NARU 2012 Guenther: Counting Education
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

NARU 2012 Guenther: Counting Education

on

  • 476 views

Presentation to NARU Public Seminar Series, Darwin, 31 October 2012.

Presentation to NARU Public Seminar Series, Darwin, 31 October 2012.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
476
Views on SlideShare
476
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

NARU 2012 Guenther: Counting Education Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Are we making education count inremote Australian communities orjust counting education? John Guenther October 2012
  • 2. Cooperative Research Centre for Remote Economic ParticipationGoals:1. To develop new ways to build resilience and strengthen regional communities and economies across remote Australia.2. To build new enterprises and strengthen existing industries that, provide jobs, livelihoods and incomes in remote areas.3. To improve the education and training pathways in remote areas so that people have better opportunities to participate in the range of economies that exist.
  • 3. Cooperative Research Centre for Remote EconomicParticipation projects • Regional economies • Population Mobility and Labour Markets • Enduring Community Value from Mining • Climate Change Adaptation and Energy Futures • Enterprise development • Aboriginal Cultural Enterprise • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Economies • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Tourism Product • Carbon Economies in Remote Australia • Plant Business • Precision Pastoral Management Tools • Investing in people • Pathways to Employment • Interplay Between Health, Wellbeing, Education and Employment • Remote Education Systems http://crc-rep.com/research
  • 4. 4
  • 5. Remote Education Systems sites
  • 6. The discourse of remote education • The rhetoric of ‘disadvantage’ • The rhetoric of poor outcomes • The rhetoric of remote schooling 6
  • 7. Disadvantage • Disparity • Gap, and closing the gap • Lower school attendance and enrolment rates; • Poorer teacher quality (though no data are offered on this one); • A lack of Indigenous Cultural Studies in school curricula (again no data to support this); • Low levels of Year 9 attainment; • Low levels of Year 10 attainment; and • Difficulties in the transition from school to work Overcoming Disadvantage Report But what of the richness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture? And where are the celebrations of achievement? 7
  • 8. Poor outcomes Results for Indigenous students in very remote Australia are extremely poor. The majority of Indigenous students in very remote Australia currently do not meet the national minimum standard in reading, writing and numeracy. (FaHCSIA 2009:, p. 15) (ACARA 2011) But how should we define ‘success’ in remote schools? 8
  • 9. Remote schooling • Improving attendance • Improving teacher quality • Improving teaching and learning (pedagogical) quality • Curriculum and reporting to national standards • Stronger school-community partnerships • Stronger accountability and choice . 9
  • 10. Analysis of NAPLAN results in very remote schools Year 3 reading in very remote schools v School attendance Year 5 numeracy in very remote schools v Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) 10
  • 11. Attendance vs NAPLAN Year 3 Reading Score, 2011all very remote schools (n=119) Moderate relationship 11
  • 12. Attendance vs NAPLAN Year 3 Reading Score, 2011very remote schools >80 per cent Aboriginal or TorresStrait Islander students (n=70) Weak relationship 12
  • 13. ICSEA vs NAPLAN Year 5 Numeracy Score, 2011all very remote schools (n=121) Strong relationship 13
  • 14. ICSEA vs NAPLAN Year 5 Numeracy Score, 2011very remote schools >80 per cent Aboriginal or TorresStrait Islander students (n=73) No relationship 14
  • 15. What does this then mean? This analysis suggests that for very remote schools with mainly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: • Strategies that work to increase attendance will not necessarily result in improved educational outcomes (based on NAPLAN). • Strategies that address disadvantage which are designed to improve educational outcomes (based on NAPLAN), will not necessarily work. 15
  • 16. More questions than answers • Why does the relationship between ICSEA, attendance and NAPLAN hold true for all remote schools but not for those with mostly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students? 16
  • 17. Bush Mechanics 17
  • 18. Some propositions ? Measurement meaning ? Culturally laden concepts ? Individuated way of administering NAPLAN ? Unrealistic expectations of ‘progress’ ? The supply side drivers of ‘improvement’ vs demand side motivators for ‘improvement’; ? Definitions of ‘improvement’ differ in supply and demand side of remote education; ? Socio-cultural factors, language, ontologies, epistemologies, axiologies and cosmologies ? Coercive (or voluntary) interventions result in resistance 18
  • 19. What could work, what might be abandoned? × The positioning of remote students as ‘disadvantaged’ × Punitive instruments are not working and should be abandoned; × Attendance as a proxy for school performance in remote schools  Alternative measures of school performance;  Definitions of success that reflect local aspirations;  Redefinition of a quality teacher and what it means to teach effectively; × Assessment against national curriculum standards; ? Assumptions about the outcomes of school-community partnerships  The field of remote education is ripe for radical innovation; × Instruments of accountability.But NAPLAN still has a place and should not be abandoned 19
  • 20. Contact John Guenther john.guenther@flinders.edu.au 0412 125 661 Cooperative Research Centre for Remote Economic Participation http://www.crc-rep.com 20