KAVCO VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIP MODULE THREE SUPERVISION
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KAVCO VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIP MODULE THREE SUPERVISION

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The Volunteer Leadership Training Series is a peer-to-peer program researched, complied and created through an initiative of KAVCO members. This series of training is focused on sharing the vital ...

The Volunteer Leadership Training Series is a peer-to-peer program researched, complied and created through an initiative of KAVCO members. This series of training is focused on sharing the vital elements of leading volunteers.

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KAVCO VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIP MODULE THREE SUPERVISION KAVCO VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIP MODULE THREE SUPERVISION Presentation Transcript

  • Volunteer Leadership TrainingEffective Volunteer Supervision Becoming a better supervisor. January 2012 Module 3 of 4 Created by C.Piggott
  • Effective Volunteer SupervisionSome words that could describe the traits of an effective supervisor are planning, communicating, leading, and problem solving. Help is a key word. You must offer it and ask for it.As a supervisor, you can’t do everything required by your organization or program.In large part, you must learn to do your job by getting your volunteers and agency partners to do the work.
  • Effective Volunteer Supervision1. Communicator - Active listening; providing feedback; conflict management. Problem solving - coaching volunteers.2. Advisor /3. Team Builder - Building a collaborative team environment. Manager Planning - work; setting priorities/4. Planner/ delegating tasks; managing time; managing meeting.5. Community Partnership - Assessing community needs; building and sustaining collaboration; public relation.
  • The CommunicatorSupervisors spend about 75 percent of their time engaged in two activities-talking and listening.The three critical communication skills you must call on if you hope to be a helper and a leader are: Active listening Providing feedback Conflict management
  • Active listening First, you need to listen to understand—What is this personexpressing to me about how she or he is thinking and feeling?Second, you need to check to see if the person with whom you are interacting understands the meaning or the message of what you are saying in response. The greater the diversity of your volunteer group (or staff), the more challenging clear communication becomes because everyone filters what they hear differently.
  • Providing Feedback You communicate work expectations to volunteers. You have volunteers express their expectations for supportfrom you, from agency partners, and from other volunteers.You explain who assesses their performance and how that information is communicated, and to whom. Last, but not least, you describe the consequences tied to the process. There are rules of the game and you explain how to play by them.
  • Conflict Management You communicate work expectations to volunteers. You have volunteers express their expectations for supportfrom you, from agency partners, and from other volunteers.You explain who assesses their performance and how that information is communicated, and to whom. Last, but not least, you describe the consequences tied to the process. There are rules of the game and you explain how to play by them.
  • Advisor / Problem solvingBy helping your volunteers accurately identify their problems and then determining viable solutions together, you will be fulfilling one of your most important supervisory functions.The three critical skills you must call on if you hope to be a helper and a leader are: „Problem solving „ Coaching „Helping volunteers build commitment
  • Problem Solving By helping your volunteers accurately identify their problems and determining viable solutions, you will be fulfilling one of your most important supervisory functionsSupervisors with strong advisory skills create ways to make theprocess truly collaborative. This means you must resist the urge to take over and dictate solutions.
  • Coaching Coaching means unlocking volunteer’s potential andhelping them improve their problem-solving and planning skills.The goal is to help volunteers learn rather than to teach them.Your role as a coach is to help volunteers define their personaland professional goals and provide them with the information, resources, knowledge, and skills they need.Your resources are your knowledge, skills, and ability and theworld of other training, coaching, and teaching resources in the community.
  • Helping volunteers build commitmentIt is critical that you understand what your members/volunteerswant to get out of their assignments and what motivates them to do their job well.Different people will be motivated by different things, dependingupon what they value. What might be a risk to one person may be rewarding to another. Once you begin learning about your volunteers’ internalincentives (wha t the y wa nt fo r the m s e lve s , no t wha t y o u wa nt fo r the m ),you can help them find ways to achieve their personal rewards while helping the program accomplish its goals.
  • Volunteers are likely to develop their commitment to program goals when:1. They are clear about their mission, values, and goals and can see them in action.2. They feel appreciated for their contributions.3. They are competent and confident.4. They have influence over developing their roles in the program.5. Their personal goals are metOne way to help members/volunteers sustain their energy level and commitment is to build a supportive, high- energy organizational culture.
  • Planner and Manager Most volunteer supervisors work with plans that cover a period of one year or less.Depending on your organization and assignment, you maybe asked to participate in the development of programs and projects which address the strategies of your agency and national office.A program is defined as a set of activities which accomplish broad objectives over a relatively long period. If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.
  • Project plans usually include the following components:1. Goals—an overall broad but clear statement of what you want to achieve in a given period of time.2. Objectives—similar to goals but more specific and focused on short-term results needed to meet the long-term goal. Objectives should be “SMART:” specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time-bound.3. Tasks or Activities—steps you need to do in order to reach your objectives They have influence over developing their roles in the program.4. Resources—human, physical, or monetary resources you will need to complete the tasks/activities.5. Monitoring/ Evaluation Plan—checkpoints for measuringyour progress on the tasks and your overall success in reachingthe project’s objectives.
  • Community Partnership • Build and maintain collaborative relationships becausecommunity members (individuals, organizations, and agencies) know more about their problems than anyone. • The more you involve community members in defining and developing your service activities, the more they will buy into the project and sustain their efforts over the long term • Community partners increase your program’s potential tooffer better services and accomplish things neither group coulddo alone because you are pooling your ideas and energy along with other resources.
  • In conclusion•Supervising volunteers isnt much different from supervising paid employees. If you do it well, you will keep the best volunteers coming back to give their time.  • Supervising volunteers can be time-consuming, but it isinvesting in the future of our organization. It is volunteers who always add value both to direct client service and to the necessary support work. And, it is fulfilled volunteers who spread the word in the community about all the good work done in that particular organization You have now completed Module 3 of the KAVCO Volunteer Leadership Training. Please follow this link http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DK35Y8Q
  • Resources •http://www.nonprofit champion.com/cycleofvolunteermanagement.html.•http://www.citizensinformationboard.ie/publications/voluntary_sector/managing_volunteers/3 introductionvm_publications_voluntary_managing.html •http://www.nationalserviceresources.org/ •http://www.slideshare.net/FamilyForce/the-volunteer-management-cycle •www.energizeinc.com/art/subj/Reten.html •www.ecivc.net/Presentations/Siebold.pdf