The Holy Tridentine Mass

3,434 views

Published on

ROMAN CATHOLIC DAILY 1962 MISSAL (ANGELUS PRESS); DOUAY-RHIEMS BIBLE (BARONIUS PRESS); THE ESV STUDY BIBLE (CROSSWAY) & THE VATICAN. ADDENDUM: POST-VATICAN II MASS; DEVOTIONS FOR CONFESSION; THANKSGIVING FOR SMALL CHILDREN; SUMMARY OF THE CATHOLIC DOCTRINE; TREASURE OF PRAYERS; THE RULE OF SAINT BENEDICT; FOLLOW THE WORDS OF THE LATIN MASS & ALTAR CARDS; ABRAHAM AND HIS DECENDANTS; THE BIBLE’S HISTORICAL TIMELINE · SUMMARY OF THE OLD TESTAMENT; THE TABERNACLE; THE TABERNACLE TENT; THE GARMENTS OF THE HIGH PRIEST – KOHEN GADOL; JERUSALEM IN THE TIME OF DAVID; JERUSALEM IN THE TIME OF SOLOMON; SOLOMON’S TEMPLE; JERUSALEM IN THE TIME OF HEZEKIAH; JERUBBABEL’S TEMPLE; JERUSALEM IN THE TIME OF NEHEMIAH; JERUSALEM IN THE TIME OF JESUS; THE TEMPLE MOUNT; THE TEMPLE COMPLEX; THE JERUSALEM TEMPLE; GOLGOTHA; THE APOSTLES’ CREED; THE ATHANASIAN CREED; AN HISTORICAL AND CHRONOLOGICAL INDEX TO THE NEW TESTAMENT; THE ANNUNCIATION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY; THE HOLY FAMILY OF JESUS, MARY AND JOSEPH; THE BAPTISM OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST; THE TRANSFIGURATION OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST; THE HOLY HOUR DEVOTION; THE WAY OF THE CROSS; HOLY WOUNDS DEVOTION; LITANY OF THE MOST HOLY NAME OF JESUS; THE CHAPLET OF THE SEVEN SORROWS OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY; THE HOLY ROSARY; SAINT JOSEPH; OUR LADY OF THE MIRACULOUS MEDAL; OUR LADY OF LA SALETTE; THE LITTLE OFFICE OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION; THE EXALTATION OF THE HOLY CROSS; OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE; THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS; PRAYER TO SAINT MICHAEL THE ARCHANGEL; HYMN TO SAINT MICHAEL AND ANGELICAL CROWN; SALVATION IN THE CATHOLIC FAITH; HYMN – TE DEUM LAUDAMUS; THE STORY OF JESUS CHRIST; PARABLES OF JESUS; MIRACLES OF JESUS; THE MINISTRY OF JESUS; PAUL’S MISSIONARY JOURNEYS; THE SHROUD OF TURIN AND THE HOLY FACE OF JESUS; VARIOUS PRAYERS TO SAINTS; LIST OF POPES; THE LAST JUDGMENT BY MICHELANGELO; THE APOCALYPSE OF PETER; HEAVEN BY BENEDICT XVI; TABLE OF FEASTS & VARIOUS ENGRAVINGS OF FEASTS.

Published in: Spiritual
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,434
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The Holy Tridentine Mass

  1. 1. THE HOLY MASS Roman Catholic Daily Missal 1962 THE LATIN MASS
  2. 2. CHRISTUS EST ET MORI LUCRUM FOR TO ME, MIHI VIVERE PHILIP I·21 TO LIVE IS CHRIST; AND TO DIE IS GAIN. PHIL. I·21 THE HOLY MASS ON THE TRIDENTINE LATIN RITE MASS WITH 100-PAGE ADDENDUM FROM THE ROMAN CATHOLIC DAILY 1962 MISSAL & DOUAY-RHEIMS BIBLE With the words of God in Dark Red, those of Jesus Christ in Bright Red, those of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Blue, and those of Saint Peter in Green.
  3. 3. M.R.TREMBLAY, Editor OTTAWA, A.D. MMXVI All Right Reserved THERE WAS A CERTAIN RICH MAN, WHO WAS CLOTHED IN PURPLE AND FINE LINEN; AND FEASTED SUMPTUOUSLY EVERY DAY. AND THERE WAS A CERTAIN BEGGAR, NAMED LAZARUS, WHO LAY AT HIS GATE, FULL OF SORES, DESIRING TO BE FILLED WITH THE CRUMBS THAT FELL FROM THE RICH MAN’S TABLE, AND NO ONE DID GIVE HIM; MOREOVER THE DOGS CAME, AND LICKED HIS SORES. AND IT CAME TO PASS, THAT THE BEGGAR DIED, AND WAS CARRIED BY THE ANGELS INTO ABRAHAM’S BOSOM. AND THE RICH MAN ALSO DIED: AND HE WAS BURIED IN HELL. AND LIFTING UP HIS EYES WHEN HE WAS IN TORMENTS, HE SAW ABRAHAM AFAR OFF, AND LAZARUS IN HIS BOSOM: AND HE CRIED, AND SAID: FATHER ABRAHAM, HAVE MERCY ON ME, AND SEND LAZARUS, THAT HE MAY DIP THE TIP OF HIS FINGER IN WATER, TO COOL MY TONGUE: FOR I AM TORMENTED IN THIS FLAME. AND ABRAHAM SAID TO HIM: SON, REMEMBER THAT THOU DIDST RECEIVE GOOD THINGS IN THY LIFETIME, AND LIKEWISE LAZARUS EVIL THINGS, BUT NOW HE IS COMFORTED; AND THOU ART TORMENTED. AND BESIDES ALL THIS, BETWEEN US AND YOU, THERE IS FIXED A GREAT CHAOS: SO THAT THEY WHO WOULD PASS FROM HENCE TO YOU, CANNOT, NOR FROM THENCE COME HITHER. AND HE SAID: THEN, FATHER, I BESEECH THEE, THAT THOU WOULDST SEND HIM TO MY FATHER’S HOUSE, FOR I HAVE FIVE BRETHREN, THAT HE MAY TESTIFY UNTO THEM, LEST THEY ALSO COME INTO THIS PLACE OF TORMENTS. AND ABRAHAM SAID TO HIM: THEY HAVE MOSES AND THE PROPHETS; LET THEM HEAR THEM. BUT HE SAID: NO, FATHER ABRAHAM: BUT IF ONE WENT TO THEM FROM THE DEAD, THEY WILL DO PENANCE. AND HE SAID TO HIM: IF THEY HEAR NOT MOSES AND THE PROPHETS, NEITHER WILL THEY BELIEVE, IF ONE RISE AGAIN FROM THE DEAD. (Lk. 16:19-31) XXX
  4. 4. IN · MEMORIAM REMIGIUS IOHANNES IULIUS TREMBLAY A.D. MCMXXVI – MCMXCVIII GEMMA MARTINEAU A.D. MCMXXXIV – MCMLXXVIII SR ALINE TREMBLAY, O.M.R. A.D. MCMXII – MMII FIDELIUM AMINÆ PER MISERICORDIAM DEI REQUIESCANT IN PACE. AMEN.
  5. 5. PSALM · 24 AD TE, DOMINE, IEVAVI. A PRAYER FOR GRACE, MERCY,AND PROTECTION AGAINST OUR ENEMIES. TO THEE, O LORD, HAVE I LIFTED UP MY SOUL. IN THEE, O MY GOD, I PUT MY TRUST; LET ME NOT BE ASHAMED. NEITHER LET MY ENEMIES LAUGH AT ME: FOR NONE OF THEM THAT WAIT ON THEE SHALL BE CONFOUNDED. LET ALL THEM BE CONFOUNDED THAT ACT UNJUST THINGS WITHOUT CAUSE. SHEW, O LORD, THY WAYS TO ME, AND TEACH ME THY PATHS. DIRECT ME IN THY TRUTH, AND TEACH ME; FOR THOU ART GOD MY SAVIOUR;AND ON THEE HAVE I WAITED ALL THE DAY LONG. REMEMBER, O LORD, THY BOWELS OF COMPASSION; AND THY MERCIES THAT ARE FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE WORLD. THE SINS OF MY YOUTH AND MY IGNORANCES DO NOT REMEMBER. ACCORDING TO THY MERCY REMEMBER THOU ME: FOR THY GOODNESS’ SAKE, O LORD. THE LORD IS SWEET AND RIGHTEOUS: THEREFORE HE WILL GIVE A LAW TO SINNERS IN THE WAY. HE WILL GUIDE THE MILD IN JUDGEMENT: HE WILL TEACH THE MEEK HIS WAYS. ALL THE WAYS OF THE LORD ARE MERCY AND TRUTH, TO THEM THAT SEEK AFTER HIS COVENANT AND HIS TESTIMONIES. FOR THY NAME’S SAKE, O LORD, THOU WILT PARDON MY SIN: FOR IT IS GREAT. WHO IS THE MAN THAT FEARETH THE LORD? HE HATH APPOINTED HIM A LAW IN THE WAY HE HATH CHOSEN. HIS SOUL SHALL DWELL IN GOOD THINGS: AND HIS SEED SHALL INHERIT THE LAND. THE LORD IS A FIRMAMENT TO THEM THAT FEAR HIM: AND HIS COVENANT SHALL BE MADE MANIFEST TO THEM. MY EYES ARE EVER TOWARDS THE LORD: FOR HE SHALL PLUCK MY FEET OUT OF THE SNARE. LOOK THOU UPON ME, AND HAVE MERCY ON ME; FOR I AM ALONE AND POOR. THE TROUBLES OF MY HEART ARE MULTIPLIED: DELIVER ME FROM MY NECESSITIES. SEE MY ABJECTION AND MY LABOUR; AND FORGIVE ME ALL MY SINS. CONSIDER MY ENEMIES FOR THEY ARE MULTIPLIED, AND HAVE HATED ME WITH AN UNJUST HATRED. KEEP THOU MY SOUL, AND DELIVER ME: I SHALL NOT BE ASHAMED, FOR I HOPED IN THEE. THE INNOCENT AND THE UPRIGHT HAVE ADHERED TO ME: BECAUSE I HAVE WAITED ON THEE. DELIVER ISRAEL, O GOD, FROM ALL HIS TRIBULATIONS.
  6. 6. THE TRADITIONAL LATIN TRIDENTINE MASS CONTENTS ON THE RESTORATION OF ALL THINGS IN CHRIST E SUPREMI – Encyclical of H.H. Pope St. Pius X ON THE ORDINARY OF THE MASS – H.H. Pope St. Pius X I. INTRODUCTION II. THE HOLY MASS III. THE ALTAR IV. THE INCARNATION V. THE PASSION OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST VI. YOUR MASS AND YOUR LIFE i. MAN’S RETURN ii. THE BREAK IN THE HARMONY OF THE DIVINE PLAN – SIN iii. CHRIST’S INTERVENTION iv. THE INCARNATION v. THE REDEMPTION How may we bring about this return? vi. THE HOLY SACRIFICE OF THE MASS vii. OFFERING CHRIST TO THE FATHER How can such a frail creature as man offer acceptable praise to the Blessed Trinity? Why so many Masses? In what does Christ’s Sacrifice consist? Is the Mass the same as Christ’s Sacrifice on the Cross, or is it a different Sacrifice? Does the Mass differ in any way from the Sacrifice of the Cross? To whom is the Sacrifice of the Mass offered? For whom may Mass be celebrated? Do all members of the Mystical Body have an equal share in the fruits of the Mass? viii. OFFERING MYSELF WITH CHRIST What is the source of our obligation to offer ourselves in the Mass with Christ? What are the three principal parts of the Mass? What is meant by this expression: “The Mass must be lived”? What preparation should Ι bring to my Mass? ix. PURPOSE OF THE HOLY MASS VII. A LONG INTROIT VIII. AT THE COLLECTS IX. AN EXERPT FROM AN EPISTLE OF ST. PAUL X. A GRADUAL XI. A READING FROM THE GOSPEL XII. AN OFFERTORY XIII. A SECRET PRAYER XIV. A COMMUNION VERSE XV. A POST-COMMUNION PRAYER XVI. THE DIVISIONS OF THE MASS I. MASS OF THE CATECHUMENS A) PREPARATORY PRAYERS AT THE FOOT OF THE ALTAR B) FROM THE INTROIT TO THE OFFERTORY II. MASS OF THE FAITHFUL A) FROM THE OFFERTORY TO THE PREFACE (OFFERTORY) B) FROM THE PREFACE TO THE PATER NOSTER (CONSECRATION) C) FROM THE PATER NOSTER TO THE ABLUTIONS (COMMUNION) D) FROM THE ABLUTIONS TO THE END (THANKSGIVING) III. CONCLUSION OF THE MASS ADDENDUM POST-VATICAN II MASS · DEVOTIONS FOR CONFESSION · THANKSGIVING FOR SMALL CHILDREN · SUMMARY OF THE CATHOLIC DOCTRINE · TREASURE OF PRAYERS · THE RULE OF SAINT BENEDICT · FOLLOW THE WORDS OF THE LATIN MASS & ALTAR CARDS · ABRAHAM AND HIS DECENDANTS · THE BIBLE’S HISTORICAL TIMELINE · SUMMARY OF THE OLD TESTAMENT · THE TABERNACLE · THE TABERNACLE TENT · THE GARMENTS OF THE HIGH PRIEST – KOHEN GADOL · JERUSALEM IN THE TIME OF DAVID · JERUSALEM IN THE TIME OF SOLOMON · SOLOMON’S TEMPLE · JERUSALEM IN THE TIME OF HEZEKIAH · ZERUBBABEL’S TEMPLE · JERUSALEM IN THE TIME OF NEHEMIAH · JERUSALEM IN THE TIME OF JESUS · THE TEMPLE MOUNT · THE TEMPLE COMPLEX · THE JERUSALEM TEMPLE · GOLGOTHA · THE APOSTLES’ CREED · THE ATHANASIAN CREED · AN HISTORICAL AND CHRONOLOGICAL INDEX TO THE NEW TESTAMENT · THE ANNUNCIATION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY · THE HOLY FAMILY OF JESUS, MARY AND JOSEPH · THE BAPTISM OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST · THE TRANSFIGURATION OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST · THE HOLY HOUR DEVOTION · THE WAY OF THE CROSS · HOLY WOUNDS DEVOTION · LITANY OF THE MOST HOLY NAME OF JESUS · THE CHAPLET OF THE SEVEN SORROWS OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY · THE HOLY ROSARY · SAINT JOSEPH · OUR LADY OF THE MIRACULOUS MEDAL · OUR LADY OF LA SALETTE · THE LITTLE OFFICE OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION · THE EXALTATION OF THE HOLY CROSS · OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE · THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS · PRAYER TO SAINT MICHAEL THE ARCHANGEL · HYMN TO SAINT MICHAEL AND ANGELICAL CROWN · SALVATION IN THE CATHOLIC FAITH · HYMN – TE DEUM LAUDAMUS · THE STORY OF JESUS CHRIST · PARABLES OF JESUS · MIRACLES OF JESUS · THE MINISTRY OF JESUS · PAUL’S MISSIONARY JOURNEYS · THE SHROUD OF TURIN AND THE HOLY FACE OF JESUS · VARIOUS PRAYERS TO SAINTS · LIST OF POPES · THE LAST JUDGMENT BY MICHELANGELO · THE APOCALYPSE OF PETER · HEAVEN BY BENEDICT XVI · REFERENCES · TABLE OF FEASTS _______
  7. 7. FOR GOD SO LOVED THE WORLD, AS TO GIVE HIS ONLY BEGOTTEN SON; THAT WHOEVER BELIEVETH IN HIM, MAY NOT PERISH, BUT HAVE LIFE EVERLASTING. (JN. 13:16) xxxxx
  8. 8. ON THE RESTORATION OF ALL THINGS IN CHRIST Joseph Sarto was born at Riese in Venetia on June 2, 1835, He was successively curate, parish priest, bishop of Mantua, patriarch of Venice, Italy. He was elected Pope (who chose the name Pius X) on August 4, 1903. As chief pastor of the Church he realized to the full the value of the lithurgy as the prayer of the Church and spared no effort to propagate the practice of frequent and daily Communion. In his encyclical Pascendi Dominici Gregis, he exposed and condemned the modernist heresy with force and clarity (1907). He died on August 20, 1914, and was canonized on May 29, 1954. The Feast of St. Pius X is on September 3. E SUPREMI – ENCYCLICAL OF H.H. POPE ST. PIUS X This was the first encyclical issued by the 257th pontiff succeeding St. Peter as Vicar of Christ and Bishop of Rome. The Pope expressed his deep feelings of unworthiness by quoting the plight of Anselm of Canterbury (c. 1033 – 21 April 1109). The Pope saw the current age as wracked with troubles and even thought that we had perhaps reached the end of days. He fervently wished to administer to the spiritual needs of the day – emphasizing the Catholic position on marriage, education, respect for property, maintaining order and justice in the social classes. He emphasized the great importance of educating priests and of maintaining the highest level of morals in seminarians. Venerable Brethren, Health and the Apostolic Benediction. In addressing you for the first time from the Chair of the supreme apostolate to which We have, by the inscrutable disposition of God, been elevated, it is not necessary to remind you with what tears and warm instance We exerted Ourselves to ward off this formidable burden of the Pontificate. Unequal in merit though We be with St. Anselm, it seems to us that We may with truth make Our own the words in which he lamented when he was constrained against his will and in spite of his struggles to receive the honor of the episcopate. For to show with what dispositions of mind and will We subjected Ourselves to the most serious charge of feeding the flock of Christ, We can well adduce those same proofs of grief which he invokes in his own behalf. “My tears are witnesses,” he wrote, “and the sounds and moanings issuing from the anguish of my heart, such as I never remember before to have come from me for any sorrow, before that day on which there seemed to fall upon me that great misfortune of the archbishop of Canterbury. And those who fixed their gaze on my face that day could not fail to see it… I, in color more like a dead than a living man, was pale for amazement and alarm. Hitherto I have resisted as far as I could, speaking the truth, my election or rather the violence done me. But now I am constrained to confess, whether I will or no, that the judgments of God oppose greater and greater resistance to my efforts, so that I see no way of escaping them. Wherefore vanquished as I am by the violence not so much of men as of God, against which there is no providing, I realize that nothing is left for me, after having prayed as much as I could and striven that this chalice should if possible pass from me without my drinking it, but to set aside my feeling and my will and resign myself entirely to the design and the will of God.” In truth reasons both numerous and most weighty were not lacking to justify this resistance of Ours. For, beside the fact that We deemed Ourselves altogether unworthy through Our littleness of the honor of the Pontificate; who would not have been disturbed at seeing himself designated to succeed him [i.e. H.H. Pope Leo XIII – 1878-1903] who, ruling the Church with supreme wisdom for nearly twenty six years, showed himself adorned with such sublimity of mind, such luster of every virtue, as to attract to himself the admiration even of adversaries, and to leave his memory stamped in glorious achievements? Then again, to omit other motives, We were terrified beyond all else by the disastrous state of human society today. For who can fail to see that society is at the present time, more than in any past age, suffering from a terrible and deep-rooted malady which, developing every day and eating into its inmost being, is dragging it to destruction? You understand, Venerable Brethren, what this disease is – apostasy from God, that which in truth nothing is more allied with ruin, according to the word of the Prophet: “For behold they that go far from Thee shall perish” (Ps. 72:17). We saw therefore that, in virtue of the ministry of the Pontificate, which was to be entrusted to Us, We must hasten to find a remedy for this great evil, considering as addressed to Us that Divine command: “Lo, I have set thee this day over the nations and over kingdoms, to root up, and to pull down, and to waste, and to destroy, and to build, and to plant” (Jer. 1:10). But, cognizant of Our weakness, We recoiled in terror from a task as urgent as it is arduous. Since, however, it has been pleasing to the Divine Will to raise Our lowliness to such sublimity of power, We take courage in Him who strengthens Us; and setting Ourselves to work, relying on the power of God, We proclaim that We have no other program in the Supreme Pontificate but that “of restoring all things in Christ” (Eph. 1:10), so that “Christ may be all and in all” (Col. 3:2). Some will certainly be found who, measuring Divine things by human standards will seek to discover secret aims of Ours, distorting them to an earthly scope and to partisan designs. To eliminate all vain delusions for such, We say to them with emphasis that We do not wish to be, and with the Divine assistance never shall be aught before human society but the Minister of God, of whose authority We are the depositary. The interests of God shall be Our interest, and for these We are resolved to spend all Our strength and Our very life. Hence, should anyone ask Us for a symbol as the expression of Our will, We will give this and no other: ‘To renew all things in Christ.’ In undertaking this glorious task, We are greatly quickened by the certainty that We shall have all of you, Venerable Brethren, as generous cooperators. Did We doubt it We should have to regard you, unjustly, as either unconscious or heedless of that sacrilegious war which is now, almost everywhere, stirred up and fomented against God. For in truth, “The nations have raged and the peoples imagined vain things” (Ps. 2:1) against their Creator, so frequent is the cry of the enemies of God: “Depart from us” (Job. 21:14). And as might be expected we find extinguished among the majority of men all respect for the Eternal God, and no regard paid in the manifestations of public and private life to the Supreme Will – nay, every effort and every artifice is used to destroy utterly the memory and the knowledge of God. When all this is considered there is good reason to fear lest this great perversity may be as it were a foretaste, and perhaps the beginning of those evils which are reserved for the last days; and that there may be already in the world the ‘Son of Perdition’ of whom the Apostle speaks (II Thess. 2:3). Such, in truth, is the audacity and the _______
  9. 9. wrath employed everywhere in persecuting religion, in combating the dogmas of the faith, in brazen effort to uproot and destroy all relations between man and the Divinity! While, on the other hand, and this according to the same apostle is the distinguishing mark of Antichrist, man has with infinite temerity put himself in the place of God, raising himself above all that is called God; in such wise that although he cannot utterly extinguish in himself all knowledge of God, he has contemned God’s majesty and, as it were, made of the universe a temple wherein he himself is to be adored. “He sitteth in the temple of God, showing himself as if he were God” (II Thess. 2:2). Verily no one of sound mind can doubt the issue of this contest between man and the Most High. Man, abusing his liberty, can violate the right and the majesty of the Creator of the Universe; but the victory will ever be with God – nay, defeat is at hand at the moment when man, under the delusion of his triumph, rises up with most audacity. Of this we are assured in the holy books by God Himself. Unmindful, as it were, of His strength and greatness, He “overlooks the sins of men” (Wis. 11:24), but swiftly, after these apparent retreats, “awaked like a mighty man that hath been surfeited with wine” (Ps. 72:65), “He shall break the heads of his enemies” (Ps. 77:22), that all may know “that God is the king of all the earth” (Ib. 66:8), “that the Gentiles may know themselves to be men” (Ib. 9:20). All this, Venerable Brethren, We believe and expect with unshakable faith. But this does not prevent us also, according to the measure given to each, from exerting ourselves to hasten the work of God – and not merely by praying assiduously: “Arise, O Lord, let not man be strengthened” (Ib. 9:19), but, more important still, by affirming both by word and deed and in the light of day, God’s supreme dominion over man and all things, so that His right to command and His authority may be fully realized and respected. This is imposed upon us not only as a natural duty, but by our common interest. For, Venerable Brethren, who can avoid being appalled and afflicted when he beholds, in the midst of a progress in civilization which is justly extolled, the greater part of mankind fighting among themselves so savagely as to make it seem as though strife were universal? The desire for peace is certainly harbored in every breast, and there is no one who does not ardently invoke it. But to want peace without God is an absurdity, seeing that where God is absent thence too justice flies, and when justice is taken away it is vain to cherish the hope of peace. “Peace is the work of justice” (Is. 22:17). There are many, We are well aware, who, in their yearning for peace, that is for the tranquility of order, band themselves into societies and parties, which they style parties of order. Hope and labor lost. For there is but one party of order capable of restoring peace in the midst of all this turmoil, and that is the party of God. It is this party, therefore, that we must advance, and to it attract as many as possible, if we are really urged by the love of peace. But, Venerable Brethren, we shall never, however much we exert ourselves, succeed in calling men back to the majesty and empire of God, except by means of Jesus Christ. “No one,” the Apostle admonishes us, “can lay other foundation than that which has been laid, which is Jesus Christ.” (I Cor. 3:2) It is Christ alone “whom the Father sanctified and sent into this world” (Is. 10:36), “the splendor of the Father and the image of His substance” (Heb. 1:3), true God and true man: without whom nobody can know God with the knowledge for salvation, “neither doth anyone know the Father but the Son, and he to whom it shall please the Son to reveal Him.” (Mt. 11:27) Hence it follows that to restore all things in Christ and to lead men back to submission to God is one and the same aim. To this, then, it behooves Us to devote Our care – to lead back mankind under the dominion of Christ; this done, We shall have brought it back to God. When We say to God We do not mean to that inert being heedless of all things human which the dream of materialists has imagined, but to the true and living God, one in nature, triple in person, Creator of the world, most wise Ordainer of all things, Lawgiver most just, who punishes the wicked and has reward in store for virtue. Now the way to reach Christ is not hard to find: it is the Church. Rightly does Chrysostom inculcate: “The Church is thy hope, the Church is thy salvation, the Church is thy refuge.” (Hom. de capto Euthropio, n. 6.) It was for this that Christ founded it, gaining it at the price of His blood, and made it the depositary of His doctrine and His laws, bestowing upon it at the same time an inexhaustible treasury of graces for the sanctification and salvation of men. You see, then, Venerable Brethren, the duty that has been imposed alike upon Us and upon you of bringing back to the discipline of the Church human society, now estranged from the wisdom of Christ; the Church will then subject it to Christ, and Christ to God. If We, through the goodness of God Himself, bring this task to a happy issue, We shall be rejoiced to see evil giving place to good, and hear, for our gladness, “a loud voice from heaven saying: Now is come salvation, and strength, and the kingdom of our God and the power of his Christ.” (Apoc. 12:10) But if our desire to obtain this is to be fulfilled, we must use every means and exert all our energy to bring about the utter disappearance of the enormous and detestable wickedness, so characteristic of our time – the substitution of man for God; this done, it remains to restore to their ancient place of honor the most holy laws and counsels of the gospel; to proclaim aloud the truths taught by the Church, and her teachings on the sanctity of marriage, on the education and discipline of youth, on the possession and use of property, the duties that men owe to those who rule the State; and lastly to restore equilibrium between the different classes of society according to Christian precept and custom. This is what We, in submitting Ourselves to the manifestations of the Divine will, purpose to aim at during Our Pontificate, and We will use all our industry to attain it. It is for you, Venerable Brethren, to second Our efforts by your holiness, knowledge and experience and above all by your zeal for the glory of God, with no other aim than that Christ may be formed in all. As to the means to be employed in attaining this great end, it seems superfluous to name them, for they are obvious of themselves. Let your first care be to form Christ in those who are destined from the duty of their vocation to form Him in others. We speak of the priests, Venerable Brethren. For all who bear the seal of the priesthood must know that they have the same mission to the people in the midst of whom they live as that which Paul proclaimed that he received in these tender words: “My little children, of whom I am in labor again until Christ be formed in you” (Gal. 4:19). But how will they be able to perform this duty if they be not first clothed with Christ themselves? and so clothed with Christ as to be able to say with the Apostle: “I live, yet not I, but Christ lives in me” (Gal. 2:20). “For me to live is Christ” (Phil. 1:21). Hence although all are included in the ________
  10. 10. exhortation “to advance towards the perfect man, in the measure of the age of the fullness of Christ” (Eph. 4:3), it is addressed before all others to those who exercise the sacerdotal ministry; thus these are called another Christ, not merely by the communication of power but by reason of the imitation of His works, and they should therefore bear stamped upon themselves the image of Christ. This being so, Venerable Brethren, of what nature and magnitude is the care that must be taken by you in forming the clergy to holiness! All other tasks must yield to this one. Wherefore the chief part of your diligence will be directed to governing and ordering your seminaries aright so that they may flourish equally in the soundness of their teaching and in the spotlessness of their morals. Regard your seminary as the delight of your hearts, and neglect on its behalf none of those provisions which the Council of Trent has with admirable forethought prescribed. And when the time comes for promoting the youthful candidates to holy orders, ah! do not forget what Paul wrote to Timothy: “Impose not hands lightly upon any man” (I. Tim. 5:22), bearing carefully in mind that as a general rule the faithful will be such as are those whom you call to the priesthood. Do not then pay heed to private interests of any kind, but have at heart only God and the Church and the eternal welfare of souls so that, as the Apostle admonishes, “you may not be partakers of the sins of others.” (Ibid.) Then again be not lacking in solicitude for young priests who have just left the seminary. From the bottom of Our heart, We urge you to bring them often close to your breast, which should burn with celestial fire – kindle them, inflame them, so that they may aspire solely after God and the salvation of souls. Rest assured, Venerable Brethren, that We on Our side will use the greatest diligence to prevent the members of the clergy from being drawn to the snares of a certain new and fallacious science, which savoureth not of Christ, but with masked and cunning arguments strives to open the door to the errors of rationalism and semi-rationalism; against which the Apostle warned Timothy to be on his guard, when he wrote: “Keep that which is committed to thy trust, avoiding the profane novelties of words, and oppositions of knowledge falsely so called which some promising have erred concerning the faith” (I Tim. 6:20) This does not prevent Us from esteeming worthy of praise those young priests who dedicated themselves to useful studies in every branch of learning the better to prepare themselves to defend the truth and to refute the calumnies of the enemies of the faith. Yet We cannot conceal, nay, We proclaim in the most open manner possible that Our preference is, and ever will be, for those who, while cultivating ecclesiastical and literary erudition, dedicate themselves more closely to the welfare of souls through the exercise of those ministries proper to a priest jealous of the divine glory. “It is a great grief and a continual sorrow to our heart” (Rom. 9:2) to find Jeremiah’s lamentation applicable to our times: “The little ones asked for bread, and there was none to break it to them” (Lam. 4:4). For there are not lacking among the clergy those who adapt themselves according to their bent to works of more apparent than real solidity – but not so numerous perhaps are those who, after the example of Christ, take to themselves the words of the Prophet: “The Spirit of the Lord hath anointed me, hath sent me to evangelize the poor, to heal the contrite of heart, to announce freedom to the captive, and sight to the blind” (Lk. 4:18-19). Yet who can fail to see, Venerable Brethren, that while men are led by reason and liberty, the principal way to restore the empire of God in their souls is religious instruction? How many there are who mimic Christ and abhor the Church and the Gospel more through ignorance than through badness of mind, of whom it may well be said: “They blaspheme whatever things they know not” (Jude 2:10). This is found to be the case not only among the people at large and among the lowest classes, who are thus easily led astray, but even among the more cultivated and among those endowed moreover with uncommon education. The result is for a great many the loss of the faith. For it is not true that the progress of knowledge extinguishes the faith; rather is it ignorance, and the more ignorance prevails the greater is the havoc wrought by incredulity. And this is why Christ commanded the Apostles: “Going forth teach all nations” (Mt. 27:19). But in order that the desired fruit may be derived from this apostolate and this zeal for teaching, and that Christ may be formed in all, be it remembered, Venerable Brethren, that no means is more efficacious than charity. “For the Lord is not in the earthquake” (III Kg. 19:2) – it is vain to hope to attract souls to God by a bitter zeal. On the contrary, harm is done more often than good by taunting men harshly with their faults, and reproving their vices with asperity. True the Apostle exhorted Timothy: “Accuse, beseech, rebuke,” but he took care to add: “with all patience” (II Tim. 4:2). Jesus has certainly left us examples of this. “Come to me,” we find Him saying, “come to me all ye that labor and are burdened and I will refresh you” (Mt. 11:28). And by those that labor and are burdened he meant only those who are slaves of sin and error. What gentleness was that shown by the Divine Master! What tenderness, what compassion towards all kinds of misery! Isaias has marvelously described His heart in the words: “I will set my spirit upon him; he shall not contend, nor cry out; the bruised reed he will not break, he will not extinguish the smoking flax” (Is. 42:1). This charity, “patient and kind” (I. Cor. 13:4), will extend itself also to those who are hostile to us and persecute us. “We are reviled,” thus did St. Paul protest, “and we bless; we are persecuted and we suffer it; we are blasphemed and we entreat” (I. Cor. 4:12) They perhaps seem to be worse than they really are. Their associations with others, prejudice, the counsel, advice and example of others, and finally an ill advised shame have dragged them to the side of the impious; but their wills are not so depraved as they themselves would seek to make people believe. Who will prevent us from hoping that the flame of Christian charity may dispel the darkness from their minds and bring to them light and the peace of God? It may be that the fruit of our labors may be slow in coming, but charity wearies not with waiting, knowing that God prepares His rewards not for the results of toil but for the good will shown in it. It is true, Venerable Brethren, that in this arduous task of the restoration of the human race in Christ neither you nor your clergy should exclude all assistance. We know that God recommended every one to have a care for his neighbor (Eccl. 17:12). For it is not priests alone, but all the faithful without exception, who must concern themselves with the interests of God and souls – not, of course, according to their own views, but always under the direction and orders of the bishops; for to no one in the Church except you is it given to preside over, to teach, to “govern the Church of God which the Holy Ghost has placed you to rule” (Acts 20:28). Our predecessors have ____
  11. 11. long since approved and blessed those Catholics who have banded together in societies of various kinds, but always religious in their aim. We, too, have no hesitation in awarding Our praise to this great idea, and We earnestly desire to see it propagated and flourish in town and country. But We wish that all such associations aim first and chiefly at the constant maintenance of Christian life, among those who belong to them. For truly it is of little avail to discuss questions with nice subtlety, or to discourse eloquently of rights and duties, when all this is unconnected with practice. The times we live in demand action – but action which consists entirely in observing with fidelity and zeal the divine laws and the precepts of the Church, in the frank and open profession of religion, in the exercise of every kind of charitable works, without regard to self interest or worldly advantage. Such luminous examples given by the great army of soldiers of Christ will be of much greater avail in moving and drawing men than words and sublime dissertations; and it will easily come about that when human respect has been driven out, and prejudices and doubting laid aside, large numbers will be won to Christ, becoming in their turn promoters of His knowledge and love which are the road to true and solid happiness. Oh! when in every city and village the law of the Lord is faithfully observed, when respect is shown for sacred things, when the Sacraments are frequented, and the ordinances of Christian life fulfilled, there will certainly be no more need for us to labor further to see all things restored in Christ. Nor is it for the attainment of eternal welfare alone that this will be of service – it will also contribute largely to temporal welfare and the advantage of human society. For when these conditions have been secured, the upper and wealthy classes will learn to be just and charitable to the lowly, and these will be able to bear with tranquility and patience the trials of a very hard lot; the citizens will obey not lust but law, reverence and love will be deemed a duty towards those that govern, “whose power comes only from God” (Rom. 13:1). And then? Then, at last, it will be clear to all that the Church, such as it was instituted by Christ, must enjoy full and entire liberty and independence from all foreign dominion; and We, in demanding that same liberty, are defending not only the sacred rights of religion, but are also consulting the common weal and the safety of nations. For it continues to be true that “piety is useful for all things” (I Tim. 4:8) – when this is strong and flourishing “the people will” truly “sit in the fullness of peace” (Is. 32:18). May God, “who is rich in mercy” (Eph. 2:4), benignly speed this restoration of the human race in Jesus Christ for “it is not of him that willeth, or of him that runneth, but of God that showeth mercy” (Rom. 9:16). And let us, Venerable Brethren, “in the spirit of humility” (Dan. 3:39), with continuous and urgent prayer ask this of Him through the merits of Jesus Christ. Let us turn, too, to the most powerful intercession of the Divine Mother – to obtain which We, addressing to you this Letter of Ours on the day appointed especially for commemorating the Holy Rosary, ordain and confirm all Our Predecessor’s prescriptions with regard to the dedication of the present month to the august Virgin, by the public recitation of the Rosary in all churches; with the further exhortation that as intercessors with God appeal be also made to the most pure Spouse of Mary, the Patron of the Catholic Church, and the holy Princes of the Apostles, Peter and Paul. And that all this may be realized in fulfillment of Our ardent desire, and that everything may be prosperous with you, We invoke upon you the most bountiful gifts of divine grace. And now in testimony of that most tender charity wherewith We embrace you and all the faithful whom Divine Providence has entrusted to Us, We impart with all affection in the Lord, the Apostolic Blessing to you, Venerable Brethren, to the clergy and to your people. Given at Rome at St. Peter’s, on the 4th day of October, 1903, in the first year of Our Pontificate. ST. PIUS PP. X Glorious Pope of the Eucharist, Saint Pius X, you sought ‘to restore all things in Christ.’ Obtain for me a true love of Jesus so that I may live only for Him. Help me to acquire a lively fervor and a sincere will to strive for sanctity of life, and that I may avail myself of the riches of the Holy Eucharist in sacrifice and sacrament. By your love for Mary, mother and queen of all, inflame my heart with tender devotion to her. Blessed model of the priesthood, obtain for us holy, dedicated priests, and increase vocations to the religious life. Dispel confusion and hatred and anxiety, and incline our hearts to peace and concord, so that all nations will place themselves under the sweet reign of Christ. Amen. Saint Pius X, pray for me. ___
  12. 12. ON THE ORDINARY OF THE MASS – H.H. Pope St. Pius X “The Holy Mass is a prayer itself, even the highest prayer that exists. It is the sacrifice, dedicated by our Redeemer at the Cross, and repeated every day on the altar. If you wish to hear Mass as it should be heard, you must follow with eye, heart, and mouth all that happens at the altar. Further, you must pray with the Priest the holy words said by him in the Name of Christ and which Christ says by him. You have to associate your heart with the holy feelings which are contained in these words and in this manner you ought to follow all that happens at the altar. When acting in this way you have prayed Holy Mass.” (c.f. 1962 Missal, p. 835). I. INTRODUCTION Of all the practices recommended by our holy religion – Morning and Evening Prayers, Prayers before and after Meals, Visits to the Most Holy Sacrament, Rosary, Way of the Cross, etc. – the august Sacrifice of the Mass is the greatest, the most precious, and the most holy, as well as the most conductive to man’s salvation. Holy Mass was instituted by Christ Himself at the last supper. He commands His Apostles to do the same that He had done, saying: “…ye shall do them in memory of Me.” Assisting at holy Mass you should have a fourfold intention of Adoration, by which we acknowledge our dependence on God as the Ruler over life and death; Praise and Thanksgiving for the benefits conferred on us; of Reparation for our sins and negligences; of Impetration, to implore of Him the grace necessary for our salvation. Thanks to the efforts begun by John Paul the Great and continued by Benedict XVI, the 1962 version of the Latin rite of the Roman Catholic Mass is finally beginning to gain back the recognition that it always deserved, and which previously was virtually eliminated, not by the Vatican II Fathers, but by the Vatican II ‘periti’ – the Council ‘experts’. The more current descriptive term for them is Liturgists. His Holiness Benedict XVI issued the Motu Proprio Summorum Pontificum July 7, 2007, to take effect September 14, 2007, the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross. Along with the Motu Proprio, the Vatican released the Holy Father’s Letter to Bishops on Summorum Pontificum, and also an Explanatory Note on Motu Proprio Summorum Pontificum. The Motu Proprio addresses the traditional Latin Tridentine Mass as contained in the 1962 Missal of John XXIII. By way of explanation of why we should even need to explain and describe the traditional Latin Mass, we need to look at the horrific tale of how it almost disappeared completely from the Catholic scene, and perhaps even from the world. The one item of vital importance to note here is this: despite the concerted efforts of multiple liberal Bishops and thundering herds of Catholic liturgists, the Traditional Latin Tridentine Mass was never abrogated or repealed by the One Holy Roman Catholic Church. It has always remained valid. It remains the most thoroughly consistent Liturgical form in the Catholic Church today. The development of the Latin rite Mass is traced through a series of links in an unbroken chain beginning with very first mass given by Christ 2,000 years ago at the Last Supper. Beginning with that fateful evening, on every single day that has passed since then, this same offering has been done. It’s been done millions of times for billions of people, just as He commanded. The Traditional Latin Mass of today is essentially unchanged since the Council of Trent, five centuries ago. Some elements are derived from Jewish customs dating back to pre-Apostolic times, and other parts were developed by Church Fathers and various Saints and Popes. Pope Saint Gregory the Great instituted the Greek Kyrie eleison and Sacred Chant during his reign. The vestments have changed little since they were developed during ancient Roman empire. The traditional Latin Tridentine Mass has been quite accurately described as “the most beautiful thing this side of heaven.” What this booklet attempts to capture in some small way is the invaluable, golden treasure of the Latin Liturgy – beauty, glorious and majestic. This is what we almost lost, and it needs to be re-recognized by today’s laymen as possibly the most glorious and inspirational Earthly thing existing today. Nothing in this world today can be as consistently uplifting of the human spirit as the ancient Latin Mass, or any of the Eastern Rite variants. It is not possible to properly glorify God, praise Him and give Him thanks, as is done in this Liturgy, without simultaneously lifting our own spirits to new heights. The most important part of the Mass – actual, physical Communion with Divinity Himself – is put into most proper human perspective when surrounded by the beauty and majesty of the ancient forms of the Mass. May it continue to survive all non-magisterial attempts to ‘tone it down’ or ‘improve’ or ‘reform’ it, and may it continue to be the Church’s most valuable tool of inspiration and evangelization. II. THE HOLY MASS The Holy Mass is the unbloody sacrifice of the New Law in which the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ is offered to God under the species of bread and wine. The Holy Mass is the sacrifice of the cross, without bloodshedding. On the stone of the altar and on the wood of the cross, the same Priest, Jesus Christ, dedicates the same sacrifice, His Holy Body and Blood. If this was always borne in mind, with that deep respect Mass should be attended. In the Holy Sacrifice, Jesus, the Second Person of the Holy Trinity, is Victim and Sacrifier; and by this the Holy Mass has an immense value in itself. The merits and fruits of the Holy Mass are shared to a fixed and limited degree by the faithful according the God’s free will and to the fervor of our faith, love, and piety. (see VI. Your Mass and Your Life/1962 Missal – Introduction, p.xlvii ff.) There is one truth, which is generally lost to sight, a truth which however explains in a particular way the Liturgy of the Holy Mass, namely that although the Holy Sacrifice is dedicated to God by the Priest, all those who are present are invited to unite themselves and their own offerings to the sacrifice of the Mass. The Priest is the consecrated minister of this sacrifice, deputed by the Holy Church; but the faithful, joined with
  13. 13. the Priest, are also invested with a kind of priesthood. The Priest, saying Mass, at times speaks in the name of a multitude and so he says in the plural: “Let us pray,” “We offer,” “Brethren, pray that my sacrifice and yours may be acceptable to God the Father almighty.” It is possible to think of this and to content oneself with saying some prayers with a distracted mind, without paying attention to the sublime office with which one is invested? And more than this, the faithful not only are offering the sacrifice together with the Priest but, with Jesus Christ, they offer themselves to the Lord, our Father in heaven. This is brought out in the prayer after the offering of the wine: “with humble spirit and contrite heart may we be received by Thee, O Lord, and may our sacrifice be so offered up in Thy sight this day that it may be pleasing to Thee, O Lord God.” Always bear in mind this exalted and comforting thought when hearing Mass, and you will avoid reciting the prayers too quickly, without paying attention to the wonder that is being performed only a few steps from the place where you are. The best way of hearing Mass is to join in spirit with the Priest and to follow closely all that happens at the altar. Think that you are standing beneath the cross of the dying Jesus, to catch in your soul a drop of the divine Blood, a drop that has power to deliver the whole world from all sin. We give here some practical hints which will help you to follow the Holy Mass with piety and fruit: 1. Along with the Priest, follow all the ceremonies and liturgical texts of the Mass in your missal. Pray the Mass! 2. Read (in your Christian Prayer book or the 1962 Missal-ribbons) the prayers which correspond to the various parts of the Mass, i.e., following the order of the Mass in connection with the Proper of the Season. (ibid,p.135) III. THE ALTAR The traditional Latin Tridentine Mass is offered on an altar, which is Latin for ‘high place’. The right side of the altar, as you face it, is the Epistle side, and the left side is the Gospel side. An altar stone containing relics or images of Saints is imbedded in the front of the altar. On the center-rear of the altar table is the tabernacle, which is Latin for ‘small inn’. The most blessed sacrament of the altar is stored in the tabernacle. A sanctuary lamp burns at all times signifying that our Lord Jesus Christ, body, blood, soul and Divinity, is present in the tabernacle. There is a crucifix on or over the altar, behind and/or above the tabernacle, that is large enough and positioned so as to be clearly visible to everyone in the church. Two beeswax candles (more than two for more solemn high Masses) on left and right light the altar area. The beeswax represents the purity of our Lord’s body, and the candle flame represents His soul. The altar is covered with three linen cloths; the top cloth hangs to the floor. The altar cloths absorb and catch any of the sacred species which may fall or spill. The altar cloths remind us of the wrapping of our Lord’s body in the tomb of Resurrection. Relics and images of saints may also adorn the altar background area. For the Tridentine Latin rite Mass, the altar, the Sanctuary of the temple, is generally composed of a table on four columns and was formerly placed above a tomb, as in the first ages of Christianity. Mass was celebrated by preference on the burial place of the Martyrs. Nowadays a square flat stone is placed in the middle of the altar table. This altar stone is consecrated by the Bishop. It is adorned with five little carved crosses. The stone contains one or more relics of Saints. It is on this stone that Holy Mass is celebrated. (c.f. 1962 Missal, p. 127 ff. ) IV. THE INCARNATION One day, in the long procession of men groping in the shadow of death, Christ appeared. “Christ was made sin” for us writes St. Paul. To this poor, purblind race of ours, He revealed the Father’s wondrous plan. “The Father Himself loves you….He has not abandoned you….I am your Savior….I am Life.” He will unite the peoples! St. Patrick Church – Nepean, Ontario, Canada
  14. 14. Jesus’ miracles culminate with his most potent, raising Lazarus from the dead. In St. John’s Gospel, it is this last miracle, and not the temple incident, that prompts the authorities to have Jesus executed. Jesus’ discourses identify him with symbols of major significance, “the bread of life,” “the light of the world,” “the door of the sheep,” “the good shepherd,” “the resurrection and the life,” “the way, the truth, and the life,” and “the real vine.” The Apostle John was present at the crucifixion. The Gospel according to St. John is an account of the life and ministry of Jesus of Nazareth. It details the story of Jesus from his Baptism to his Resurrection. The Passion begins at John 12 with the conspiracy against Jesus, and unfolds in the following events: A meal a few days before Passover. A woman anoints Jesus. He says that for this she will always be remembered. In Jerusalem, the Last Supper shared by Jesus and his disciples. Jesus gives final instructions, predicts his betrayal, and tells them all to remember him. On the path to Gethsemane after the meal. Jesus tells them they will all fall away that night; after Peter protests he will not, Jesus says Peter will deny him three times before the cock crows. Gethsemane, later that night. As the disciples rest, Jesus prays; then a mob led by Judas Iscariot arrests Jesus, and all the others run away. The high priest’s palace, later that night. The mob brings Jesus to the Sanhedrin (i.e., Jewish supreme court); they examine Jesus and determine he deserves to die. They send him to Pontius Pilate, the Prefect (governor) of the Roman province of Judæa from A.D. 26–36. What follows is the history of the passion of Christ. V. THE PASSION OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST The Passion of our Lord Jesus Christ according to John (Jn. 18:1-40; 19:1-42): When Jesus had said these things, he went forth with his disciples over the brook Cedron, where there was a garden, into which he entered with his disciples. And Judas also, who betrayed him, knew the place; because Jesus had often resorted thither together with his disciples. Judas therefore having received a band of soldiers and servants from the chief priests and the Pharisees, cometh thither with lanterns and torches and weapons. Jesus therefore, knowing all things that should come upon him, went forth, and said to them: Whom seek ye? They answered him:Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus saith to them: I am he. And Judas also, who betrayed him, stood with them. As soon therefore as he had said to them: I am he; they went backward, and fell to the ground. Again therefore he asked them: Whom seek ye? And they said, Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus answered, I have told you that I am he. If therefore you seek me, let these go their way. That the word might be fulfilled which he said: Of them whom thou hast given me, I have not lost any one. Then Simon Peter, having a sword, drew it, and struck the servant of the high priest, and cut off his right ear. And the name of the servant was Malchus. Jesus therefore said to Peter: Put up thy sword into the scabbard. The chalice which my Father hath given me, shall I not drink it? Then the band and the tribune, and the servants of the Jews, took Jesus, and bound him: And they led him away to Annas first, for he was father in law to Caiphas, who was the high priest of that year. Now Caiphas was he who had given the counsel to the Jews: That it was expedient that one man should die for the people. And Simon Peter followed Jesus, and so did another disciple. And that disciple was known to the high priest, and went in with Jesus into the court of the high priest. But Peter stood at the door without. The other disciple therefore, who was known to the high priest, went out, and spoke to the portress, and brought in Peter. The maid therefore that was portress, saith to Peter: Art not thou also one of this man’s disciples? He saith: I am not. Now the servants and ministers stood at a fire of coals, because it was cold, and warmed themselves. And with them was Peter also, standing, and warming himself. The high priest therefore asked Jesus of his disciples, and of his doctrine. Jesus answered him: I have spoken openly to the world: I have always taught in the synagogue, and in the temple, whither all the Jews resort; and in secret I have spoken nothing. Why asketh thou me? ask them who have heard what I have spoken unto them: behold they know what things I have said. And when he had said these things, one of the servants standing by, gave Jesus a blow, saying: Answerest thou the high priest so? Jesus answered him: If I have spoken evil, give testimony of the evil; but if well, why strikest thou me? And Annas sent him bound to Caiphas the high priest. And Simon Peter was standing, and warming himself. They said therefore to him: Art not thou also one of his disciples? He denied it, and said: I am not. One of the servants of the high priest (a kinsman to him whose ear Peter cut off) saith to him: Did I not see thee in the garden with him? Again therefore Peter denied; and immediately the cock crew. Then they led Jesus from Caiphas to the governor’s hall. And it was morning; and they went not into the hall, that they might not be defiled, but that they might eat the pasch. Pilate therefore went out to them, and said: What accusation bring you against this man? They answered, and said to him: If he were not a malefactor, we would not have delivered him up to thee. Pilate therefore said to them: Take him you, and judge him according to your law. The Jews therefore said to him: It is not lawful for us to put any man to death; That the word of Jesus might be fulfilled, which he said, signifying what death he should die. Pilate therefore went into the hall again, and called Jesus, and said to him: Art thou the king of the Jews? Jesus answered: Sayest thou this thing of thyself, or have others told it thee of me? Pilate answered: Am I a Jew? Thy own nation, and the chief priests, have delivered thee up to me: what hast thou done? Jesus answered: My kingdom is not of this world. If my kingdom were of this world, my servants would certainly strive that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now my kingdom is not from hence. Pilate therefore said to him: Art thou a king then? Jesus answered: Thou sayest that I am a king. For this was I born, and for this came I into the world; that I should give testimony to the truth. Every one that is of the truth, heareth my voice. Pilate saith to him: What is truth? And when he said this, he went out again to the Jews, and saith to them: I find no cause in him. But you have a custom that I should release one unto you at the pasch: will you, therefore, that I release unto you the king of the Jews? Then cried they all again, saying: Not this man, but Barabbas. Now Barabbas was a robber…
  15. 15. When the chief priests, therefore, and the servants, had seen him, they cried out, saying: Crucify him, crucify him. Pilate saith to them: Take him you, and crucify him: for I find no cause in him. The Jews answered him: We have a law; and according to the law he ought to die, because he made himself the Son of God. When Pilate therefore had heard this saying, he feared the more. And he entered into the hall again, and he said to Jesus: Whence art thou? But Jesus gave him no answer. Pilate therefore saith to him: Speakest thou not to me? knowest thou not that I have power to crucify thee, and I have power to release thee? Jesus answered: Thou shouldst not have any power against me, unless it were given thee from above. Therefore, he that hath delivered me to thee, hath the greater sin. And from henceforth Pilate sought to release him. But the Jews cried out, saying: If thou release this man, thou art not Cæsar’s friend. For whosoever maketh himself a king, speaketh against Cæsar. Now when Pilate had heard these words, he brought Jesus forth, and sat down in the judgment seat, in the place that is called Lithostrotos, and in Hebrew Gabbatha. And it was the parasceve of the pasch, about the sixth hour, and he saith to the Jews: Behold your king. But they cried out: Away with him; away with him; crucify him. Pilate saith to them: Shall I crucify your king? The chief priests answered: We have no king but Cæsar. Then therefore he delivered him to them to be crucified. And they took Jesus, and led him forth. And bearing his own cross, he went forth to that place which is called Calvary, but in Hebrew Golgotha. Where they crucified him, and with him two others, one on each side, and Jesus in the midst. And Pilate wrote a title also, and he put it upon the cross. And the writing was: JESUS OF NAZARETH, THE KING OF THE JEWS. This title therefore many of the Jews did read: because the place where Jesus was crucified was nigh to the city: and it was written in Hebrew, in Greek, and in Latin. Then the chief priests of the Jews said to Pilate: Write not, The King of the Jews; but that he said, I am the King of the Jews. Pilate answered: What I have written, I have written. The soldiers therefore, when they had crucified him, took his garments, (and they made four parts, to every soldier a part,) and also his coat. Now the coat was without seam, woven from the top throughout. They said then one to another: Let us not cut it, but let us cast lots for it, whose it shall be; that the scripture might be fulfilled, saying: They have parted my garments among them, and upon my vesture they have cast lots. And the soldiers indeed did these things. Now there stood by the cross of Jesus, his mother, and his mother’s sister, Mary of Cleophas, and Mary Magdalen. Then therefore, Pilate took Jesus, and scourged him. And the soldiers platting a crown of thorns, put it upon his head; and they put on him a purple garment. And they came to him, and said: Hail, king of the Jews; and they gave him blows. Pilate therefore went forth again, and saith to them: Behold, I bring him forth unto you, that you may know that I find no cause in him. (Jesus therefore came forth, bearing the crown of thorns and the purple garment.) And he saith to them: Behold the Man.
  16. 16. When Jesus therefore had seen his mother and the disciple standing whom he loved, he saith to his mother: Woman, behold thy son. After that, he saith to the disciple: Behold thy mother. And from that hour, the disciple took her to his own. Afterwards, Jesus knowing that all things were now accomplished, that the scripture might be fulfilled, said: I thirst. Now there was a vessel set there full of vinegar. And they, putting a sponge full of vinegar and hyssop, put it to his mouth. Jesus therefore, when he had taken the vinegar, said: It is consummated. And bowing his head, he gave up the ghost. (Here all kneel and pause a few moments and reflect on Christ’s passion.) Then the Jews, (because it was the parasceve,) that the bodies might not remain on the cross on the sabbath day, (for that was a great sabbath day,) besought Pilate that their legs might be broken, and that they might be taken away. The soldiers therefore came; and they broke the legs of the first, and of the other that was crucified with him. But after they were come to Jesus, when they saw that he was already dead, they did not break his legs. But one of the soldiers with a spear opened his side, and immediately there came out blood and water. And he that saw it, hath given testimony, and his testimony is true. And he knoweth that he saith true; that you also may believe. For these things were done, that the scripture might be fulfilled: You shall not break a bone of him. And again another scripture saith: They shall look on him whom they pierced. And after these things, Joseph of Arimathea (because he was a disciple of Jesus, but secretly for fear of the Jews) besought Pilate that he might take away the body of Jesus. And Pilate gave leave. He came therefore, and took the body of Jesus. And Nicodemus also came, (he who at the first came to Jesus by night,) bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about an hundred pound weight. They took therefore the body of Jesus, and bound it in linen cloths, with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury. Now there was in the place where he was crucified, a garden; and in the garden a new sepulchre, wherein no man yet had been laid. There, therefore, because of the parasceve of the Jews, they laid Jesus, because the sepulchre was nigh at hand. “And they gave me gall for my food, and in my thirst they gave me vinegar to drink.” (Ps. 68:22) PRAISE BE TO THEE, O CHRIST.
  17. 17. VI. YOUR MASS AND YOUR LIFE In God’s plan, it is not man who is the center of the universe; but Jesus Christ, the Incarnate Word. God created all things for Christ. For the sake of Christ Jesus in whom the Father already had “placed all His delight” and for the sake of Mary, His Mother, “full of grace,” God decided to create man and the universe. To this Son, in whom He is well pleased, friends were to be given – and so man was created. (The race of man represents the “friends of the Bridegroom” mentioned by our Lord in the Gospel.) To this Son whom He loves, the Father will give a house and garden – and so the universe was created. Man, created for Christ, is loved in Him. We thus form, as it were, a “wedding gift” from God the Father to Jesus Christ, the Bridegroom. In Him, through Him, and for Him, we are pleasing to the heavenly Father. Without Him we are nothing. This last doxology is very important for an understanding of the Mass. Our sacrifices are of value only through their being united with Christ’s Sacrifice. Since all have been issued from the heart of God solely to give pleasure to Jesus, all then are brothers. Creation itself is our kin. The universe and I, what are we, if not a delicate thought of the Father toward His Divine Son? The creation, launched into existence by God’s loving power, will forever have something unfinished about it, until that time when it shall return to the Source of its perfection; there to receive from that same Source its final perfection and beatitude. Thus the general plan of creation appears to us as an image and prolongation of the fecundity of the Most Blessed Trinity. The chronological order of the plan is as follows: 1) Creation of the heavens; 2) Preparation of the earth; 3) Creation of minerals, vegetation, and animals; 4) Creation of man. King though he may be of that creation predating his own existence, man, however, is not creation’s final goal. Man – simple link in a chain that must go back to God – paves the way for the coming of the blessed Virgin Mary. Mary, God’s jewel case, in which reposed He Who upholds all things, Jesus Christ! Christ is the center of the universe. He is before all things: “He is before all creatures.” (Col. 1:17) “The firstborn of every creature.” (Col. 1:15) “In the beginning was the Word...” (Jn. 1:1) “In Him...through Him...unto Him...all things!” (Col. 1:16, 17) All things are through Him. “Without Him was made nothing that was made.” (Jn. 1:3) “Upholding all things by the word of His power.” (Heb. 1:3) All things are in Him. “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord, Jesus Christ, Who hath blessed us with spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ; as He chose us in Him before the foundation of the world.” (Eph. 1:3-4) All things are unto Him. “Whom He hath appointed heir of all things.” (Heb. 1:2) “I am Alpha and Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end.” (Apoc. 22:13) i. MAN’S RETURN Man, having come from God, must return to God: his Final End. “Thou hast made us for Thyself, 0 God,” cried St. Augustine, “and our hearts are restless until they find rest in Thee!” The creation – a work of sheer mercy, a stooping of the Creator toward the creature – returns to God, chanting a hymn of praise and thanksgiving. A feather from a bird, a ray of light, a finely modulated voice, a drop of water falling to earth, a hastening ant, a seed sprouting from the earth, the stars that whirl in the firmament with never a collision; all are directed by God to that magnificent end for which He has ordained them – man’s pleasure, Christ’s happiness, and finally, the glory of the Most Holy Trinity. ii. THE BREAK IN THE HARMONY OF THE DIVINE PLAN – SIN Alas, man is free to destroy God’s harmonious plan! Everything is in equilibrium, because everything tends toward God. All things cohere, because all things are submissive to the Author of life and being. But this adhesion to God is effected in a free act of love. The freedom with which man is adorned, gives to the entire creation an incomparable majesty. God thus receives a praise that is spontaneous. This very freedom, however, exposes the one enjoying it to immense peril. Let man but once refuse to spread forth his hands in a gesture of oblation, and the whole order of things falls apart. But one day man, in a gesture of pride and egoism, rejected his priesthood. His role of mediator no longer satisfied him. Man “would be like God.” Through his lips, Satan once more uttered his cry of rage, “I will not serve!” By his refusal, man shattered the universe. For the universe rested on man as the arch on the keystone. The entire universe turned against man its betrayer. In chorus, it hurled back into the teeth of man the cry that man had dared to address to God, “I will not serve!” First of all, man’s own body revolted. Man, terror-stricken, suddenly beheld within himself the unleashing of sinful passions. Henceforth, seven fetters, which theology is later to designate by the title of ‘Capital Sins’, will shackle his formerly free impulses – Adam and Eve “perceive themselves to be naked.” Man is deeply stricken in the very harmony of his being: “I will multiply your sorrows and your conceptions; in sorrow shall you bring forth children.” Social discord now corresponds to inner imbalance. “You shall be under your husband’s power, and he shall have dominion over you.” Looming up on the horizon, in addition to these ‘domestic squabbles’ are quarrels between families, wars between city and city, between nation and nation, world war, revolution. The animal kingdom, over which man formerly reigned, rises up in its turn. The earth itself refuses to cooperate ____
  18. 18. with man. Only at the cost of a struggle, will man be able to wrest from it miserably a few meager fruits: “Cursed is the earth in your work. Thorns and thistles shall it bring forth to you.” Man is broken, disoriented. Suffering is to be, henceforth, his earthly portion. “In the sweat of your face shall you eat bread... In sorrow shall you bring forth children.” Man created to be the friend of Christ, has gone astray in the disobedience of Adam. Humanity, separated from Christ, is without form or beauty. Will God remain deaf, insensible, to the cry of His distressed creature? Will He punish or pardon? iii. CHRIST’S INTERVENTION At this tragic moment in the history of humanity when the Blessed Trinity could have, conceivably, left us in our state of hopeless misery, Jesus intervened: “Father, these men are for Me the sign and expression of Thy love. They are My children. They are Mine, for it was for My sake that you gave them life and being. Never will I abandon them! Since they are incapable of knowing My joy, I am determined to share their misery.” Christ was to have come in glory like the bridegroom whose arrival on the wedding day is joyously awaited by the wedding guests. Now His coming will take place under the reign of Sin; in a body capable of being crushed by suffering, with a heart that affliction will overwhelm, He will come to destroy sin, this ‘wall of separation’ between God and man – between man and man. He will reconcile in His blood heaven and earth. He will unite the peoples. iv. THE INCARNATION One day, in the long procession of men groping in the shadow of death, Christ appeared. To this poor, purblind race of ours, He revealed the Father’s wondrous plan. “The Father Himself loves you.... He has not abandoned you... I am your Savior... I am Life.” v. THE REDEMPTION It was bearing His Cross that He came – weighted down under the burden of our sins. He climbed Calvary’s hill and reddened it with His blood. He was barbarously crucified on a Cross, and died between two thieves. Let us look for a moment at our suffering Savior. Taking place before our horrified gaze is the drama that dominates the world. Christ was ‘made sin’ for us, writes St. Paul. On the high hill of Calvary, overlooking the world, a terrible struggle is taking place between Love and Hate – a struggle of unheard-of force. As a result of this fearsome combat, Hate dies in the blood of his immolated Victim. The last words of Christ are a shout of triumph: “Father, it is consummated.” Love has conquered Hate. Sin is now in full flight. A moment ago, an enormous tidal wave, made up of all the crimes of earth, had sought to engulf within its corrupt depths Him who offered Himself as the Life of the World. Now, Life descends victorious from Calvary, driving back Sin to its ultimate retrenchments. God’s plan now unfolds in all its majesty – the return to the Father, to the Father’s House. How may we bring about this return? By following Christ the Way, in what is to be henceforth His sorrowful way. “If anyone wishes to follow Me, let him deny himself, take up his cross, and follow Me.” Integrated into Christ by Baptism, I (and not somebody else) ought to die to self, and live the life of Christ. “Christ died for all; that they also who live, may not now live to themselves, but unto Him Who died for them, and rose again.” (II Cor. 5:15) With St. Paul we should say, “Those things that are wanting of the sufferings of Christ, I fill up in my flesh, for His body, which is the Church.” (Col. 1:24) If our good works, sacrifices, and sufferings are to count for eternity and be pleasing to God, it is necessary for us (as we have seen above) to be united to Christ. It is through Him, and with Him, and in Him that we become recipients of God’s loving-kindness and mercy. Our union with Christ, our integration into His Mystical Body, is effected by the sacraments. It is by Baptism that we are introduced into Christ’s mystical family. It is through Baptism that we receive divine life; become adopted sons of God the Father; brothers of Jesus Christ; temples of the Holy Spirit, and heirs of heaven! But how should we offer up – following our Lord’s example – our adoration, thanksgivings, satisfactions, and petitions to God? How should we nourish the divine life within us? By means of the Mass – the Sacrifice of the Mystical Body. vi. THE HOLY SACRIFICE OF THE MASS The Mass is the means whereby we may become the prolongation of Christ. • Through the offering of ourselves with Christ • Through the consecration of ourselves through Christ • Through the communion in Christ to the greater glory of the Blessed Trinity and the sanctification of our souls. The Mass reminds us at one and the same time of God’s condescension toward man, and of man’s ascension toward God! For the Mass sums up the twin mysteries of the Incarnation and Redemption, at the same time that it applies to us their fruits. Crib and Cross manifest to mankind God’s love for all; whereas the Mass stresses His love for the individual. One ought, then, to look on the Mass as the sum total of man’s ascensions toward God, because it presupposes and completes them. The sinner derives from it abundant graces of conversion. The just man finds fervor in it – outstripping himself from one Consecration to another. Through the Mass man offers to God praise that is worthy of Him.
  19. 19. This, then, is the place that the Mass occupies in God’s plan. Like Christ, it is at the center: as a sun to bring light and warmth, to transform and uplift all creation and bring it back to its Creator in a hymn of thanksgiving. The Mass ought to occupy ALL the place in our lives. We ought to: • Offer ourselves up, like Christ on the Cross. • Consecrate ourselves, ‘transubstantiate’ ourselves – dying to our life of sin; to live, henceforth, the life of Christ. • Unite ourselves to Someone stronger than ourselves, communicating with Christ through reception of His Sacred Body, in order to identify ourselves ever more closely with Him, so that – our bodily members belonging more to Him than to us – we may be able to accomplish divine and supernatural works. • Render – through Christ – perfect praise to the august Trinity. Such should be the constant concern of our earthly existence, and the prelude to our heavenly life in a blessed eternity. vii. OFFERING CHRIST TO THE FATHER We have seen that Christ is the center of religion and the universe. The creation, over which Christ reigns, is willed by God for His glory. We are beings created solely for the praise and glory of God. How can such a frail creature as man offer acceptable praise to the Blessed Trinity? In this way. The Word of God was incarnated, became one of us, and to each one of us gave something of Himself in such a way that we are enabled through Him, with Him, and in Him, to fulfill our religious duties toward God, duties that may be summarized in two acts, as follows: 1. Our continual offering of Jesus Christ to God the Father. 2. Our offering of ourselves with Him and like Him in complete self-surrender and self-sacrifice, so as to become one with Jesus Christ. For Christ alone can glorify God as He deserves. Christ, equal to the Father by His Godhead, lowered Himself to our level by the Incarnation. As man, Christ is able to bow before God and render Him true adoration in humility, submission, and obedience. As God, Christ offers His Father homage of infinite worth. It is the Incarnation that empowers us to offer God to God in the Person of Jesus Christ. Hence, the grandeur and incomparable superiority of the Mass over all other acts of religion. Why so many Masses? In order that the thought of offering Him up to God the Father may be continually present to our minds, Christ has willed to represent the offering up of His Sacrifice. But the Christ who thus offers Himself in the Mass is not just ‘Jesus, the Son of Mary’, but the total Christ – Christ complete, entire. That is, all the members of the Mystical Body offer themselves with Christ, their Head. Hence, the active role we should play in the Mass. Pope Pius XII recalled this truth in his encyclical on the Mystical Body (Mystici Corporis): “In it, the priest not only represents our Savior, but the entire Mystical Body; and each of the faithful in particular. The faithful, themselves, moreover, united to the priest in a common will and prayer, offer up to the Eternal Father the Immaculate Lamb brought down on the altar by the voice of the priest. They offer Him, by the hands of the same priest, as a most pleasing Victim of propitiation and praise, for the necessities of the whole Church. And just as the Divine Redeemer, dying on the Cross, offered Himself as Head of the human race, to the Eternal Father; in the same way, in this ‘clean oblation’, He not only offers Himself as Head of the Church to the Heavenly Father, but in Himself He also offers His mystical members; since all – even the most infirm and feeble – are contained in His loving heart.” In what does Christ’s Sacrifice consist? Our Lord’s Sacrifice consists in His complete self-renunciation – an immolation that began with the first instant of His earthly existence and terminated on Calvary’s Cross. Our Lord’s Sacrifice consists above all in the preferring of God’s will to His own: a preference shown by His oblation, which persists eternally. This perfect love of Christ for His Father was stabilized by His death and will abide throughout eternity. Death fixes us in the dispositions we have at the moment of dying. Our degree of charity at death will mark our degree of glory for eternity. The set of our hearts at death remains as the final disposition of our wills. Our Lord, at the moment of His death on the Cross, attained (so to speak) the climax of His love for His Father. And it is precisely these sublime dispositions of our Lord toward His Father at the moment of His death that are made actual in the Mass. Now do you see why the Mass is of such great value? Is the Mass the same as Christ’s Sacrifice on the Cross, or is it a different Sacrifice? It is the same Sacrifice. Christ offered Himself once for all. “...[W]e are sanctified by the oblation of the Body of Jesus Christ once.” (Heb. 10:10) To understand this, we have only to go back to the concept of oblation, renunciation, and choice. The renunciation is summarized by Christ’s death accepted once and for all. On Calvary, this act of renunciation was made Once, and it passed. But above all, our Lord’s Sacrifice consists in this constant desire for His Father’s will in preference to His Own; and this preference remains eternally fixed in heaven. Suffering passes – the fact of having suffered remains. It is the same thing for us when we renounce anything. The act of self-denial is, like all acts, temporary; but the disposition of the will to deny itself for a greater good remains just so long as we do not take it back. Death fixes us forever in the dispositions in which it finds us. Christ’s Sacrifice persists in heaven, because the legacy of His ____
  20. 20. life made on the Cross has never been cancelled. That which He gave was given for all time.... Christ’s immolation is eternal. St. John, in his vision of heaven, sees Jesus as “a Lamb standing upright, yet slain (as I thought) in sacrifice.” (Apoc. 5:6) This is understandable. The purpose of our Lord’s Sacrifice having been to glorify God, the act whereby He glorifies Him must, of necessity, be eternal. When the priest brings Christ down upon the altar, he renders Him present such as He is in heaven; and He is in heaven with the same loving dispositions that He had on Calvary at the moment of His death. The Mass is, therefore, not a new Sacrifice by Christ; but the same Sacrifice actualized in the present. “We know that Christ rising again from the dead, dieth now no more.” (Rom. 6:9) The Mass is thus the perpetual prolongation of the Sacrifice made on the Cross. Consequently, every Mass is the one immolation of Christ repeated in the Act of Oblation. By the same act of the will, Jesus offers at the Last Supper His death in the future; on Calvary His death in the present; in heaven and on the altar His death in the past. This special presence of Christ on the altar is peculiar to the Mass and demonstrates its grandeur. When we celebrate the other mysteries of Christ’s life, we merely commemorate them. There is no real renewal of the mystery on the day devoted to it. At Christmas, the Church recalls to our minds the Savior’s birth, but this birth does not really take place – is not actualized in the present. On Ascension Thursday, our Lord does not renew His ascent into heaven. It is quite otherwise for the Mass. It is no simple symbolic representation, for the same Sacrifice that Christ accomplished on the cross is made truly present in an unbloody manner on the altar. Does the Mass differ in any way from the Sacrifice of the Cross? 1. EXTERNALLY We have seen that on the Cross, Christ expressed inner adoration toward His Father, by loving Him more than the thing most precious to Him – His own life. We find the same interior adoration in the Mass, since Christ’s preferential love for His Father persists eternally. The difference appears in the outward expression of Christ’s inner sentiments. On the Cross, Christ manifests His love for His Father by His death in a bloody manner. In the Mass, Christ offers Himself to His Father in a non- bloody manner. What sign, then, in the Mass gives outward expression to Christ’s inner adoration? For the Mass, like the Sacraments, has a visible sign that signifies and actualizes the Sacrifice. This sign is the separate Consecration of the bread and wine, representing the separation of our Lord’s body and blood on the Cross. The active Consecration – that is, not yet accomplished, but in process of accomplishment – effectively signifies Christ’s Sacrifice; since it renders present on the altar the same Sacrifice as that of Calvary. Note that the Real Presence of Christ in the tabernacle is not, properly speaking, a sacrifice; since the exterior sign – the Consecration – is lacking. Where the exterior element is lacking, there can be no sacrifice. 2. BY THE MODE OF OFFERING Two things are needed to make a sacrifice: a) Renunciation or immolation; b) preference, choice, oblation or offering. Now on the Cross, as in the Mass, it is the same Victim that is immolated – our Lord. A difference exists, however, in the method or mode of oblation. In the Mass, it is still our Lord who offers Himself as He did on Calvary, but through the ministry of His priests. Nevertheless, the priest is merely Christ’s representative. There is only one priest – Jesus Christ. But our Blessed Lord, in His great mercy, and in order to make us participate still more intimately in His Sacrifice, has self- imposed the condition whereby He cannot offer Himself on the altar without His priests. Thus, on the Cross, Christ offers Himself by Himself in our name. In the Mass, it is the priest who, in the name of all the people, offers Christ exteriorly. For interiorly, it is always Christ who offers. 3. AS TO TIME AND PLACE The Sacrifice of the Cross occurred at a given moment in a given spot on the earth. Christ offered His death in the present. In the Mass, Christ offers Himself throughout the whole universe, exactly as the prophet Malachias had prophesied, and at each moment of the day and night. He offers His death as an accomplished historical fact. To whom is the Sacrifice of the Mass offered? To God alone. Why to God alone? a) Because the Mass is an act of adoration; b) because the dignity of Christ, Victim and Sacrificer, is infinite, hence His offering can be addressed only to God; c) because an offering made to a creature would be idolatrous, since the end of sacrifice is to acknowledge God’s pre-eminence and kingship over all creation. Nevertheless, the Sacrifice of the Mass may be offered in honor of the angels and saints: a) To thank God for the wonderful way in which He has rewarded their virtue; b) to ask graces from God through their intercession or patronage; c) to celebrate their virtues and their triumphs; d) to stir us up to imitate them. The custom of offering the Mass in honor of the saints is a very ancient one. In the early days of the Church, it was customary to gather round the tombs of the martyrs on the anniversaries of their deaths and have Mass celebrated to honor their memory. For whom may Mass be celebrated? God always receives infinite praise from the Mass, even should the celebrant be unworthy of his high office; for it is Christ, who – in the Mass, as once on Calvary – is both Priest and Victim. The Mass is offered to God alone; but for the advantage, profit, utility, and benefit of the Mystical Body of Christ.
  21. 21. The beneficiaries of the Mass are thus the members of the Mystical Body. The Mass includes the ‘Memento of the Living’ and the ‘Memento of the Dead’. We shall find there indicated the persons for whom Mass may be celebrated. 1. The living. These are the members of Christ’s Mystical Body still on earth: consequently, each one of us. Incidentally, a beautiful prayer formula for offering prayer for dying sinners is the following: “My God, I offer you all the Masses that are being celebrated today for those sinners who are in their agony now and are to die today. May the precious Blood of Jesus obtain mercy for them!” 2. The dead. In other words, the souls in purgatory. Charity demands that those members of the Mystical Body who have access to Christ’s oblation, should not forget those members no longer able to offer the Holy Sacrifice. It devolves on us to see that the Church Suffering is not deprived of its greatest good: the Mass, which applies to it Christ’s merits. If we would have Christians still on earth think of us, when we in our turn shall be in purgatory; let us not forget the departed, who implore our prayers and Masses! The merit of a charitable work depends on three factors: 1) The value of the work in question; 2) The effort involved; 3) The amount of charity with which the work is accomplished. No work of mercy surpasses in value the gift of a Mass. If the cup of cold water is rewarded, of how much greater merit is Christ’s infinite oblation applied to a human soul! No ether offering or riches is comparable. If material or spiritual aid to a neighbor in need, draws down upon us Heaven’s blessings, how much more meritorious still, the offering to a suffering member of the Mystical Body of the very immolation of Christ! Do all members of the Mystical Body have an equal share in the fruits of the Mass? It is customary to distinguish four fruits of the Mass: • A general fruit destined for all members of the Mystical Body. • A special fruit designed for all those assisting at the Sacrifice with suitable dispositions. • A functional fruit directed toward those persons for whose intentions the Mass is being offered. • A personal fruit designated for the priest celebrating the Holy Sacrifice. Be it noted, however, that whatever may be our title for sharing in the fruits of the Mass, the profit we derive from the Mass will depend on the dispositions with which we hear it. viii. OFFERING MYSELF WITH CHRIST What is the source of our obligation to offer ourselves in the Mass with Christ? We have seen that the Mass is Christ’s Sacrifice, that is, the Sacrifice of Calvary made present on the altar. Now Christ’s Sacrifice on the Cross was not an individual, but a social sacrifice. It was as Head of the Mystical Body that Christ consented to die. In offering and immolating Himself on the Cross, He included us in His Sacrifice. Christ was obedient to His Father in His own name, and in ours. Our Lord had a right to include, to integrate us into His Sacrifice; because we belong to Him, we are His members. He could require, therefore, that we should be obedient to His Father, as He Himself was obedient. On our Lord’s side, the Sacrifice is complete, of infinite merit. On our side, it is incomplete, finite, limited in its application. We carry out this offering, this submission, or this immolation, with the passage of time; and also to the degree in which we do not draw back from immolating ourselves with Christ. We understand better now St. Paul’s words: “I now rejoice in my sufferings for you, and fill up those things that are wanting of the sufferings of Christ, in my flesh, for His Body, which is the Church.” (Col. 1:24) Christ’s sufferings are complete in the order of satisfaction and merit, but not in the order of application. On our side, the Sacrifice of the whole Christ is incomplete. It will terminate with the death of the last member of the Mystical Body, who adds the last thing lacking to the Passion of Christ. Consequently, our obligation to offer ourselves with Christ in the Mass comes from our membership in Christ’s Mystical Body, into which we were introduced by Baptism. “It is not surprising,” writes Pope Pius XII in Mediator Dei, “that Christians should be raised to this dignity. For by the bath of Baptism, Christians are made members of the Body of Christ the Priest; and by the ‘character’ which is, as it were, graven on their souls, are ordered to divine worship. They thus participate according to their condition in the priesthood of Christ Himself.” A non-baptized person may be bodily present at Mass, and may even follow the ceremonies intelligently. Yet, in the full meaning of the term, he does not ‘assist’ at Mass; for he who truly assists has to be offered with Christ. Now to be offered with Christ, one must first have been incorporated into Christ – be the prolongation of His life. Hence, the baptismal character comprises a union with Christ, a likeness by reason of which we share in His priesthood. And by virtue of our integration into Christ, we are enabled to be offered with Him; and to share in the offering of His immolation, in His Sacrifice. Not only is it permissible for us to be offered with Christ, but we are under obligation to offer ourselves with Him – under pain of mutilating the total Christ! For the head alone is not the total Christ. In order for the Mystical Body to be complete, both head and members are needed. This is the whole Christ, as He was offered up to God on Calvary – as He is offered each day on our altars. What are the three principal parts of the Mass? The three principal parts are: 1) the Offertory or oblation; 2) the Consecration or immolation; 3) the Communion or reception.
  22. 22. These three parts belong together and are the indispensable elements of every sacrifice. Every Mass demands an offering, a relinquishment, a renunciation. Every offering calls for a consecration, an immolation, a choice. Every consecration presupposes a communion – love calls for love, sacrifice for reception. What is meant by this expression: “The Mass must be lived”? Christ included us in His Sacrifice by offering us together with Himself to the Father. The Mass is the means the Church has at her disposal for offering supreme homage to the Blessed Trinity. The Mass is not Christ’s Sacrifice alone, but that of the whole Mystical Body as well. If we are content to offer up our Lord’s sufferings, there is no sacrifice on our part, but a petition (“Dear God, here are the sufferings of your Divine Son. In return, please grant me such and such a favor!”) If the Mass is to become my Mass, my sacrifice offered to God, if I am to offer the Blessed Trinity my portion of thanksgiving and praise, I must live the way Christ lived; in the same dispositions of denial of self and of placing God first, of obedience, of daily immolation. My sacrifice must be added to His! It is only when we offer our sacrifices to God in union with Christ’s Sacrifice that they become as gold, just as the tiny drop of water that falls into the chalice becomes wine! It is ‘through Him’ and ‘in Him’ that our sacrifices acquire all their value. Hence, the extreme importance of centering our lives on the Mass. Our Sacrifice, our Mass, is in two parts: 1. The ritual offering in union with that of Christ in His name. I offer myself completely, and in advance, for the hours that lie ahead. 2. The second action – too often forgotten – is as important as the first. This consists in the carrying out of the offering, throughout the course of the day, in the midst of the series of actions that make up its warp and woof. This is what is known as ‘living my Mass’. Everything does not end with the Ite, missa est. On the contrary, it is then that everything begins. For when a person has offered himself, all himself, with Christ, how is it possible for him to think, speak, and act as do those who have never offered themselves? Remember! God gives Himself to the one giving himself, and God is not pleased with half gifts! God never lets Himself be outdone in generosity. That is why, after giving ourselves to God through Christ, our Mass is completed by Communion, which gives God to us through Christ. What preparation should Ι bring to my Mass? The celebration of a Mass is not just something that can be improvised on the spot, especially when one considers that the Mass is the greatest event in world history. Α proper preparation should be threefold: 1. Doctrinal preparation. By means of reading, of listening to God’s Word, and of study groups. Such preparation for Mass is most important and fruitful, because it shows us the prime value of the Mass and compels us to study the great dogmas of our Faith, for which the Mass serves as a rallying-point: The Trinity, the Incarnation, Redemption, grace and glory. If many souls fail to progress, if instead of going forward, they continually go backward, it should be recognized that the principal cause of their spiritual anemia is to be found in their total or partial ignorance of the Mass – center of their lives. Let us rise up against this ignorance and apathy. Let us study these great truths and then share with others the knowledge that we acquire. 2. Liturgical preparation. The ceremonial of the Mass is of singular help in the understanding of the doctrine. The Church has multiplied the number of liturgical ceremonies so as to present, under a simple form of imagery, the fundamental theology of the Sacrifice of the Mass. 3. Ascetic preparation. Of the three preparations, the ascetic (or that of the heart and will) is the most important. It should be the constant concern of my life. Its purpose is to conform me more and more to Christ. The more I am a victim, the more will my Mass profit me and my neighbor. For Christ, the Mass is the Sacrifice of utter self-abasement and self- surrender. We are members of Christ. ix. PURPOSE OF THE HOLY MASS The end of Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross was the salvation of mankind. As this end was attained fully and completely and for all times by the suffering of Christ, the purpose of the Holy Mass must be quite different from the purpose of the sacrifice on the cross. The Mass is an application of the merits of His death on the cross to us sinners. From this it follows that in a fuller way and with a more sublime signification than the sacrifices of the Old Testament, the Holy Mass is to be considered as: • An offering of adoration and recognition of the Supreme Majesty: Jesus Christ adores God as fully as He deserves. In the Mass, we honor God by God Himself, namely by Jesus Christ. • An offering of thanksgiving to God, the origin of all blessings. Here also Jesus takes our place and He thanks the Creator with infinite perfection for all His heavenly and earthly blessings. By Jesus alone can we entirely fulfill our duty of thankfulness towards God. • An offering of atonement for forgiveness of daily sins and of temporal punishments due for mortal sins that are already forgiven. The Holy Mass makes mercy possible where there is sufficient sorrow for deadly sins. • An offering of impetration or prayer. It is Jesus Who is praying for us in the Sacrifice, Jesus Whose prayers are always heard.
  23. 23. VII. A LONG INTROIT Psalm 18:2-30 Diligam te, Domine. David’s thanks to God for his delivery from all his enemies. Unto the end, for David the servant of the Lord, who spoke to the Lord the words of this canticle, in the day that the Lord delivered him from the hands of all his enemies, and from the hand of Saul. (c.f. II Kg. 22) I WILL LOVE THEE, O LORD, MY STRENGTH: The Lord is my firmament, my refuge, and my deliverer. My God is my helper, and in him will I put my trust. My protector and the horn of my salvation, and my support. Praising I will call upon the Lord: and I shall be saved from my enemies. The sorrows of death surrounded me: and the torrents of iniquity troubled me. The sorrows of hell encompassed me: and the snares of death prevented me. In my affliction I called upon the Lord, and I cried to my God: And he heard my voice from his holy temple: and my cry before him came into his ears. The earth shook and trembled: the foundations of the mountains were troubled and were moved, because he was angry with them. There went up a smoke in his wrath: and a fire flamed from his face: coals were kindled by it. He bowed the heavens, and came down: and darkness was under his feet. And he ascended upon the cherubim, and he flew; he flew upon the wings of the winds. And he made darkness his covert, his pavilion round about him: dark waters in the clouds of the air. At the brightness that was before him the clouds passed, hail and coals of fire. And the Lord thundered from heaven, and the highest gave his voice: hail and coals of fire. And he sent forth his arrows, and he scattered them: he multiplied lightnings, and troubled them. Then the fountains of waters appeared, and the foundations of the world were discovered: At thy rebuke, O Lord, at the blast of the spirit of thy wrath. He sent from on high, and took me: and received me out of many waters. He delivered me from my strongest enemies, and from them that hated me: for they were too strong for me. They prevented me in the day of my affliction: and the Lord became my protector. And he brought me forth into a large place: he saved me, because he was well pleased with me. And the Lord will reward me according to my justice; and will repay me according to the cleanness of my hands: Because I have kept the ways of the Lord; and have not done wickedly against my God. For till his judgments are in my sight: and his justices I have not put away from me. And I shall be spotless with him: and shall keep myself from my iniquity. And the Lord will reward me according to my justice; and according to the cleanness of my hands before his eyes. With the holy, thou wilt be holy; and with the innocent man thou wilt be innocent. And with the elect thou wilt be elect: and with the perverse thou wilt be perverted. For thou wilt save the humble people; but wilt bring down the eyes of the proud. For thou lightest my lamp, O Lord: O my God enlighten my darkness. For by thee I shall be delivered from temptation; and through my God I shall go over a wall. VIII. AT THE COLLECTS STIR UP THY POWER, WE BESEECH THEE, O LORD, AND COME: that from the threatening dangers of our sins we may deserve to be rescued by Thy protection, and to be saved by Thy deliverance: Who livest and reignest with God the Father in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, world without end. Amen IX. AN EXERPT FROM AN EPISTLE OF ST. PAUL Romans 8:1-2, 10-11 THERE IS NOW therefore no condemnation to them that are in Christ Jesus, who walk not according to the flesh. For the law of the spirit of life, in Christ Jesus, hath delivered me from the law of sin and of death. And if Christ be in you, the body indeed is dead, because of sin; but the spirit liveth, because of justification. X. A GRADUAL Psalm 117:1-2, 16-29 Confitemini Domino. The psalmist praiseth God for his delivery from evils: putteth his whole trust in him; and foretelleth the coming of Christ. Alleluia. GIVE PRAISE TO THE LORD, FOR HE IS GOOD: FOR HIS MERCY ENDURETH FOR EVER. Let Israel now say that he is good: that his mercy endureth for ever. The right hand of the Lord hath wrought strength: the right hand of the Lord hath exulted me: the right hand of the Lord hath wrought strength. I shall not die, but live: and shall declare the works of the Lord. The Lord chastising hath chastised me: but he hath not delivered me over to death. Open ye to me the gates of justice: I will go into them, and give praise to the Lord. This is the gate of the Lord, the just shall enter into it. I will give glory to thee because thou hast heard me: and art become my salvation. The stone which the builders rejected; the same is become the head of the corner. This is the Lord’s doing: and it is wonderful in our eyes. This is the day which the Lord hath made: let us be glad and rejoice therein. O Lord, save me: O Lord, give good success. Blessed be he that cometh in the name of the Lord. We have blessed you out of the house of the Lord. The Lord is God, and he hath shone upon us. Appoint a solemn day, with shady boughs, even to the horn of the alter. Thou art my God, and I will praise thee: thou art my God, and I will exalt thee. I will praise thee, because thou hast heard me, and art become my salvation. O praise ye the Lord, for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever.

×