Contamination Control in the Food Industry

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Contamination Control in the Food Industry looks at best practices for preventing food-borne illness as a result of poor industrial housekeeping practices. It explains the selection and use of industrial vacuums to improve food manufacturing cleanliness.

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Contamination Control in the Food Industry

  1. 1. Industrial Cleaning Best Practices Contamination Control in the Food Industry Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com Presenter: Kim Kanis, Senior District Manager, Nilfisk CFM 2011
  2. 2. Overview <ul><li>Why Clean? </li></ul><ul><li>A Common Enemy: Contamination </li></ul><ul><li>Cleaning Methods: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pros and Cons </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Preferred Methods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dry Cleaning Techniques </li></ul></ul><ul><li>HEPA-Filtered Industrial Vacuums </li></ul><ul><li>Combustible Dust in the Food Industry </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  3. 3. Contamination Control – Why Clean? <ul><li>GMPs </li></ul><ul><li>HACCP </li></ul><ul><li>Product Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Product Quality </li></ul><ul><li>Company Reputation </li></ul><ul><li>Cost of Recalls </li></ul><ul><li>Cost of Lawsuits </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  4. 4. Contamination Control – Why Clean? <ul><li>The CDC estimates 76 million cases of foodborne disease occur each year in the United States, responsible for 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths. </li></ul><ul><li>Financial: the average food/beverage recall is $10 million.* </li></ul><ul><li>*Deloitte, GMA and FMI study, 2009. </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  5. 5. Contamination Control - Threats <ul><li>Bacteria and viruses </li></ul><ul><li>Parasites </li></ul><ul><li>Allergens </li></ul><ul><li>Rodents/pests </li></ul><ul><li>Mold, toxins, and contaminants </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  6. 6. Contamination Control <ul><li>“ We Live in a Microbial World” </li></ul><ul><li>The consequences of failure to attain adequate control of airborne microbial contamination can result in product spoilage and/or a foodborne disease hazard. Airborne bacteria counts will normally be greatest in dusty environments and can range as high as 10,000 organisms per cubic meter. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Sanitation in Food Processing - Second Edition </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  7. 7. Cleaning Methods <ul><li>Controlled Wet - minimal wet cleaning methods used as needed </li></ul><ul><li>Wet - wet cleaning methods used for all standard cleaning procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Dry - dry cleaning methods used for all standard cleaning procedures </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  8. 8. Cleaning Methods <ul><li>Dry Cleaning: The Preferred Method </li></ul><ul><li>Although microorganisms survive, they cannot grow in dry foods or in their equipment soils. To introduce water in any form into such a process is to court disaster. Therefore, for routine cleanup of dry food lines use only procedures such as vacuuming, wiping with clean cloths, brushing or scraping. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Principles of Food Processing Sanitation </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  9. 9. Dry Cleaning - Methods <ul><li>Brooms/Mops </li></ul><ul><li>Compressed Air </li></ul><ul><li>Shop-Style Vacuums </li></ul><ul><li>Central Vacuum System </li></ul><ul><li>HEPA Vacuums </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  10. 10. Cleaning Methods - Tips <ul><li>Work from top down </li></ul><ul><li>Vacuum, brush or shovel to remove fines and dust </li></ul><ul><li>Use a scraper to remove excessive product buildup </li></ul><ul><li>Vacuum, brush or wipe to remove fines created by scraping </li></ul><ul><li>If possible, integrate industrial vacuum into process to collect excess dust during production run, packaging, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Sanitize as needed </li></ul><ul><li>Compressed air should not be used to substitute a vacuum cleaner, brush or broom </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  11. 11. Cleaning Methods <ul><li>Dust removal is accomplished by use of: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Vacuum Cleaners </li></ul><ul><li>2. Brooms and Brushes </li></ul><ul><li>3. Compressed Air </li></ul><ul><li>These are given in order of preference. The vacuum cleaner must be used whenever possible. Compressed air should be used only where a vacuum and brushes will not reach. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: AIB - Basic Food Plant Sanitation Manual </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  12. 12. Brooms and Mops <ul><li>Pros </li></ul><ul><li>Ease-of-use </li></ul><ul><li>Readily available </li></ul><ul><li>Inexpensive </li></ul><ul><li>Cons </li></ul><ul><li>Not effective for fine powder collection </li></ul><ul><li>Can disturb and spread dust, bacteria, allergens & insects </li></ul><ul><li>Limited to floor cleaning </li></ul><ul><li>Must be regularly cleaned and zoned for some areas </li></ul><ul><li>Mops introduce water and can leave residue </li></ul><ul><li>Cleaning water can become a source of contamination if not changed frequently </li></ul><ul><li>Mops must be cleaned, dried and stored properly </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  13. 13. Compressed Air <ul><li>Pros </li></ul><ul><li>Ease-of-use </li></ul><ul><li>Useful in tight areas </li></ul><ul><li>Cons </li></ul><ul><li>Distributes contaminants in compressed air system </li></ul><ul><li>Spreads fine dust, bacteria and allergens everywhere </li></ul><ul><li>Does not remove fine dust </li></ul><ul><li>Blows dust into hard-to-reach areas </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com Compressed air just moves dust from point a to point b; it does not eliminate the dust
  14. 14. Shop-Style Vacuums <ul><li>Pros </li></ul><ul><li>Ease of use </li></ul><ul><li>Many are designed for wet and dry collection </li></ul><ul><li>Can be used to clean a variety of areas </li></ul><ul><li>Inexpensive </li></ul><ul><li>Cons </li></ul><ul><li>Not effective for fine powder collection, bacteria, or allergen control </li></ul><ul><li>Motor burn-up (not cost-effective) </li></ul><ul><li>Many do not hold up well in industrial environments </li></ul><ul><li>Loud </li></ul><ul><li>Static electricity build-up </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com Source: http://jc-coleman.com/shopvac-meltdown/
  15. 15. Central Vacuum Systems <ul><li>Pros </li></ul><ul><li>Convenient to use </li></ul><ul><li>Powerful </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous-duty capabilities </li></ul><ul><li>Large collection capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Ideal for multiple operator use </li></ul><ul><li>Cons </li></ul><ul><li>System failure can leave many people without a way to clean </li></ul><ul><li>System cannot be used outside of immediate area </li></ul><ul><li>Piping can become blocked and/or contaminated </li></ul><ul><li>Cannot collect liquid; mold build-up in pipes </li></ul><ul><li>Can be expensive </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  16. 16. HEPA-filtered Vacuums <ul><li>Pros </li></ul><ul><li>Ease-of-use </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-stage filtration / HEPA filtration captures bacteria </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple filter options </li></ul><ul><li>Many are designed for wet and dry collection </li></ul><ul><li>Can be used to clean a variety of areas (general maintenance and specialized applications) </li></ul><ul><li>Many have unique filter loading indicators and filter cleaning options </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com Manual filter shaker removes caked on dust; maintaining performance Nomex ® filters and high-temp wands withstand hot ovens to remove crumbs, etc.
  17. 17. HEPA-filtered Vacuums <ul><li>Pros </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous-duty capabilities </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple construction material choices </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple vacuum performance choices including portable units and central systems </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com <ul><li>Portable </li></ul><ul><li>Wet/Dry </li></ul><ul><li>Stainless Steel </li></ul><ul><li>Three-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Pneumatic </li></ul><ul><li>Drum-top </li></ul><ul><li>EXP </li></ul>
  18. 18. HEPA-filtered Vacuums <ul><li>Cons </li></ul><ul><li>Initial Cost </li></ul><ul><li>Problems can arise if dry-only HEPA vacuums are used for wet collection </li></ul><ul><li>Some require filter changes between wet and dry use </li></ul><ul><li>Not all vacuums are created equal </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  19. 19. HEPA-filtered Vacuums <ul><li>Accessories </li></ul><ul><li>Food-grade </li></ul><ul><li>Color-coded </li></ul><ul><li>Wall/Overhead </li></ul><ul><li>Floor </li></ul><ul><li>High-temperature </li></ul><ul><li>Stainless </li></ul><ul><li>Bulk collection </li></ul><ul><li>Micro tools </li></ul><ul><li>Anti-static </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  20. 20. HEPA-filtered Vacuums Not just for general maintenance… Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com Industrial vacuum decreases product loss by collecting pistachios that fell during transport from silo to plant. Industrial vacuum removes excess product and fine dust from production line; can be integrated into line for continuous processing Quickly collect bulk materials
  21. 21. Combustible Dust <ul><li>Food Industry is particularly under the microscope </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA NEP raises the issue of using “properly-equipped” industrial vacuums as defined by NFPA 654. </li></ul><ul><li>Classed materials may require an “explosion-proof” vacuum, as determined by Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJ, eg. building inspector, fire marshall, insurance agent). </li></ul><ul><li>Often, a standard, non-EXP industrial vacuum cleaner is suitable for collecting “combustible dusts.” </li></ul><ul><li>Remember, it is up to the AHJ to determine if your work area or facility is classified hazardous, which then determines the type of equipment you should use. </li></ul><ul><li>Shop-style vacuums can add to the risk! </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com
  22. 22. Air-operated, Pneumatic Vacuums Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com Air-operated Explosion Proof <ul><li>Powered by compressed air (Venturi principle) </li></ul><ul><li>No electrical components </li></ul><ul><li>No moving parts </li></ul><ul><li>Use when electricity is prohibited or unavailable </li></ul><ul><li>Intrinsically Safe </li></ul><ul><li>Meet the requirements for use in Class II areas </li></ul><ul><li>Made of non-sparking materials </li></ul><ul><li>Conductive accessories </li></ul><ul><li>Grounded </li></ul>
  23. 23. Explosion-Proof Vacuums <ul><li>Certified as “Explosion Proof” by NRTL </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CSA, UL, ETL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>EXP rated TEFC motors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>EXP rated sealed switches/connections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Internally/externally grounded (filters, body, tank, wheels, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conductive hose and accessories </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Beware of posers! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Some companies offer “dressed up” models with antistatic accessories </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Remember, investing in the proper equipment is only one part of the equation. Inspect your facility to ensure you have proper safety measures in place, including Explosion Prevention (NFPA 69) and Deflagration Venting devices (NFPA 68). </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com Approved for use in Class I, Group D and Class II, Groups E, F & G
  24. 24. Resources <ul><li>AIB Resources </li></ul><ul><li>General Website </li></ul><ul><li>www.aibonline.org </li></ul><ul><li>Food Plant Sanitation Workshops </li></ul><ul><li> https://secure.aibonline.org/php/ecomm-catalog.php?catalogNbr=392 </li></ul><ul><li>FDA Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid a Recall </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/IndustryGuidance/default.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Federal Food Safety </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.foodsafety.gov/ </li></ul><ul><li>Other Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Combustible Dust NEP: </li></ul><ul><li>www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=DIRECTIVES&p_id=3830 </li></ul><ul><li>Nilfisk CFM Food Industry Focus Site </li></ul><ul><li>www.foodprocessingvacuum.com </li></ul>Visit our food industry focus site at www.foodprocessingvacuum.com

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