This resource by the English Department, STP was found free at http://www.english-teaching.co.ukCopyright  2000 FRET – Fr...
This resource by the English Department, STP was found free at http://www.english-teaching.co.ukCopyright  2000 FRET – Fr...
This resource by the English Department, STP was found free at http://www.english-teaching.co.ukCopyright  2000 FRET – Fr...
This resource by the English Department, STP was found free at http://www.english-teaching.co.ukCopyright  2000 FRET – Fr...
This resource by the English Department, STP was found free at http://www.english-teaching.co.ukCopyright  2000 FRET – Fr...
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  1. 1. This resource by the English Department, STP was found free at http://www.english-teaching.co.ukCopyright  2000 FRET – Free Resources for English Teaching. All rights reserved.1Aims of the lesson: To learn about figures of speech.By the end of the lesson you should know about:SIMILESMETAPHORSA simile is a figure of speech where X is compared to Y, using the words ASor LIKE.For example: "He was as cold as ice.""My luve’s like a red, red rose."A metaphor is a figure of speech where X is compared to Y, and where X issaid to be Y. A metaphor says that X is Y.For example: "It is raining cats and dogs.""My bedroom is a tip."“Juliet is the sun.”Helpful Hint 1.‘ARE’ is the plural form of the verb ‘IS’.For example: The girl is going. / The girls are going.Helpful Hint 2.One use of an apostrophe (’) is to show that letters are missing.For example: The boy’s here = The boy is here.Authors use metaphors and similes to create IMAGES and PICTURES in ourmind. These images are meant to suggest and hint at MEANING.
  2. 2. This resource by the English Department, STP was found free at http://www.english-teaching.co.ukCopyright  2000 FRET – Free Resources for English Teaching. All rights reserved.2Identify whether the following are similes or metaphors. Beware,there are some trick ones in there!1. "Juliet is the sun." (Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet.)2. Tracy felt as sick as a parrot.3. "...the perfect sky is torn." (Natalie Imbruglia, "Torn")4. The traffic is murder.5. Tom is as deaf as a post.6. "Life’s but a walking shadow." (Shakespeare, Macbeth.)7. She ran like the wind.8. I’m as light as a feather.9. "The sun’s a thief." (Shakespeare, Timon of Athens.)10. Kitty is the apple of her mother’s eye.11. "Death lies upon her like an untimely frost." (Shakespeare, Romeo andJuliet.)12. Her eyes are as blue as the ocean..13. "There’s more life in a tramp’s vest." (Stereophonics, "more life in atramp’s vest.")14. Tom is silly.15. "Everyday is a winding road…" (Sheryl Crow, "Everyday is a windingroad.")16. My eyes are blue.17. "England … is a fen of stagnant waters." (Wordsworth.)18. "Their smiles, wan as primroses." (Keats.)19. The cucumber is cool.20.Your beauty shines like the sun.21. "Love is blind, as far as the eye can see." (The Spice Girls, "TooMuch.")22. She looked as pretty as a picture.23. James was as cool as a cucumber.24. His feet are as black as coal.25. It’s been a hard day’s night / And I’ve been working like a dog."(Lennon and McCartney.)In groups, identify the similes and metaphors in the following poems.Illustrate your poems (using drawings, pictures or clipart) in a storyboard.Support each of the illustrations with quotations.
  3. 3. This resource by the English Department, STP was found free at http://www.english-teaching.co.ukCopyright  2000 FRET – Free Resources for English Teaching. All rights reserved.3A BirthdayMy heart is like a singing birdWhose nest is in a watered shoot;My heart is like an apple treeWhose boughs are bent with thickest fruit;My heart is like a rainbow shellThat paddles in a halcyon sea;My heart is gladder than all theseBecause my love is come to me.Raise me a dais of silk and down;Hang it with vair and purple dyes;Carve it in doves and pomegranatesAnd peacocks with a hundred eyes;Work it in gold and silver grapes,In leaves and silver fleur-de-lys;Because the birthday of my lifeIs come, my love is come to me.CHRISTINA G. ROSSETTI 1830-1894
  4. 4. This resource by the English Department, STP was found free at http://www.english-teaching.co.ukCopyright  2000 FRET – Free Resources for English Teaching. All rights reserved.4You’reClownlike, happiest on your hands,Feet to the stars, and moon-skulled,Gilled like a fish. A Common-senseThumbs-down on the dodo’s mode.Wrapped up in yourself like a spool,Trawling your dark as owls do.Mute as a turnip from the FourthOf July to All Fool’s Day,O high-riser, my little loaf.Vague as fog and looked for like mail.Farther off than Australia.Bent-backed Atlas, our travelled prawn.Snug as a bud and at homeLike a sprat in a pickle jug.A creel of eels, all ripples.Jumpy as a Mexican bean.Right, like a well-done sum.A clean slate, with your own face on.SYLVIA PLATH (1932-1963)
  5. 5. This resource by the English Department, STP was found free at http://www.english-teaching.co.ukCopyright  2000 FRET – Free Resources for English Teaching. All rights reserved.5POETRY READING - FORMATResponse to A Birthday by Christina Rossetti or Youre byMargaret Atwood. (or any other poem for that matter)In groups, decide (or let your teacher decide) who will be the poet. Allother group members are to be the audience / questioners.Now, compile a list of questions and answers. The poet andaudience must share responsibility for this. You might want to askabout:• the title,• the form and structure,• rhyme and rhythm,• use of language,• imagery,• why it was written,• ideas (themes) and messages,• who was it written for, etc.Don’t ask closed questions. (A closed question is one that will give a‘Yes’ or No answer.) Read through your ideas, deciding who will askwhat and when. Make any necessary changes to the running order andtry a final trial run through - without reading.! The poet will introduce her/himself. (This should be brief,informative and relevant! It may be wise to undertake somebrief background research.)! The poet will introduce the poem. ‘I’d like to read you my poem,"A Birthday". It is a poem about …’! After the reading, the poet should invite the audience to askquestions regarding her/his work.! The audience will do so!If possible, try to tape or video the readings. I can assure you,they will make very enjoyable viewing (or listening.) You mayeven find yourselves in possession of some Youve Been Framedfootage!

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