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Nisqually Funding Mechanisms Workshop Part 2
 

Nisqually Funding Mechanisms Workshop Part 2

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Presentation Given By: Tracy Stanton, Earth Economics

Presentation Given By: Tracy Stanton, Earth Economics

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    Nisqually Funding Mechanisms Workshop Part 2 Nisqually Funding Mechanisms Workshop Part 2 Presentation Transcript

    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Developing  New  Funding   Mechanisms  in  the  Nisqually   July 19, 2013
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Built Capital Social Capital Human Capital Natural Capital Four Types of Capital
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Nisqually  Watershed   12  Ecosystem  Services   18  Land  Cover  types  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Freshwater Supply © 2013 Earth Economics
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Erosion Control
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Biological Control
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Flood Protection http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss5/biome/wetlands/wetlandsgallery.htm
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Nutrient Cycling http://www.plantanswers.com/Articles/DirectSeedingIntoGardenSoil.asp
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Carbon Sequestration © 2012 Earth Economics
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Soil Formation hEp://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Asia/India/North/Jammu_and_Kashmir/Gurez/photo1160427.htm  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Pollination © 2012 Earth Economics
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Wildlife Habitat http://robinloznakphotography.blogspot.com/2010/07/northern-spotted-owl.html
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Aesthetic and Recreation © 2012 Earth Economics
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Categories  of  Ecosystem  Services   Informa4on  Func4ons   Aesthe4c  &  Recrea4on   Cultural  &  ar4s4c   Science  &  educa4on   Habitat  Func4ons   Wildlife  Habitat   Nursery   Provision  Func4ons   Water  supply   Drinking  Water  Purifica4on   Food   Raw  materials   Gene4c  resources   Medicinal  resources   Ornamental  resources   Regula4on  Func4ons   Climate  Stability   Gas  Regula4on   Flood  Protec4on   Storm  Protec4on   Water  Regula4on   Soil  Erosion  Control   Soil  Forma4on   Nutrient  Cycling   Waste  Treatment   Pollina4on   Biological  Control   Provision  Func4ons   Water  supply   Drinking  Water  Purifica4on   Food   Raw  materials   Gene4c  resources   Medicinal  resources   Ornamental  resources   Informa4on  Func4ons   Aesthe4c  &  Recrea4on   Cultural  &  ar4s4c   Science  &  educa4on   Regula4on  Func4ons   Climate  Stability   Gas  Regula4on   Flood  Protec4on   Storm  Protec4on   Water  Regula4on   Soil  Erosion  Control   Soil  Forma4on   Nutrient  Cycling   Waste  Treatment   Pollina4on   Biological  Control   Habitat  Func4ons   Wildlife  Habitat   Nursery  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   ES  in  Nisqually  Report-­‐2009   High   $280  million  Low   $4.1  Billion   In yearly benefits
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Copyright © 2011 Earth Economics Applying  Ecosystem  Services   Identify Value Model and Map Analyze Fund What? Why? Result
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Copyright © 2011 Earth Economics Stakeholders   Identify Value Model and Map Analyze Fund Watershed  Managers  U[li[es   Standards  Boards   Farmers   Government  Agencies   Business  Interests   Academic  Ins[tu[ons   Rural  Landowners   NGOs   Urban  Residents   Tribes  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Overview  of  Project   Secure sufficient funding for the full-scale implementation of the restoration of the Nisqually Watershed hEp://www.wetlandsplendors.com/porbolio/allegheny-­‐river-­‐clearing-­‐storm-­‐2/  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Goals  and  Outcomes   1.  Iden[fy  3-­‐5  poten[al  funding  mechanisms;     2.  Stakeholder  engagement  to  evaluate  the  funding   mechanisms  based  on  a  set  of  criteria;     3.  Of  the  3  selected  by  stakeholders,  provide  an  overview  of   economic  benefits  to  residents  and  the  implementa[on   strategy;   4.  Focus  on  one  mechanism  that  is  likely  to  be  implemented   within  one  year  ager  the  project  concludes.    
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Ques[ons  to  address…   1.  How  much  funding  is  needed?    A:  ($3  million)   2.  How  much  funding  is  dedicated  to  habitat  restora[on   annually?    A:  ($1  -­‐  1.5  million)   3.  Verify  the  scale  of  implementa[on  for  the  funding   mechanism    A:  (aiming  for  $1.5M  (new  sources  of  $$)  for   the  whole  watershed;  for  a  suite  of  ac[vi[es  and  needs  that   go  beyond  the  Salmon  Recovery  Plan).  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   List  of  Funding  Mechanisms   1.  Investment  in  Watershed  Services  (Payments  for  Ecosystem  Services)   2.  Regulatory  Markets:  trading,  offset  markets,  mi[ga[on  banking   3.  Special  Fees:  assessed  by  Park  Service  in  Mt.  Rainier  Na[onal  Park   4.  Taxes   5.  Watershed  Investment  District   6.  Conserva[on  Easements  &  Tradable  Development  Rights   7.  Loans:  State  Revolving  Loans  (low  interest)     8.  Grants  (from  Government,  NGOs,  Private  Founda[ons)   9.  Special  Purpose  Districts  (water,  stormwater,  conserva[on)   10.  Special  Purpose  Funds  (Eugene,  OR-­‐  Watershed  Investment  Fund)   11.  Voluntary  Offsets  (carbon,  in  stream  water  rights,  stormwater)  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Poten[al  Funding  Mechanisms  for   Nisqually   1.  Watershed  Protec[on  Fee  (collected  by  water  u[lity)   2.  Watershed  Stewardship  Fee  (levied  upon  entrance  to  Mt.   Rainier  Na[onal  Park  and  Nisqually  Na[onal  Wildlife  Refuge)   3.  Watershed  Investment  District  (WID)   4.  Per  parcel  tax  assessment    or  “flush”  tax  (flat  rate  or   based  on  value:  i.e.  70,000  x  $30  =  $2,100,000)   5.  Voluntary  Offset  Fund  (for  water  use,  stormwater  or   biodiversity-­‐poten[ally  in  conjunc[on  with  large   ins[tu[onal  players  in  the  basin-­‐Joint  Base  Lewis-­‐McChord,   Tacoma  Power,  others)  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   1.  Watershed  Protec[on  Fee     (Driven  by  water  u[lity)  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   2.  Watershed  Stewardship  Fee     (Collected  upon  entrance  to  Mt.  Rainier  Na[onal  Park   and  Nisqually  Na[onal  Wildlife  Refuge)  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   3.  Watershed  Investment  District  (WID)  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   4. Special assessments (tax) Per parcel: (i.e. $30 x 70,000 = $2,100,000); flush tax
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   5.  Voluntary  Offset  Fund   Model:  Voluntary  Carbon  Offsets  used  for  biodiversity,   stormwater  or  water-­‐use  offsets  (opportunity  to  engage  across   the  watershed  including  with  large  ins[tu[onal  players  in  the   basin  such  as    Joint  Base  Lewis-­‐  McChord,  Tacoma  Power  and   others)  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Stakeholder  Engagement   Evalua[on/Ra[ng    Criteria  of  the  FM:     •  Equity/fairness   •  Adequacy  to  generate  sufficient  revenue   •  Poli[cal  feasibility   •  Meets  outreach  and  educa[onal  goals   •  Can  be  implemented  ager  one  year  
    • ©  2013  Earth  Economics   Thank  You   tstanton@eartheconomics.org   lflores@eartheconomics.org