978-547-LAWN
978-547-LAWN
Today’s Agenda
SECTION 1 - Introduction to our Team
SECTION 2 – Weed ID Guide
SECTION 3 – Lawn Care
- Waterin...
978-547-LAWN
SECTION 1 – OUR TEAM
Eric T
Service
Manager
Jeffrey C
Lawn & Tree
Specialist
Derek B
Service
Manager
Scott V
...
978-547-LAWN
SECTION 2 – WEED ID GUIDE
“Plant out of Place”
• Any plant growing where it is not wanted.
• Plant with gener...
978-547-LAWN
Oxalis
• It is most recognizable due to the heart-
shaped leaflets that are found three to a leaf.
• The plan...
978-547-LAWN
Spurge
• Leafy spurge is a creeping
perennial that reproduces
from seed and vegetative
root buds.
• Appears i...
978-547-LAWN
Crabgrass
• Tight compact crab-like circle
• Seeds sprout in spring and summer
after rain or watering
• Very ...
978-547-LAWN
Plantain
• Found in moist soil, shade
• Spreads by seeding
• Appears in spring and continues through
summer
•...
978-547-LAWN
Wild Violets
• Wild violet is most often found in
shaded, fertile sites and prefers moist soils.
• Flowers oc...
978-547-LAWN
Nutsedge
• Identified by its stout triangular stem
• Yellow nutsedge has dark, unevenly globe-
shape, almond ...
978-547-LAWN
SECTION 3 – LAWN CARE PRACTICES
978-547-LAWN
Noon Fall Lawn Care
Round 5 Late Summer: August
A second application of organic fertilizer is applied to gree...
978-547-LAWN
Lawnmower
• Fall maintenance checklist
– Clean your mower right
– Grease fittings
– Lubricate linkages and ca...
978-547-LAWN
Watering & Mowing newly seeded areas
• New seed - watered 2-3 times each day, preferably
early morning and la...
978-547-LAWN
• Used on PGA tournament golf courses
• Safe for kids and pets
• Reduce run-off
• Improve lawn health
• Save m...
978-547-LAWN
Fall Core Aeration
Core aeration is a type of cultivation or cultural
practice that extracts a plug of turf, ...
978-547-LAWN
1. Improves Turf Health. Core aeration provides the root zone with greater access to air, water,
and fertiliz...
978-547-LAWN
• Simple & Effective
• Build turf density
• Healthier & Stronger
• Fight off weeds & disease
• Couple with Ae...
978-547-LAWN
Fall Lime Application
The application of lime is an integral and often essential
part of quality turfgrass ma...
978-547-LAWN
Fall Potassium
• Applied in the spring or fall, potassium helps
promote bottom growth of the turfgrass.
• Red...
978-547-LAWN
SECTION 4 – LAWN DISEASE ID GUIDE
-
If neglected, your lawn will suffer
the consequences, like disease.
Prope...
978-547-LAWN
Pythium Blight
• Also known as “cottony blight”," or "grease
spot," is a highly destructive turfgrass disease...
978-547-LAWN
Snow Mold
• A disease of grasses appearing as grayish-white or
pinkish patches after heavy snow has melted .
...
978-547-LAWN
Fusarium Blight (Frog’s Eye)
Can Be Avoided with Good Lawn Maintenance
• Watch for this lawn to disease to sh...
978-547-LAWN
Dollarspot
• Dollar spot is encouraged by drought stress
and leaf wetness.
• All grasses are susceptible to d...
978-547-LAWN
Brown Patch
• Fungal disease of hot, humid weather
• Most common in mid to late summer when
night temperature...
978-547-LAWN
SECTION 5 – PEST ID GUIDE
Insect pests can be grouped into two major categories:
1) Those that feed on leaves...
978-547-LAWN
Pest ID Guide
Insect pests can then be categorized into sub-groups:
Chewing insects : Eat entire parts of the...
978-547-LAWN
Black Vine Weevil
• Adult will feed on over 100 different kinds
of trees, shrubs, vines, and flowers in
lands...
978-547-LAWN
Mealy Bug
• Feed on plant juices and are destructive
especially for greenhouse ornamentals,
succulents and fr...
978-547-LAWN
Japanese Beetles
• The Japanese Beetle is an
invasive insect that can cause
some pretty nasty damage to
your ...
978-547-LAWN
Japanese Beetles Skeleton Leaves
Japanese Beetles Eating Skeletonized Leaf
978-547-LAWN
Fall Webworm
• Pest of shade trees and shrubs and
appears from late summer through early
fall.
• Feeds on alm...
978-547-LAWN
Fall Webworm
• The larval stage of this pest skeletonizes and
consumes leaves inside the protection of a
tent...
978-547-LAWN
Winter Moth
• Winter moth larvae hatch and feed ravenously on
leaves and fruit beginning in early spring.
• I...
978-547-LAWN
SECTION 6 - TREE AND SHRUB CARE
978-547-LAWN
2013 Season Notes Probably the most neglected or
ignored investments we have on our
property are our trees an...
978-547-LAWN
Fall Tree & Shrub Care
• Round 5 Late Summer Disease and Insect Resistance: August
Round 5 is a fungicidal an...
978-547-LAWN
MSI & WP
Merit Soil injection
• Performed fall or spring an injection is made around the drip line or
canopy
...
978-547-LAWN
White and Grey Birch
• Known for their pleasing white bark and
colorful leaves in fall.
• It is best to pick ...
978-547-LAWN
Flowering Crabapple
• Its best to refrain from fertilizing late
summer to minimize frost and winter
damage on...
978-547-LAWN
Cherry Tree
• Trees with a south facing side will be
susceptible to sun scald to the tree trunks.
• To minimi...
978-547-LAWN
Rhodedendrons
• Protect them for winter by applying a
fluffy mulch made of whole or chopped up
oak leaves or ...
978-547-LAWN
Azaleas
• Watering them in the fall before the ground
freezes.
• Azaleas will need 20 minutes in a drippy hos...
978-547-LAWN
Japanese Maple
• 2 ½ -3” of shredded hardwood mulch.
• Water 2x a week during the season deeply &
more often ...
978-547-LAWN
Burning Bush
• Mulch a 2-4” layer of organic material.
This will minimize soil moisture loss.
• Trim in early...
978-547-LAWN
Thank You
Raffle for FREE 2-step Noon WaterSaver for 2013.
SECTION 7 - TREE AND SHRUB CARE
978-547-LAWN
and now… our
open Q&A forum!
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Homeowner, Lawn, Tree, Shrub, and Insect ID Guide and Educational Webinar

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This is the complete slide deck from our 3rd Annual webinar from August 24 2013. Some great information contained within about weeds, lawns, trees, shrubs, pests and insects and more!

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  • Thank you all for attending our late summer /fall webinar Probably the most neglected or ignored investments we have on our property are our trees and shrubs.Usually one starts to care about their plant material once they notice something out of the ordinary happening.  This season we had a lot of snow that actually insulated your trees and shrub root systems which is great however the heavy snow did cause some limb breakage. In June we had a lot of rain and lots of new growth but fungi issues were abound.This year the insect most prevalent were canker worm in easly spring and through out the season lacebugs mealy bugs and scale issues.The beetles in July were mainly the European chafer Beetle attacking the trees and shrubs and some Japanese but in less populations.Right now we have lace bug and mealy and webworms in the crabs and cherries.  Once the warm weather starts to get cooler it is time to prune all dead material out of your plant material.Also prune to shape to minimize structural damage from winter.
  • Applications Rd5 Insect and disease control will help to minimize late summer early fall issues .This treatment will include a little oil  topical fungicide and insect product. Rd6 Is a Deep root or soil drench fertilization depending on the plant material. It is used to replace food supply and get the plants ready for fall and winter.This is applied with a lance and is a balance fertilization  Rd7 Is a Dormant horticultural oil performed in the fall and spring to suffocate overwintering eggs layed from caterpillars, aphid mites scale lace bugs and mealy.
  • Homeowner, Lawn, Tree, Shrub, and Insect ID Guide and Educational Webinar

    1. 1. 978-547-LAWN
    2. 2. 978-547-LAWN Today’s Agenda SECTION 1 - Introduction to our Team SECTION 2 – Weed ID Guide SECTION 3 – Lawn Care - Watering & Mowing Practices - NEW Noon WaterSaver Program - Aeration & Overseeding, Lime, Potassium - Fall Lawn Care SECTION 4 – Disease ID Guide SECTION 5 – Pest ID Guide SECTION 6 - Tree & Shrub - Fall Tree & Shrub Services - 2013 Overview - Tree & Shrub ID Guide SECTION 7 – RAFFLE and Q & A
    3. 3. 978-547-LAWN SECTION 1 – OUR TEAM Eric T Service Manager Jeffrey C Lawn & Tree Specialist Derek B Service Manager Scott V Service Manager Dan C Sales Manager
    4. 4. 978-547-LAWN SECTION 2 – WEED ID GUIDE “Plant out of Place” • Any plant growing where it is not wanted. • Plant with generally undesirable properties. • Plant that spreads rapidly and competitively. • A non-native (exotic) invasive plant.
    5. 5. 978-547-LAWN Oxalis • It is most recognizable due to the heart- shaped leaflets that are found three to a leaf. • The plant has a shallow taproot, and hairy stems that are 4 to 10 inches tall. • Flowers are bright yellow, have five petals, and bloom in early spring (March to April) • Capable of living more than two years. • They thrive in weak, thin turf; golf fairways and roughs; home lawns; playfields; and industrial grounds • Proper turf maintenance is the key to control of this weed.
    6. 6. 978-547-LAWN Spurge • Leafy spurge is a creeping perennial that reproduces from seed and vegetative root buds. • Appears in spring and summer • Prefers sunny areas • Forms a stiff mat that chokes and shades grass
    7. 7. 978-547-LAWN Crabgrass • Tight compact crab-like circle • Seeds sprout in spring and summer after rain or watering • Very fast growing • Likes bare and weak areas of the lawn • Fight by growing a dense healthy lawn • Proper mowing, fertilization, and watering • Spot treat with appropriately labeled products.
    8. 8. 978-547-LAWN Plantain • Found in moist soil, shade • Spreads by seeding • Appears in spring and continues through summer • Broadleaf plantain common in wet, compacted soil • Perennial broadleaf turf weeds are capable of living more than two years. • They thrive in weak, thin turf • Controlled with appropriately labeled weed-kill products. • It helps to aerate compacted soil and avoid over-watering.
    9. 9. 978-547-LAWN Wild Violets • Wild violet is most often found in shaded, fertile sites and prefers moist soils. • Flowers occurs in mid-May • Usually violet colored, but can vary from deep-blue-violet to completely white. • Plants spread by rhizomes and seed. • Difficult to control • They are capable of living more than two years • Proper turf maintenance is the key to control of this weed.
    10. 10. 978-547-LAWN Nutsedge • Identified by its stout triangular stem • Yellow nutsedge has dark, unevenly globe- shape, almond tasting tubers at the ends of slender rhizomes 1. Underground tubers are ¼ inches or less, roughly round shaped, and smooth 2. Underground tubers are not attached to each other in chains. 3. They exist as a single nutlet at the end of an underground chain 4. Seed heads are yellow 5. Leaves are narrow 1/4 to 5/16 inches, light green/yellow in color 6. Leaves are generally upright (60 degrees or more)
    11. 11. 978-547-LAWN SECTION 3 – LAWN CARE PRACTICES
    12. 12. 978-547-LAWN Noon Fall Lawn Care Round 5 Late Summer: August A second application of organic fertilizer is applied to green up the lawn. Spot weeding applied to control any present weeds. Round 6 Early Fall: August-September A third application of organic fertilizer is applied as a granular with a root builder and one of the only with phosphate. Round 7 Late Fall Winter Application: September-October A winterizer fertilizer is applied to prepare the lawn for another harsh New England winter. This application helps provide nutrients to the roots of the grass as it enters its dormant stage.
    13. 13. 978-547-LAWN Lawnmower • Fall maintenance checklist – Clean your mower right – Grease fittings – Lubricate linkages and cables – Check and replace the air filter – Change oil and filter – Change the spark plug & check wire – Check and sharpen mower blades • Fuel Stabilizer in Winter for a better Spring – Drain the fuel by running the tank dry – Stabilize the fuel and store
    14. 14. 978-547-LAWN Watering & Mowing newly seeded areas • New seed - watered 2-3 times each day, preferably early morning and late afternoon. • Normally 15 minutes per zone during each watering cycle is sufficient until seed is established. • The lawn should be kept lightly damp. Do not over water! • Watch the weather and adjust your watering to keep the soil lightly damp, not soaking wet and muddy. • Once established, reduce watering to once a day. • You should wait until the new seedlings are about 2” before mowing. • Make sure your blade is sharp so that it does not tug on the new sprouts and raise the blade to 2 ½ - 3” for the first couple of mows. • This will help the new grass develop a deeper root system while not sending your existing grass into shock by cutting off too much of the blade at once.
    15. 15. 978-547-LAWN • Used on PGA tournament golf courses • Safe for kids and pets • Reduce run-off • Improve lawn health • Save money • Help the environment by reducing water usage • Better turf performance • Notably less runoff on sloped areas – low areas aren’t wet, high areas aren’t dry Save 20-50% on water and energy • Increased fertilizer efficiency. • Increases benefits of Noon’s 7-step Lawn Care Program
    16. 16. 978-547-LAWN Fall Core Aeration Core aeration is a type of cultivation or cultural practice that extracts a plug of turf, thatch, and soil and deposits the plug on the surface of the lawn. The aeration process leaves holes in the turf and soil that encourages: • Oxygen exchange in the root zone. • Improves moisture and nutrient penetration. • Relieves compaction. • Increases the rate of thatch decomposition. What is core aeration?
    17. 17. 978-547-LAWN 1. Improves Turf Health. Core aeration provides the root zone with greater access to air, water, and fertilizer. This access to air, water, and nutrients, improves the overall health of the turf. Also, turfgrass roots will be deeper and more extensive. 2. Aids Thatch Management. Core aeration helps in thatch management by punching holes in the thatch layer, and by introducing thatch-decomposing microorganisms from the soil to the top of the thatch layer. 3. Relieves Soil Compaction. Soil density is decreased by removing cores, thus relieving compaction. 4. Benefits pH Modification. Applying lime or sulphur after core aeration promotes the change of pH deeper into the soil profile. This will let nutrients penetrate deeper in the root zone to become available to the turf. 5. Benefits Overseeding Operations. It is helpful to core aerate before and after seeding into an existing lawn. Soil cultivation enhances seed-topsoil contact necessary for germination, and creates a moist, protected environment optimal for seedling growth and development. What are the benefits of core aeration?
    18. 18. 978-547-LAWN • Simple & Effective • Build turf density • Healthier & Stronger • Fight off weeds & disease • Couple with Aeration • With aeration seed to soil contact is at its highest granting best germination rates • Seeds will germinate within 2 weeks to 30 days fully • Water regularly for optimum germination Overseeding
    19. 19. 978-547-LAWN Fall Lime Application The application of lime is an integral and often essential part of quality turfgrass management. The objectives of liming are to : • Neutralize acids • Correct calcium deficiencies in the soil • Precipitate soluble compounds of iron and aluminum that are toxic • Raising the pH of the soil to improve soil microorganism activity & increase the availability of nutrients. • pH in New England is highly acidic naturally, applying lime application regularly will help to regulate soil pH. •This creates less weeds, potentially less moss, and better absorption rates of fertilizer.
    20. 20. 978-547-LAWN Fall Potassium • Applied in the spring or fall, potassium helps promote bottom growth of the turfgrass. • Reduces transpiration (loss of water through the blades), so grass needs less water • It helps develop the root system in the fall and improves overall winter hardiness. • It helps fight disease as well as improve wear tolerance.
    21. 21. 978-547-LAWN SECTION 4 – LAWN DISEASE ID GUIDE - If neglected, your lawn will suffer the consequences, like disease. Proper cultural practices like aeration and an ergonomically correct approach to fertilization will help maximize the appeal of your home.
    22. 22. 978-547-LAWN Pythium Blight • Also known as “cottony blight”," or "grease spot," is a highly destructive turfgrass disease • All naturally cultivated cool-season turfgrasses are susceptible to Pythium and if conditions are favorable • Can destroy a whole turfgrass stand in a few days or less. • Pythium favors hot and very humid weather and will usually develop in low areas.
    23. 23. 978-547-LAWN Snow Mold • A disease of grasses appearing as grayish-white or pinkish patches after heavy snow has melted . • Two common types of snow mold are found in New England • Pink snow mold may initially look white and mature to a faint pink to salmon color. •Gray snow mold is white to gray. • Caused by fungi that thrive at low temperatures. • All common lawn grasses may be infected, but Kentucky bluegrass fescue lawns are the least susceptible to severe damage. • Fall fertility programs should be timed so that they do not influence the ability of the grass to become dormant for the winter season. Noon’s rounds 5, 6, and 7 play an important role in your lawn experience this year and next spring.
    24. 24. 978-547-LAWN Fusarium Blight (Frog’s Eye) Can Be Avoided with Good Lawn Maintenance • Watch for this lawn to disease to show up when it's hot, humid, and sunny during drought conditions. • Fusarium blight has a recognizable "frog-eye" pattern. • If conditions are right, the diseased areas will grow together, and large areas of the lawn may be destroyed. • You can help the situation by aerating your lawn each season.
    25. 25. 978-547-LAWN Dollarspot • Dollar spot is encouraged by drought stress and leaf wetness. • All grasses are susceptible to dollar spot disease, but some Kentucky bluegrass cultivars are relatively resistant. • Excessive thatch accumulations greatly encourage dollar spot activity. • Dollar spot disease responds readily to fungicides • You can help the situation by aerating your lawn each season.
    26. 26. 978-547-LAWN Brown Patch • Fungal disease of hot, humid weather • Most common in mid to late summer when night temperatures and relative humidity stay high for several days and are accompanied by rain. • Expanding patches of discolored grass up to several feet in diameter mark the presence of a severe outbreak. • Brown patch is known as a foliar disease, so it does not have any effect on the crown or roots of the turf plant. • Following the correct agronomic schedule and proper cultural practices every season can help minimize or eliminate the problem.
    27. 27. 978-547-LAWN SECTION 5 – PEST ID GUIDE Insect pests can be grouped into two major categories: 1) Those that feed on leaves. 2) Those that invade bark and trunks.
    28. 28. 978-547-LAWN Pest ID Guide Insect pests can then be categorized into sub-groups: Chewing insects : Eat entire parts of the leaf. They can feed on the edges of leaves, chew holes in the centers of leaves ("shotgun" holes), skeletonize the leaf (eat tissue between veins), or "window feed" (eat away only the upper or lower surface of the leaf). Sucking insects feed on plants by sucking the juices out of leaves or stems. Common sucking insects are aphids, scale, and mites.
    29. 29. 978-547-LAWN Black Vine Weevil • Adult will feed on over 100 different kinds of trees, shrubs, vines, and flowers in landscapes. • They have a strong preference for yews & various species of rhododendrons. • Can also be found damaging hemlock, Japanese andromeda, Euonymus, mountain laurel & Japanese Holly • Adults feed along the leaf margins leaving distinctive hemispherical notches. • If left untreated it could truly weaken and destroy your plant.
    30. 30. 978-547-LAWN Mealy Bug • Feed on plant juices and are destructive especially for greenhouse ornamentals, succulents and fruit trees. • Like many pests, mealy bugs tend to favor new growth. • Over time, their damage causes the leaves to yellow and eventually drop from the plant. • They can also cause fruits, vegetables, and flower buds to prematurely drop off. • In a bad infestation, their waxy excretions encourages the development of sooty mold fungus. Among the most destructive plant pests
    31. 31. 978-547-LAWN Japanese Beetles • The Japanese Beetle is an invasive insect that can cause some pretty nasty damage to your favorite ornamental trees and shrubs. • It eats the tender tissues between the veins of the leaves of plants that it attacks and all that's left of the leaves are the brown, skeletal remains.
    32. 32. 978-547-LAWN Japanese Beetles Skeleton Leaves Japanese Beetles Eating Skeletonized Leaf
    33. 33. 978-547-LAWN Fall Webworm • Pest of shade trees and shrubs and appears from late summer through early fall. • Feeds on almost 90 species of deciduous trees commonly attacking hickory, walnut, birch, cherry, and crabapple. • Fall webworm constructs its nest over the end of the branch. • The large conspicuous webs contain caterpillars, dead partially eaten leaves, and fecal droppings.
    34. 34. 978-547-LAWN Fall Webworm • The larval stage of this pest skeletonizes and consumes leaves inside the protection of a tent-like web that they enlarge as they require additional food and grow. • They may defoliate a tree occasionally, but rarely kill it. • On shade trees webs usually occur on occasional branches. • They may not injure the tree appreciably, but they reduce its ornamental value.
    35. 35. 978-547-LAWN Winter Moth • Winter moth larvae hatch and feed ravenously on leaves and fruit beginning in early spring. • In June, larvae drop to the ground under the trees where they bury themselves in the soil until fall. • November through January, adults come out and mate. • Use of Horticultural oils to suffocate insect egg- casings and denigrate populations of insects. • Use of Merit Soil injection technologies to stop very damaging insects from destroying trees and shrubs for the long term
    36. 36. 978-547-LAWN SECTION 6 - TREE AND SHRUB CARE
    37. 37. 978-547-LAWN 2013 Season Notes Probably the most neglected or ignored investments we have on our property are our trees and shrubs. • This season we had a lot of snow that actually insulated your trees and shrub root systems which is great however the heavy snow did cause some limb breakage. • In June we had a lot of rain and lots of new growth but fungi issues were abound. • This year the insect most prevalent were canker worm in easly spring and through out the season lacebugs mealy bugs and scale issues. • The beetles in July were mainly the European chafer Beetle attacking the trees and shrubs and some Japanese but in less populations. • Once the warm weather starts to get cooler it is time to prune all dead material out of your plant material. Also prune to shape to minimize structural damage from winter.
    38. 38. 978-547-LAWN Fall Tree & Shrub Care • Round 5 Late Summer Disease and Insect Resistance: August Round 5 is a fungicidal and insecticidal product to target horticultural insects and diseases. • Round 6 Early Fall Fertilizer: August-September Our Round 6 application is a fertilizer to all trees and shrubs which will help their root systems. This fall feeding will help in the overall health and growth of trees and shrubs. • Round 7 Late Fall Dormant Oils: September-October Our Round 7 application is a non-toxic dormant oil spray to kill insect eggs that are laid on the buds of tree and shrub branches.
    39. 39. 978-547-LAWN MSI & WP Merit Soil injection • Performed fall or spring an injection is made around the drip line or canopy • Deals with Wooly Adelgid on Hemlocks, scale, and more. • Goes up root system and into branches, needles and or buds • Winter Protection or Wilt Proofing • A vapor applied to all non-deciduous shrubs to seal in moisture. • Will help minimize winter damage such as creating brown or maroon leaves and wind burn.
    40. 40. 978-547-LAWN White and Grey Birch • Known for their pleasing white bark and colorful leaves in fall. • It is best to pick a species that will do well in snow and cold and is native to your region. • Its recommended to not prune or water after late August on Birches. • Insulate the base of the tree with mulch 2-3” woodchips or compost made of leaves. • The snow pack will mulch, insulate and keep a moderate temperature throughout winter. • Do not place the mulch against the tree bark
    41. 41. 978-547-LAWN Flowering Crabapple • Its best to refrain from fertilizing late summer to minimize frost and winter damage on new growth and buds. • Water your tree early fall in the mornings to encourage evaporation. Install a 6” layer of mulch to insulate the roots. • Be sure not to apply the mulch touching the bottom of the tree itself. • If you wish to apply blankets or sheets to the trunk that is fine but remove daily in the AM so the tree can get sunlight.
    42. 42. 978-547-LAWN Cherry Tree • Trees with a south facing side will be susceptible to sun scald to the tree trunks. • To minimize damage in winter it is best to use a white wrap that is reusable every season. • For moles, voles and mice, wrap a piece of sheet made of Tin, about 17” high and 3” in width or you can purchase a premade one. • To prevent deer damage, you may add a cylindrical wrap around the flexible wrap • Mulch a 3” layer but not touching any portion of the tree trunk.
    43. 43. 978-547-LAWN Rhodedendrons • Protect them for winter by applying a fluffy mulch made of whole or chopped up oak leaves or salt marsh hay applied around the base right up to the plant. • It can be put down right over any existing mulch. Use 4-6” in depth. • Anti-desiccants can be applied in a waxy form to the leaves and will seal in moisture. • This material can be used on all non- deciduous plant material.
    44. 44. 978-547-LAWN Azaleas • Watering them in the fall before the ground freezes. • Azaleas will need 20 minutes in a drippy hose couple times a week during season. • Feed them in spring and or fall with a slow release product for acid loving plants. • Mulch 2-3” for root ball protection. • Do not place the mulch up against the trunk. • Prune after flowering in the spring to promote new growth by hand pruners. • Spray an anti-desiccant in late fall. This will help to minimize wind and winter burn.
    45. 45. 978-547-LAWN Japanese Maple • 2 ½ -3” of shredded hardwood mulch. • Water 2x a week during the season deeply & more often if its a new tree. • Check for insect and disease issues. • Prune your tree late summer/early fall to get ready for winter. • Prune out middle to increase air circulation & sunlight. • Prune out all dead twigs & branches. • Re-mulch 3” of shredded hardwood if needed & move it away about 3-4” from the trunk. • During winter, remove snow ASAP
    46. 46. 978-547-LAWN Burning Bush • Mulch a 2-4” layer of organic material. This will minimize soil moisture loss. • Trim in early spring to natural contour or desired shape. • Protect for winter with burlap or other breathable material. • You can also build an “A” frame of wood over each plant. • Tie wrap branches loosely together where snow and ice usually collect. • Knock off snow ASAP.
    47. 47. 978-547-LAWN Thank You Raffle for FREE 2-step Noon WaterSaver for 2013. SECTION 7 - TREE AND SHRUB CARE
    48. 48. 978-547-LAWN and now… our open Q&A forum!

    ×