Email marketing 2012 Sample email-in-action

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Marché Mondial de l'email marketing.

Marché Mondial de l'email marketing.

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  • 1. Market Data / Supplier Selection / Event Presentations / User Experience Benchmarking / Best Practice / Template Files / Trends & InnovationSAMPLE2012: Email in ActionA US study by the Email ExperienceCouncil of the DMA and EconsultancySAMPLE ONLY. Please download the full report from: http://econsultancy.com/reports/2012-email-in-actionn
  • 2. 2012: Email inActionPublished February 2012 Econsultancy New York Econsultancy London 41 East 11th St., 11th Floor 4th Floor, The Corner New York, NY 10003 91-93 Farringdon RoadAll rights reserved. No part of this publication may be United States London EC1M 3LNreproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, United Kingdomelectronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording Telephone:or any information storage and retrieval system, without +1 212 699 3626 Telephone:prior permission in writing from the publisher. +44 (0)20 7269 1450 http://econsultancy.comCopyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012 help@econsultancy.com
  • 3. Contents 1. Introduction from the Email Experience Council of the DMA ................................................................................ 6 2. Executive Summary ........................................................ 7 3. Email in Action ............................................................... 9 3.1. Challenges to Email .................................................................. 9 3.2. Email and Social ...................................................................... 11 3.3. Testing and Tracking ............................................................... 13 3.4. Budgeting and Financial Metrics ............................................ 18 3.5. Email Benchmarks .................................................................. 22 3.6. Personalization & Segmentation ............................................. 28 3.7. List Size and Growth ............................................................... 32 3.8. Automation ............................................................................. 34 3.9. Improving Email Performance................................................ 36 4. Methodology and Respondent Demographics .............. 39 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 3 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 4. Table of FiguresFigure 1: Challenges to Future Success in Email ........................................................... 9Figure 2: Clients‟ Use of Email: The Agency View ...................................................... 10Figure 3: Social and Email Integration ......................................................................... 11Figure 4: Social and Email Integration (B2C) ..............................................................12Figure 5: Social and Email Integration (B2B) ..............................................................12Figure 6: Email Factors Tested .....................................................................................13Figure 7: Email Factors Tested (B2C) ...........................................................................14Figure 8: Email Factors Tested (B2B) ..........................................................................14Figure 9: Email Metrics Tracked .................................................................................. 15Figure 10: Email Metrics Tracked (B2C) ......................................................................16Figure 11: Email Metrics Tracked (B2B) ....................................................................... 17Figure 12: Email Budget Distribution .......................................................................... 18Figure 13: Email Budget Distribution (B2C) ................................................................19Figure 14: Email Budget Distribution (B2B) ................................................................19Figure 15: Financial Metrics Tracked .......................................................................... 20Figure 16: Financial Metrics Tracked (B2C).................................................................21Figure 17: Financial Metrics Tracked (B2B) .................................................................21Figure 18: B2C Lead Generation – Newsletter Benchmarks ...................................... 22Figure 19: B2C Lead Generation – Sales Email Benchmarks ..................................... 23Figure 20: B2B Lead Generation – Newsletter Benchmarks...................................... 23Figure 21: B2B Lead Generation – Sales Email Benchmarks ..................................... 24Figure 22: B2C Direct Sales – Newsletter Benchmarks .............................................. 24Figure 23: B2C Direct Sales – Sales Email Benchmarks ............................................ 25Figure 24: B2B Direct Sales – Newsletter Benchmarks .............................................. 25Figure 25: B2B Direct Sales – Sales Email Benchmarks ............................................ 26Figure 26: Definitions of Inactivity .............................................................................. 27Figure 27: Factors in Personalization/Segmentation ................................................. 28Figure 28: Factors in Personalization/Segmentation (B2C) ...................................... 29Figure 29: Factors in Personalization/Segmentation (B2B) ...................................... 29Figure 30: Preferences Offered to Subscribers ........................................................... 30Figure 31: Preferences Offered to Subscribers (B2C) ..................................................31Figure 32: Preferences Offered to Subscribers (B2B) ..................................................31Figure 33: Changes in List Size .................................................................................... 32Figure 34: Changes in List Size (B2C) ......................................................................... 33Figure 35: Changes in List Size (B2B) ......................................................................... 33Figure 36: Effectiveness of Automated Triggers ......................................................... 34Figure 37: Effectiveness of Automated Triggers (B2C) ............................................... 352012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 4All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 5. Figure 38: Effectiveness of Automated Triggers (B2B) .............................................. 35Figure 39: Word Cloud – “What‟s the Key to Effective Email?” ................................. 36Figure 40: Respondent Organizations by Type ........................................................... 39Figure 41: Size of Respondent Organizations .............................................................. 40Figure 42: Target Markets of Respondent Organizations .......................................... 40Figure 43: Respondents‟ Primary Conversion Goal .....................................................41Figure 44: Respondents‟ Database Size (B2C) .............................................................41Figure 45: Respondents‟ Database Size (B2B) ............................................................ 422012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 5All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 6. 1. Introduction from the Email Experience Council of the DMA Email marketing is going through a bit of a mid-life crisis. The changes in the way people communicate with each other have generated some valid questions about the future of email. Is it still as relevant as it once was before the rise of social media and the mass penetration of smartphones? How can it compete with other media that are always on, ready to provide instant feedback from friends and companies? Are younger people less likely to read email regularly? DMA’s Email Experience Council and Econsultancy set out to find out how marketers are answering these questions. What we found is that concern about email is widespread, but gloom about its future is not. For most marketers, the challenge is not to find out whether or not to use email, it’s more about rediscovering how to use it. Virtually every marketer remains an email marketer. This ubiquity, however, has generated one of email marketing’s greatest weaknesses. Everyone gets too much email, which has reduced the impact of all email. Clutter is a major problem, especially in the face of competition from social media. As a result, providing relevant email that works with social media is a high priority for marketers. Marketers are increasing the relevance of emails through personalization and better matching of behavioral data with content. Even so, most marketers want to do more, and more quickly. With consumers online continuously with their smartphones, email needs to move faster. As a result, automated response email systems that smartly use data have grown in popularity. Email does not seem to be in decline, but it is changing. We invite email marketers to use this report to see where their colleagues expect email marketing to go in the future. Yorum Wurmser, Ph.D. Director, Marketing & Media Insights Direct Marketing Association The Email Experience Council of the Direct Marketing Association celebrates and empowers marketers around the globe to create amazing subscriber experiences, follow and improve email marketing best practices and, by their example and dedication, demonstrate the critical role email plays in integrated marketing. Our mission is to invest in, educate and bring together innovative email and digital marketers who understand the critical role email marketing plays in integrated, multi-channel marketing. The Council provides a broad series of initiatives that illustrate the importance of email marketing as a communications vehicle. We accomplish this through stellar education at our conferences, relevant research, legislative advocacy and member roundtables and advisory committees. We continually partner with innovative companies who positively impact our community and represent the voices of our members. Sign up for our free newsletters and gain access to a wealth of information: www.emailexperience.org. . 2012: Email in Action Page 6 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 7. 2. Executive Summary Email will always be a tactic that suffers from averages, because it is really two channels – one that’s precise, highly effective and unique, the other a blunt instrument that attempts to compensate for relevance with volume. At organizations that practice the first, email continues to rank as the tactic with the highest return and as the best way for communicating with customers and prospects over the long-term. For organizations still “batching and blasting” the results have ebbed, deliverability has dropped, and list growth is slowing. But by the standards of digital marketing, this is an old phenomenon and these are old arguments. Perennial articles drum up interest with the claim that “email is dead” and far flung defenders come together to repel the attack. There’s self-interest, but also passion in the defense, because saying that email doesn’t work simply isn’t true. It does and for some, it works better than anything else. At the same time, the industry has to acknowledge that online behaviors are changing in a profound way and on a massive scale. It’s not yet clear whether the new social and mobile Internet is more or less friendly to the use of email, but for certain, it means rethinking email strategy, and optimizing the subscriber experience for this new world. The Email in Action Survey, conducted with the Email Experience Council of the DMA, benefits from the input of over 450 marketing organizations, ESPs and agencies focused on email. Fielded in the fourth quarter of 2011, the survey explored the challenges, opportunities and changes in email marketing. Segmentation & Personalization  55% of client side marketers are using lead source to personalize/segment their mailings, while 53% are using demographic data.  While fewer than half of markets are using behavior for email personalization, it’s the area of highest interest. Nearly one in four reports having a plan in place to implement some level of behavioral analysis in the next year.SAMPLE ONLY. Please download the full report from: http://econsultancy.com/reports/2012-email-in-actionn 2012: Email in Action Page 7 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 8. 3. Email in Action3.1. Challenges to Email Figure 1: Challenges to Future Success in Email Competition with social media for recipients 25% 50% 18% 8% time and attention Getting the budget and attention email 21% 44% 27% 8% programs deserve Measuring and proving the ROI of email 19% 40% 32% 10% marketing programs Young people abandoning email as a 18% 51% 13% 18% primary channel Integrating email with other marketing 17% 44% 35% 4% channels 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Very challenging Somewhat challenging Easy to overcome Background noise Number of respondents:239SAMPLE ONLY. Please download the full report from: http://econsultancy.com/reports/2012-email-in-actionn 2012: Email in Action Page 8 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 9. 3.2. Budgeting and Financial Metrics Figure 2: Email Budget Distribution Other 7% Data hygiene/ Email Service Deliverability Provider (ESP) 8% 31% Analytics 9% Agency (creative & strategy) 12% Content creation Lists 19% 14% Number of respondents:239SAMPLE ONLY. Please download the full report from: http://econsultancy.com/reports/2012-email-in-actionn . 2012: Email in Action Page 9 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 10. 3.3. Email Benchmarks Benchmarks are highly fallible. Every company and every product produce metrics that are unique to them. To attempt to make these benchmarks as useful as possible, they are associated with three different variables; goal, sales target and type of email. Figure 3: B2C Lead Generation – Newsletter Benchmarks 30% 25% 24% 18% 12% 11% 6% 1.8% 0% Newsletter Open Rate Newsletter Clickthrough Newsletter Conversion Rate Rate Number of respondents:118SAMPLE ONLY. Please download the full report from: http://econsultancy.com/reports/2012-email-in-actionn 2012: Email in Action Page 10 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 11. 3.4. Improving Email Performance Figure 4: Word Cloud – “What’s the Key to Effective Email?” Number of respondents:239SAMPLE ONLY. Please download the full report from: http://econsultancy.com/reports/2012-email-in-actionn 2012: Email in Action Page 11 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 12. What’s the number one thing you’d recommend to other companies to improvetheir email marketing performance?SAMPLE ONLY. Please download the full report from: http://econsultancy.com/reports/2012-email-in-actionn SAMPLE QUOTE 2012: Email in Action Page 12 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 13. 4. Methodology and Respondent Demographics Figure 5: Respondent Organizations by Type What phrase best describes the type of organization you work for? 45% 40% 39% 35% 31% 30% 25% 20% 20% 15% 10% 7% 5% 4% 0% Client side Agency or Other type of Email Service Institution marketer consultancy organization Provider (government, military or educational) Number of respondents:467 SAMPLE ONLY. Please download the full report from: http://econsultancy.com/reports/2012-email-in-actionn 2012: Email in Action Page 13 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 14. Figure 6: Size of Respondent Organizations How many employees are in your organization worldwide? 30% 25% 25% 23% 22% 20% 19% 15% 10% 7% 5% 4% 0% 1-10 11-100 101-500 501-1000 1001-2,000 More than employees employees employees employees employees 2,000 employees Number of respondents:239Figure 7: Target Markets of Respondent Organizations Which type of customer is the primary target of your organization’s email marketing? 60% 50% 50% 40% 30% 23% 20% 12% 12% 10% 0% Consumers Small to mid-size Large businesses or True mix of consumer businesses or organizations with and business targets organizations with 1,000 or more fewer than 1,000 employees employees Number of respondents:2392012: Email in Action Page 14All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 15. Figure 8: Respondents’ Primary Conversion Goal Which of the following best describes the "conversions" or primary goals of your email programs? 35% 29% 30% 25% 25% 19% 20% 15% 10% 7% 7% 6% 6% 5% 0% Lead Immediate Specific Later offline Later online Time on site Other generated purchase action purchase purchase goal or (form online (phone call, multiple completed) used an pages application, viewed etc.) Number of respondents:239Figure 9: Respondents’ Database Size (B2C) How large is your total email database of names? 45% 41% 40% 35% 30% 26% 25% 20% 15% 15% 12% 10% 5% 5% 0% Fewer than 5,000 5,000 to 24,999 25,000 to 99,999 100,000 to More than 500,000 500,000 Number of respondents:1182012: Email in Action Page 15All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
  • 16. Figure 10: Respondents’ Database Size (B2B) How large is your total email database of names? 35% 31% 30% 25% 24% 20% 20% 15% 15% 9% 10% 5% 0% Fewer than 5,000 5,000 to 24,999 25,000 to 99,999 100,000 to More than 500,000 500,000 Number of respondents:131SAMPLE ONLY. Please download the full report from: http://econsultancy.com/reports/2012-email-in-actionn 2012: Email in Action Page 16 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012