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SME Regional Development in a Globalized World. Entrepreneurs and Business Circle. Crises prevention and development

SME Regional Development in a Globalized World. Entrepreneurs and Business Circle. Crises prevention and development

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  • There are 125 million formal MSMEs in this set ofeconomies, including 89 million in emerging markets.
  • Source: Köllinger – Thurik, Erasmus University, Rotterdam 2010
  • 8. How much money does it take to fund a Millennium Village?A core aspect of the Millennium Villages is that the poverty-ending investments in agriculture, health, education, and infrastructure can be financed by donors at an average incremental cost of just $50 per villager per year�$250,000 per village per year. The overhead costs of managing the project in each village are also low, $50,000 per year, since the project draws upon skilled local managers who work alongside the UN Millennium Project and the Earth Institute at Columbia University. This modest investment offers the realistic prospect that a community of 5,000 men, women, and children can achieve the Millennium Development Goals and embark on a path of self-sustaining economic development.On a per person basis, the average total village of $110 per person is comprised of:$50 Donor funding through the Millennium Village program $30 Local and national governments (this is most likely to include funding for interventions themselves and the provision of agricultural and health extension workers in the villages) $20 Partner organizations (e.g., existing programs supported by official bilateral donors) and in-kind corporate giving (for example, Sumitomo Chemical Corporation recently agreed to donate insecticide-treated bednets for the Millennium Villages)$10 Village members, typically through in-kind contributions of their time and expertise Critically, the external financing needs of $70 per capita are in line with the financial commitments made by the leaders of industrialized countries at the 2005 G8 Summit in Gleneagles. G8 countries promised to raise their development assistance to Africa to the equivalent of $70 per capita by 2010. Critically, the external financing needs of $70 per capita are in line with the financial commitments made by the leaders of industrialized countries at the 2005 G8 Summit in Gleneagles.  G8 countries promised to raise their development assistance to Africa to the equivalent of $70 per capita by 2010..
  • Transcript

    • 1. SMEs LOCAL DEVELOPMENT IN A GLOBALIZED WORLDMORE SMEs = MORE JOBS = BETTER QUALITY OF LIFE WORLD WIDE THE GROWTH EQUATION FOR OUR FUTURE By Prof. Dr. Norbert W. Knoll – Dornhoff General Secretary Dornhoff General Secretary
    • 2. 1. Reform of Institutions – Ease of Doing SME Biz2. Promotion of equity SME financing3. Mutual SME Funds for Crises Prevention and Development – Tobin Tax and VAT4. Reform of EIB financing
    • 3. MSMEDensityWorld per1000 peopleSource: IFC WorldBank 2010
    • 4. MSMEDENSITYHigh income –high densityLow income -low density
    • 5. MSMEEmploymentFormal MSMEsemploy morethan one-thirdof the world’slabor force, butthe percentagedropssignificantly withincome level.
    • 6. Constraints forMSMEDevelopment ELECTICITY AND ACCESS TO FINANCE
    • 7. HUNGARYMain constraintsfor SMEs
    • 8. DR CONGOMain constraintsfor SMEs
    • 9. Self Employment rate and GDP
    • 10. EASE OF DOING BUSINESS OR SUFFERING ?1201008060 GDP p.c EASE DB40 SUFFERING %20 0
    • 11. Relation GDI per capita – Ease DB - Suffering 180 175 160 140 134 127 122 123 120 100 GDI 79 80 EASE SUFFERING 60 46 40 34 34 21 23 22 19,2 19,3 20 14 10,9 11 10,3 8 7,6 2 3,6 1,2 0,32 0 BRAZIL INDIA DR CONGO UGANDA SOUTH CHINA RUSSIAN HUNGARY AFRICA FED
    • 12. THRIVING in AFRICA 180180 160160 133 137140120100 GDP p.c. EASE DB80 THRIVING60 5240 25 2420 8,5 8,9 1 4 2 0 MALAWI BOTSWANA TOGO BURUNDI
    • 13. Source: How big isAfrica Really ?. By ErikaAmoako-AgyeiAfrica is 30,3 million km² andthus is larger than thecombination of:China (9,6 million km²),the US (9,4 million km²),Western Europe (4,9 millionkm²),India (3,2 million km²)and Argentina (2,8 millionkm²)plus the Scandinaviancountries and the BritishIsles with room to spare.
    • 14. FROMTRADING TOINDUSTRIALPARTNERSHIPTRADE WITHBRICS64% IMPORTSfrom CHINA58% EXPORTS toCHINA
    • 15. I. Essential Markets Trends for Africa 2011 and beyond Africa is, and will continue to be, one of the fastest-growing economic regions in the world, thanks to surging demand both from abroad (from China and India in particular) and at home (fuelled by urbanization and consumerism. Telecoms, banking, retailing, manufacturing and even agriculture will be the the region’s fastest growing sectors: Africa’s consumer market will account for the region’s largest growth. Energy from renewable sources, sun, water,wind, biomass, waste Low cost housing Rapidly expanding, Africa’s youthful workforce, will be a key advantage. Smart phones will be the fastest-growing category of handsets, even in the poorer areas, where they often serve as a substitute for PCs. . commerce will flourish in 2011. Africa is well positioned to profit from natural resources as global demand for commodities continues to rise. Companies that succeed in these neglected emerging markets are not only putting down roots in the world’s most fertile soil. They are giving themselves a chance to establish business habits for years to come. Erika Amoako-Agyei, Jounalist and Africa Expert
    • 16. IMF – Autumn 2011 forecast GDP growth in percent – 2011 * 2012 – forecast spring 2011
    • 17. 7 000 Inward FDI stock 1985 -2007 Tanzania 6 000 5 000 4 000 Ethiopiamillion USD Uganda Congo, Democratic Republic of Uganda Kenya 3 000 Ethiopia United Republic of Tanzania 2 000 Kenya 1 000 Congo -DR - 19851986198719881989199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007
    • 18. Uganda: Best at education
    • 19. GDP per capita – annual growth in % - 2006 10 9 8 7 6percent 5 4 3 2 1 0
    • 20. II. ConstraintsRelation Delay in obtaining water connections (days)and GDP per capita (x 100)
    • 21. Main constraints: Electricity
    • 22. Bosnia – Herzegovina Main Constraints for SMEs
    • 23. Constraints: The Banks
    • 24. III. A new framework for development
    • 25. Millennium Villages
    • 26. Millennium Regions
    • 27. The proposed WMRin Sub Saharan Countries shall be aterritories which the Governments and thelocal Authorities declare as an area ofinfrastructural development to be set up inpleasant sites served by internationaltransport and communicationinfrastructure; nearby Research/Trainingcenters and Universities.
    • 28. MSME - Technology Park, Center of Competence
    • 29. Gallup Wellbeing in AfricaRelation to SMEs Ease of Doing Business and GNI perCapita (PPP – Purchasing Power Parity) 2010
    • 30. SMEs – Ease of Doing BusinessWord Bank Group – Reform of Institutions
    • 31. SMEs – Start-up Reforms
    • 32. EIB European Investment BankThe EIB has not so far produced any evidence thatits loans have actually benefited local populationsand not corrupted leaders andbusinessmen even in more stable politicalcircumstances. The EIB has invested inNorth Africa since 1979 but civilsociety activists say the lender concentrated toomuch of its investments on the energy sector.Between 2006 and 2010, the energy sectoraccounted for about 93 percent of the 1.85 billionEuros lent by the EIB to Egypt and 46 percentof lending to Tunisia.
    • 33. Promotion of SME equity financingThis can be achieved by retaininggreater reserves within the firm, and byseeking sources of external privateequity rather than debt finance.
    • 34. FTL – Finance Transaction Levy
    • 35. Micro-financing for SMEs, said Gian Franco Terenzi, President WUSME, particularly in agro-industry will have priority fo SME Mutual Fund for Crises Prevention and Development Micro-financing for SMEs, said Gian Franco Terenzi, President WUSME, particularly in agro-industry will have priority for WUSMEs Action Plan. This can be achieved by creating national “Mutual SME - Funds for Crises Prevention and Development”, financed with the CTL Currency Transaction Levy and a small percentage of the VAT that SMEs collect free of charge for the Finance Ministers.
    • 36. CurrencyTransaction Levyfor economicdevelopment andcrises prevention inAfrican CountriesEstimated annualrevenue of a 0.005%Currency TransactionLevy in selectCommonwealthcountries.Country Estimatedannual revenue (US$)4Australia $2,211,000,000Canada $1,386,000,000India $231,000,000New Zealand £627,000,000Singapore $396,000,000South Africa MALI$297,000,000 International demand for products such as cotton has dropped, meaning many farmers can no longer afford such essentials as school fees for their children. ©Helen Palmer/Oxfam
    • 37. THANK YOU FOR YOURATTENTION WUSME WORLD UNION OF SMEs General Secretariat1026 Budapest, Garas utca 22 Tel: +361- 315 10 59 mailto: wus@europe.com, web:www.wusme.org
    • 38. WUSME’sMISSIONa) Facilitatetechnology transferfrom WUSMEmember countries tothe organisations andenterprises in Africa.b) Enterprise toenterprisecooperation.c) Training to AfricanEntrepreneurs forsetting up SMEs.d) Undertake missionwith a view to providepolicy andinstitutional reforms