2013-2014 Educator guide

  • 141 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
141
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. www.anchoragemuseum.org 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG
  • 2. EDUCATOR CATALOG 2013-14 ANCHORAGE MUSEUM EDUCATORS have developed focused trip sheets to make your field trip as successful as possible. Download these pre-K–8 student trip sheets to help guide your free choice learning. These simple, adaptable trip sheets include activities for the gallery, as well as suggested pre- and post-visit activities for the classroom. Available trip sheets include: I Feel Colorful (pre-K–K); Forces and Motion (3–5); Space Rocks (3–5); The Museum Caper (3–5); Waves (6–8); and Glaciers and Ice (6–8). Download these trip sheets and find additional resources at anchoragemuseum.org/learn. Simplify your Anchorage Museum visit with free downloadable trip sheets letter from the director of education WELCOME BACK! In the Anchorage Museum, young learners gain new knowledge through the act of discovery. Artistic, cultural, historical, and scientific learning is facilitated through objects, exhibitions, and hands-on experiences. Our school programs are designed to promote active participation. We offer options that are guided by a museum educator or docent (tours, guided investigations, and more) as well as options for teachers who would like to guide their students through the museum at their own pace. For teachers who aren’t able to bring their students to the museum, we offer a multitude of outreach options, including a traveling planetarium and hands-on traveling artifact kits. The museum serves more than 20,000 students and teachers annually with interdisciplinary programs that connect Pre-K–12 students from various backgrounds to the museum’s vast resources. We kick off the school year with our free Evening for Educators on Thursday, Sept. 26, which has a special focus on the exhibition Dena’inaq’ Huch’ulyeshi: The Dena’ina Way of Living. At this event, you’ll gain valuable information about our school programs and explore the first comprehensive exhibition about Dena’ina Athabascan people, who have lived in Southcentral Alaska for more than 1,000 years. We’re excited to help reinforce your classroom curriculum and ignite your students’ passion for learning. Please join us today to begin planning your museum learning experience! ANCHORAGE MUSEUM ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS Susan Knowles, Chair Evan Rose, Vice Chair Todd Bell, Treasurer Jim Kostka, Secretary Barbara Donatelli Laura Emerson Heather Flynn Leonard Hyde James Kallman John Levy Steve Lindbeck Peter Michalski Arild Skjervoey Tim Thompson Louis Ulmer CONTACT US FIELD TRIP REGISTRATION Registration (907) 929-9280 Registration information fieldtrips@anchoragemuseum.org Curriculum-specific information Art (907) 929-9269 Culture and history (907) 929-9276 Science (including planetarium) (907) 929-9273 Outreach (907) 929-9279 Teacher professional development (907) 929-9271 All other education inquiries (907) 929-9280 ANCHORAGE MUSEUM AT RASMUSON CENTER 625 C St. Anchorage, AK 99501 (907) 929-9200 phone (907) 929-9290 fax www.anchoragemuseum.org Anchorage Museum Educator Catalog 2013-14 © August 2013 The Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center is owned by the Municipality of Anchorage and operated under contract by the Anchorage Museum Association, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization. The museum is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and is supported in part by annual contributions from the Anchorage Museum Association, Anchorage Museum Foundation, Municipality of Anchorage and private, corporate and foundation funds. IMAGE CREDITS Cover: (clockwise from top left) Children, Chris Arend; Wayne Price, Raven Hand Mask, yellow cedar, human hair, latex paint, 1981; boy, Chris Arend; blanket toss at Anchorage Fur Rendezvous, Feb. 22, 1952, Steve McCutcheon; Chomper the turtle, Chris Arend; boy, Chris Arend; Alvin Eli Amason, Good to See You, oil on canvas, 1985. p. 3: Fire bags, Tyonek and Knik River, Alaska, 1883, caribou hide, sinew, dentalia, quills, beads, red ocher, black velvet, cotton, Ethnological Museum of Berlin; Elizabeth Leader, Tires Underwater, pencil drawing; moon, Evans & Sutherland; all other images by Chris Arend. This guide is distributed by the Anchorage School District. However, the Anchorage School District does not endorse these materials or the viewpoints expressed in them. anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 2WELCOME Monica Garcia-Itchoak, M.Ed. DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION AND PUBLIC PROGRAMS X
  • 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS 4 STUDENT PROGRAM OPPORTUNITIES 5 PROGRAMS AT A GLANCE 6 PLANNING YOUR FIELD TRIP 7 PROGRAMS PRE–K 7 PROGRAMS K–2 8 PROGRAMS 3–5 10 PROGRAMS 6–8 12 PROGRAMS 9–12 13 EXHIBITIONS 14 THE DENA’INA WAY OF LIVING 15 GYRE 16 OUTREACH 18 PLANETARIUM 20 JUST FOR TEACHERS 21 TRAVELING KITS 22 REGISTRATION 24 MUSEUM CONDUCT OUR MISSION TO SHARE AND CONNECT ALASKA WITH THE WORLD THORUGH ART, CULTURE, HISTORY AND SCIENCE 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 3 anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280WELCOME
  • 4. STUDENT PROGRAM OPPORTUNITIES ON-SITE DOCENT-LED TOURS Docents guide students on in-depth tours, sharing their expertise and knowledge of the museum’s rich collection and temporary exhibitions. 45 minutes. $25 per group plus $5 admission per student. GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS A museum educator uncovers the mysteries of art, history, culture, or science. Students explore topics using the museum’s resources, collections, and exhibitions. 45 minutes. $100 per group plus $5 admission per student. TOUR PLUS INVESTIGATION The most in-depth museum tour learning experience, combining an exhibition and hands- on classroom experiences. Students participate in a 45-minute guided tour and then dive deep into a 45-minute guided investigation. 90 minutes. $115 per group plus $5 admission per student. PLANETARIUM Planetarium Shows are educational films projected on a full-dome screen. Lengths vary 16–40 minutes. $75 plus $5 admission per student. Guided Planetarium Experiences are presentations led by a museum educator. Lengths vary 45–60 minutes. $125 plus $5 admission per student. FREE CHOICE LEARNING Give your students time for free choice learning, guide them with your own lesson plan, or use the museum’s student trip sheets. $5 per student. HOMESCHOOL Homeschool groups require at least 10 or more students to qualify for group rates and programs. For more information email fieldtrips@ anchoragemuseum.org or call (907) 929-9280. $5 admission per student. OFF-SITE OUTREACH The museum provides educational programming at off-site facilities such as schools and community centers. Opportunities include festivals, StarLab portable planetarium shows, science-focused guided investigations or traveling, hands-on art or artifact kits. Fees and length of programs vary. TRAVELING MUSEUM KITS With the museum’s traveling art and artifact kits, students can touch historical and art objects while learning about Alaska. The kits are free to all Alaska educators and are available for pick-up at the museum. Kits can be mailed to schools outside Anchorage for the cost of shipping. REGISTRATION AND ADMISSION School groups pay a program fee as well as student admission. The education admission rate is $5 per student. Dena’inaq’ Huch’ulyeshi: The Dena’ina Way of Living and Gyre are included with education admission. Admission is free for chaperones within the allotted ratio of one adult per five to eight students. Adults beyond this ratio must pay general admission and program fees when applicable. When registering for field trips, please remember the museum is closed Mondays from Oct. 1 to April 30. Student programs are available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays unless otherwise noted. Free Choice and some planetarium options are available on Fridays. All student programs align with the Alaska Content Standards and Alaska Cultural Standards for Students. For detailed registration information, see page 22. anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 4STUDENTPROGRAMOPPORTUNITIES
  • 5. Programs at a glance GRADE PROGRAM PAGE TERM LENGTH 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 5 anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280PROGRAMSATAGLANCE
  • 6. PLANNING YOUR FIELD TRIP TRAINED MUSEUM EDUCATORS and docents are extremely effective, but you bring many essential assets to the museum learning experience, including knowledge of the curriculum and understanding of students’ abilities and interests. The Anchorage Museum’s exhibitions tell many multicultural and interdisciplinary stories that can engage students in multiple ways. The role of teachers and chaperones is to facilitate student interaction with exhibitions. The best way to prepare for this is to visit the museum before your field trip (see page 23 for more details). Remember to allow ample time for transition between programs, bathroom breaks, lunch, and free-choice exploration. BEFORE YOUR FIELD TRIP Pre-visit activities should familiarize students with what they will see and do at the museum. It’s also important to discuss appropriate conduct and set expectations. We recommend pre-field trip activities such as reading relevant literature, doing Internet research, or conducting hands-on activities and labs. AT THE MUSEUM Choose from one of our educational programs for your field trip experience. In addition to those programs, we encourage leaving time for free- choice exploration. To the right, we’ve outlined some suggested field trip activities to help you develop or modify one of our Focused Trip Sheets for specific grade levels and exhibitions. We suggest you give chaperones the Focused Trip Sheet and the answers. This empowers chaperones to fully participate and guide student exploration. BACK IN THE CLASSROOM Provide opportunities for students to connect pre- visit lessons to post-visit concepts and classroom projects. Ask them to dig further into a subject by reading relevant literature, doing Internet research, or conducting experiments. Find specific post- visit activity ideas in the museum’s downloadable Focused Trip Sheets. SUGGESTED FIELD TRIP ACTIVITIES Foster students’ critical thinking skills through the following activities: n Sending students on scavenger hunts adds excitement. Allow extra time to examine exhibitions more closely afterward. n Re-creating an object by sketching and drawing encourages students to pause and make closer observations. n Fact-finding and taking notes are useful ways for students to gather information from label copy and document questions that arise in their investigation. n Categorizing objects in exhibitions is an easy way to help students group things together, compare and contrast, and identify similarities and themes. n Creating a hypothesis as a pre-visit activity and testing it at the museum prompts students to think critically about real-world applications. n Writing or journaling encourages students to reflect on the museum experience, make connections to the classroom, and articulate their opinions. anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 6PLANNINGYOURFIELDTRIP CHRISAREND
  • 7. STUDENT PROGRAMS PRE-K Programs are available Fall 2013 (Sept. 3–Dec. 20) and Spring 2014 (Jan. 6–May 16) unless otherwise noted. GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or noon. 30 minutes. LEGENDS FOR LITTLE ONES Students gather in the Alaska History Gallery in front of culture-specific houses for an interactive adventure. Each story includes music, active participation, and art activities to complete in the classroom. Alaska History Gallery. Domain Guidelines: 1, 3, 4, and 5. THE FOX WOMAN (UNANGAX) THE MOSQUITO AND THE RAVEN (TLINGIT) EYE OF THE NEEDLE (YUP’IK) PORCUPINE AND THE BEAVER’S TAIL (ATHABASCAN) GRADES K-2 Programs are available Fall 2013 (Sept. 3–Dec. 20) and Spring 2014 (Jan. 6–May 16) unless otherwise noted. DOCENT-LED TOURS Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., or 1:30 p.m. 45 minutes. LIFE IN ALASKA Students travel to the ancient past to learn how Alaska Native people built houses, made clothing, and hunted and gathered food without metal tools or electricity. This tour includes dress-up activities. Alaska History Gallery. History Standards: A. Science Standards: E, F. EARLY ANCHORAGE Some of the most fascinating history is right under our noses. This tour focuses on the construction of the Alaska Railroad, early settlement of Anchorage, and Dena’ina Athabascan history. This tour includes hands-on activities with artifacts. Alaska History Gallery. History Standards: A, B. Geography Standards: F. ART OF THE NORTH Students learn about Alaska through imagery, objects, landscape, and people. Learners hear the captivating stories behind the art, and find out why Alaska’s artists had to be adventurous. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards B, C, D. GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or noon. 45 minutes. IS IT DIRT? What’s the difference between soil and dirt? Students scratch the surface of the Earth’s top layer and learn how water and time affect precious soils. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, D. ART OF SEEING Students play interactive games in the museum’s art galleries that encourage them to think and talk about the art they see. Young learners are introduced to new vocabulary and make color observations. Art galleries. Arts Standards: A, B, C, D. History Standards: A. INTO THE WILD Sydney Laurence, Alaska’s best-known artist, lived a fascinating life. Students learn about him and the mountain he loved to paint. Young learners describe nature, gain inspiration from Laurence’s 13-foot-wide painting of Mount McKinley, then create their own watercolor mountain painting. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards: A, B, D. History Standards: A. English/Language Arts Standards: A. NIGHT DRAWINGS Students learn about the aurora borealis, including how it is formed, and then experiment with chalk pastels to make colorful drawings of the night sky. Art of the North and South Classroom. Arts Standards: A, D. Science Standards: C. Geography Standards: A. 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 7 anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280STUDENTPROGRAMS CHRISAREND
  • 8. GRADES 3–5 Programs are available Fall 2013 (Sept. 3–Dec. 20) and Spring 2014 (Jan. 6–May 16) unless otherwise noted. DOCENT-LED TOURS Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., or 1:30 p.m. 45 minutes. ALASKA NATIVE CULTURES Students learn about Alaska Native culture groups including Unangax, Athabascan, Iñupiat, Yup’ik, and Tlingit. Students explore traditional Alaska Native housing, customs, and lifestyles. Includes hands-on activites. Alaska History Gallery and Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center. History Standards: A, B. Science Standards: E, F. Geography Standards: B. Government and Citizenship Standards: C. Arts Standards: B, D. World Languages Standards: B. ART OF THE NORTH Students learn about Alaska through imagery, objects, landscape, and people. Learners hear the captivating stories behind the art, and find out why Alaska’s artists had to be adventurous. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards B, C, D. GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or noon. 45 minutes. COLD HARD FACTS Students examine the phases of matter through the unique properties of dry ice and liquid nitrogen. They explore the strange properties of these cold materials through demonstrations and hands-on activities. (Balloons are used in this demonstration.) North Classroom. Science Standards: A, B. anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 8STUDENTPROGRAMS CHRISARENDISTOCKPHOTO.COM
  • 9. ROCKS ROCK Using the rock cycle and hands-on earth science exhibits as guides, students navigate the journey from formation to disintegration through the processes of weathering and erosion. Students gain an understanding of the various compositions of rocks and how they are affected by water, wind, and weather. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, D. Geography Standards: C. EYE TO EYE Students explore the complex functions of the eye while observing the similarities and differences between cow and human eyes. Students also work through the scientific processes of observation and dissection. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, C, G. ART OF SEEING Students play interactive games in the museum’s art galleries that encourage them to think and talk about the art they see. Learners are introduced to new vocabulary and make color observations. Art galleries. Arts Standards: A, B, C, D. History Standards: A. INTO THE WILD Sydney Laurence, Alaska’s best-known artist, lived a fascinating life. Students learn about him and the mountain he loved to paint. Learners describe nature, gain inspiration from Laurence’s 13-foot-wide painting of Mount McKinley, then create their own watercolor mountain painting. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards: A, B, D. History Standards: A. English/Language Arts Standards: A. NIGHT DRAWINGS Students learn about the aurora borealis, including how the aurora is formed, and experiment with chalk pastels to make colorful drawings of the night sky. Art of the North and South Classroom. Arts Standards: A, D. Science Standards: C. Geography Standards: A. 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 9 anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280STUDENTPROGRAMS Eustace P. Ziegler, Pack Train near Mt. McKinley, oil on canvas, c. 1920s CHRISAREND
  • 10. GRADES 6–8 Programs are available Fall 2013 (Sept. 3–Dec. 20) and Spring 2014 (Jan. 6–May 16) unless otherwise noted. DOCENT-LED TOURS Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., or 1:30 p.m. 45 minutes. ALASKA HISTORY This tour spans 10,000 years of Alaska history. Topics include Alaska Native cultures, Russian colonization, statehood, and the trans-Alaska oil pipeline. Students discover why different groups of people came to Alaska and how they shaped history. Alaska History Gallery. History Standards: A, B, C. Geography Standards: B, D, E, F. Government and Citizenship Standards: C. Arts Standards: B, D. THE FIRST PEOPLES OF ALASKA Students are given an overview of Alaska’s nine indigenous cultures. Students learn about different geographic regions of Alaska through 600 artifacts used in subsistence, celebrations, and community. Exhibition films provide contemporary, firsthand narratives from Alaska Native people about each culture. Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center. History Standards: A, B. Geography Standards B. ART OF THE NORTH Students learn about Alaska through imagery, objects, landscape, and people. Learners hear the captivating stories behind the art, and find out why Alaska’s artists had to be adventurous. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards B, C, D. GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or noon. 45 minutes. HEART TO HEART Through dissection, students explore the structure and function of the heart while observing the similarities and differences between pig and human hearts. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, C, G. EYE TO EYE Students explore the complex functions of the eye while observing the similarities and differences between cow and human eyes. Students also work through the scientific processes of observation and dissection. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, C, G. anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 10STUDENTPROGRAMS Lucy Bend of Nome hanging fish, 1949 STEPHENMCCUTCHEON
  • 11. ART OF SEEING Students play interactive games in the museum’s art galleries that encourage them to think and talk about the art they see. Young learners are introduced to new vocabulary and make color observations. Art galleries. Arts Standards: A, B, C, D. History Standards: A. INTO THE WILD Sydney Laurence, Alaska’s best-known artist, lived a fascinating life. Students learn about him and the mountain he loved to paint. Young learners describe nature, gain inspiration from Laurence’s 13-foot-wide painting of Mount McKinley, then write haikus and create their own watercolor mountain painting. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards: A, B, D. History Standards: A. English/ Language Arts Standards: A. NIGHT DRAWINGS Students learn about the aurora borealis, including how the aurora is formed, and experiment with chalk pastels to make colorful drawings of the night sky. Art of the North and South Classroom. Arts Standards: A, D. Science Standards: C. Geography Standards: A. 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 11 anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280STUDENTPROGRAMS CHRISARENDALASKAAIRLINESFOUNDATION Sydney Laurence, Mount McKinley, oil on canvas, 1929.
  • 12. GRADES 9–12 Programs are available Fall 2013 (Sept. 3–Dec. 20) and Spring 2014 (Jan. 6–May 16) unless otherwise noted. DOCENT-LED TOURS Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., or 1:30 p.m. 45 minutes. ALASKA HISTORY This tour spans 10,000 years of Alaska history. Topics include Alaska Native cultures, Russian colonization, statehood, and the trans-Alaska oil pipeline. Students discover why different groups of people came to Alaska and how they shaped history. Alaska History Gallery. History Standards: A, B, C. Geography Standards: B, D, E, F. Government and Citizenship Standards: C. Arts Standards: B, D. ART OF THE NORTH Students learn about Alaska through imagery, objects, landscape, and people. Learners hear the captivating stories behind the art, and find out why Alaska’s artists had to be adventurous. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards B, C, D. THE FIRST PEOPLES OF ALASKA Students are given an overview of Alaska’s nine indigenous cultures. Students learn about different geographic regions of Alaska through 600 artifacts used in subsistence, celebrations, and community life. Exhibition films provide firsthand narratives from Alaska Native people about each culture. Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center. History Standards: A, B. GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or noon. 45 minutes. HEART TO HEART Through dissection, students explore the structure and functions of the heart while observing the similarities and differences between pig and human hearts. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, C, G. EYE TO EYE Students explore the complex functions of the eye while observing the similarities and differences between cow and human eyes. Students also work through the scientific processes of observation and dissection. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, C, G. ART OF SEEING Students play interactive games in the museum’s art galleries that encourage them to think and talk about the art they see. Students are introduced to new vocabulary, make color observations, and discuss artists’ intent. Art galleries. Arts Standards: A, B, C, D. History Standards: A. NIGHT DRAWINGS Students learn about the aurora borealis, how the aurora is formed, and experiment with chalk pastels to make colorful drawings of the night sky back in our classroom. Art of the North and South Classroom. Arts Standards: A, D. Science Standards: C. Geography Standards: A. anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 12STUDENTPROGRAMS CHRISAREND
  • 13. PERMANENT EXHIBITIONS ALASKA HISTORY GALLERY (PRE-K–12) Here, visitors can take a journey through 10,000 years of Alaska history. Full-scale and miniature dioramas highlight early lifestyles of Alaska’s Native peoples. Other gallery topics include Russian exploration and settlement, the gold rush era, World War II, statehood, and the trans-Alaska oil pipeline. ART OF THE NORTH (PRE-K–12) The museum’s permanent art collection represents the best of Alaska art and art from the circumpolar North. Offerings include large-scale landscape paintings, drawings from early European expeditions to Alaska, works by contemporary Alaska artists, and paintings by Sydney Laurence, Alaska’s best- known artist. IMAGINARIUM DISCOVERY CENTER (PRE-K–12) Hands-on science galleries allow visitors of all ages to explore earth, life, and physical science. This center houses the Thomas Planetarium and more than 80 exhibits that put scientific concepts into an Alaska context. Visitors can use an infrared camera, meet a king crab, experiment with an earthquake shake table, and more. SMITHSONIAN ARCTIC STUDIES CENTER (3–12) Alaska’s nine indigenous cultures are represented by 600 Alaska Native artifacts on loan from the Smithsonian Institution. These cultural treasures allow visitors to appreciate how each culture is unique and how their traditions are connected. Historical objects such as waterproof gut clothing and wood hunting tools are placed into the context of people’s lives today through contemporary images, video, and audio. TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS RE/MARKS On view through Feb. 9, 2014 Alaska Native artists present traditional stories and aesthetics in innovative, contemporary ways in this exhibition curated from the Anchorage Museum collection. The 31 artworks span the 1970s until the present. Featured artists include John Hoover, Susie Silook, Sonya Kelliher-Combs, and Perry Eaton. Their work challenges preconceived notions of indigenous art, demonstrating that Native art is vital and varied. FOOTNOTES: SHOES WITH STORIES TO TELL On view Oct. 4, 2013 through Feb. 16, 2014 From XtraTufs to ice skates to sealskin boots, this exhibition showcases life in Alaska from the ground up. Each pair of footwear chosen from the museum’s collection serves as a launching point for a story unique to Alaska’s history. QANGA: DRAWING THE PAST On view Nov. 17, 2013 through Jan. 12, 2014 The pre-history of Inuit people comes to life in this graphic novel-style exhibition. Music, comic art, storytelling, and archaeology combine to explain the first human migrations from Canada to Greenland. Learn about the Inuit people’s technology and culture, as well as their social incentives for migration. A collaboration between artist Nuka K. Godtfredsen, composers Kristian Bjerre Harting and Lill Rastad Bjørst, and archaeologists from the National Museum of Denmark. ANCHORAGE SCHOOL DISTRICT ART SHOW On view Feb. 28 through March 23, 2013 The annual Anchorage School District exhibition showcases artwork from the district’s most creative student artists, giving them the rare opportunity to display their art in a museum. Works are chosen by teachers and include drawings, paintings, and sculpture. RISKLAND: REMEMBERING THE 1964 ALASKA EARTHQUAKE On view April 11 through Sept. 15, 2014 In 1964, Alaska was hit by the largest earthquake ever experienced in North America, a 9.2 on the Richter scale. To mark the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Good Friday earthquake, this exhibition looks at this devastating event, the reconstruction efforts that followed, and our earthquake preparedness today. Learn through historical photographs, video, personal narratives of earthquake survival, artifacts, and hands-on activities. 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 13 anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280EXHIBITIONS NATIONALMUSEUMOFDENMARK Qanga: Drawing the Past
  • 14. ABOUT HALF ALASKA’S RESIDENTS LIVE IN TRADITIONAL DENA’INA TERRITORY, but there is little general knowledge about the indigenous people who have called Southcentral Alaska home for more than 1,000 years. The Anchorage Museum has set out to change that, with the first major exhibition about the Dena’ina Athabascan people. Meet the Dena’ina through film, life-size re-creations, images, hands-on learning stations, audio, and more than 160 artifacts on loan from museums across the world. Through first- hand stories, learn what it means to be Dena’ina in the 21st century. EVENING FOR EDUCATORS DENA’INAQ’ HUCH’ULYESHI: THE DENA’INA WAY OF LIVING 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 Free, pre-registration required online. Immerse yourself in the Dena’ina way of living! Meet exhibition curators and engage with museum educators to learn how this exhibition can rouse your students’ excitement about social studies. Listen to traditional stories, make a string calendar, and see a life-size model of a traditional fish camp. Takeaways include the exhibition catalog, an educator guide, and lesson plan ideas to help guide your field trip. Enjoy light refreshments and door prizes. GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS Available Sept. 17, 2013 – Jan. 10, 2014 Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or noon. 45 minutes. STRING CALENDARS (K–12) In this hands-on experience, students learn about Dena’ina string calendars, also known as counting cords. Then they use feathers, beads, and cord to create their own string calendar celebrating key events in their lives. Dena’inaq’ Huch’ulyeshi and South Classroom. Arts Standards: A, B, D. Cultural Standards: A. Mathematics Standards: A. English/Language Arts Standards: A. LIVING DENA’INA (K–12) Students explore a traditional Dena’ina village by participating in a subsistence lifestyle activity. Students handle authentic artifacts and learn traditional trade routes by exploring a giant Alaska map. Students gain a better understanding of cultural traditions and contemporary subsistence lifestyles. Dena’inaq’ Huch’ulyeshi and South Classroom. Geography Standards: B, C, D, E, F. Government Standards: F, G. History Standards: B. Cultural Standards: B, E. RESOURCES DENA’INA TRAVELING KIT Available year-round. This traveling artifact kit features birch bark baskets, Dena’ina recordings, primary source documents, and several different animal skins, in addition to paper art projects and lesson plans. Learn more about reserving traveling kits on page 21. ONLINE RESOURCES Anchorage Museum, anchoragemuseum.org/denaina Alaska Native Knowledge Network, ankn.uaf.edu/ANCR/athabascan.html Alaska Native Heritage Center, alaskanative.net Alaska Native Language Center, uaf.edu/anlc Dena’ina Qenaga Language Guide, qenaga.org DENA’INAQ’ HUCH’ULYESHI: THE DENA’INA WAY OF LIVING ON VIEW SEPT. 15, 2013 — JAN. 12, 2014 anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 14THEDENA’INAWAYOFLIVING ALASKADEPARTMENTOFFISHANDGAME Nancy Delkittie and Jessica Hay, Nondalton, 2008.
  • 15. GYRE TELLS A GLOBAL MARINE DEBRIS STORY: Learn about marine debris, why it’s a problem, and how people are trying to solve it. This exhibition features work by contemporary artists from around the world, including Cynthia Minet, who re-purposes plastic containers into life-size animal sculptures. An exhibition section specific to Alaska features the results of a 2013 scientific expedition along Alaska’s coastline, as well as art created from the marine debris gathered on Alaska’s beaches during the journey. Presented in collaboration with the Alaska SeaLife Center. EVENING FOR EDUCATORS GYRE 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 Explore ocean literacy through an interdisciplinary approach. Learn about this unique marine-debris focused expedition and exhibition from the expedition’s on-board educator. Leave with a greater understanding of our complex ocean, educational tools, and a field trip action plan. Enjoy light refreshments and door prizes. GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS Available Feb. 7–May 16, 2014 Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or noon. 45 minutes. SEA CREATURES (Pre-K–8) Students create a sea creature sculpture and learn about marine debris. Gyre and South Classroom. Arts Standards: A, D. Science Standards: C, D. Geography Standards: A, E. PONDERING PLASTIC (3–12) Students learn how scientists and artists tackle topics like marine debris in their work. An educator facilitates a lively group discussion about finding environmental solutions and the importance of civic engagement. Gyre and South Classroom. Arts Standards: B, C, D. Science Standards: C, D. Geography Standards: A, E. LIFE ON THE EDGE (K–12) Available year-round. Students learn about Alaska sea creatures in the museum’s hands-on marine life tanks, and discover how invertebrates are well-suited for marine environments. Imaginarium Discovery Center and North Classroom. Science Standards: A, C. RESOURCES NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC GIANT TRAVELING PACIFIC MAP Available April 7-May 16, 2014. This giant map the size of a racquetball court introduces the marvels of the Pacific Ocean. Students learn how the Pacific has been a barrier and a highway throughout human history. They explore the Mariana Trench, the deepest place on Earth, and the Great Barrier Reef, the largest living structure in the world. Students experience the Pacific as a living thing: active volcanoes giving birth to new islands, deep-sea vents supporting unique life forms, and phytoplankton blooms providing more than half of the planet’s fresh air. Reserve at 907-929-9280. ONLINE RESOURCES Anchorage Museum, anchoragemuseum.org/gyre Alaska SeaLife Center, alaskasealife.org Blue Ocean Institute, blueocean.org COSEE of Alaska, coseealaska.net NOAA Marine Debris Program, marinedebris.noaa.gov GYRE ON VIEW FEB. 7 — SEPT. 6, 2014 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 15 anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280GYRE KIPEVANS Marine debris in Resurrection Bay, 2011.
  • 16. ANCHORAGE MUSEUM EDUCATORS bring the wonders of the museum to you. The Outreach Program provides educational programming at off-site facilities such as schools and community centers. Opportunities are available for small and large groups, including festivals, StarLab portable planetarium shows, scientific guided investigations or traveling art and artifact kits. Not in the Anchorage/Mat-Su area? Our statewide outreach program can come to you! Contact the museum at 929-9279 for availability and pricing. OUTREACH FESTIVALS Festivals include family-friendly exhibits and activities that foster parent and community involvement in art, history, culture, and science education. Programs run for up to two hours and cost $400; additional hours are $100 per hour, maximum six hours. Maximum 300 people per two-hour festival. DISCOVERY FEST (K–12) Though multiple hands-on tabletop exhibits, students explore the senses, color, flight, the human body, optical illusions, magnetism, animals, and much more. CHANGING ALASKA FESTIVAL (3–12) Learn about sea ice, temperature changes, animal migration, and the science behind our changing climate through hands-on activities and animated visuals. Our Magic Planet digital globe displays animated NASA and NOAA imagery to showcase the Earth’s weather patterns as seen from space. GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS Students explore science topics under the guidance of a museum educator. $200 for each 50 minute session, minimum of two sessions per day required. Maximum 30 students per session. GREAT GREY WHALE MIGRATIONS (K–3) Students explore how increasing temperatures affect plants and animals. Students record data and play the role of scientists following the gray whale migration along the Pacific coast. Students sketch, describe, and measure the whales they observe. Students gain a better understanding of our warming oceans, why animals migrate, and why scientists study and continue to learn new things about our changing environment. Science Standards: A, D, G. anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 16OUTREACH ISTOCKPHOTO.COM
  • 17. TRACKING MIGRATION (4–6) Students gain a better understanding of what migration means and the reasons animals migrate. Using scientists’ observations students examine migration patterns of gray whales. Students use data to calculate distance and track animal migration, then make predictions of the possible impact on gray whale migration patterns caused by increasing global temperatures. Science Standards: A, C, E, G. SEA ICE, ICE BABY (4–8) Students see animations of seasons, sea ice, and ocean currents on a Magic Planet digital globe and explore how color affects the ability of a material to reflect light and absorb heat. Students conduct an experiment using independent and dependent variables, record data, and analyze results. Students learn about the important role of sea ice in regulating Earth’s temperature. Science Standards: A, B, C, D, G. MAPPING MIGRATION (7–8) Students view a short presentation on a Magic Planet digital globe about our changing Arctic and learn about the research conducted at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Students collect data and track animal migration to gain a better understanding of migration patterns of gray whales. Students predict possible effects on gray whale migration patterns caused by increasing global temperatures. Science standards: A, F. STARLAB (K–12) Bring presentations about the night sky and constellations to your school with the StarLab portable planetarium. This inflatable dome requires a minimum of 10½ foot ceiling clearance and 400 square feet of open floor space. Cost is $300 for up to two hours (four presentations), $100 for each additional hour. Maximum six hours in one day at one location. Shows run 25 minutes. Maximum of 30 people per show. Science Standards: D. Educators may also rent the StarLab and facilitate their own star shows. Rental is $150 for the first day, $75 for each additional day. Rentals include dome, fan, two specified topic cylinders, and educational materials. Additional cylinders are available for $25 each. Teachers must participate in a two-hour professional development session prior to operating the StarLab without a museum employee present. See page 20 for StarLab training dates. StarLab rental comes with the Starfield and Greek Mythology cylinders. However, others are available if you prefer a different topic. Each cylinder comes with curriculum; for a preview, visit starlab.com Available cylinder topics for StarLab rental include: n Starfield n Greek Mythology n Deep Sky Objects n Native American Mythology n Ancient Chinese Legends n African Mythology n Earth n Biological Cell OUTREACH CANCELATION POLICY The Anchorage Museum will travel to Anchorage/Mat-Su destinations primarily during the school year, with limited availability during the summer months. From time to time, weather conditions and other unforeseen events may cause the museum to cancel outreach programs. Programs canceled due to weather will be rescheduled at the earliest available time. Should it be necessary for a school or organization to cancel a scheduled program, a minimum notice of 10 business days is required or the school/organization will be charged a 50% cancellation fee and all travel costs already incurred. 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 17 anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280OUTREACHStarLab THEODYSSEYSCHOOL
  • 18. THOMAS PLANETARIUM THE THOMAS PLANETARIUM is an exciting way to learn about astronomy and space. The 530-square-foot facility lets students journey to the stars, take trips through the solar system, or join in presentations that explore the night sky. The planetarium seats 44 and includes handicap accessible seating. Planetarium programs are available Fall 2013 (Oct. 1–Dec. 20) and Spring 2014 (Jan. 6–April 30) unless otherwise noted. PLANETARIUM SHOWS Planetarium Shows are educational films projected on a full-dome screen. Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 10:30 a.m. or 11:15 a.m. Show length varies. EARTH, MOON AND SUN (Pre-K–5) Coyote has a razor-sharp wit, but he’s confused about what he sees in the sky. Join this character for a show that discusses American Indian star lore, lunar phases, eclipses, and space exploration. 26 minutes. Science Standards: D, E, F. Geography Standards: A. A teacher’s guide can be found online. DINOSAUR PASSAGE TO PANGAEA (Pre-K–12) This animated adventure explains one of the greatest geological events in Earth’s history: the separation of the supercontinent Pangaea. When two children embark on a geology field trip back in time, they are thrown into a fantastic voyage where they witness incredible geological wonders and learn about the mysterious process that created present-day continents. 40 minutes. Science Standards: D, E, G. Geography Standards: B. ICE WORLDS (2–12) Examine the ecosystems that thrive in the Arctic and Antarctic. See how ice shapes landscapes on other planets and moons in our solar system. 25 minutes. Science Standards: A, C, D, E. Geography Standards: E, F. SEVEN WONDERS (2–12) Turn back the pages of time to witness the ancient wonders of the world as they appeared thousands of years ago. Travel to Egypt to see the Great Pyramids, to Babylon to explore the fabled Hanging Gardens, and more. See some of the universe’s greatest wonders. 32 minutes. Science Standards: D, E. History Standards: B. Geography Standards: B. NEW HORIZONS (2–12) Embark on a journey to the planets and moons of our solar system and travel down to the surface of all the planets. Also available in Spanish and Mandarin by request. 23 minutes. Science Standards: D, E, G. INTO THE DEEP (3-12) Dive alongside deep-sea research pioneers to learn about marine biology, underwater geology and the history of deep-sea exploration. Traveling in famous historic submersibles, come face-to-face with fascinating underwater creatures such as vampire squid and pelican eels. Discover how diving vessels make these underwater encounters possible for humans. Science Standards: A, C, D, E, G. Geography Standards: E, F WONDERS OF THE UNIVERSE (3–12) Peer deep into space through the eyes of the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope and travel back billions of years in time to witness the birth of the universe. Also available in Spanish, Italian, and Mandarin by request. 21 minutes. Science Standards: D, E. anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 18THOMASPLANETARIUM Ice Worlds EVANS&SUTHERLAND
  • 19. SHOWS COURTESY EXXONMOBILOF THE LUNAR STORY (3–12) Learn the moon’s story from its formation to its effects on Earth. Explore the relationship between the Earth, moon, and sun through an investigation of seasons, tides, eclipses, and orbital motion. 26 minutes. Science Standards: D. Geography Standards: A, F. MICROCOSM: THE ADVENTURE WITHIN (4–12) At the center of nano medicine in the year 2053, viewers shrink down to the size of a microbe and get injected into a patient who is suffering from a mysterious virus. Also available in Spanish by request. 16 minutes. Science Standards: C. SUPERVOLCANOS (5–12) Travel back in time and experience the massive volcanic eruptions that shaped the Earth and solar system. Journey to Yellowstone National Park, Neptune’s moon Triton and Jupiter’s moon Io to witness historic eruptions. Could a supervolcano erupt in our era? Scientists weigh in. 35 minutes. Science Standards: A, C, D, E, G, F. Geography Standards: E, F. History: A. A teacher’s guide can be found online. OUR LIVING CLIMATE (5–12) Learn about the delicate balance required to support life by comparing Earth to its neighbors — the moon and Venus. Discover how the Earth’s climate is a complex system that changes over millennia. 28 minutes. Science Standards: A, C, D, E, G. Geography Standards: E, F. A teacher’s guide can be found online. PLANETARIUM GUIDED EXPERIENCES In each Guided Planetarium Experience, students learn about visible objects, constellations, and recent astronomy news. In addition, you may choose one of the focus areas listed below. Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or 11:15 a.m. 30–45 minutes. STARLORE (3–12) Take a closer look at stories that various cultures have told to explain astronomical phenomena. Science Standards: D, E, F. Geography Standards: A. History Standards: A. MOTION OF EARTH (3–12) Learn how the rotation and revolution of the planets affect us on Earth. Science Standards: D, E, G. Geography Standards: A. SIZE AND SCALE OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM (3–12) Gain an understanding of the size of our solar system, galaxy, and universe. Science Standards: D, G. Geography Standards: A. CELESTIAL NAVIGATION (3–12) Discover how different cultures throughout history have used the stars to navigate the Earth. Science Standards: D, E, G. Geography Standards: A. History Standards: A. EXPERIENCE THE AURORA (3–12) Marvel as the Northern Lights shimmer and glisten overhead with time-lapse footage captured in the Arctic Circle. This immersive show is the next best thing to being under Alaska’s winter night sky. 26 minutes. Science Standards: C. Geography Standards: A. A teacher’s guide can be found online. LIFE: A COSMIC STORY How did life on Earth begin? Find out on this journey through time. Witness key events since the Big Bang that set the stage for life. See the first stars ignite, galaxies coalesce and entire worlds take shape. On a young Earth, two scenarios for the dawn of life are presented — one near a turbulent, deep-sea hydrothermal vent, and the other in a primordial hot puddle on a volcanic island. 25 minutes. Science Standards: A, B, C, D. Thanks to sponsor ExxonMobil, a limited number of Life: A Cosmic Story and Experience the Aurora showings are available to school groups at no cost. Shows will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 19 anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280THOMASPLANETARIUM Life: A Cosmic Story MORRISONPLANETARIUM
  • 20. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CUSTOMIZED IN-SERVICE Available year-round Schedule a customized educator in-service at the Anchorage Museum. Learn the ins and outs of field trip planning, how to bring exhibitions to life through hands-on exploration, and how to use the museum as an authentic extension of classroom curriculum. Walk away with pre- and post-field trip activities. Price varies. For more information call (907) 929-9271 or download an in-service registration form online. STARLAB PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (Required for StarLab rental) Learn how to operate and use the StarLab in your classroom. Museum educators take you through the inflatable dome’s set-up and takedown processes. Discover the many possibilities for broadening your students’ knowledge base. Available dates for StarLab professional development: StarLab Fall Training for Educators 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 $15 per person, pre-registration required online StarLab Spring Training for Educators 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, April 10, 2014 $15 per person, pre-registration required online Can’t attend one of the dates listed? Contact 929-9280 to schedule your own training. 4 person minimum RESOURCES The Anchorage Museum offers a multitude of free resources for teachers including worksheets, traveling artifact kits, and research aids. FOCUSED TRIP SHEETS Download Pre-K–8 student trip sheets to help guide your field trip experience during free exploration. These simple, adaptable trip sheets include activities for the gallery, as well as suggested pre- and post-visit activities for the classroom. Find downloadable Focused Trip Sheets at anchoragemuseum.org/learn. FIRST FRIDAY ART REVIEWS (9–12) First Friday is a great extra-credit opportunity for high school students. The museum offers free general admission from 6 to 9 p.m. the first Friday of each month. Consider having your students write reviews after attending gallery talks by noted artists, watching live performances, and viewing current exhibitions. Find a downloadable trip sheets at anchoragemuseum.org/learn. For more information, call (907) 929-9269. BOB AND EVANGELINE ATWOOD ALASKA RESOURCE CENTER The Atwood Resource Center maintains a library of more than 12,000 titles with a focus on the history, ethnography, and art of Alaska and the North. This is a great resource for teens and teachers to conduct research. Materials do not circulate, but the general public is welcome to reference the collection. The archival collections, including more than 500,000 photographs, are also available for on-site research. For more information, call (907) 929-9235 or email resourcecenter@anchoragemuseum.org. JUST FOR TEACHERS anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 20JUSTFORTEACHERS CHRISAREND
  • 21. TRAVELING MUSEUM KITS BRING THE MUSEUM to your classroom and make your lessons come alive with our Traveling Kits! Kits feature objects from different disciplines such as art, history, and culture. Kits also include lesson plans for K–12 students. These kits are a great way to introduce primary source documents into your classroom lessons. The kits are free to all Alaska educators and are available for pick-up and return at the museum’s Education Department. Artifact kits can be shipped to schools outside the Anchorage area for the cost of shipping. Learn more at travelingkits@anchoragemuseum.org or (907) 929-9276. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Traveling Kit Fall Training for Educators 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013 $15 per person, pre-registration required online Traveling Kit Spring Training For Educators 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 $15 per person, pre-registration required online CULTURE KITS (K–12) PEOPLES OF ALASKA AND NORTHEAST SIBERIA The vast territory between the Arctic and Pacific oceans is home to more than 150,000 indigenous residents, whose diverse languages and cultures are both a link to history and the foundation for contemporary lives. Artifacts from several Alaska Native culture groups, personal accounts of major life events, and transcripts of interviews with prominent Alaska Native elders are featured in these culture kits. ANCIENT MYSTERIES This kit includes bone, stone, and wooden artifacts from St. Lawrence Island and spurs discussion about ancient Arctic technologies, subsistence, survival strategies, archaeology, and more. BERING SEA AND BEYOND This kit contains natural samples and objects pertaining to Yup’ik and Iñupiaq cultures. Students can touch seal pelts, try on snow goggles, and compare ivory and whale bone. PEOPLE OF THE RAVEN This kit introduces Athabascan and Tlingit Native cultures with samples of natural materials, traditional tools, and beautifully crafted artifacts. HISTORY KITS (5-12) WORLD WAR II IN THE ALEUTIANS World War II had a significant impact on Alaska, and brought together three distinct groups of people: American military personnel, Japanese soldiers, and evacuated Unangax civilians. These kits explore personal stories from each group through interviews, documents, photographs, and authentic objects. Kits contain lesson plans, maps and films. AMERICAN STORY Explore American fighter pilots’ military personal accounts. UNANGAX STORY Hear Unangax children’s stories of evacuation. JAPANESE STORY Read firsthand excerpts from Japanese soldiers’ memoirs. ART KITS (K–12) These art focused kits include tools such as interactive games, images, miniature paintings and real objects from the collection. TRAVELING ART EXHIBIT This kit includes a mini diorama of a museum gallery. Students use this art exhibit-in-a-box to build and curate their own classroom museum exhibition. MUSEUM MEMORY Play an interactive memory game to learn the names of Alaska artists and match them to their artwork. ART DETECTIVES Inspired by the game Clue, Students use the museum’s collection to solve an exciting mystery. 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 21 anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280TRAVELINGMUSEUMKITS CHRISAREND
  • 22. REGISTER YOUR SCHOOL GROUP PRICES GENERAL ADMISSION School group general admission is $5 per student. Chaperones are admitted free in a ratio of one adult per five to eight students; additional chaperones pay general admission rates plus premium exhibition fees when applicable. REGISTRATION FOR FIELD TRIPS TO THE ANCHORAGE MUSEUM Teachers must contact the museum’s Education Operations Specialist at (907) 929-9280 to register for field trips to the Anchorage Museum. Please have the following information ready when scheduling your field trip. FIELD TRIP RESERVATION CHECKLIST n Requested field trip date (Tuesday-Friday only) n Arrival time, time of program, and departure time n Alternate date(s) and time(s) n Program(s) desired n Alternate program(s) desired n School name n Teacher name(s) attending field trip n Teacher phone number(s) n Teacher email(s) n Grade level(s) n Number of students n Number of chaperones n Transportation method n Lunch tables (reservations required) n Payment method PROGRAM FEES These prices are in addition to student admission. Docent-Led Tour, $15 per group Guided Investigation, $100 per group Tour Plus Investigation, $115 per group Planetarium Show, $75 per group Planetarium Guided Experience, $100 per group Outreach Programs, for Anchorage/Mat-Su outreach prices see page 16, for distance outreach quotes, please call 929-9279. Prices are subject to change. Payment is due upon arrival via cash, check, or credit card. If you are unable to pay with cash, check, or credit card, you must submit a purchase order prior to your visit and contact the museum’s Education Operations Specialist for approval. anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 22REGISTRATION ISTOCKPHOTO.COM
  • 23. TEACHERS Please plan early as field trips fill up quickly. It’s recommended that educators schedule at least three weeks before a desired field trip. The museum requires at least two weeks advance notice. Pre-registration is required to receive the reduced educational admission rates. Groups that don’t pre-register must pay general admission rates and will not have access to school programs. FIELD TRIP CANCELATION To cancel or alter a field trip, please contact the museum five business days prior to a field trip or a cancelation fee may apply. Scheduled field trips that aren’t canceled at least two full business days prior will be charged 100% of the program fees. The museum will send a confirmation email to registered educators with important field trip details. SIBLINGS The museum requests that parent chaperones not bring siblings on field trips. If it is necessary, the parent must pay full admission for the sibling(s) and any additional fees for premium exhibitions. Siblings are not allowed to participate in field trip activities. BUSES, PARKING, AND ENTRANCE If you are traveling by school bus, there is a bus drop-off zone on Seventh Avenue near the main entrance. If parents are driving students to the museum, street parking is available, and there are seven public pay lots within a two-block radius. Visit our website for a detailed list of options. The museum does not validate or reimburse parking fees. The museum opens at 10 a.m. October through April. No early entrance is allowed. PHOTOGRAPHY Cameras are permitted in most exhibitions, but no flash photography, videography, or tripods are allowed. When taking pictures, please respect the barriers around the displays. GALLERY CLOSURES Occasionally, areas of the museum are temporarily unavailable due to exhibition installation. To confirm a specific gallery is available, call (907) 929-9280. FIELD TRIP PREP Teachers may contact the Education Operations Specialist to schedule a visit prior to the field trip date. This is by appointment only, and only teachers may attend. You will receive museum information and access to galleries included in the upcoming field trip experience. For more information contact (907) 929- 9280 or fieldtrips@anchoragemuseum.org. LUNCH OPTIONS In order for a field trip group to eat brown bag lunches in the museum’s atrium, tables must be reserved in advance. Tables are only available at certain times and are on a first-come, first-served basis. Absolutely no food or drink is allowed in galleries. No exceptions. CHAPERONE POLICY One adult chaperone is required for up to eight students. Specific ratios for each group are determined based on grade level, special needs, and school policy. Please note that adults in excess of the ratio must pay full general admission and any additional fees for premium exhibitions. Students must remain with their chaperones at all times while they are in the museum. Museum rules will be explained to chaperones upon arrival, and chaperones are expected to enforce these rules. Failure to adequately supervise students may result in a group being asked to leave. No exceptions. SCHOLARSHIP ASSISTANCE Thanks to generous sponsors, some scholarship assistance is available for Gyre and Dena’inaq Huch’ulyeshi programs, as well as some planetarium shows. To learn more about these opportunities, call (907) 929-9280  . MEMBERSHIP Membership benefits do not apply to field trips. CONTACT Email: fieldtrips@anchoragemuseum.org Phone: (907) 929-9280 Fax: (907) 929-9290 2013–2014 EDUCATOR CATALOG p. 23 anchoragemuseum.org/learn907.929.9280REGISTRATION CHRISAREND ’
  • 24. CHRISAREND MUSEUM CONDUCT TO MAKE YOUR EXPERIENCE as positive as possible, we ask that you, your students, and your chaperones follow some rules of conduct while your group is at the Anchorage Museum. Just remember to LEARN: LISTEN: Follow all instructions provided by museum staff and refrain from side conversations or cell phone use during your visit. ENGAGE: Actively participate in the learning experience and interact with exhibitions. ATTEND: Keep track of assigned students and adhere to scheduled times for programs, lunch, and free-choice exploration. All students must be supervised at all times. RESPECT: Show respect for the museum’s exhibitions and staff and be a good model of behavior for students. Deal with behavioral issues. NO-NOS: Please remind students the museum doesn’t allow running, yelling, or chewing gum. Food and drink are not allowed in galleries. Some objects are touchable, some are not: Please consult gallery signage. SPONSORS THANK YOU The Anchorage Museum is grateful to our generous sponsors for supporting our mission. Education programs are made possible, in part, thanks to funding from the Anchorage Museum Foundation through the Larry and Wilma Carr Education Fund, and the Emi Chance Memorial Fund. Additional support is provided by the following sponsors: Municipal Light and Power Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Habitat Housewares Northrim Bank Mary Ellen Segelhorst CIRI