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Presentation from Cost in the Countryside event 25/02/2011. Highlighting triple cost of living in rural Norfolk

Presentation from Cost in the Countryside event 25/02/2011. Highlighting triple cost of living in rural Norfolk

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  • 38 hour week
  • Over last 12 months Based 1,000 litres
  • 15% in fuel poverty in Norfolk. Higher in Rural

Cost and the Countryside Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Cost In the Countryside Jon Clemo Chief Executive
  • 2. Norfolk RCC
    • Supporting Communities
    • Rural Advocacy
    • Developing Solutions
  • 3.
    • Local perspective
    • The need in rural areas
    • The triple hit rural communities are taking
    • The future Challenges
    • The future Opportunities
  • 4. What’s the need?
  • 5. Share of Deprivation In Rural Norfolk 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 All people Loan pensioner households Lone parent households Pensionable age Income Support Claimants Income Deprived (IMD) Pension credit claimants Jobseekers allowance claimants Incapacity benefits No qualifications Limiting long term illness No car ownership Social Rented Housing Housing Benefit Claimants Houses Lacking central heating
  • 6. 10% most deprived East Of England OCSI Output Area Model 2010
  • 7. Price at the pump
    • 4.4% increase between Dec and Jan
    • Record breaking £1.28 per litre
    • Average commute in rural Norfolk is 32 miles (return trip)
    • Annual Cost £1,564
    • 13% of gross income on minimum wage
    • Some caveats but some reason to suspect it’s worse
    • Not just petrol…
  • 8. Heating your home
    • Majority off mains gas
    • Older properties often lower insulation standards and opportunities for improvements
    • More detached properties
  • 9. Fuel Price Comparison Average UK Price (pence per litre) Department of Energy and Climate Change
  • 10. Fuel Poverty in Norfolk 14.8% 52,278 356,338 Totals 14.2% 6,942 48,823 South Norfolk 9.3% 5,333 57,602 Norwich 22.2% 9,864 44,393 North Norfolk 17.5% 10,716 61,105 King's Lynn and West Norfolk 12.5% 5,060 40,499 Great Yarmouth 11.7% 6,006 51,552 Broadland 16.0% 8,357 52,364 Breckland fuel poverty households total households ONS 2006 7.7% 6,891 89,953 Hackney 5.8% 5,126 87,859 Tower Hamlets 11.7% 7,160 61,213 Knowsley 16.3% 31,068 190,937 Manchester 15.8% 30,838 195,319 Liverpool
  • 11. The Challenge
    • 52,778 households in fuel poverty*
    • Heating oil increased 44% in cost over one year**
    • Impact of recession on incomes
    *2006 data- more than 10% of income on maintaining reasonable temperature **Dec ’09- Dec ’10 Department of Energy and Climate Change
  • 12. Combined impact
    • To afford a minimum standard of living, a single person needs to earn at least:
    • £15,600 a year in a rural town
    • £17,900 a year in a village
    • £18,600 in a hamlet or the remote countryside.
    • In comparison, urban dwellers need £14,400, to meet the specified minimum.
    • http://www.jrf.org.uk/publications/minimum-income-rural-households
  • 13. Impacts of Low Incomes 13.75 England 11.99 East of England 14.83 Norfolk 11.89 South Norfolk 19.54 Norwich 15.05 North Norfolk 14.15 King's Lynn And West Norfolk 17.85 Great Yarmouth 11.89 Broadland 13.43 Breckland Total households: % with an income under £10K 2004 Norfolk Insight
  • 14. What About Providers
    • Commercial & Public Sector
    • Smaller populations mean higher cost per output- impacts value for money
    • Higher cost to deliver in rural areas
    • Cost increases also effect providers
    • Urban models of delivery that don’t work with rural patterns of life
  • 15. Future Challenges
    • Public sector service delivery reductions tend to effect rural areas disproportionately
    • This shifts costs onto the most vulnerable in our communities
    • Deprived rural areas have over twice level of no car ownership (36.5% compared to rural average of 14.4%)
    • Public Sector employment is higher in rural areas
  • 16. Future Challenges
    • Aging Population
    • Aging faster in rural
    • Increases care needs and costs
    • Pattern of retirement to rural areas
      • Affordable Housing
      • Loss of local services
      • Impact on friendly eyes and ears
  • 17. Opportunities
    • Change and redesign
    • Opportunity to reform
    • Better access planning
    • Better models of delivery
    • Better rural proofing
  • 18. Big Society & Localism
    • Strong role in preventative services
    • Must link to effective public services
    • Local focus for local needs
    • There are limits
    • Must be supported
    • Needs a practical administrative framework
    • Varying capacity needs varying solutions
    • Balance between what is truly local and cost of delivery
  • 19. Redesign of Public Transport
    • Public transport cuts
    • Empty buses at the wrong places and times are bad
    • Demand responsive is often better
    • Better Access planning
    • But…
    • Must offer same level of coverage
    • Communication and information
    • Strong role for community sector
    • Service to the people or people to the services
  • 20. Positive Activities
    • Happiness and wellbeing
    • UK Happiness Index
    • Knock on effects on physical and mental health
    • Family, friends and social life bigger drivers than money
    • In one study, volunteer and charity work generated more joy than anything except….
    • dancing!
    • Target funding differently
    • Deliver more locally
  • 21.  
  • 22. Rural Big Society
    • Huge amount of community activity
    • Overwhelmingly good, healthy and safe places to live
    • Rural Communities are good at self help
    • Potential to grow and develop
    • Need to provide support
    • Need to address rural equality issues