Nisqually Knotweed Program Update - 2011

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Nisqually Knotweed Program Update - 2011

  1. 1. Nisqually River Knotweed Control Project Update<br />Renee R. Mitchell<br />Pierce Conservation District<br /> 5430 66th Avenue East<br />Puyallup, WA 98371<br />(253) 845-9770<br />reneem@piercecountycd.org<br />
  2. 2. What is Knotweed?<br /><ul><li>Tall, very aggressive, invasive herbaceous perennial species native to Asia
  3. 3. Stems are thick & hollow, resembling bamboo, green to reddish in color
  4. 4. Leaves are alternate, and bright green in color
  5. 5. Can reach up to 15 feet in height within a single growing season
  6. 6. Listed as a Class B non-designated noxious weed</li></ul>Species:<br /><ul><li>Japanese
  7. 7. Giant
  8. 8. Bohemian (*Hybrid of Giant & Japanese)
  9. 9. Himalayan</li></li></ul><li>Why control it?<br />Knotweed:<br /><ul><li>Displaces and Crowds out Native Riparian Vegetation
  10. 10. Increases Erosion
  11. 11. Reduces Seedling Recruitment of Native Trees
  12. 12. Degrades Fish and Wildlife Habitat
  13. 13. Alters Soil Nutrient Cycling
  14. 14. Impacts Aquatic Food Webs</li></li></ul><li>It’s Everywhere<br />
  15. 15. How does knotweed spread primarily?<br />Root fragment sprout<br />Stem fragment rooted in cobble at nodes<br />
  16. 16. Mineral Creek<br />
  17. 17. Knotweed = Persistence<br />
  18. 18. 2010 Major Project Changes<br />*April of 2010:<br />Nisqually Knotweed Control Project transferred from Pierce County Noxious Weed Board to the Pierce Conservation District<br />Pierce County<br />
  19. 19. Nels Parvi<br />
  20. 20. New Project Manager<br />
  21. 21. Project Partners<br />
  22. 22. Project Partner Collaboration<br />*Float surveys conducted from LaGrande Dam to Nisqually Estuary with:<br />Florian Leischner: Rick Johnson: <br />Restoration Biologist Noxious Weed Control Coordinator<br />Nisqually Tribe Thurston County<br /> Jesse Barham: Bret Forrester:<br />Restoration Biologist Wildlife & Recreation Coordinator<br />U.S. Fish & Wildlife Tacoma Power<br />
  23. 23. 2010 Project Funding<br />Project Funding for 2010 consisted of:<br /><ul><li> WSDA Grant
  24. 24. Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRF Board)</li></ul>* In October 2010, the WSDA Grant was pulled from the Nisqually Knotweed Control Project <br />
  25. 25. Education & Community Outreach<br />2010:<br /><ul><li>Knotweed awareness was presented to the public via outreach letters, brochures, face-to-face meetings, and phone calls
  26. 26. Thurston County Noxious Weed Control Board provided educational brochures on knotweed control strategies during the Water Festival held at the Nisqually Wildlife Refuge
  27. 27. Conducted a “No Knotweed” bending party utilizing volunteers from the surrounding Ashford community</li></li></ul><li>Treatment Methods<br />Nisqually<br />Foliar Applications = Backpack sprayers containing:<br />1% Imazapyr (Polaris)<br />1% Surfactant (Competitor)<br />Stem Injection =<br />Injector Guns <br />containing:<br /> 3 ml Glyphosate (Glypro) <br />
  28. 28. AlternativeControl Methods<br />Cutting - remove stems, bag them up & take to garbage<br />Mowing - pick up every fragment, bag them up & take to garbage<br />Dig up roots - must try and remove as much root system as possible<br />Cover – spread heavy duty geo-textile fabric/black plastic<br />*These methods stimulate shoot growth which helps deplete energy from the roots/rhizomes<br />****Warning: Do not add root & stem fragments to compost/mulch piles<br />
  29. 29. 2010 Project Accomplishments<br />Lower Watershed – <br /><ul><li>Surveyed 38.4miles along the main stem below the Alder Dam by raft, jet boat, and stream walking
  30. 30. Re-treated and mapped 100% of all re-sprouts and new infestations found
  31. 31. Float surveys were conducted in partnership with the Nisqually Tribe, Tacoma Power, Thurston County Noxious Weed Control Board, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife</li></li></ul><li>2010 Lower Watershed Treatment<br />Alder Lake<br />
  32. 32. 2010 Lower Watershed Treatment<br />
  33. 33. 2010 Project Accomplishments<br />Upper Watershed –<br /><ul><li> Surveyed 5.6 miles along the main stem starting from outside the Mt. Rainier National Park entrance by stream walking
  34. 34. Re-treatments were made along the old Nisqually River channel, Copper Creek, spot treatments for various concerned landowners, and Gifford-Pinchot National Forest parcels
  35. 35. Treated 2.6 miles of new heavy knotweed infestations along the main stem of the river </li></li></ul><li>2010 Upper Watershed New Areas Treated<br />Tre<br />Start<br />
  36. 36. 2010 Upper Watershed New Areas Treated<br />
  37. 37. 2010 Upper Watershed End of Treatment<br />2010 End of Treatment<br />
  38. 38. Tributaries Surveyed and Treated<br />Upper & Lower Watershed<br /><ul><li>Berry Creek, Mona Creek, Wildcat Creek, Little Nisqually, Powell Creek, Lacamas Creek, Muck Creek, South Muck Creek, Horn Creek, Unnamed tributary to Harts Lake, Rocky Slough, and Tule Lake</li></ul> Total = 34 miles by stream walking and road surveys<br />
  39. 39. The Grand total:<br /><ul><li>78 total miles of river & creeks surveyed
  40. 40. 47 private & public-owned parcels surveyed and treated
  41. 41. 180 acres of knotweed infestations treated </li></ul>* Treatment estimated at a 90% mortality rate <br />
  42. 42. Knotweed Treatment as of 2010<br />
  43. 43. Rare Finds Along the Nisqually Floodplains<br />Western Toad (Bufo boreas) Wooden Buffalo Carving<br />* Species of concern in WA & OR<br />
  44. 44. Plan for 2011<br /><ul><li>Ensure the lower main stem of the Nisqually remains knotweed free by survey, monitoring and re-treating where necessary
  45. 45. Continue annual main stem rafting floats with project partners
  46. 46. Continue survey, retreatment , and treatment of new areas within the upper watershed
  47. 47. Increase Knotweed awareness among private landowners through knotweed workshops and community meetings
  48. 48. Continue to request land owners cooperation in the project
  49. 49. Identify areas to replace native vegetation that has been negatively impacted by the presence of knotweed</li></li></ul><li>2011 Treatment Goal<br />
  50. 50. Project Needs<br /><ul><li>Additional Funding Sources
  51. 51. More knotweed technicians
  52. 52. Stronger partner collaboration efforts
  53. 53. Cooperation from more private landowners</li></li></ul><li>Help!!!!!!!!.........Questions……….<br />

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