Cutting the trees of knowledge: social software, information architechture & their epistemic consequences

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Presentation on Week 9 reading: 'Cutting the trees of knowledge: social software, information architechture & their epistemic consequences' by Michael Schiltz, Frederik Truyen, and Hans Coppens.

Presentation on Week 9 reading: 'Cutting the trees of knowledge: social software, information architechture & their epistemic consequences' by Michael Schiltz, Frederik Truyen, and Hans Coppens.

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  • 1. Social Software, Information Architecture, & Their Epistemic Consequences Schiltz; Truyen; Coppens.
  • 2.
    • Wikipedia
    • Yahoo!
    • Google
    • Social software has distorted the semantics of the conventional scientific system – But at the same time, we get more suspicious of what we find on the Web.
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
  • 6.
    • PRINT
    • Passive
    • 1-to-1; 1-to-Many
    • Info flows in one direction
    • Author
    • Copyright
    • Exclusivity
    • Expensive
    • Info + Knowledge = Economics
    • DIGITAL
    • Interactive
    • Many-to-Many
    • Back-and-Forth Communication
    • Ubiquity
    • Community
    • Marginal Cost
    • “ FREE”
  • 7.
    • Scholarly communication crisis
      • Conflict between commercial publishers & demand of scientific careers
      • Information moving online
      • Removing price barriers
      • Removing permission barriers
    • Putting peer-reviewed scientific and scholarly literature on the internet. Making it available free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Removing the barrier to serious research.
  • 8. PRINT  Coupling of Science & Economics DIGITAL  DE-coupling, enabling fresh interest in thinking about information and its possession. “ OPEN ACCESS ’ is...to the advantage of scientific production if it is generous and ubiquitous – an idea which even scientific publishers must eventually concede .”
  • 9.
    • Social software enables group interaction
    • Most visited websites are ‘social’ at their core
    • Despite authorship issues, copyright concerns, this has been to the advantage of progress
    • Social Software + Acceptance of Open Source Methods = Growth of Knowledge & Information Sharing
    • But INFORMATION ≠ KNOWLEDGE
  • 10.  
  • 11.  
  • 12.
    • Superior type of knowledge : Understanding where to access knowledge components when needed.
    • New internet usage : outsourcing the knowledge process to others.
  • 13.
    • “ Knowing means being embedded in a social knowledge network that guarantees just-in-time delivery of the knowledge components you need”
  • 14.
    • Traditional beliefs have become downloadable beliefs
      • The fact that they are ready for download in trusted environments warrants their truth
    • Acceptance Principle
      • The act of knowing takes place in the social network, not the individual mind
      • A lot of what we know is about cognitive artifacts, not about the directly empirical
  • 15.
    • Projects
    • Galaxy Zoo
    • Open Science Wiki
    • USGSted
    • Tools
    • GPS
    • OpenID
  • 16.  
  • 17.  
  • 18.  
  • 19.
    • Saves us TIME.
    • Dangers of inaccuracy or misunderstanding?
      • No proponent of OPEN ACCESS has ever proclaimed the main advantage of free accessibility resides in accessibility to lay people
      • Helps experts
      • Allows lay people to help experts help them
  • 20.
    • Nature of what is known itself seems to be changing
    • Ontological, epistemological consequences
    • How has the shift in knowledge production, distribution, and vindication semantically affect our dealing with information, our arrangement of meaning?
  • 21.
    • Limits of traditional classification: budgetary, spatial, complexity constraints
    • We have added a degree of ABSTRACTION to make sense of things
    • We take into account relational qualities of the classified items – items that can be ordered in such a way as they are RE-ENCOUNTERED at different places in a structure
  • 22.
    • SLIP BOX = TAGGING
    • Highlights relations between items in a structure
    • Creation of order through meaningful redundancy  semantic web.
  • 23.
    • Quality of labelling is not to be judged on an individual basis.
    • All tags don’t have to be validated.
    • The value of tagging is in its collaborative aspect, its accurate result as defined by the community, that bridges social gaps.
  • 24.
    • The limitations of the conventional taxonomy system and knowledge growth
    • The value of folksonomies – what may be the current best practice
    • The need for circularity and polycontextuality
    • The world is not static and eternal, but dynamic and evolving.
    IN CONCLUSION, we realize...
  • 25.
    • If the production of knowledge is always a social process, what are the implications of social media?
    • If innovations such as GPS and OpenID technology can help social software promote the production of knowledge, what else can be incorporated to make for more seamless or fruitful collaboration?
    • Does anonymity on the Web help or prevent social software from achieving its potential as a knowledge generator?
    • Can social software do for journalism what it has done for science?
  • 26.
    • Schiltz, M., Truyen, F., & Coppens, H. (2007). 'Cutting the trees of knowledge: social software, information architecture & their epistemic consequences'. Thesis Eleven, 89 (1), 94.
    • Nguyen, Joe (2010), 'Social Networking: No Longer a Niche Market in Asia-Pac', comScore.com [online]. Available: http://blog.comscore.com/2010/09/social_networking_asia_pacific.html [Accessed 23 September, 2010]
    • Neylon, Cameron (2009), 'What should social software for science look like?', Science in the open [online]. Available: http://blog.openwetware.org/scienceintheopen/2009/12/09/what-should-social-software-for-science-look-like/ [Accessed 23 September, 2010]
    • Allen, Christopher (2004), 'Tracing the Evolution of Social Software', Life With Alacrity [online]. Available: http://www.lifewithalacrity.com/2004/10/tracing_the_evo.html [Accessed 23 September, 2010]
  • 27.
    • Madrigal, Alexis (2009), 'Freaked-Out Tweets After Earthquakes Help Scientists', Wired.com [online]. Available: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/12/twitter-earthquake-alerts/ [23 September, 2010]
    • Rowe, Aaron (2008), 'GPS-Equipped iPhone Could Enable New Citizen Science', Wired.com [online]. Available: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/06/iphones-with-gp/ [Accessed 23 September, 2010]
    • Ria News Desk (2006), 'Dion Hinchliffe's SOA Blog: How Can We Best Make "The Writeable Web" A Responsible Place?', SOA World Magazine [online]. Available: http://soa.sys-con.com/node/173822 [Accessed 23 September, 2010]
  • 28.
    • Raphael, JR (2009), 'The 15 Biggest Wikipedia Blunders', PC World [online]. Available: http://www.pcworld.com/article/170874/the_15_biggest_wikipedia_blunders.html [Accessed 23 September, 2010]
    • Galaxy Zoo: Hubble [online]. N.d. Available: http://www.galaxyzoo.org/ [Accessed 23 September, 2010]
    • Open Science Wiki [online]. N.d. Available: http://science.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page [Accessed 23 September, 2010]
  • 29.
    • Slide 2: http://geekandpoke.typepad.com/geekandpoke/2009/01/crowdsourcing-09.html
    • Slide 3: http://www.pcworld.com/article/170874/the_15_biggest_wikipedia_blunders.html
    • Slide 4: http://www.techmynd.com/how-do-i-turn-off-caps-lock-yahoo-answers-best-answer-hilarious/
    • Slide 5: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Google_Bomb_Miserable_Failure.png
    • Slide 6: http://www.codypetruk.com/large/analog.jpg
    • Slide 7: http://librarywall.maastrichtuniversity.nl/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/openaccess.jpg
    • Slide 8: http://www.pyroenergen.com/articles09/images/dna.jpg
    • Slide 9: http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs45/i/2009/097/5/9/Social_media_icons_by_plechi.jpg
    • Slide 10 & 11: http://blog.comscore.com/2010/09/social_networking_asia_pacific.html
    • Slide 12: http://ceoworld.biz/ceo/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/social-media-profiles.png
    • Slide 13: http://gisellert1987.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/social_media_sites1.jpg
    • Slide 14: http://www.clker.com/clipart-9618.html
    • Slide 15 & 17: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/12/twitter-earthquake-alerts/
    • Slide 16: http://www.galaxyzoo.org/
    • Slide 18: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/06/iphones-with-gp/
    • Slide 19: http://malefis.u-strasbg.fr/site/images/homer-brain.jpg
    • Slide 20: http://www.cartoonstock.com/newscartoons/cartoonists/jhe/lowres/jhen13l.jpg
    • Slide 21: http://www.alonnissos.org/page9/files/taxonomy%20tree.jpg
    • Slide 22: http://www.fuelinteractive.com/blog/2008/04/my-social-medianetworking-talk.cfm
    • Slide 23: http://net.educause.edu/elements/images/Uploaded_Images/CONNECT/uni_tag_cloud_wordle.png
    • Slide 24: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/a5/TagCloudCloud.png/800px-TagCloudCloud.png