Variable Content Publishing Lecture

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This is a multi-part lecture series on publishing variable documents. It deals with both concepts and mechanics. It discusses the use of basic design automation tools and techniques to get desired results. The intention is to help practitioners understand the basics before getting heavily invested.

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Variable Content Publishing Lecture

  1. 1. Document Variability: Basic Concepts & Mechanics A Classroom Lecture for R.I.T. School of Print Media Nick D. Barzelay March, 2010 Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. Concept: Documents & Variability Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  3. 3. What Is a “Document”? • New Oxford American Dictionary: – A piece of written, printed, or electronic matter – Provides information or evidence – Serves as an official record. • Wikipedia: – A bounded physical representation of a body of information – Designed with the capacity (and usually intent) to communicate. – May manifest symbolic, diagrammatic or sensory-representational information. – In prototypical usage, a paper artifact containing information in the form of ink marks. – Increasingly also understood as digital artifacts. Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  4. 4. What Is “Variability”? 1. Content changes on an “ad hoc” basis 2. Content changes on a periodic basis 3. Content changes during document generation according to predefined values and logic Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  5. 5. What is “Content”? • Digital Images – Raster Graphics – Vector Graphics • Text – Composed character sets • Words & sentences • Headings & paragraphs – Tagged text entities • Data – Textual characters – Numeric characters – Symbolic characters Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  6. 6. What Is a “Static Document”? 1. One that doesn’t move around; it just sits there on the coffee table 2. The Absence of Deliberate Deviation • Within a production run • Between production runs 3. Consistent Design • Color & white space • Size, shape, & positioning 4. Consistent Content • Message (text & data) • Graphic imagery Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  7. 7. What Is a “Variable Document”? 1. One that’s capricious, indecisive, fickle, or erratic 2. Formulated Deviation • Within a production run • Between production runs 3. Consistent Design Framework • Document size, columns, margins • Master text frames & styles 4. Interchangeable Content • Message (text) • Graphics (shape, color, image) • Data Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  8. 8. What Are Variable Document Qualities? Both Design Elements and Content Elements possess: • Structure • Uniformity • Commonality • Flexibility • Modularity – Design – Function Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  9. 9. How Do We Facilitate Variability? 1. Establish standards, conventions, & operating procedures 2. Establish an iterative workflow 3. Maintain a stable design structure with functional separation • Static - Page Masters • Variable - Page Spreads 4. Accurately define & uniformly prepare content 5. Define objectives while allowing flexibility for potential surprises Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  10. 10. Isn’t “Uniformity” Incompatible? There’s a dependent • Variability increases relationship: Need for – Content dissimilarity – Number of variables Uniformity Increases As: • Complexity increases – Design – Content • Quantities increase – Documents produced – Document pages – Page content elements • Static Elements decrease • Automation increases & Human Intervention Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved. decreases
  11. 11. Which Are Variable? Static? Why? • Poster • Report • Catalog • Magazine • Newspaper • Digital Book • Printed Book • Business Form • Restaurant Menu • Web Page or Blog Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved. • Marketing Collateral
  12. 12. When Is or Isn’t a Document Variable? That Depends... • Can you step on the same water twice? • Does a tree falling in the forest make a sound if no one is there to hear it? • Is a painting colored without human sight? • What is the sound of one hand clapping? Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  13. 13. Design Standardization Generated Documents From Variable Content Collection 1 Collection 1 Standardized (Images and Text) Document (Standard Layout with Static Images, Variable Content Static Text, & Format Styles) Generated Collection n Documents (Images and Text) From Collection n • Disparate collections of content • Run through a single design engine • Produces one or more copies of each document • Maintains similar “look & feel” for each produced set Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  14. 14. Serial Variability Generated Documents for Print Variable Content Stream Standardized (Text & Image Document References) (Content Stream Import , Formatting, & Image Retrieval) Generated Images Documents for Web Conversion • Single collection of content • Contains predefined element variations • Run through a design engine • Produces multiple documents of consistent structure • Each may differ in message, data, imagery, & purpose Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  15. 15. Concept: Content & Design Structure Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  16. 16. What Is “Structure”? 1. Content Properties: – Organization – Frequency – Dimensions – Quantity 2. Design Attributes: – Layout – Format Styles • Paragraphs • Characters • Objects – XML Tag/Style Mapping Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  17. 17. Design Automation Principles • A design contains both static and dynamic content • Use Page Masters for static content • Flatten layers used in any page masters • Content is placed in a design according to XML order • An XML element can only be used once in a document Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  18. 18. Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  19. 19. Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  20. 20. Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  21. 21. Raw Text: “The Old Garden Cart” Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  22. 22. DTD: “The Old Garden Cart” Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  23. 23. XML Tagged Text: “The Old Garden Cart” Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  24. 24. Design Structure: a common approach • Intends to automate • Does detailed layout • Uses frames to format • Precludes future automation Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  25. 25. Design Structure: a workable approach • Starts with a Master Text Frame • Creates open layout • Uses styles to format • Insures capability for future automation Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  26. 26. Content set #1 (the initial development set) Subtitle & paragraph counts are key factors: • Subtitle #1: 1 paragraph • Subtitle #2: 3 paragraphs • Subtitle #3: 2 paragraphs Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  27. 27. Content set #2 Subtitles & paragraphs: • Subtitle #1: 1 paragraph • Subtitle #2: 3 paragraphs • Subtitle #3: 2 paragraphs Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  28. 28. Content set #3 Trouble! Subtitles & paragraphs: • Subtitle #1: 3 paragraph • Subtitle #2: 3 paragraphs • Subtitle #3: 1 paragraphs Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  29. 29. DTD - Variation on a Theme Prior three content sets with minor changes will be combined into a single multi-page document Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  30. 30. Front Page Master Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  31. 31. Following Page Master Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  32. 32. Page 1 Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  33. 33. Page 2 Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  34. 34. Page 3 Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  35. 35. Content - Three Poems I Have a Rendezvous with Death Alan Seeger Born June 22, 1888; died July 4, 1916 I have a rendezvous with Death God knows ‘twere better to be deep At some disputed barricade Pillowed in silk and scented down, When Spring comes round with rustling shade Where love throbs out in blissful sleep, And apple blossoms fill the air. Pulse nigh to pulse, and breath to breath, I have a rendezvous with Death Where hushed awakenings are dear… When Spring brings back blue days and fair. But I’ve a rendezvous with Death At midnight in some flaming town, It may be he shall take my hand When Spring trips north again this year, And lead me into his dark land And I to my pledged word am true, And close my eyes and quench my breath; I shall not fail that rendezvous. It may be I shall pass him still. I have a rendezvous with Death On some scarred slope of battered hill, One of the greatest poems written during the First World War. A favorite of President John F. Kennedy. When Spring comes round again this year From Poems by Alan Seeger. And the first meadow flowers appear. Copyright 1916, by Charles Scribner’s Sons. Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  36. 36. Chanson D’Automne Trees Sergeant Joyce Kilmer Paul Verlaine - "Autumn Song" 165th Infantry (69th New York), A.E.F. March 30, 1844 to January 8, 1896 (Born December 6, 1886; killed in action near Ourcy, July 30, 1918) Les sanglots longs I think that I shall never see Des violons A poem lovely as a tree. De l’automne A tree whose hungry mouth is prest Blessent mon coeur Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast; D’une langueur Monotone. A tree that looks at God all day, And lifts her leafy arms to pray; Tout suffocant Et blême, quand A tree that may in Summer wear Sonne l’heure, A nest of robins in her hair; Je me souviens Upon whose bosom snow has lain; Des jours anciens Who intimately lives with rain. Et je pleure; Poems are made by fools like me, Et je m’en vais But only God can make a tree. Au vent mauvais Qui m’emporte Reprinted from Trees and Other Poems, Deçà, delà, By Joyce Kilmer, by permission of George H. Doran Company, Pareil à la publishers. Copyright, 1914. Feuille morte. Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  37. 37. DTD - At First Blush... Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  38. 38. Detailed Definition Potential Decision Point Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  39. 39. “Common Denominator” The Decision: Eliminate the line element to achieve uniformity Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  40. 40. How Is Uniformity Achieved? • By Simplifying • By Finding Commonality Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  41. 41. Poetry Page Layout Page Master with single master text frame Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  42. 42. Page 1 Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  43. 43. Page 2 Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  44. 44. Page 3 Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  45. 45. Raw Data - a delimited file displayed in MS Excel Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  46. 46. DTD for Prepared XML Data Stream Sequence of Events: 1. Raw data import 2. Data cleansing 3. Field additions 4. Field deletions 5. Field reordering 6. Postal sorting 7. XML Export & cleanup 8. Export validation Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  47. 47. Page Layout - one variable side Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  48. 48. Example Mailer Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  49. 49. Page Layout - two variable sides Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  50. 50. Example Mailer (1 of 4) Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  51. 51. Mailers (#’s 2 through 4) Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  52. 52. Concept: Document Design Workflow Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  53. 53. RIT Customer/Printer Workflow ( Source Reference: RIT Cross Media Workflow II, Spring Quarter, 2006 ) Tasks typically performed Tasks typically performed by the customer by the printer Customer Service Project Planning Web Preflighting Page Design Job Planning Web Workflow Trapping Art Text Imposition Scanner Vector Raster RIP Digital Camera Page Layout Film Plate Press Handoff from Customer Contact to Finishing Printer's Customer Service Representative Shipping Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  54. 54. IPA Graphic Workflow, Part 1 (Source Reference: IPA Workflow TEAM. Copyright 2006 IPA. www.ipa.org ) Creative Premedia Proof Design Image Assembly & Client Idea Pre-flight Pre-flight (content & Concept Layout layout) Asset Management Internet Data Capture Color Correction Photo- graphy digital photo Retouching Imagery Database Defined or Mgmt negative Scanning Created Text Copy Raw Color Proofing Created Artwork Typography Media to Variable Digital Data Press Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  55. 55. IPA Graphic Workflow, Part 2 (Source Reference: IPA Workflow TEAM. Copyright 2006 IPA. www.ipa.org ) Prepress Output Trapping & Color Contract Computer Postpress or Fulfill- Distri- Color Manage for Hard Final RIP Press to Plate Converting ment bution Breaks Output Proof Stepping digital Large Computer Format Kiting Final RIP to Plate Printing Stepping Digital Contract Press Soft Proof Contract film Final RIP Proof Plating (analog) from Variable Data Stepping Internet Published Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  56. 56. Content Choreography 1 DATA DIGITAL ASSETS 3 C 2 B A 4 Selected and Selected Digital Asset Prepared Prepared Prepared Digital Assets Source Data XML Streams Digital Assets Data Sources 1. Data is selected from multiple sources 2. Data is merged, cleansed, analyzed, and enhanced to prepare it for ultimate design application 3. Data is grouped by postal code, response optimization strategy, and then converted to XML content streams. A. Digital images and textual content are selected B. Digital images and textual content are groomed and edited to meet design requirements C. Digital images and textual content are grouped to match associated data elements 4. Coordinated XML content streams and digital assets are ready for document design, PDF conversion, and production. Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  57. 57. Content Storage Partitioning & Circulation Content New Raw Materials Backups (local & remote) Receiving Backups & Content Prepared Content Collection (add keywords Retrievals Collection Content & metadata) (Scheduled Backup Cycles) Requested Content Copy Work In Process Projects Under Projects Under Projects Under Projects Under Development Development Development Development Design & Backups & Assembly Projects Under Projects Under Projects Under Projects UnderRetrievals Elements Development Development Development Development Retrieved Finished Goods Projects Production Production Production Ready Ready Ready Completed Completed Projects Projects Projects Completed Project Backups & Project Projects Archive Retrievals Archive Production Production Production (Scheduled Ready Ready Ready Backup Cycles) Projects Projects Projects Print Streams to Production Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  58. 58. Data Acquisition, Preparation, & Storage New Data Raw Materials Backups Submission (local & remote) Receiving Data Submission Repository (Initial Evaluation Evaluated (An initial database important may Backups & Data Submission of the Data Submission be performed here or within the Retrievals Repository Submission) specific project in Work In Process) (Scheduled Backup Cycles) Requested Data Copy Work In Process Projects Under Projects Under Projects Under Projects Under Development Development Development Development Design & Assembly Projects Under Projects Under Projects Under Projects Under Elements Development Development Development Development Retrieved Finished Goods Projects Production Production Production Ready Ready Ready Completed Completed Projects Projects Projects Completed Project Backups & Project Projects Archive Retrievals Archive Production Production Production (Scheduled Ready Ready Ready Backup Cycles) Projects Projects Projects Print Streams to Production Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  59. 59. Solution Design Functional Structure VCP Resolves to Any VCP Application Solution Solution Design Uses a Has a Uses a Owns a Content Source Production Platform Application Purpose End Product Data Digital Printing Marketing Single Document Images (photo & Art) Offset Printing Accounting Reporting Multiple Documents Text (XML) Auxiliary Printers Information Publishing Assembled Document Design Structures Auxiliary Interfaces Target Audience Printed Item(s) Content Characteristics Digital Communications Single Program Email Item(s) Content Topicality Physical Transport Integrated Campaign Web Presentation(s) Published Document(s) Digital Package Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  60. 60. Basic Design Components? • Document Type Definition (DTD) • XML-tagged text &/or data mapped to styles • XML-referenced images • Page master layout • Paragraph, character, & object styles Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  61. 61. Basic Integration Model Basic Model: Content Source: Integrating Element Data Design & Assembly (Transfer medium & Text Element associated tools) Graphics Content Mgt. System Selected Dynamic Data Selected Static Content Database Mgt. System Selected Dynamic Graphics Selected Static Graphics Minimal Tools: FileMaker Pro XML w/XSLT or PERL Adobe InDesign Minimal Skills: Rudimentary Database Elementary XML & optional Basic Adobe InDesign & FileMaker Pro basic XSLT or PERL Proficiencies Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  62. 62. Physical Workflow Design Image Sketch Preparation Concept & Objectives Document Document Design Assembly Content VCP XML Management Document Data Working Prepar- & QA Stream Source Dataset ation PDF Proofing Generation Prepress & Production Imposition Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  63. 63. Conceptual Workflow Objectives Requirements, To & QA, & Exit? Production Inception Document Initial Assembly Design Design Content Image Integration Management Preparation Preparation XML Data Preparation Acquisition Data Preparation Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  64. 64. How Work Is Accomplished Objectives Requirements, To & QA, & Exit? Production Inception Document Initial Assembly Design Design Content Image Integration Management Preparation Preparation XML Data Preparation Acquisition Line Key: Data Expected Interactions Preparation Potential Interactions All lines are bi-directional Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  65. 65. What About Basic Tools? • Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Acrobat, & Bridge • FileMaker Pro or MS Excel • XML & XSLT • Perl or Ruby programing languages • Text editor • XML editor Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  66. 66. Basic VCP Development Environment Design Preparation Integration Graphic Raw Design Text Toolkit select apply Digital Data , Digital Content , XML, XML Images Storage and Design Preparation Editor Connectivity Tool and Application Importing Raw apply Program Data Editor Programming Desktop Database XML (includes SQL) XSLT Perl Ruby Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  67. 67. Are They Easy to Use? • Basic Adobe InDesign, Bridge, & Acrobat • Basic Photoshop & Illustrator • Basic database & file handling • Basic XML & XSLT • Basic Perl or Ruby Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  68. 68. Concept: Planning for Quality & Control Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  69. 69. Setting Objectives - An Overview About? Opportunity or Risk Who? Audience Critical Success Factors Definition Why? Desired Outcomes Enablers How? Methods Operational Inhibitors Objectives What? Means Offsets When? Timing Surprises Where? Locations Business Case Tally Counts: Plus & Minus Cash Flow Value Receipts less Outlays ROI Ratio Actual over Expected Quantified Objectives Payback Range Scaled: High to Low NPV Grouping Statistical Analysis Measurement Trending Statistical Analysis Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  70. 70. Key Planning Questions? • What is the document’s purpose? • What will it accomplish? • Who will get the document? • How will they use it? • What document content will be static? • What document content will be variable? • What data, text, and images are required? • What content preparation will be performed? Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  71. 71. Key Questions (continued) • What will be the document’s dimensions? • What printing capabilities will be needed for production? • Are there any finishing or processing requirements after printing? • What print stock and weight will be needed? Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  72. 72. Potential Design Trade-offs... • Flexibility & variability goals – Design template structure – Content structure • Complexity • Repetition • Size & quantity • Standardization goals • Automation goals – Achieved results – Manual intervention needs • Repeatability/reusability goals • Production capabilities Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  73. 73. Reflection & Reconciliation Business Objectives Do business objectives Audience Do business objectives comprehend available Desired Outcomes comprehend available data? Methods & Means content? Success Measurements Does available data Does available content support business support business objectives? Does the design concept objectives? support business objectives? Design Concept Does the design Business Does the design comprehend the Considerations comprehend the data? Data Considerations content? Content Considerations Does the data Image geometry Does the content support the Data Geometry support the design? layout Geometry design? Available Data Available Content Internal How well does the available Internal External data and the available content External Descriptive integrate with each other? Text Behavioral Imagery Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  74. 74. Implementing Quality Practices Establish Workflows & Procedures Standards Toolsets & Equipment Editorial Practices Measurement Points Process Improvement Device Maintenance Proofing Practices Compliance Reporting Observe Early Identification Tools & Equipment Compliance Behaviors Compliance Verification Communications Outcome Reviews Results Variation Recording (±) Accrued Impact Quantification Evaluate Variance Tracking Data Collection Variances Variance Categorization Data Classification Variance Analysis Statistical Analysis Non-numerical Analysis Solution Identification Documentation & Training Modify & Accredit Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  75. 75. Establishing Traceability Who? Audience Objectives What? Message or Information How? Media Validation When? Schedule & Frequency Extrapolation Where? Geography & Demography Who? Audience Segments Requirements What? Data & Content How? Design Specifications Status Reporting Where? Functional Responsibilities Specification When? Schedule Parameters What? Deliverables & Components Project Plans How? Workflow & Tasks Estimation Where? Task Precedence Accounting Who? Assignments Project Budget When? Duration & Effort Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  76. 76. Establishing Control Work Breakdown Total Accumulated Comprehensive Budgeted or Estimated to Actual: Project Cost Project Status Duration, Effort, Cost Template What? Deliverable Cost Remaining Duration Reported Status Components? Accumulated Effort Accumulated Cost Remaining Duration How? Precedence? Who? Effort? Duration? Rate? Cost? Actuals: Incurred Effort Elapsed Time Incurred Cost Work Breakdown Total Accumulated Comprehensive Budgeted or Estimated to Actual: Project Cost Project Status Duration, Effort, Cost Example Deliverable 1 Deliverable Cost Remaining Duration Reported Status Component 1.1 Accumulated Effort Accumulated Cost Remaining Duration Task 1.1.1 Start to Start Who Effort Duration Rate Cost Actuals: Incurred Effort Elapsed Time Incurred Cost Task 1.1.n Start to Finish Who Effort Duration Rate Cost Actuals: Incurred Effort Elapsed Time Incurred Cost Component 1.2 Accumulated Effort Accumulated Cost Remaining Duration Task 1.2.1 Finish to Finish Who Effort Duration Rate Cost Actuals: Incurred Effort Elapsed Time Incurred Cost Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  77. 77. Mechanics: Key Development Steps The objective of this section is NOT to teach XML, Adobe InDesign, or FileMaker Pro !! Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  78. 78. Development Workflow 1. Initial Design 2. Image Preparation 3. Data Preparation 4. XML Preparation 5. Design Preparation 6. Assembly Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  79. 79. 1. Initial Design • Determine specifications • Determine static content • Identify dynamic content • Sketch the design • Label design elements • Sequence design elements Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  80. 80. Design Geometry (Images, Data, & Text) Document Sketch (one side of a duplex document) <first name> Pre-paid Post Floating text message plus <store location> and Mark <discount offer> on <product> <referenced graphic> Additional static information or message 6" 3" .25 " <postal barcode> <title> <given name> <last name> 3" <address (one line or two lines)> <city>, <state> <campaign barcode> .5 " <zip code> 9" Text in angle brackets " < > " is variable content from an XML content stream Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  81. 81. 2. Image Preparation • Copy Original • Resolve Color Space • Resolve Problems & Enhance • Crop & Size • Apply Any Filters • Store as Appropriate 3” x 3” Image File Type • Move to Staging Area Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  82. 82. 3. Data Preparation • Import to Database Are there alternatives? • Import to Spreadsheet • Cleanse data fields - Cleanse & Modify • Create needed fields - Export to Tab-delimited File - Convert to XML Programmatically • Load new fields • Convert Delimited File to XML Programmatically • Sort in postal order - Modify & Enhance XML File Programmatically or with XSLT • Select data fields and • Modify & Enhance Delimited place in flow order File programmatically - Convert Delimited File to XML • Perform XML export Programmatically Potential Issue: Progressively moving away from WYSIWYG Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved. results in doing more work!
  83. 83. Example... A Direct XML Export from a Spreadsheet ISSUES: 1. 128 rows before data starts 2. Column names are not tag names 3. Individual data elements are not tagged with usable XML 4. Superfluous XML throughout Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  84. 84. Create Empty Database Table for Import select the “fields” button If no appropriate table exists: Select “File > Define > Database” from the menu bar to add new Table enter the new field name choose a field type ✔ click the “create” button Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  85. 85. Database Import of Spreadsheet 1. Select the Customer Worksheet these aren’t needed in the design 2. Select the desired columns Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  86. 86. Data Cleanup: 1. Case is the most obvious issue 2. Hidden white space is a potential issue 3. Spelling could be an issue 4. Duplicate records could be another issue 5. Incorrect data could be a hidden problem 6. Then there’s the question of multiple people at the same address Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  87. 87. Data Enhancement: ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Based on our design we added fields… Why? 1. An XML element can only be used ONCE in a document, and must be in SEQUENCE 2. “offer”, “image”, & “code” elements didn’t exist in the original data 3. “name” & “location” were needed twice in the design Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  88. 88. Scripting: Select “Scripts > ScriptMaker” An existing script may be used “ is”, or... as - Create a new script - Edit an existing script PURPOSE: Populate or edit selected columns Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  89. 89. Postal Sort Last step before XML Export: click to perform sort Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  90. 90. 4. XML Preparation Select “File > Export Records” from the menu bar Select the columns to be exported from the list Set order of selected columns to meet design requirements Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  91. 91. Obvious Export Format Selection FMPXMLRESULT Note: Little difference than exporting directly from a spreadsheet Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  92. 92. Better Selection: FMPDSORESULT - Tag names match the database column names - Column elements are imbedded bet ween Row elements This will be much easier to use! Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  93. 93. DTD - Validation before Integration Quality Assurance: ✓ Well Formed? ✓ Valid? Reduce Work! Detect problems prior to integrating Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  94. 94. XML Touchup Steps 1. Insert line breaks (CR, Approaches: LF, or CRLF) between • Text Editor: XML elements - Delete 2. Delete unneeded XML - Search & Replace non-repeating content • XSLT 3. Delete unneeded XML repeating content • Programmatically: - Perl 4. Delete extra space - Ruby 5. Create attributes for - Other languages image references Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  95. 95. XML Touchup Example Highlight Key: Deletion Editing Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  96. 96. Touchup Results... • All unneeded XML and leading space removed • Editing of selected elements completed • XML is ready for Adobe InDesign import The cleaner the XML, the more trouble-free the import processing Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  97. 97. 5. Design Preparation • Create a new document • Establish or adjust master text frame • Place static content in page masters • Flatten page masters if layered • Display “Structure Pane”, “Frames”, and “Tag Panel” in InDesign • Build Styles using XML tag names • Map Styles to XML Tags Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  98. 98. Create Target Document Select “File > New > Document” • Selections will vary according to design needs • Key consideration here is to get workable page masters • If problems are encountered later, use: - “File > Document Setup” - “Layout > Margins and Columns” Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  99. 99. Set Up Page Master Bleed Text Frame Page Edge Text Frame • Note that “Page Margins” are not set • All Static Content placed on Page Master • Facilitate content flow with “Text Threads” between frames • If content is “Layered”, flatten it when finished Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  100. 100. 6. Component Assembly • Validate XML Prior to InDesign import • Import XML First XML Import • Edit XML, insert Cloned Text InDesign Story Editor • Set up anchored graphic InDesign Object Menu & Style Panel frames & object styles • Set up paragraph & character InDesign Style Panel styles for data & cloned text • Map XML tags to styles InDesign Tag Panel • Re-import XML and test Second XML Import • If problems, correct and Within & outside of InDesign reimport XML Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  101. 101. First XML Import Select “import options” and “merge content” Leave all options unchecked Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  102. 102. Preparation for Integration 1. Only the first <row> is Trash needed Can 2. Select the second <row> 3. Hold the Shift Key First <row> 4. Select the last <row> 5. Click the “Trash Can” 6. Select the first <row> icon and drag it to the first page spread 7. Drag first <row> to the first Page Spread; Not the Page Master Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  103. 103. Formatting: Story Editor & Style Editor Colored XML tag pair (Text between tag pairs is XML content) Anchored object for graphic image Applied Paragraphs (Text inserted outside the tags is “cloned text” that repeats on each page) Anchored text frame for barcode New page starts at “name” tag per paragraph style (Select “Keep” option in the Paragraph Style panel to set pagination - ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY to AUTOFLOW Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved. XML PAGE GENERATION)
  104. 104. Second XML Import Select “import options” and “merge content” Check these three options If differences bet ween 1st & 2nd imports, check this option also Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  105. 105. After the Second Import... 1. Select <dataroot> and drag it to first page spread Root Element 2. If no show, place Text Tool on page and select Story Editor 3. Delete blank line at very top and exit Story Editor 4. Click the pointer on the loaded “out port” on first page spread 5. Drag a new page spread from Page Master 6. Shift-Click on new page to “autoflow” XML to succeeding pages Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  106. 106. Resulting Mailers... You’ve see these before! Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  107. 107. Output: Print Stream Preparation Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  108. 108. Pre-Print Sequence 1. Colorspace Conversion 2. PDF Settings 3. PDF Proof & Production Setup 4. PDF Page Spread Edits Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  109. 109. Colorspace Conversion Convert from workspace to destination space • Determine destination and convert colors: - Digital Press: Convert to CMYK - Digital Printer (laser or inkjet): Factory recommendation or CMYK - Web: Convert to Web RGB or sRGB (may not be necessary) • Color Management “By the Numbers” – Compare converted image color measurements to corrected image measurements - If unsatisfactory, rework and correct Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  110. 110. PDF Settings • Press Quality Adobe PDF Presets may • Compression: No be satisfactory • Down sample: No • Crop Image to Frame Use InDesign “Export to • No Printer Marks PDF” to Select, Edit, or • Use Document Bleed Create Presets • Output: CMYK no color conversion • No Password Let Your Production Device Be Your Guide • Designate Acrobat Compatibility Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  111. 111. PDF Proof & Production Setup Final color verification prior to production steps • PDF Generation: – Create a Postscript file of the document(s) – Generate PDF from Postscript file using Acrobat Distiller Proof Setup – Measure results and compare with color conversion measurements (If unsatisfactory, correct) • Production PDF Generation – Use Distiller & same Postscript file to create destination PDF – Proof print production PDF & compare measurements with the conversion results (Correct if unsatisfactory, else obtain proof sign-offs) • Perform page spread edits on production PDF Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  112. 112. PDF Page Spread Edits • Page spreads generated by InDesign during XML auto-flow processing may contain extra blank page spreads (usually at the end) • Do Not Delete Extra Page Spreads within InDesign !! – May cause lost page spreads – May result in out-of-synch duplex page spreads • Make final corrections directly to production PDF Print Stream prior to RIP handoff – Always start at file end and work backward Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  113. 113. PDF Print Stream Edit Example #1 • Stream of single pages Variable Content First page Page • One side printed, blank Variable underside Content Page • All pages contain Variable Content variable content Page • All may contain some Variable Content Page Last complete page repeating static content • Stream may end with Blank Page one or more empty pages Blank Page • Delete empty pages Last empty page: Blank Page - Start deletions here - Work backwards Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  114. 114. PDF Print Stream Edit Example #2 • Stream of single pages Static Content Page First page static • Both sides printed Variable • One side contains variable Content Start variable pages Page content Note: Variable This arrangement is totally • The other side contains only Content dependent on capabilities Page static content of the RIP being used Variable • Each static side will be Content Page Last complete page replicated from first page • Each variable side may also Blank Page contain some repeating static content Blank Page • Stream may end with one or more empty pages Last empty page: • Delete empty pages Blank Page - Start deletions here - Work backwards Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  115. 115. PDF Print Stream Edit Example #3 • Alternating static (“A”) & variable Static (“B”) page types Content First static page Page A • Duplex printing Variable Static • Each variable side may also Content Content Page B Page A contain repeating static content Variable Static • Both page types (“A” & “B”) may Content Content end with one or more trailing Page B Page A blank pages Variable Static Content Content • To start print with type “A” Page B Page A simply delete blank pages (the Variable Static page types are already paired) Content Content • To start print with type “B”: Page B Page A – Remove trailing blank pages Variable Remove next Content Blank Page Note: To start printing – Move first static page to the Page B A with variable, replace end of the static column to this position by moving Blank Page first static page here create variable/static pairs B Start blank removal here Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  116. 116. PDF Print Stream Edit Example #4 • Mix of variable & static content on Blank Page Remove Last !! both page types (“A” & “B”) A • Each variable content instance (a Variable Variable Content rows in row or record) populates both Content Page B Content Page A page pairs page types as a synchronized pair Variable Variable • Duplex printing Content Content Page B Page A • Both page types (static & variable) Variable Variable may end with one or more trailing Content Content blank pages Page B Page A • The right-most column of pages Variable Variable (type “A”) will probably start with Content Page B Content Page A a blank Blank Page Blank Page Remove next: • To maintain synchronized page B A First “A”, then “B” pairs, remove the blanks alternately starting with the last Blank Page type “A”, then “B”, then “A”, etc. B Start blank removal here Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.
  117. 117. Questions or Comments? Copyright © Nick D. Barzelay, 2010. All rights reserved.

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