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Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
Identity and self
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Identity and self

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This is a summary work by David Buckingham: …

This is a summary work by David Buckingham:
Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001
The book is available FREE.
This is a revised presentation in which I have removed the discussion on Sherry Turkle and created a new one.

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  • While not a scholar of Foucault, and this is a terrible simplification, but it could be said here that there is a kind of ‘self-government’ happening in this notion. Whether that is by the individual, the state (whatever that is) or the individual’s societal ties, might be contested.
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    • 1. Identity and Self ICT & 21ST CENTURY LEARNING COMMUNITIES EDUC 90591 Nick Reynolds
    • 2. Youth, Identity, and Digital Media  What is ‘identity’?  How it is used today:  Identity theft  self actualisation  cultural, national independence  ‘identity’ Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001
    • 3. “Globalization, the decline of the welfare state, increasing social mobility, greater flexibility in employment, insecurity in personal relationships —all these developments are contributing to a sense of fragmentation and uncertainty, in which the traditional resources for identity formation are no longer so straightforward or so easily available” (p. 1) Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001
    • 4. Psychological accounts of identity (development)  Blogs as a source of identity formation or self awareness development  Myspace* for social development and affiliation  *(This is a 2008 book. One could easily replace Myspace with Facebook) Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001
    • 5. Sociological accounts of identity (socialisation)  Nature of youth varies significantly according to the social context  Gen X (and following) “youth” is essentially a social and historical construct, rather than a universal state of being (p. 4)  Discussion Point  Did (do) generations see themselves in terms of this construct?  When did it start?  Why did it start?  Who created this construct? Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001
    • 6.  ‘how a sense of group belonging or “community” is developed and maintained, and how groups discriminate against outsiders; how the boundaries between groups operate, and how groups relate to each other’  ‘As a result, the formation of identity often involves a process of stereotyping or “cognitive simplification” that allows people to distinguish easily between self and other, and to define themselves and their group in positive ways’ (p. 6) Research focus on radical/underground not on ‘mundane, mainstream middle class youth’ Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001
    • 7.  Distinction between ‘front stage’ and ‘back stage’ identity (Erving Goffman, The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life (New York: Anchor Books, 1959))  Who we are in different settings  Identity politics and the debate about the use of identity (e.g., ‘women’) as a label for a hugely complex and various group  Other labels of identity  Gay, young, old, black, white … Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001
    • 8. Social Theory  Reduction in the influence of ‘traditional’ institutions – religion  Replaced by ‘self-help’ and ‘guidance’  ‘Foucault argues that who we are—or who we perceive ourselves to be—is far from a matter of individual choice; on the contrary, it is the product of powerful and subtle forms of “governmentality” that are characteristic of modern liberal democracies’ (p.10). Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001
    • 9. Technology  ‘The telephone, for example, was celebrated for the way in which it could make business more efficient and facilitate more democratic forms of social life, yet it was also condemned for its disruption of intimate relationships and its unsettling of established social hierarchies’ (p.11).  Use of SMS as the favoured communication method for many young people Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001
    • 10. Technology  ‘Technology is then seen to have effects—to bring about social and psychological changes— irrespective of the ways in which it is used, and of the social contexts and processes into which it enters  Like the printing press, television, and other new technologies that preceded it, the computer is seen as an autonomous force that is somehow independent of human society and acts upon it from outside’ (p.11)  Unanticipated consequences of technologies – affordance  ‘technology is both socially shaped and socially shaping’ (from Raymond Williams, Television: Technology and Cultural Form (Glasgow: Fontana, 1974). Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001
    • 11. Affordance  James Gibson, 1979. An Ecological Approach to Visual Perception  The relational properties between an organism and the environment  “It is equally a fact of the environment and a fact of behaviour. It is both physical and psychical, yet neither. An affordance points both ways, to the environment and to the observer” (Gibson 1979 p. 129).
    • 12. Affordance and co-perception  The act of perception of the environment (externally) is also, at the same time, an act of perception of oneself (internally)
    • 13. ‘Digital Natives’  Prensky  ‘digital natives have a very different style of learning: they crave interactivity, they value graphics before words; they want random access, and they operate at the “twitch speed” of video games and MTV’  Compare with Kennedy  http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet24/kennedy.html
    • 14. Technology as empowering, positive and the way of the future  ‘This relentlessly optimistic view inevitably ignores many of the down sides of these technologies—  the undemocratic tendencies of many online “communities”  the limited nature of much so-called digital learning and the grinding tedium of much technologically driven work  wholly positive view of [young people’s] critical intelligence and social responsibility that is deliberately at odds with that of many social commentators  It is also bound to ignore the continuing “digital divide” between the technology rich and the technology poor, both within and between societies’ (p. 14). Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001
    • 15. Concerns  Risks to young people beyond pornography and paedophiles – negative physical and psychological consequences  The ‘banality’ of much new media use  ‘Recent studies suggest that most young people’s everyday uses of the Internet are characterized not by spectacular forms of innovation and creativity, but by relatively mundane forms of communication and information retrieval’ (p.14) Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001
    • 16. Digital Literacy Needed  New communication grammars  Nuance is understood through simple icons or abbreviations  New curriculum approaches that look at ‘Interactions and Impacts’ (Australian Curriculum, Digital Technologies), as well as more ‘traditional’ computing practices such as coding, algorithms, computational thinking
    • 17. Digital Literacy  ‘Perhaps most importantly, a focus on identity requires us to pay close attention to the diverse ways in which media and technologies are used in everyday life, and their consequences both for individuals and for social groups. It entails viewing young people as significant social actors in their own right, as “beings,” and not simply as “becomings” who should be judged in terms of their projected futures’ (p. 19). Buckingham, D. (2008) “Introducing Identity." Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Edited by David Buckingham. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 1–24. doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.001

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