral or written – EXCEPT for HAZMAT which must be written.
    • For small incidents, the IAP is developed by the Incident Commander and passed on verbally to subordinates and assigned resources.
    • On large incidents, the Planning Section develops the IAP.
    • The IAP addresses:
    • - What must be done
    • - Who is responsible
    • - How information will be communicated
    • - What should be done if someone is injured
  • 29. Responders to an Incident
    • Fire Service
    • Law Enforcement
    • Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
    • Hazardous Materials Response Teams (HAZMAT)
    • Emergency Management
    • CERT (Community Emergency Response Teams)
    • Private entities – Utilities, Locate services, contractors etc.
    • Media
    • The Public
  • 30. Common Objectives
    • Life Safety
    • Protect the public, responders, employees
    • Incident Stabilization
    • Get it under control and resolved
    • Property Conservation
    • Minimize further property damage/loss
  • 31. Who’s in Charge?
    • Local, State, and Federal Regulations
    • Emergency Management vs. Law Enforcement vs. Fire Service
    • Many states have statutes that address jurisdiction during emergency response.
    • Some statutes address interference with emergency officials at the scene of an incident.
  • 32. Coordination is Paramount for a Successful Outcome
    • A MUST for safety!
    • All participants need to understand the game plan. (Strategy, Objectives & Tactics – the Incident Action Plan)
    • Keep the Incident Commander informed and updated
    • Explain company procedures
    • Communicate!
  • 33. Size-Up
    • Size-up begins when the call comes in.
    • The initial responder on the scene assumes command and determines:
    • - The nature and scope of the incident
    • - Hazards and safety concerns
    • - Injuries
    • - What assets are involved
    • - Isolation and evacuation issues
    • - Security issues
    • Size-up information is provided to other responders
  • 34. You have arrived at the scene of the incident depicted on the next slide. Quickly perform a size-up and relay your observations…
  • 35.  
  • 36. Emergency Responder Considerations
    • Lack of familiarity with product & systems
    • Response to a wide variety of emergencies
    • “ Put the wet stuff on the red stuff”
    • Lack of detection/monitoring equipment
    • Industry lack of familiarity with responder procedures & resources
    • Tunnel Vision
  • 37. Response Considerations
    • Weather (wind & direction, heat/cold, precipitation, severe weather)
    • Terrain
    • Fire/No fire
    • Size of Release
    • Gas Migration
    • Exposures
    • Population
    • Rescue/Evacuation
    • Service Interruption considerations
    • Manpower
    • Security
    • Ignition sources
    • Airspace closure
    • ????
  • 38. Crisis Communications – Dealing with the News Media
  • 39. Crisis Communications
      • A crisis will attract media and public attention
      • If you don’t tell your story, others will
      • In today’s environment of instantaneous communications, companies need to be prepared to respond quickly and proactively to media inquiries.
  • 40. Crisis Communications
    • Remember to focus on what you are doing about the crisis-not the details of the crisis ( size of flames, amount of product loss, etc.)
    • Focus on key points and re-emphasize them whenever possible: “we have activated our crisis response plan and we are working closely with the local emergency responders”
    • Consider providing media “hand-off” training to key field supervisors. Help the designated company spokesperson to establish a positive and proactive response to the crisis
  • 41. Crisis Communications Tips
    • “ No comment” or “off the record” simply doesn’t work
    • Don’t allow reporters or sightseers to wander around unescorted-establish a public information/media area
    • Don’t estimate damages or place blame
    • Don’t be afraid to say you don’t know
    • Do speak in non-technical, no jargon, understandable language
    • Emphasize your key points
    • Train, practice, and exercise!
  • 42. Crisis Communications Now let’s see how it to put this in practice… “ Building a Foundation”
  • 43. Mock Emergency Exercises
  • 44. Mock Emergency Exercises
    • Table tops versus full field mock emergency drills
    • Exercise the Crisis Management Plan
    • In addition to the operational response, evaluate the “outside looking in” exposures
    • Develop realistic scenarios- don’t be afraid of “Achilles' heels
    • Establish a system for managing and sharing crisis response information
    • Identify areas of improvement and revise procedures and the Crisis Management Plan accordingly
  • 45. Exercise Guidelines
    • Here’s a sample…
    • All safety measures and precautions will be observed
    • All communications (telephone calls, emails, faxes and radio communications will stress that the event is a simulated crisis exercise at both the start and end of the communication
    • Emergency response actions will be performed up to the point of, but not including, the physical action of any system or process shutdown. Do not open or close valves
  • 46. What Would You Do?
    • A delivery truck backs into a meter set behind a large retail outlet store in a large shopping complex
    • Shoppers and store employees begin smelling gas inside
    • Fire Department and Law Enforcement personnel arrive on the scene and establish a Command Post
    • They are requesting gas company technical assistance
    • A large elementary school is located across the street from the shopping complex
    • School officials express concern over the leaking gas and some parents are requesting to pick up their children
  • 47. Nixon & Associates Nixon & Associates is a Leesburg, Virginia based communications and emergency management consulting firm with offices in Houston, Texas, and Columbia, South Carolina. Our client base consists of primarily energy companies. Our services include:
    • Crisis Consultation/Media Training
    • Incident Command System Training
    • Mock Emergency Drills
    • Emergency information software solution
    • Issues Management
    • Pipeline Public Awareness/RP 1162 Consultation
    • Pipeline Construction Public Relations
    • Skills Performance Evaluator Training in Conjunction with the Southern Gas Association
  • 48. Glen Boatwright Vice President Nixon & Associates 803-360-9890 [email_address] Questions?

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