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Tips for Teaching: Using Macros to Create Reusable Comments and Feedback
 

Tips for Teaching: Using Macros to Create Reusable Comments and Feedback

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Macros provide an effective method for creating authentic teaching presence. We will discuss how to use macros to cultivate cognitive, social and teaching presence throughout the online learning ...

Macros provide an effective method for creating authentic teaching presence. We will discuss how to use macros to cultivate cognitive, social and teaching presence throughout the online learning experience. In addition, I will offer a demonstration of the uses and applications of macros, their dynamic functionality and their convenience to the instructor as a teaching tool.

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Tips for Teaching: Using Macros to Create Reusable Comments and Feedback Tips for Teaching: Using Macros to Create Reusable Comments and Feedback Presentation Transcript

  • Tips for Teaching: Using Macros to Create Reusable Comments and Feedback CDL Conference April 24, 2009 Nicola Martinez Center for Distance Learning
  • Abstract
    • Macros provide an effective method for creating authentic teaching presence.
    • We will discuss how to use macros to cultivate cognitive, social and teaching presence throughout the online learning experience.
    • In addition, I will offer a demonstration of the uses and applications of macros, their dynamic functionality and their convenience to the instructor as a teaching tool.
  • Community of Inquiry Framework From: Garrison et al., (2000-2006)
  • Cognitive Presence
    • Cognitive presence is defined as the exploration, construction, resolution and confirmation of understanding through collaboration and reflection in a community of inquiry. The practical inquiry model operationalizes cognitive presence and is ground in the work of Dewey (1933) on reflective thinking.
    • (Garrison et al., 2000, 2006)
  • Social Presence
    • Social presence is described as the ability to project one’s self and establish personal and purposeful relationships. The three main aspects of social presence, as defined here, are affective communication, open communication and group cohesion.
    (Garrison et al., 2000, 2006)
  • Teaching Presence
    • Teaching presence is the design, facilitation, and direction of cognitive and social processes for the realization of personally meaningful and educationally worthwhile learning outcomes. Teaching presence has three components: Instructional Design and Organization, Facilitating Discourse, and Direct Instruction.
    (Garrison et al., 2000, 2006)
  • Enhancing Teaching Presence with Macros Providing high quality feedback for multiple students in an online course can be quite challenging and time consuming. The Angel Macro provides an excellent solution to this.
  • What Are Macros in Angel?
    • Macros are valuable assessment shortcuts that allow you to store and reuse feedback for students; course commentary; responses to frequent questions; and other useful text.
    • Macros can be used to provide students with individualized, contextualized feedback.
    • They can assist instructors in establishing ongoing teaching presence.
  • Ways to Use the Macro Information from Schedule Saved from Schedule Discussion Commentary Saved from a Previous Section Saved Quote From: Privacy, Security, Freedom: Social Concerns for the 21st Century
  • How Do Angel Macros Work?
    • The Macro is a simple tool that allows instructors to store comments and feedback for further use.
    • Macros may be dropped into a coursemail message, discussion forum posting, grade book evaluation, ongoing narrative feedback to students or even the final course narrative evaluation. With some personalization and formatting, the end result is customized, prompt feedback for your students.
  • Combine Macros with New Text New Comment Macro Saved from a Previous Section New Comment From: Privacy, Security, Freedom: Social Concerns for the 21st Century
  • Why are they effective?
    • Comments may be stored, re-used, and personalized for the students. Voilà, time saved .
    • They are useful for providing similar notes or assessment feedback for students, and eliminate the need to hunt for previous versions or copy and paste .
    • As an added plus, macros are shareable across courses and sections . This means that you only need to create a macro once, and it will be available for ongoing use across your courses, sections, and terms.
    • Macros are always editable .
  • Where is the Macro Tool in Angel?
    • Embedded in the HTML editor
  • Create A Macro
  • Create Categories
  • Macros are Editable
  • Raw Macro Inserted into A Message
  • Another Macro for the Message
  • From Macro to Message
  • Macro CAN save formatting with HTML
  • The HTML Icon
  • Share Macros Across Courses
  • Discussion
    • Let’s talk about strategies for creating teaching presence with macros and other Angel tools.
    • Do you have any to share?
  • Contact Information
    • Visit our web site at:
    • http://www.esc.edu/cdl
    Nicola Martinez Director of Curriculum and Instructional Design Center for Distance Learning 111 West Avenue, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 518-587-2100, ext. 2276 [email_address]
  • References
    • Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text -based environment:Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2-3), 1-19 http://communitiesofinquiry.com
    • Anderson, T., Rourke, L., Garrison, D. R., Archer, W. (2001). Assessing Teaching presence in a Computer Conference Environment. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Network, 5 (2). http://www.aln.org/publications/jaln/v5n2/v5n2_anderson.asp
    • Garrison, D. R. Garrison, D. R. (2006). Online Community of Inquiry Update: Social, Cognitive, and Teaching Presence Issues. Unpublished paper.
    • Gibbs, G. (1992b). Improving the quality of student learning . Bristol: Technical and Educational Services.
    • Shea, P., Pickett. A., & Peltz, W. A Follow-up Investigation of “Teaching Presence” in the SUNY Learning Network . (2003) Journal of Asynchronous Learning Network, 7 (2). http://www.sloan-c.org/publications/jaln/v7n2/pdf/v7n2_shea.pdf
    • Knowles, M. S. (1970, 1980) The Modern Practice of Adult Education. Andragogy versus pedagogy , Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall/Cambridge.
    • Knowles, M. S., Holton III, Elwood F., Swanson, Richard A. (1998). The Adult Learner. Houston: Gulf.
    • Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in Society . (Trans. M. Cole). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
    • Wlodkowski, R. J. (1993). Enhancing adult motivation to learn: A guide to improving instruction and increasing learner achievement. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  •