5. POSITIVE CLASSROOM DISPLINE     MODEL [ PCD] [JONES, 1987]2. Bahasa badan• 90% dpd masalah disiplin dan mengekalkan  mu...
5. POSITIVE CLASSROOM DISPLINE     MODEL [ PCD] [JONES, 1987]3. Sistem intensif• Utk menggalakkan murid mengikut kemahiran...
5. POSITIVE CLASSROOM DISPLINE     MODEL [ PCD] [JONES, 1987]2. Bahasa badan• 90% dpd masalah disiplin dan mengekalkan  mu...
JENIS MESEJ1. Mesej lisan2. Mesej bukan lisan   1) Bahasa muka { facial language }   2) Bahasa badan { facial language }  ...
Komponen mesej lisan1. Komponen lisanPerkataan sebenar yg diucapkan2. Komponen vokalKetegasan    suara, ton, tempo, kenyar...
5. POSITIVE CLASSROOM DISPLINE     MODEL [ PCD] [JONES, 1987]• Bantuan yg berkesan• Kurangkan dpd 4 minit seorang kpd 20 s...
Mesej bukan lisannon verbal messages can reinforce, modify or  even contradict our verbal messages action  speak louder th...
3. Model disiplin positifSistem intensif :-• Digunakan untuk memastikan pelajar  meneruskan kerja yang diberi.• Apa sahaja...
3. Model disiplin positifBantuan yang cekap:-• Jangan terlalu lama membantu satu-satu  pelajar sehingga meninggalkan yang ...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE      STUDENT BEHAVIOR  1. Give a    1. Give student                                         ...
FACULTY RESPONSE                • Give clear and concise verbal directive,                  remind student of syllabus pol...
TEACHER RESPONSE EXAMPLES“ It is time to stop____________________.”“ We need to move on now.”“That is inappropriate and wi...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE           STUDENT BEHAVIOR                RECOMMENDED TIPS1.   Look for behavior reinforceme...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE      STUDENT BEHAVIOR                                        TEACHER RESPONSE               ...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE      STUDENT BEHAVIOR         TEACHER RESPONSE EXAMPLES“ Your line of questioning is off-top...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE       STUDENT BEHAVIOR                   RECOMMENDED TIPS1.   Use the Code of Student Conduc...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE      STUDENT BEHAVIOR                               TEACHER RESPONSE                        ...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE      STUDENT BEHAVIOR           TEACHER RESPONSE EXAMPLES“ If you would like to remain in th...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE      STUDENT BEHAVIOR             RECOMMENDED TIPS1. Be firm2. Outside of class, seek wisdom...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE      STUDENT BEHAVIOR                  TEACHER RESPONSE               1. Give immediate and ...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE      STUDENT BEHAVIOR         TEACHER RESPONSE EXAMPLES“Doing______________in class is conti...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE      STUDENT BEHAVIOR             RECOMMENDED TIPS1. Have your plan ready, before you need i...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE      STUDENT BEHAVIOR                  TEACHER RESPONSE               1. GET HELP           ...
MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE      STUDENT BEHAVIORTEACHER RESPONSES1. GET HELP    a. Depart from student’s presence    b....
Who are the Gifted?Giftet students range from the highly gifted to the  cooperative “teacher’s pet”, and from the artist  ...
General Charateristics of Gifted                Children•   Use advanced vocabulary•   Show curiosity, ask endless questio...
Social and Emotional Characteristics of            Gifted Children•   Prefers adults or older children•   Has high energy ...
Is a student who is gifted a straight “A”                  student?• Not necessarily. There are gifted students whose acad...
What’s the difference between a high     achiever and being gifted?• Students who are high achievers are those  who typica...
Modify your classroom1. Depth/complexity & relevancy2. Alter the style & space as necessary3. Use high level questioning (...
Needs of Gifted Students• Gifted and talented elementary school students have    mastered from 35 to 50 percent of the cur...
Specific Concerns when Teaching             Gifted Students• Students could become interested in topic, but  the teaching ...
When the student will learn the information,skills, and/or concepts faster than most others in                     the cla...
When the student does not feel academically or          intellectually challenged:• Questivities• ILPs at the higher level...
Using Tomlinson’s Equalizer to Chart Complexity     Foundational      Information Ideas, Materials,       Transformational...
Positive classroom displine model [ pcd] [jones, 1987]
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Positive classroom displine model [ pcd] [jones, 1987]

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Positive classroom displine model [ pcd] [jones, 1987]

  1. 1. 5. POSITIVE CLASSROOM DISPLINE MODEL [ PCD] [JONES, 1987]2. Bahasa badan• 90% dpd masalah disiplin dan mengekalkan murid dgn tugasannya boleh dilaksanakan dgn kemahiran penggunaan bahasa badan• Cth merapati murid, kontak mata, badan menghampiri murid, memek muka
  2. 2. 5. POSITIVE CLASSROOM DISPLINE MODEL [ PCD] [JONES, 1987]3. Sistem intensif• Utk menggalakkan murid mengikut kemahiran guru• Cth masa sendiri, baca sendiri, permainan bercorak pendidikan dan tekanan rakan sebaya [masa utk aktiviti yg disukai dikurangkan bila murid tidak berkelakukan baik]
  3. 3. 5. POSITIVE CLASSROOM DISPLINE MODEL [ PCD] [JONES, 1987]2. Bahasa badan• 90% dpd masalah disiplin dan mengekalkan murid dgn tugasannya boleh dilaksanakan dgn kemahiran penggunaan bahasa badan• Cth merapati murid, kontak mata, badan menghampiri murid, memek muka, suara
  4. 4. JENIS MESEJ1. Mesej lisan2. Mesej bukan lisan 1) Bahasa muka { facial language } 2) Bahasa badan { facial language } 3) Ruang dan pergerakan { language of space and motion } 4) Masa { language of time } 5) Suara { language of the vioce }
  5. 5. Komponen mesej lisan1. Komponen lisanPerkataan sebenar yg diucapkan2. Komponen vokalKetegasan suara, ton, tempo, kenyaringan, kekuatanCth mari sini – makna bergantung kpd……
  6. 6. 5. POSITIVE CLASSROOM DISPLINE MODEL [ PCD] [JONES, 1987]• Bantuan yg berkesan• Kurangkan dpd 4 minit seorang kpd 20 saat seorang supaya lebih ramai dapat bantuan guru.• Jika semua kurang berkesan, in-class isolation or removal from the room
  7. 7. Mesej bukan lisannon verbal messages can reinforce, modify or even contradict our verbal messages action speak louder than words“Duduk le dulu!” Sambil memegang pintu.“ Apa khabar, lama tak jumpa” tangan digenggam erat, pipi bersentuh pipi.
  8. 8. 3. Model disiplin positifSistem intensif :-• Digunakan untuk memastikan pelajar meneruskan kerja yang diberi.• Apa sahaja pengaruh luaran yang menyebabkan pelajar bertindak.• Jones cadangkan aktiviti yang disukai oleh pelajar• Gunakan tekanan rakan sebaya.
  9. 9. 3. Model disiplin positifBantuan yang cekap:-• Jangan terlalu lama membantu satu-satu pelajar sehingga meninggalkan yang lain.• Bantuan setiap pelajar lebih kurang 10-20 saat sahaja.
  10. 10. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR 1. Give a 1. Give student 1. 1. Get away fromclear verbal clear verbal 2. Identify student.directive or directive. 1. Set and enforce limits consequences in 2. Get helpreminder to 2. 2.document class immediately. student and file 2. Give immediate verbal directive 3. Notify UCO w/consequence police services 3. Set different time & at (405) place for discussion 4. Formally 4. Formally document document 1. Give student 5. Give written verbal and written warning reminder/warning 5. File a complaint at of instruction and management & HEP warning Inform management & HEP
  11. 11. FACULTY RESPONSE • Give clear and concise verbal directive, remind student of syllabus policies and/or Code of Student Conduct policies w/expectation for termination of behavior. • Use constructive and non-belittling comments. Boundary Test ExamplesBOUNDARY TEST Talking, cell phone usage, passing notes, DISRUPTIONS distractive and/or annoying behaviors (i.e., fidgeting, muttering to self/neighbor, noise making, too many questions/off-topic questions)
  12. 12. TEACHER RESPONSE EXAMPLES“ It is time to stop____________________.”“ We need to move on now.”“That is inappropriate and will not be allowed in the classroom.”“Cell phones are to be turned off during class.”“As stated in your syllabus, off-topic, loud talking during lectures constitutes a disruption and thereby a violation of the Code of Student Conduct.”
  13. 13. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR RECOMMENDED TIPS1. Look for behavior reinforcements (i.e. friends) and precipitating factors and consider disbanding any groups, cliques.2. Cite the Code of Student Conduct in course syllbus.3. Make notes of events, behaviors. Directives.4. Encourage the three C’s of UCO.
  14. 14. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR TEACHER RESPONSE 1. 2 reminder/warning, document the behavior and response, issue verbal INTENTIONAL DISRUPTIONS possibility of consequences if behavior continues. 2. If necessary, meet with student during break, before or after class, or office hours. Document interactions (dates, times, locations, purpose and outcomes). Intentional Examples Continuing behavior after verbal directive persistent questioning, arguing, attention getting, disruptive, comments, sarcastic comments/distracting joke-telling in class.
  15. 15. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR TEACHER RESPONSE EXAMPLES“ Your line of questioning is off-topic. Please refrain from asking any futher off-topic questions.”“ Your side comments are disruptive. I expect you to listen or participate in the discussion and not be disruptive.”“ Please speak with me after class.”
  16. 16. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR RECOMMENDED TIPS1. Use the Code of Student Conduct as a reference guide.2. Identify behavior and impact on class/other students.3. State consequences, referral to management/HEP.4. Meet with student and possible 3 person; if 3 person is not available, meet in open space or in office with door open and 3 person nearby.
  17. 17. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR TEACHER RESPONSE 1. 2 reminder/warning, document the behavior and response, issue verbal possibility of consequences if behavior continues.CHALLENGING BEHAVIORS 2. If necessary, meet with student during break, before or after class, or office hours. Document interactions (dates, times, locations, purpose and outcomes). Challenging Examples Questioning teachers authority, credentials course syllabus, reasoning for a test, grading policy
  18. 18. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR TEACHER RESPONSE EXAMPLES“ If you would like to remain in this class, I recommend that you refrain from doing____________again.”You can either participate in class in an acceptable, non-distracting manner or con tinue with your current behavior and receive a ‘0’ for your participation grade today and face further consequences. Its is your choice.”
  19. 19. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR RECOMMENDED TIPS1. Be firm2. Outside of class, seek wisdom from experienced colleague, if available.3. Watch for any changes in context of the challenges. If the challenges change to intimidating statements and/or thearts, then follow the listed Teacher Response.
  20. 20. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR TEACHER RESPONSE 1. Give immediate and specific directives w/possible consequences. 2. INITIATE CLASS BREAK. During break, inform student that they must leave class and may not return until they meet with management rep. 3. Document and give student directive letter.
  21. 21. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR TEACHER RESPONSE EXAMPLES“Doing______________in class is continuing to be disruptive. I asked you to stop_____and you refused. Therefore, you may not attend this class until you meet with_______and I receive conformation of this meeting and your willingness to comply with the rules.”
  22. 22. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR RECOMMENDED TIPS1. Have your plan ready, before you need it.2. Know where the telephones are near your classroom and in your buliding.3. File a complaint with the management
  23. 23. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR TEACHER RESPONSE 1. GET HELP a. Depart from student’s presence b. Get in contact w/another staff c. Get someone to escort you to a safe area/safe proximity
  24. 24. MANAGING CLASSROOM DISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIORTEACHER RESPONSES1. GET HELP a. Depart from student’s presence b. Get in contact w/another staff person c. Get someone to escort you to a safe area/safe proximity from student2. NOTIFY POLICE3. DOCUMENT: After the situation is under control, notify the management and file a complaint.
  25. 25. Who are the Gifted?Giftet students range from the highly gifted to the cooperative “teacher’s pet”, and from the artist to the rebellious underachiever.Federal law (PL 91-230) defines gifted and talented children in fives categories:1. General Intellectual Ability2. Specific Academic Aptitude3. Creative or Productive Thinking4. Leadership Ability5. Visual/Performing Arts
  26. 26. General Charateristics of Gifted Children• Use advanced vocabulary• Show curiosity, ask endless questions• Display original ideas• Use imagination, creativity• Enjoy or display humor• Think of many solutions to solve problems
  27. 27. Social and Emotional Characteristics of Gifted Children• Prefers adults or older children• Has high energy level, needs less sleep• Aware of injustices and moral wrongs• Has extreme emotions
  28. 28. Is a student who is gifted a straight “A” student?• Not necessarily. There are gifted students whose academic achievement crosses all areas (language arts, mathematics, social studies, and science). There are many who may excel in only one or two areas. There are students that are gifted and have qualified outside of academic achievement that may not have any particular academic strenght but use their intellectual ability in other ways. These students display exceptional ability (s) in the visual or performing arts or have critical thinking skills that they demonstrate through problem solving opportunities. Another type of student that may qualify for gifted services may also have a disability that interferes with their ability to perform well in certain curricular areas.
  29. 29. What’s the difference between a high achiever and being gifted?• Students who are high achievers are those who typically are good students, do what is expected of them, please teachers with their attention, and like school for what it is. Gifted students are often more of a challenge to teachers, by always asking questions, questioning what is being offered, and may be less inclined to do what asked of them. The attached document – Note the Difference – will give you more of an idea of the difference.
  30. 30. Modify your classroom1. Depth/complexity & relevancy2. Alter the style & space as necessary3. Use high level questioning (Bloom)4. Provide guidance to student’s curiosity5. Allow student to choose content6. Allow group brainstorming7. Allow creativity and let student show preseverance8. Encourage students to show what they’ve learned thru various media eg theatre, reports, tv commercials. Cartoons, art, song etc9. Allow student to prepare or research alone or in groups
  31. 31. Needs of Gifted Students• Gifted and talented elementary school students have mastered from 35 to 50 percent of the curriculum offered in five basic subjects before they begin the school year.• Most regular classroom teachers make few, if any, provisions for gifted and talented children.• Most of the highest achieving students in the nation included in who’s who among american high school students reported that they studied less that 1 hour a day.- it’s easy to see why so many gifted students say they are bored in school.
  32. 32. Specific Concerns when Teaching Gifted Students• Students could become interested in topic, but the teaching style doesn’t match the learning style.• Student already knows the skill or concept that is being taught.• Student will learn the information, skills and/or concepts faster than most others in the class.• Student does not feel academically or intellectually challenged.• Student has given up on school is unmotivated, wants to be entertained rather than work.
  33. 33. When the student will learn the information,skills, and/or concepts faster than most others in the class:• Independent study• Student becomes a resident expert on some facet of the topic• Thematic Units• Learning Contract
  34. 34. When the student does not feel academically or intellectually challenged:• Questivities• ILPs at the higher level of Bloom’s• Enrichment activities that involve real life problem solving• Tiered Lessons/Units
  35. 35. Using Tomlinson’s Equalizer to Chart Complexity Foundational Information Ideas, Materials, Transformational ApplicationsConcrete Representations, ideas, abstract applications, materialsSimple Resources, research, issues, complex problems, skills, goalsFew Facets Disciplinary connections, Many facets directions, stages of developmentSmaller Leap Applications, insight, transfer Greater leapMore Structured Solutions, decisions, approaches Less structured (experts, GATE)Clearly defined Process, reasearch, products Fuzzy problemsProblemsLess Independence Planning, design, monitoring More independence

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