I See You / I Read You:
How School Libraries Can
Foster Reading Improvement
through Visual Literacy




  Lesley Farmer, C...
Visual Literacy Elements
   Interpret, understand, appreciate
    meaning of visual messages
   Communicate more effecti...
Processing: Text vs. Image
   Understand the phonemes of            Manipulate visual elements
    spoken language (audi...
Visual Information Cycle
   Private creation of an image
   Public dissemination of the image
   Public review and vali...
Visual Research
1. Task definition.
Based on prior knowledge and experience

2. Search strategies.
Images employ simultane...
Levels of Visual Messages
   Sign                 vs. Symbol




   Visual diagramming




   Maps
Type Elements
   Fonts
   Size
   Readability
   CAPS vs. lower case
   Weight
   Proximity and              Alignme...
Color and Culture
        Purity and virtue in European cultures.
        Death and mourning in Japanese,
        Chinese,...
Picture Books: Children’s
Assumptions
   Photographs are considered more real
    than drawings.
   Real is considered “...
Ways to Study Picture Books
   Visual content analysis
   Critique using artistic principles
   Evaluate use of image t...
Left to Right




                Top to
                Bottom
The Appeal of Graphic Novels
Comics & Reading




Assist Poor Readers
Connect with Visual Learners
Develop Strong Language Arts Skills
Encourage Unmoti...
Technology and Literacy
   Expands access and manipulation to images
   Media manipulate images to elicit desired
    re...
Incorporate Technology to
Visual and Textual Information
   Encourage group-based visual technology
    productions.
   ...
Library and Visual Literacy
   Atmosphere
   Collection
    development
   Instructional design:
    visual aids, tech
...
Literacy Topics Using Images
1.    Compare how different books or different artist/photographers portray
      concepts; d...
Farmer, Lesley Session I See You 090904
Farmer, Lesley Session I See You 090904
Farmer, Lesley Session I See You 090904
Farmer, Lesley Session I See You 090904
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Farmer, Lesley Session I See You 090904

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Farmer, Lesley Session I See You 090904

  1. 1. I See You / I Read You: How School Libraries Can Foster Reading Improvement through Visual Literacy Lesley Farmer, California State University, Long Beach, USA lfarmer@csulb.edu
  2. 2. Visual Literacy Elements  Interpret, understand, appreciate meaning of visual messages  Communicate more effectively by applying visual design principles  Produce visual messages using technology  Use visual thinking to conceptualize solutions to problems International Visual Literacy Assn., 1996
  3. 3. Processing: Text vs. Image  Understand the phonemes of  Manipulate visual elements spoken language (auditory simultaneously processing)  Brain registers a full-color image  Realize that phonemes can be in a fraction of a second, much represented by print faster than the processing (orthographic visual processing) speed for deciphering text  Know that a few phonemes can  When images are linked with be arranged to make many text, the messages are dual- different words (concept coded and easier to formation abilities) comprehend and remember.  Chunk letters so brain can overcome limited processing space  Decode automatically and concentrate on comprehending ideas
  4. 4. Visual Information Cycle  Private creation of an image  Public dissemination of the image  Public review and validation of the image  Public access of the image  Private use of the image
  5. 5. Visual Research 1. Task definition. Based on prior knowledge and experience 2. Search strategies. Images employ simultaneous analysis, from general/highlights to details (note picture books sequencing) 3. Locating and accessing visual information. Males use text to retrieve images; females pick up on visual cues 4. Use of visual information. Males are more critical evaluating; females see relationship between visual data better 5. Synthesis of visual information: Based on existing schemas. Females: practical, relational, and concrete; males: abstract
  6. 6. Levels of Visual Messages  Sign vs. Symbol  Visual diagramming  Maps
  7. 7. Type Elements  Fonts  Size  Readability  CAPS vs. lower case  Weight  Proximity and Alignment  Underlining, Undermining, Bold defying
  8. 8. Color and Culture Purity and virtue in European cultures. Death and mourning in Japanese, Chinese, Korean cultures. Danger in European and Japanese cultures. Joy and festivity in China. Vietnamese wedding dresses are often red. Cowardice in Western cultures. Once reserved for emperor in China.
  9. 9. Picture Books: Children’s Assumptions  Photographs are considered more real than drawings.  Real is considered “good.”  Simplified images may be considered poorly drawn, regardless of the artistic style.  Abstract images are equated with fantasy, and may have a connotation of “bad.”  While boys may process abstractions more easily than girls, they tend to favor literal images over metaphorical ones.
  10. 10. Ways to Study Picture Books  Visual content analysis  Critique using artistic principles  Evaluate use of image to give meaning  Dual-coding
  11. 11. Left to Right Top to Bottom
  12. 12. The Appeal of Graphic Novels
  13. 13. Comics & Reading Assist Poor Readers Connect with Visual Learners Develop Strong Language Arts Skills Encourage Unmotivated and "Dormant" Readers Convey Educational Messages Stimulate Readers to Explore Other Literature Engage Older Readers
  14. 14. Technology and Literacy  Expands access and manipulation to images  Media manipulate images to elicit desired responses  Viewers need to be verify image  Viewers who have more background knowledge can discern illogical images >>> wide reading aids visual literacy
  15. 15. Incorporate Technology to Visual and Textual Information  Encourage group-based visual technology productions.  Use visual editing/manipulation features – and undo options –to encourage creative risk-taking  Use images as another telecommunications “language.”  Have learners photograph a variety of objects and behaviors, and analyze the explicit and overt messages.  Have learners research the assumptions of visual messages.
  16. 16. Library and Visual Literacy  Atmosphere  Collection development  Instructional design: visual aids, tech training, production
  17. 17. Literacy Topics Using Images 1. Compare how different books or different artist/photographers portray concepts; determine the impact of culture, time period, status on the images. 2. Write a story to accompany a wordless book. 3. Create and annotate a personal virtual museum of images. 4. Take the same advertisement, and edit it in different ways to convey opposing views. This activity is particularly telling during election years. 5. Take photos of the school campus, and caption them. Compare the choice and captioning of images. 6. Produce telenovelas. 7. Create educational commercials. 8. Do digital storytelling. 9. Show scientific cycles by creating and captioning a digital photo album. 10. Analyze how films depict themes; compare filmatic and text depictions.

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