PDC+++ Module 3 Class 7. Food Sovereignty Part I

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To return the control of food to each local community is something essential to creating sustainable societies.   Only installing this practice as habitual would change other systems a lot, amongst …

To return the control of food to each local community is something essential to creating sustainable societies.   Only installing this practice as habitual would change other systems a lot, amongst them the economy, soil regeneration & ecosystem & human health.


We explore the importance of food sovereignty & how it works in practice.  Included in this class is an exploration in some detail in the various organic food-growing styles that can be used, in small & large scale, with examples of good practice in different areas of the planet.

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  • Via Campesina Movement CBasic Re-connecting (leaver attitudes: eating what there is, how difficult it is) STypes of Organic Agriculture C, S(sinérgica, biodinámica, biointensiva, paredes en crestall)Some Specific Crops SCollective Examples C12/6/11 11:52 AMsinérgica, C biodinámica, S biointensiva, S paredes en crestall C
  • Via Campesina Movement CBasic Re-connecting (leaver attitudes: eating what there is, how difficult it is) STypes of Organic Agriculture C, S(sinérgica, biodinámica, biointensiva, paredes en crestall)Some Specific Crops SCollective Examples C12/6/11 11:52 AMsinérgica, C biodinámica, S biointensiva, S paredes en crestall C
  • Via Campesina Movement CBasic Re-connecting (leaver attitudes: eating what there is, how difficult it is) STypes of Organic Agriculture C, S(sinérgica, biodinámica, biointensiva, paredes en crestall)Some Specific Crops SCollective Examples C12/6/11 11:52 AMsinérgica, C biodinámica, S biointensiva, S paredes en crestall C
  • The trouble with grains, and with some vegetables, is that they have a high "glycemic index." That means that they not only contain too concentrated doses of carbohydrate, but that their carbohydrate enters the blood stream too swiftly. The system cannot tolerate surges of carbohydrate. I learned this very very well in the years I was struggling to get rid of sugar in the urine. When the system experiences repeated threats of surging carbohydrate, the pancreas, in a way of putting it, gets trigger happy. With its insulin secretions, it snatches the carbohydrate from the blood, slaps it into its own ready prison, the fat tissue, and locks the door. No matter the size of the meal or snack just eaten, the carbohydrate which is in it--needed by the body but mostly by the brain--is snatched from circulation. The person who ate it, after a brief lift, feels sluggish and foggy-headed--again. But what one experiences isn't the worst of it. The worst comes later, in serious, often life-threatening problems.
  • The trouble with grains, and with some vegetables, is that they have a high "glycemic index." That means that they not only contain too concentrated doses of carbohydrate, but that their carbohydrate enters the blood stream too swiftly. The system cannot tolerate surges of carbohydrate. I learned this very very well in the years I was struggling to get rid of sugar in the urine. When the system experiences repeated threats of surging carbohydrate, the pancreas, in a way of putting it, gets trigger happy. With its insulin secretions, it snatches the carbohydrate from the blood, slaps it into its own ready prison, the fat tissue, and locks the door. No matter the size of the meal or snack just eaten, the carbohydrate which is in it--needed by the body but mostly by the brain--is snatched from circulation. The person who ate it, after a brief lift, feels sluggish and foggy-headed--again. But what one experiences isn't the worst of it. The worst comes later, in serious, often life-threatening problems.
  • The trouble with grains, and with some vegetables, is that they have a high "glycemic index." That means that they not only contain too concentrated doses of carbohydrate, but that their carbohydrate enters the blood stream too swiftly. The system cannot tolerate surges of carbohydrate. I learned this very very well in the years I was struggling to get rid of sugar in the urine. When the system experiences repeated threats of surging carbohydrate, the pancreas, in a way of putting it, gets trigger happy. With its insulin secretions, it snatches the carbohydrate from the blood, slaps it into its own ready prison, the fat tissue, and locks the door. No matter the size of the meal or snack just eaten, the carbohydrate which is in it--needed by the body but mostly by the brain--is snatched from circulation. The person who ate it, after a brief lift, feels sluggish and foggy-headed--again. But what one experiences isn't the worst of it. The worst comes later, in serious, often life-threatening problems.
  • eg. in my neighbourhood: pidgeons & doves + hares are a 'pest'
  • The trouble with grains, and with some vegetables, is that they have a high "glycemic index." That means that they not only contain too concentrated doses of carbohydrate, but that their carbohydrate enters the blood stream too swiftly. The system cannot tolerate surges of carbohydrate. I learned this very very well in the years I was struggling to get rid of sugar in the urine. When the system experiences repeated threats of surging carbohydrate, the pancreas, in a way of putting it, gets trigger happy. With its insulin secretions, it snatches the carbohydrate from the blood, slaps it into its own ready prison, the fat tissue, and locks the door. No matter the size of the meal or snack just eaten, the carbohydrate which is in it--needed by the body but mostly by the brain--is snatched from circulation. The person who ate it, after a brief lift, feels sluggish and foggy-headed--again. But what one experiences isn't the worst of it. The worst comes later, in serious, often life-threatening problems.
  • The trouble with grains, and with some vegetables, is that they have a high "glycemic index." That means that they not only contain too concentrated doses of carbohydrate, but that their carbohydrate enters the blood stream too swiftly. The system cannot tolerate surges of carbohydrate. I learned this very very well in the years I was struggling to get rid of sugar in the urine. When the system experiences repeated threats of surging carbohydrate, the pancreas, in a way of putting it, gets trigger happy. With its insulin secretions, it snatches the carbohydrate from the blood, slaps it into its own ready prison, the fat tissue, and locks the door. No matter the size of the meal or snack just eaten, the carbohydrate which is in it--needed by the body but mostly by the brain--is snatched from circulation. The person who ate it, after a brief lift, feels sluggish and foggy-headed--again. But what one experiences isn't the worst of it. The worst comes later, in serious, often life-threatening problems.
  • Via Campesina Movement CBasic Re-connecting (leaver attitudes: eating what there is, how difficult it is) STypes of Organic Agriculture C, S(sinérgica, biodinámica, biointensiva, paredes en crestall)Some Specific Crops SCollective Examples C12/6/11 11:52 AMsinérgica, C biodinámica, S biointensiva, S paredes en crestall C
  • (sinérgica, biodinámica, biointensiva, paredes en crestall)
  • (sinérgica, biodinámica, biointensiva, paredes en crestall)
  • (sinérgica, biodinámica, biointensiva, paredes en crestall)
  • Nature prefers to grow plants together intensively. Nature likes life everywhere. Thus when we have an open area without plants in it, weeds and other plants magically appear. This is the way trees, grains, herbs, flowers and vegetables grow when left to themselves. It is part of the biological life process. The Chinese observed this over 4,000 years ago, and imitated this living balanced complex diversity in their farming. That was one of the reasons that Asian agriculture remained sustainable for at least 4,000 years. About 2,000 years ago the Mayans, Bolivians, Peruvians and Greeks took similar initiatives. People sooner or later seem to have a kind of universal urge to plant crops as nature does with biological intenseness — Biointensively!
  • (sinérgica, biodinámica, biointensiva, paredes en crestall)
  • (sinérgica, biodinámica, biointensiva, paredes en crestall)
  • “ Through perspiration from one's feet come substances [toxins no doubt] containing information about bodily diseases. This information is taken in by the seedlings. They transmit it to the fruit, which will thus be enabled to counteract diseases.” ~ Anastasia in "Anastasia", Book 1 of The Ringing Cedars Series, p78 ~ “ The planting must be done on days appropriate to each vegetable (people already know this from the lunar calendar). In the absence of watering, a premature planting is not as harmful as an overdue planting. It is not a good idea to pull up all the weeds growing in the vicinity of the sprouts. At least one of each kind should be left in place. The weeds can be cut back...” ~ Anastasia in "Anastasia", Book 1 of The Ringing Cedars Series, p78 ~
  • (sinérgica, biodinámica, biointensiva, paredes en crestall)
  • Molybdenum
  • Via Campesina Movement CBasic Re-connecting (leaver attitudes: eating what there is, how difficult it is) STypes of Organic Agriculture C, S(sinérgica, biodinámica, biointensiva, paredes en crestall)Some Specific Crops SCollective Examples C12/6/11 11:52 AMsinérgica, C biodinámica, S biointensiva, S paredes en crestall C

Transcript

  • 1. M3.7 PDC+++
    • To return the control of food to each local community is something essential to creating sustainable societies.   Only installing this practice as habitual would change other systems a lot, amongst them the economy, soil regeneration & ecosystem & human health.
    • We explore the importance of food sovereignty & how it works in practice.  Included in this class is an exploration in some detail in the various organic food-growing styles that can be used, in small & large scale, with examples of good practice in different areas of the planet.
    of the M3.7 Food Sovereignty an integral exploration PDC + + +
  • 2. Wangari Maathai "Until you dig a hole, you plant a tree, you water it and make it survive, you haven't done a thing. You are just talking." The people are starving. They need food; they need medicine; they need education. They do not need a skyscraper to house the ruling party and a 24-hour TV station. Kenia, April 1th 1940 - September 25th 2011
  • 3.
    • The Via Campesina Movement
    • Basic Re-Connecting
    • Types of Organic Agriculture
    • Some Specific Foods
    • Feeding the World
    an integral exploration M3.7 Food Sovereignty
  • 4.
    • The Via Campesina Movement
    • Basic Re-Connecting
    • Types of Organic Agriculture
    • Some Specific Foods
    • Feeding the World
    an integral exploration M3.7 Food Sovereignty
  • 5. La Via Campesina is the international movement which brings together millions of peasants, small and medium-size farmers, landless people, women farmers, indigenous people, migrants and agricultural workers from around the world La Via Campesina comprises about 150 local and national organizations in 70 countries from Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. Altogether, it represents about 200 million farmers
  • 6. The main goal of the movement is to realize food sovereignty and stop the destructive neoliberal process. Food sovereignty is the right of people to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculture systems.
  • 7. 7 Principles Food: A Basic Human Right Agrarian Reform Protecting Natural Resources Reorganizing Food Trade Ending the Globalization of Hunger Social Peace Democratic control access to food is a constitutional right the land belongs to those who work it. the right to practice sustainable management of natural resources and to conserve biodiversity free of restrictive intellectual pro perty rights Food is first and foremost a source of nutrition and only secondarily an item of trade Regulation and taxation of speculative capital and a strictly enforced Code of Conduct for Multinational corporations (TNCs) is needed. Food must not be used as a weapon. Smallholder farmers must have direct input into formulating agricultural policies at all levels.
  • 8. Food Sovereignty it's not just an ecological issue it is mostly a political issue
  • 9. For Example in Europe The Community Agriculture Policy (CAP) receives around the 40% ot the European Budget The CAP determines what kind of food we produce, How we market it and what we eat And it's being discussed right now!!! (till the end of 2013)
  • 10. To have a CAP based in Food Sovereignty is vital to shape our future around food This one? Or maybe this one?
  • 11.
    • The Via Campesina Movement
    • Basic Re-Connecting
    • Types of Organic Agriculture
    • Some Specific Foods
    • Feeding the World
    an integral exploration M3.7 Food Sovereignty
  • 12. How do we know what to eat ?
    • Habit, learning, propaganda, addictions, the markets (created by globalization), affordability
    • Could a system as complex as our food-digestion system not be matched by an equally complex food-selection system?
    • The food, diet & health 'industries' are some of the most powerful in the globalized economy
    • Lots more money to be made out of ill -health (system set up to respond to the wrong signals)
  • 13. What do we know about how to eat ?
    • Less (amount) & more often than we usually do
    • More variety of nutrient-dense foods
    • Much slower than we tend to eat
    • With gratitude, appreciation & thanks (never when worried or tense)
    • All of these seem to aid absorption (& we are what we absorb , not what we eat)
  • 14. How do we know what to think ? (& design for)
    • Food is connected to our earliest memories & so becomes emotionally entangled with issues of comfort, love, survival & belonging
    • We are unlikely to make rational choices about food with these powerful programs running (mostly unconsciously)
    • So getting more conscious of our food issues (EVERYONE has some + our culture has) is key to good design about this vital theme.
  • 15. Some big irrationalities around our 'normal' foods
    • Wheat products are omni-present & mostly highly addictive, allergenic & de-nutritive in current forms (chemicals + highly refined)
    • Chestnuts have similar nutritional composition to wheat, but none of the health disadvantages + build instead of destroying soil
    • Wild foods (weeds & animal 'pests') are vastly more nutritious than cultivated & bred foods
  • 16. How do we know what to grow ?
    • When we grow our own food ... we choose more in terms of what can be grown (easily) than about what we 'like' to eat (minimax)
    • More likely to choose food rationally: healthy choices rather than emotionally-driven ones.
    • So growing some of your own food is a way of re-connecting with ONE self , not just re-connecting with the Earth & vital cycles
  • 17. Extra Class coming up about Nutrition
    • Why is there such a long & ongoing debate about optimum nutrition?
    • What did we evolve eating & how do Leaver & Taker diets differ in general & in particular?
    • What scientific studies are there about human nutrition & what do they conclude?
    by Jose
  • 18.
    • The Via Campesina Movement
    • Basic Re-Connecting
    • Types of Organic Agriculture
    • Some Specific Foods
    • Feeding the World
    an integral exploration M3.7 Food Sovereignty
  • 19. Many Types of 'EcoFarming'
    • Fukuoka & Synergic Methods >> Emilia Hazelip
    • BioDynamics >> Maria Thun
    • BioIntensive >> John Jeevons
    • Paredes en Crestall >> Gaspar Caballero
    • Anastasia's Method >> 'Anastasia'
    • & YOUR Style >> YOU
    • + your local's culture method/s if any
    DESIGN with these! Some may be more appropriate to some memes than others. However we convince all kinds of people to grow more of their food is an achievement !
  • 20. Natural Farming ( 自然農法 )
    • Fundamental principles:
    • No tillage
    • No fertilizer
    • No pesticides
    • No weeding
    • No pruning
    • Objective:
    • Facilitating nature’s (humans included) regeneration
    • by changing the way we live (not just agriculture).
  • 21. Cereal cultivation (Fukuoka style) All weeds, insects, etc. allowed to live Seeds broadcasted at the right moment All work is done by hand (here’s a kama )
  • 22. Rice seedlings growing between clover Harvesting rice (barley seedlings under it) Spreading rice straw over barley Sowing rice in maturing barley
  • 23. Citrus & Vegetables Food Forest Citrus, acacias, ornamentals, other fruits… Lots of diversity, new varieties Humans, chickens, etc. integrated in orchard Ancient technology for food conservation
  • 24. Soil deeply worked by natural processes Self-seeding saves work, more flowers Trees unpruned, easy & bountiful harvest Observe, experiment, connect, enjoy
  • 25. The soil on Spanish lands was terrible: dry, arid and without life. I had no idea about what could be done, but I was certain of one thing: a better way must exist Emilia Hazelip I was still a child when I realized myself that adults had no idea about agriculture.
  • 26. Composition of a plant 75% Water 25% Dry matter 20% Carbohydrates 5% N2 + Trace elements From the Soil From photosynthesis
  • 27. The Synergetic effect is between the plants and the microorganism that inhabit the soil, the plants' “digestive system”. So the key in the Synergetic Agriculture is to keep the Plants/Soil Ecosystem intact
  • 28. 1- No digging 2- No Fertilizers 3- No Chemicals 4- No Soil Compaction The Synergetic Agriculture uses the plants (green manure, mulch) to feed the microorganisms that create the fertility of the soil Synergetic Agriculture Principles
  • 29. The beds are created accumulating the top soil from the paths Permanent tutors (iron, bamboo, etc..) for tomatoes, beans, etc.. Irrigation pipes with a tap in each bed
  • 30. The planting Scheme is divided by Crop families that rotate in a systematic way Leguminous for N2 fixation Graminaceas for C Cruciferous for tilling, deep soil conditioning and control of pests and diseases And the benefits of segregation or combination of plants from the solanaceae, cucurbitaceae, and cruciferous families
  • 31. An Example of crop rotation Year 1 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 3
  • 32. In summary Lots of mulch Beneficial association strategies (in time and space) Leave the roots in the soil Actitude, lots of observation and love Self-fertilization of the Soil Raised beds
  • 33. Many Types of 'EcoFarming'
    • Fukuoka & Synergic Methods >> Emilia Hazelip
    • BioDynamics >> Maria Thun
    • BioIntensive >> John Jeevons
    • Paredes en Crestall >> Gaspar Caballero
    • Anastasia's Method >> 'Anastasia'
    • & YOUR Style >> YOU
    • + your local's culture method/s if any
    DESIGN with these! Some may be more appropriate to some memes than others. However we convince all kinds of people to grow more of their food is an achievement !
  • 34. BioDynamic Farming & Gardening Rudolph Steiner (of Waldolf education) gave some lectures in Mostly known for it's moon relationships to growing: note there are 3 DIFFERENT cycles of the moon related to: 1) distance from the earth (gravitational pull) 2) earth-moon-sun relationship (luminosity) 3) moon's progression through the constellations (what sign/element) Also some relationships to other planets are taken into account Maria Thun - investigator yearly lunar calendar with lots of info GOOD FOR PLANNING 1) 2) 3) >> very good videos in www.PermaCultureScience.org
  • 35.  
  • 36. Many Types of 'EcoFarming'
    • Fukuoka & Synergic Methods >> Emilia Hazelip
    • BioDynamics >> Maria Thun
    • BioIntensive >> John Jeevons
    • Paredes en Crestall >> Gaspar Caballero
    • Anastasia's Method >> 'Anastasia'
    • & YOUR Style >> YOU
    • + your local's culture method/s if any
    DESIGN with these! Some may be more appropriate to some memes than others. However we convince all kinds of people to grow more of their food is an achievement !
  • 37. BioIntensive Farming & Gardening
    • 8 principles of Biointensive farming:
    • Deep Soil Preparation
    • Composting
    • Intensive Planting
    • Companion Planting
    • Carbon Farming
    • Calorie Farming
    • Open Pollinated Seeds
    • Whole System Method
    Nature prefers to grow plants together intensively. Nature likes life everywhere. Thus when we have an open area without plants in it, weeds and other plants magically appear. >> very good videos in www.PermaCultureScience.org
  • 38. all while using a fraction of the resources These techniques can also: Produce 2 to 6 times more food Build the soil up to 60 times faster than in nature, if properly used Reduce by half or more the amount of land needed Statistics courtesy of Ecology Action GROW BIOINTENSIVE mini-farming techniques make it possible to grow food using: 67% to 88% less water 50% to 100% less fertilizer 99% less energy than commercial agriculture
  • 39. Many Types of 'EcoFarming'
    • Fukuoka & Synergic Methods >> Emilia Hazelip
    • BioDynamics >> Maria Thun
    • BioIntensive >> John Jeevons
    • Paredes en Crestall >> Gaspar Caballero
    • Anastasia's Method >> 'Anastasia'
    • & YOUR Style >> YOU
    • + your local's culture method/s if any
    DESIGN with these! Some may be more appropriate to some memes than others. However we convince all kinds of people to grow more of their food is an achievement !
  • 40. Parades en Crestall
    • Parada (Bed)
    • No tilling or steping on the bed
    • Crestall (mature compost)
    • Drip Irrigation
    • Rotation
    Solanaceae Compositae, Chenopodiaceae and Cucurbits Umbelliferae and Liliaceae Legumes and cruciferae The key of the success of this methodolgy it's that is a really simple way to start gardening
  • 41. Many Types of 'EcoFarming'
    • Fukuoka & Synergic Methods >> Emilia Hazelip
    • BioDynamics >> Maria Thun
    • BioIntensive >> John Jeevons
    • Paredes en Crestall >> Gaspar Caballero
    • Anastasia's Method >> 'Anastasia'
    • & YOUR Style >> YOU
    • + your local's culture method/s if any
    DESIGN with these! Some may be more appropriate to some memes than others. However we convince all kinds of people to grow more of their food is an achievement !
  • 42. Anastasia Planting Method
    • Step 1 : Put one or more of the seeds you intend to grow into your mouth under the tongue and hold them there for at least nine minutes.
    • Step 2 : Remove your shoes (and socks) and stand barefoot on the earth in the place you will be planting the seed(s).
    • Step 3 : Remove the seed(s) from your mouth and place them between the palms of your hands for about 30 seconds.
    Anastasia in the Ringing Cedar's series advises that in order for the seed to know of "the human condition" a very specific process must be followed.
    • Each person must do this for their own seeds, for each requires different substances.
  • 43. Anastasia Planting Method
    • Step 4 : Raise the seed(s) up before your mouth and blow on it lightly, warming it with your breath.
    • Step 5 : Raise the seed(s) up high and present it / them to the celestrial bodies for another 30 seconds (to allow the seed to determine the moment of it's awakening with aid from the planets to make the correct substances just for you ).
    • Step 6 : Plant the seed(s) by softening the dirt in an excavated hole with your fingers and bare toes (why? see below...) and spit into the hole as well. Afterwards do not water it for 3 days.
  • 44. Many Types of 'EcoFarming'
    • Fukuoka & Synergic Methods >> Emilia Hazelip
    • BioDynamics >> Maria Thun
    • BioIntensive >> John Jeevons
    • Paredes en Crestall >> Gaspar Caballero
    • Anastasia's Method >> 'Anastasia'
    • & YOUR Style >> YOU
    • + your local's culture method/s if any
    DESIGN with these! Some may be more appropriate to some memes than others. However we convince all kinds of people to grow more of their food is an achievement !
  • 45. Conventional Potatoes Chicken Tractor Gardens 6 mini- ponds Finca Luna Canarias a wild mix of all those methods
  • 46. Organic Matter 12 days after
  • 47. first year, 2 months after (eaten lots of veggies!)
  • 48. most 'weeds' are more nutritious than the vegetables we 'like'
  • 49. mini- ponds brassicas: young soil
  • 50. "Weeds" act as nursery no pests if system balanced & well fed
  • 51. What they all have in comon it's that they grow Organic Plants
    • It has been proven in different studies that plants which are fertilized organically are:
    • much more resistant to plague & disease than those which are grown using chemical fertilizers
    • especially against fungal desease
    • they are also more nutritious & healthy to eat  
    • they have higher protein synthesis
    • increase & regulate soil temperature 
    • erosion prevention
  • 52. TRACE ELEMENTS (needed in very small quantities but vital) Fe - iron - probably missing, with Mg, if pH high Zn - zinc - probably missing in dunes Cu - copper - probably missing in costal plains Se - selenium - often missing (seaweed) Bo - barium - very often missing (seaweed) Mb - molybdenum - missing in deep & volcanic soils Co - cobalt PRIMARY - of the soil N - nitrogen - leguminous, urine, aquatic plants P - potassium - ashes, leaves, bones K - phosphorous - bones, bird guano S - sulphur - elemental sulphur, volcanic mineral deposits, swamps Ca - calcium - calcarious rocks Mg - magnesium - dolomite ELEMENTS necessary for healthy plants BASIC (basic structure of all plants: are carbohydrates + water) C - carbon H - hydrogen O - oxygen
  • 53.  
  • 54. Scale of Interventions 1) Do Nothing 2) Pick by Hand 3) Biological Control 4) Chemical Control (Re-design) Health of soil (& people)
  • 55.
    • The Via Campesina Movement
    • Basic Re-Connecting
    • Types of Organic Agriculture
    • Some Specific Foods
    • Feeding the World
    an integral exploration M3.7 Food Sovereignty