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No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
No namewoman
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No namewoman

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  • 1. ALEXUS COBBS, DOMINIQUE DUFFY, O’NEAL HARRIS, JAMERSON JACKSON, DARREL COLEMAN, AND KANDIA JACKSON No Name Woman
  • 2. <ul><li>The Following questions can be used to generate ideas . </li></ul><ul><li>Try using the whole list when stuck in the middle of a draft. </li></ul><ul><li>Its likely that you will only benefit from two to three of them at a time. </li></ul>
  • 3. <ul><li>1. Narration – Can you tell a story about the subject? </li></ul><ul><li>2. Description – Can you use your senses to illuminate the subject? </li></ul><ul><li>3. Example – Can you point to instances that will make the subject concrete and specific ? </li></ul>
  • 4. <ul><li>4. Comparison and Contrast – Will setting the subject alongside another generate useful information? </li></ul><ul><li>5. Process Analysis – Will a step-by-step explanation of how the subject works add to the readers understanding? </li></ul>
  • 5. <ul><li>6. Division or Analysis – Can slicing the subject into its parts produce a clearer vision of it? </li></ul><ul><li>7. Classification – Is it worthwhile to sort the subject into kinds or groups? </li></ul><ul><li>8. Cause and Effect – Does it add to the subject to ask why it happened or what its results are? </li></ul>
  • 6. <ul><li>6. Division or Analysis – Can slicing the subject into its parts produce a clearer vision of it? </li></ul><ul><li>7. Classification – Is it worthwhile to sort the subject into kinds or groups? </li></ul><ul><li>8. Cause and Effect – Does it add to the subject to ask why it happened or what its results are? </li></ul>
  • 7. <ul><li>9. Definition – Can you trace a boundary that will clarify the meaning of the subject? </li></ul><ul><li>10. Argument and Persuasion – Can you state an opinion or make a proposal about the subject? </li></ul>
  • 8.  
  • 9. No Name woman <ul><ul><li>The author recounts a story she heard from her mother when she was beginning her menstruation. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The story was used as a deterrent for promiscuity which uses the story of her “nonexistent” aunt. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The author however believes that the cultural taboos have over beared the story to the point where it is completely onesided and attempts to offer alternative explainations for her aunt’s pregnancy. </li></ul></ul>
  • 10. Purpose <ul><li>The author aims to present the other half of the untold story of her dead aunt. </li></ul><ul><li>It also presents the cultural clash of traditional female roles in China and their modern roles in America. </li></ul>
  • 11. <ul><li>She wants to sympathize with her aunt’s loneliness as she compares her aunt’s loneliness to her own while she was in America. </li></ul><ul><li>“ My aunt haunts me-her ghost drawn to me because now, after fifty years of neglect, I alone devote pages of paper to her, though not origamied into houses and clothes. “ </li></ul>Tone (Sympathetic)- analysis
  • 12. Diction- analysis <ul><li>She speaks rather professionally with a profound nature in presenting her argument in favor of her aunt’s good credibility. </li></ul><ul><li>Her mother and the society speak in simple but powerful (and often hurtful) words. </li></ul><ul><li>“ . We say that your father has all brothers because it is as if she had never been born.” </li></ul>
  • 13. Syntax –in depth <ul><li>When describing her mother’s words she is brief using simple and often shorter sentences. However when speaking in her aunt’s defense she adds more complexity to her words often using commas , compound and complex sentence structures. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Don`t humiliate us. You wouldn`t like to be forgotten as if you had never been born. The villagers are watchful.” – mother </li></ul><ul><li>Chinese-Americans, when you try to understand what things in you are Chinese, how you separate what is peculiar to childhood, to poverty, insanities, one family, your mother who marked your growing with stories, from what is Chinese? What is Chinese tradition and what is the movies?” </li></ul>
  • 14. Tying it all together <ul><li>The brief remarks when quoting when quoting her mother and the villagers shows how cold the society really is and how it will demand conformity without reason or resistance. </li></ul>
  • 15. The Rhetorical Strategies
  • 16. Pathos <ul><li>Pathos is displayed though out the story so the reader can sympathize with where the author is coming from. </li></ul>
  • 17. Diction <ul><li>She uses diction to better express her feelings towards a particular part in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>“ eccentricity ”; meaning odd behavior </li></ul>
  • 18. Imagery <ul><li>The author uses imagery to try and put the reader in the actual event so they can better understand. </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;At first they threw mud and rocks at the house. Then they threw eggs and began slaughtering our stock. We could hear the animals scream their deaths-the roosters, the pigs, a last great roar from the ox.” </li></ul>
  • 19. Ethos <ul><li>The author use ethos to portray the lifestyle of which her family and villagers live and keep up. </li></ul>
  • 20. Symbolism <ul><li>The author uses symbolism in the text to display the religious views of the villagers. </li></ul><ul><li>“ The old woman from the next field swept a broom through the air and loosed the spirits-of-the broom over our heads. 'Pig.' 'Ghost.' 'Pig,” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Once my aunt found a freckle on her chin, at a spot that the almanac said predestined her for unhappiness.” </li></ul>
  • 21. Personification <ul><li>The author uses personification to demonstrate the intensity of the events that occurred. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Their lanterns doubled in the disturbed black water.” </li></ul>
  • 22. Foreshadowing <ul><li>The author uses this rhetorical strategy to keep the reader on edge and interested on what is coming next. </li></ul><ul><li>“ She could not have been pregnant, you see, because her husband had been gone for years. No one said anything. We did not discuss it.” </li></ul>
  • 23.  
  • 24.  
  • 25. Ethos- Ethical appeal <ul><li>She questions as to why people would treat her so cruelly simply for the purpose of taboos. And because she broke such a “silenced” taboo . </li></ul><ul><li>“ No one talked sex, ever” </li></ul>
  • 26. Pathos <ul><li>She presents the possibility that her aunt could have been forced to sleep with the man and that it was wrong of the villagers to ‘bully’ her into suicide. </li></ul><ul><li>“ I want her fear to have lasted just as long as rape lasted so that the fear could have been contained. No drawn-out fear. But women at sex-hazarded birth and hence lifetimes.” </li></ul>
  • 27. Logos <ul><li>Kingston appeals to the reader’s logic when talking of how the traditional roles of women should be taken into account when judging her aunt. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Women in the old China did not choose. ” </li></ul>

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