Gender – water –                               food                               Mekong regionOxfam’s Mekong Regional Tea...
Gender – water – food                         Context and snapshot 1Globally: closing the ‘gender gap’ in agriculture – or...
Gender – water – food               Context and snapshot 2Why we need to think women and women need  to be influentially i...
Gender – water – food             Context and snapshot 3“ Migrant women, widows, older women, ethnic minorities   and wome...
Gender – water – food             Brainstorm exerciseWhy does gender matter in food – water - energy?
Gender – water – foodAssessing the assessment tools and guidance
Gender – water – foodOxfam’s project assumption:Involving women…• More often• More meaningfully• Earlier and ongoing• With...
Gender – water – food  Project review - Assessment and guidance                     toolsMRC Design Guidancehttp://www.mrc...
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Gender, Water, Food in the Mekong Region

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Mekong Forum on Water, Food and Energy. 2012. Presentation from Session 8: Gender, Water , Food.

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Gender, Water, Food in the Mekong Region

  1. 1. Gender – water – food Mekong regionOxfam’s Mekong Regional TeamCPWF Forum Hanoi Nov 2012
  2. 2. Gender – water – food Context and snapshot 1Globally: closing the ‘gender gap’ in agriculture – or increasing women’s contribution to food production and enterprise by providing equal access to resources and opportunities – could reduce the number of hungry people in the world by 12-17 per cent, or by 100 to 150 million people. (Citation: FAO. 2011. The State of Food and Agriculture: Women in Agriculture – Closing the gender gap for development. Rome: FAO)Women comprise an average of 43 percent of the agricultural labor force (citation: FAO. 2011. The State of Food and Agriculture, p. 7) which is up to almost 50 per cent in Eastern and Southeastern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa)
  3. 3. Gender – water – food Context and snapshot 2Why we need to think women and women need to be influentially involved…Vietnam: Despite substantial progress in closing gender gaps fundamental challenges remain:• Women’s wages on average 75% of men’s• Decision making structures at all levels remain male dominated• 64% of working women in rural areas work in agriculture, compared to 53% men but women have less access to training and on/off farm employment
  4. 4. Gender – water – food Context and snapshot 3“ Migrant women, widows, older women, ethnic minorities and women with disabilities are particularly disadvantaged” (World Bank 2011)Women migrants in Vietnam earn 45% less than men for same hours worked
  5. 5. Gender – water – food Brainstorm exerciseWhy does gender matter in food – water - energy?
  6. 6. Gender – water – foodAssessing the assessment tools and guidance
  7. 7. Gender – water – foodOxfam’s project assumption:Involving women…• More often• More meaningfully• Earlier and ongoing• With power• In decisions = better, more sustainable outcomes
  8. 8. Gender – water – food Project review - Assessment and guidance toolsMRC Design Guidancehttp://www.mrcmekong.org/assets/Publications/Consultations/SEA- Hydropower/Preliminary-DG-of-LMB-Mainstream-dams- FinalVersion-Sept09.pdfRSAThttp://www.mrcmekong.org/assets/Publications/Reports/RSAT- Revision-3-for-printingOCT-3-2010-Corrected-FINAL.PDFHSAPhttp://www.hydropower.org/sustainable_hydropower/hsaf_Hydropower _Sustainability_Assessment_Protocol.html
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