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Gamification talk for MRS by Nile 23rd Feb 2012

Gamification talk for MRS by Nile 23rd Feb 2012

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  • Multi discipline team consisting of strategists, researchers, interaction designers, Information architects, usability specialists etcPartner with clients like RBS, Hiscox, Kelloggs to improve their long term digital strategies and deliver an exceptional customer experience along the way
  • advert for Nike + and even though you may not know it, it is brilliant example of a gaming experience.Two mega brands have come together to create a product/service that changes peoples behaviour when it comes to fitness. How has is done that, by creating a great gaming experience! They have produced a more engaging experience that has enticed, encouraged and motivated people to run using Nike and Apple products. Importantly , in addition this change in behaviour has been sustained. They have well over 2 million runners now using Nike + and the numbers are still increasing.Throughout this presentation I’m going to be talking about what’s behind this successful gaming experience, why it works? AND how can you can apply those principles to build better engagement
  • So what is Gamification. Well, it’s taking what makes a gaming experience fun and engaging and applying it to your site, service, community, content or campaign, in order to drive participation.So to be clear, gamificationisn’t just games, it’s applying game based thinking to your brand, business or research. By understanding what it is that makes games so enticing, engaging and motivating, we are aiming to apply similar principles to entice, engage and motivate people into participating in useful activities that they may otherwise be reluctant to do. Gamification can also be applied to change social behaviour. Particularly in the education and health sectors.You can use this knowledge to your advantage - to ultimately get more engagement and commitment from participants.
  • So what do we know, we know games and gaming are extremely popular. But why? Games are giving and providing something for people that they may not be getting in their real lives. Now what could that be?People seek meaningful work: work with a purpose. They want to master something, improve their skills, and get recognition for their efforts. In some cases they are not getting these things in real life. They want to be a part of something — contribute to the greater whole. Games can make people feel they can achieveThis relates to the one of the core psychological FLOW theory (why play games are fun) usually we feel best not when we are under challenged then we feel bored or not when we are over challenged because then we feel frustrated or anxious but that optimal middle ground where the challenges meet our abilities and this we get a feeling of achievement by actually mastering them.
  • And what you can do isleverage those human desires / needs that is driving that participation in that activity. For example status,self-improvement,community and social recognition,a sense of meaning,instrumental / tangible value,fun and enjoyment,competence and achievement,getting things done easier.Another way to think about it is. Increasingly people are faced with a set of choices, used to be quite clearly distinguishable between work and leisure but things have changed, this line is not longer so clear. compulsary and optional. When we get into optional time, people are naturally going to gravitate towards activites that they find the most rewarding and games are explicitly designed to maximise reward. if you can pull people into to engage with you by making it rewarding you are ...
  • Gamification isn’t something new, it’s been around for decades - Companies have been on to the idea of motivating users through points, levels and status for a long time. Market researchers have been using prizes to try and entice participation in a survey or study for years.For example Nectar/ Bootsgive you points for buying the group’s products, these points can then be redeemed for tangible benefits. If you have loyalty cards like these then the chances are they have changed your behaviour so that you now proportionately buy more products from that brand than others. That is a gaming experience. Rewards are one of the basic Gamification principles.
  • Four Square is another example of Gamification in practice. It is alocation-based social networkingwebsite. Users “check-in” at venues such as restaurants, bars, attractionsusing the mobile site, text messages or app and selecting from a list of venues that the application locates nearbyThey have led they way for driving behavioural change by checking into local venues earning you points, sometimes special deal & discounts. So what does the user get from this; satisfaction whilst climbing the leader board vs. your friends, creating status, a sense of achievement, as well as providing the tangible benefits. been very successful 3 million check-ins per day. ultimately you want to drive long-term engagement with your brand/service, however recently Four Square have been witnessing a drop-off in the number of active users. So they’ve had their popularity boom but how can they sustain that relationship with their customers? There’s clearly something missing from their model.What are Badges and are they enough? Goal setting device – Where to goInstructions – What is possibleReputation – Who you areStatus & Affiliation – What you didGroup identification – Who is like you
  • In order to drive engagement and participation with their service they provide feedback on how complete your profile (through a progress bar, one of the simplest ways to add game components to your online content), by creating a ‘To Do’ list for you to clearly see what is still left to do. They provide constant feedback of how many people have viewed your profile which in turn initiates you to think how you can improve this ‘score’, e.g. by improving your profile and connecting with more people. The underlying platform is a community were you receive feedback from others, and a knock-on effect of creating a community is you create the opportunity to create the feeing of status, achievement, competition etc. All of which require you to spend time engaging with Linked In.
  • Returning to the example that I showed you at the beginning Nike +which as I said is a shining example of both content marketing and gamification. Nike: track your running, constant feedback, allow you to create goals for yourself, provide you with goals all of which are aimed to motivate you to run and ultimately engage with this product.The question I have is how many non-runners has it incentivise to take up running that did not before? Running Game & Audio AdventureZombies, Run! is an ultra-immersive running game for the iPhone, iPod Touch, and Android. We deliver the story straight to your headphones through orders and voice recordings - and back home, you can build and grow your base with the items you've collected.You can jog in a park, run along a beach, or walk along a trail, even on treadmills! MISSIONS, VIRTUAL GOODS, FEEDBACK. collect items like medicine, batteries, and ammo while running - but when you're back home, who needs them more: the soldiers or the doctors? Which buildings need extra defenses? It’s up to you - and the bigger your base, the more missions you can play. A World of Stories - Where did the zombies come from? What are the leaders of your base planning? There’s a deeper mystery to be uncovered, puzzles to be solved, websites to be discovered, documents to be viewed so you can learn the truth of what’s happened to the world.and voice recordings.Your Own Music - the story unfolds in between your tracks through a series of dynamic radio messages Better Fitness Through Science
  • Some other interesting and more recent examples are Giff-Gaff which is a mobile network which use game mechanics to engage customers with their brand and engage in a particularly fruitful way. GIFF GAFF do not have a designated (paid) support team (surprisingly) for their 3 million strong customer base. Instead they incentivise customers to provide support for each other. They are rewarded with a points scheme, which if their support has used to successfully help someone with their problem and they reach a certain level they can redeem these points/rewards for money off their bill.
  • As business people and marketeers why should you be bothered?The companies that I just showed you are utilising these new breed ways of engagement It really is a marketers dream, get people to do more of what you want.
  • Well the potential market in terms of who you can reach by using gamification principles is huge.the number of gamers in the UK is only increasing. is almost half of the whole population of the UK! and if we break that down further; they are spending 43 million hours playing games.
  • Now show me someone in this room that doesn’t have an iPhone or a Facebook page. It’s so broad now that there’s a massive opportunity here to create a game/application/service with the right content that reaches to those who are already engaged with that activity, as well as those from the population that aren’t just by making it an appealing experience. Utilise the mechanisms and psychological needs and desires that drives people to engage with this activity to apply them to your website, business goal or service.Mobile devices allow games to interrupt the real world – people no longer have to set aside time for gaming, and so the game experience can become more casual and shorter. Utilising apps, and the short bursts of activity that people bow use their mobiles for to pass time is a massive opportunity.
  • And the people behind thattrend are...No longer just the 16-30 year old male in his bedroom playing shoot’em up games. It spans across generations and sexes.
  • There is now almost 50% of the population who are engaged with gaming activities that are female in the age bracket of 18-35.
  • So just so you know you don‘t have to create the next Second Life or Wold of War Craft I‘m going to show you the Gamification Model, which has three core dimension and you can utilise principles from each of them to create your engaging experince.
  • time-based patterns based on psychological motivations. Use game techniques like these to GUIDE AND MOTIVATE your respondents/gamers through a journey to your desired goal.
  • the system and features that make progress visible. They are constructs intended to encourage gameplay.
  • relates to the overall experience that yields the emotional engagement and ultimately emotion drives action and engagement. You want to create things like fun, pride, curiosity, satisfaction in order that people want to engage and have a reason to engage with you or your service.
  • The overall goal of gamification is to engage with consumers and get them to participate, share and interact in some activity or community. A particularly compelling, dynamic, and sustained gamification experience can be used to accomplish a variety of business goals.EXAMPLE –Rewards. So you have someone read content on your site, they’ve taken the time to visit your site, they’ve downloaded a factsheet, and watched a video about your product – they’ve just done 5 things that indicate that they are interested in what you have to offer – what are you going to do about that? Are you paying any attention to it? Or is that just getting lost in your server logs or Google analytics because that’s all aggregate info about what everybody is doing? You’ve got one individual person who is raising their hand as a by-product of what they are doing on your site and your not responding to that in real-time. Why not? Give them an offer, give them more info, get someone to contact them – Reward them for doing that work. There’s the opportunity to say I’ll reward you even more if you spread the word via Facebook and twitter. Bottom line is track and reward online engagement. Example – Unlocking of levels or rewards could equate to purchasing an off-line product which comes with a code. That code relates to something exclusive, could be a rate or particular type of content.Example – Use points to promote content. You’ll get so many extra points if you go watch this video or read this content.So Nike + is successful because it had implemented dynamics, mechanics and aesthetics in a combination and way that are appropriate for the subject and platform.
  • You have something that people might find boring that you want people to do – so how can you encourage them to do it?To do this successfully we need our ‘players’ not to get bored, frustrated, or drop out. We have to sustain their interest – as much as the topic allows. Games further motivate their players by establishing goals which create the intrinsic motivation to succeed. Research projects also have goals – task and survey completion – and associated rewards, even if they’re not always intrinsic ones.In qualitative research, and increasingly in online methods, we do this partly by encouraging interaction between players – setting up multi-participant environments like groups or communities. This creates its own emergent mechanics and behaviours – those operating in qual groups are well known, and the varieties of behaviour in online communities are becoming much better known to researchers.
  • Can’t change subject SO
  • CHNAGE STYLEQUESTIONING:add rules to questions. rules can be used to transform almost any task into a game. “describe yourself using only 7 words” human creativity seems to benefit from constraints.Turns questions into quests: By adding a motive to answer a question you turn it into a quest e.g. World of war craft involves people spending hours and hours of their life doing “meaningless” chores to earn reward points to go into battleGet them scenario planning: What if? As humans we are biologically programmed to plan and many of the games we play are centred around this very fact e.g. Civilization
  • CompetitionDown to our survival of the fittest we inherently like (achievable) challengesBin Grids make them look more interesting and engaging (INTURN will get less straight-lining, lower neutral scoring, higher enjoyment, lower dropout)Give instant feedback and use scoring mechanismsConsider abandoning the linearity that typifies most projects. the idea of the “sandbox” – an environment where players have more leeway to explore, play freely and carve out their own path. With the advent of longer-term research communities we’re seeing sandbox projects become a reality.
  • Don’t be too focused and be aware that there will always be people wanting to cheat the system (especially when there are tangible rewards). For example BMW challenged people to drive efficiently as possible in a gamified experience. faking identities, for examplehype just now - the peak of inflated expectations - trough of disillusionment - it is NOT always an appropriate tool to use.Different players have different playing styles –such, some surveys or communities will appeal to certain types of people more than others.in some ways we want research projects to be LESS like games. Competition between participants can be healthy and motivating but can also distort research’s primary role as a data collection tool.And here we run into the key difference between surveys and games – games build worlds and encourage the player to develop a strategy for dealing with those worlds effectively. Research projects build worlds but actively discourage strategy. Should this always be the case? After all, the feeling of mastering the environment is one of the most engaging and motivating in games.
  • Questions AND QR CODE

Transcript

  • 1. gamification• What is it?• Why is it so popular?• Who’s out there doing it?• Little bit of theory• How and if it can be applied to market research
  • 2. who are nile?• Experience and Service Design Co.• Multi-disciplinary team• Specialise in working within the digital space improving the overall customer experience
  • 3. This is an advert for Nike + and even though you may not know it, it is brilliant example of a gaming experience. Two mega brands have come together to create a service that changes peoples behaviour when it comes to fitness. How has is done that, by creating a great gaming experience! They have produced a more engaging experience that has enticed, encouraged and motivated people to run using Nike and Apple products. Importantly, in addition, this change in behaviour has been sustained. They have well over 2 million runners now using Nike + and the numbers are still increasing.Gamification
  • 4. Gamification
  • 5. So what is Gamification. Well, it’s taking what makes a gaming experience funand engaging and applying it to your site, service, community, content orcampaign, in order to drive participation.So to be clear, gamification isn’t just games, it’s applying game based thinkingto your brand, business or research. By understanding what it is that makes games so enticing, engaging and motivating, we are aiming to apply similar principles to entice, engage and motivate people into participating in useful activities that they may otherwise be reluctant to do.Gamification can also be applied to change social behaviour. Particularly in theeducation and health sectors.You can use this knowledge to your advantage - to ultimately get moreengagement and commitment from participants Gamification
  • 6. So what do we know, we know games and gaming are extremely popular. But why?Games are giving and providing something for people that they may not be getting in theirreal lives. Now what could that be?People seek meaningful work: work with a purpose. They want to master something,improve their skills, and get recognition for their efforts. In some cases they are not gettingthese things in real life. Games can make people feel they can achievePsychological FLOW theory (why play games are fun): Usually we feelbest not when we are under challenged then we feel bored or not whenwe are over challenged because then we feel frustrated or anxious butthat optimal middle ground where the challenges meet our abilitiesand this we get a feeling of achievement by actually mastering them.
  • 7. And what you can do is leverage those human desires and needs that aredriving that participation in that activity
  • 8. Gamification isn’t something new, it’s been around fordecades - Companies have been on to the idea of motivatingusers through points, levels and status for a long time.Market researchers have also been using prizes to try andentice participation in a survey or study for a long time. If you have loyalty cards like these then the chances are they have changed your behaviour so that you now proportionately buy more products from that brand than others. That is a gaming experience. Rewards are one of the basic Gamification principles. Gamification
  • 9. Gamification
  • 10. Gamification
  • 11. GIFF GAFF do not have a designated (paid) support team(surprisingly) for their 3 million strong customer base. Instead they incentivise customers to provide support for each other. They are rewarded with a points scheme, which if their support has used to successfully help someone with their problem and they reach a certain level they can redeem these points/rewards for money off their bill. Gamification
  • 12. so why isgamificationimportant?
  • 13. Gamification
  • 14. Gamification
  • 15. gamificationmodel
  • 16. so can you applygamification tomarket research?
  • 17. ooooo
  • 18. Contact Details Dr Alexa Matthews alexa@nilehq.com 0131 220 5671 www.nilehq.com