The effectiveness of remedial
massage therapy in dealing with
muscular issues in active adults.
James Nicholas Laverty
Nat...
Background
• Massage therapy has been used as an aid to athletes for
many years in a variety of facets
• Massage therapy h...
• Anecdotal evidence supports the purported benefits of
massage therapy
• Previous research has investigated the effect of...
Research question

How effective is the use of remedial
massage in dealing with muscular
complaints in active individuals,...
Methods
• The survey was distributed to 85 people online via Survey
monkey and promoted through my personal and work Faceb...
Results
•
•
•
•

Participants were aged from 18 to 66
51% were aged between 25 to 34
22 were men, and 25 were female
Data ...
• There was a significant negative correlation
between the frequency of massage therapy and
age (r(47)=-.463, p<0.01).
• T...
Effectiveness of massage therapy
4

3

16

18

8
13

16
22

22
22

21
22

22

19

2

3
1

15
10

0
Recovery

8

0
Preventi...
Complimentary aids
% of respondents
Anti inflammatory medication

Anti inflammatory gel
Heat pack
Stretching
Self massage
...
Other health professionals consulted
% of participants

None
Bowen therapist
Naturopath
Chinese medicine
Acupuncturist
Ost...
• 60% used massage therapy only when needed
• 44% exercise at least 6 days a week
• 75% exercise for 60 or more minutes pe...
Discussion
• Remedial massage could be:
– Predominately used when needed
– Used more frequently in those aged 25-34
– Ofte...
• Limited specific research has been conducted
at this point in time
• Further research into:
– Different massage techniqu...
Conclusion
• From these results it could be concluded that remedial
massage is:
– Predominately used when needed, rather t...
Acknowledgements

Thank you to Nick Ball, University
of Canberra, the staff at Pivotal
massage and the survey
participants...
References
1.

2.

3.

4.

Hemmings B, Smith M, Graydon J et al. Effects of
massage on physiological restoration, perceive...
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The effectiveness of remedial massage therapy in dealing with muscular issues in active adults.

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The effectiveness of remedial massage therapy in dealing with muscular issues in active adults.

  1. 1. The effectiveness of remedial massage therapy in dealing with muscular issues in active adults. James Nicholas Laverty National Institute of Sport Studies, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra and Pivotal Massage. jlaverty@live.com.au
  2. 2. Background • Massage therapy has been used as an aid to athletes for many years in a variety of facets • Massage therapy has been associated with: – – – – – – – Decreased blood pressure and heart rate Improved stretching of tendons and connective tissue(1) Decreasing muscle tension and spasming(1) Increased lactate removal Increased parasympathetic activity (2) Decrease in pain (2) Decrease in anxiety (2) • Scientifically some of the benefits are not proven • However, it is still strongly held belief that massage has a significant therapeutic benefit(3)
  3. 3. • Anecdotal evidence supports the purported benefits of massage therapy • Previous research has investigated the effect of massage on: – Recovery – Performance improvement • pre- and post-event • specific sport applications – Rehabilitation – Reduction in injury risk • Evidence to support or refute the effects of massage on sports performance is insufficient to make definitive statements until further research has been conducted(4)
  4. 4. Research question How effective is the use of remedial massage in dealing with muscular complaints in active individuals, and what other health professionals and aids are used?
  5. 5. Methods • The survey was distributed to 85 people online via Survey monkey and promoted through my personal and work Facebook pages. • 47 anonymous responses were recorded. • All respondents were all involved in regular exercise and had remedial massage at least twice before • Participants were asked a series of questions relating to: – – – – – – use of massage therapy other health professionals consulted other aids to deal with muscular issues number and frequency of sports played occupation time spent working/studying
  6. 6. Results • • • • Participants were aged from 18 to 66 51% were aged between 25 to 34 22 were men, and 25 were female Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS, standard version 21).
  7. 7. • There was a significant negative correlation between the frequency of massage therapy and age (r(47)=-.463, p<0.01). • There were no significant correlations (p> 0.05) between the frequency of massage therapy and: – – – – – Hours of work/study per week Days per week exercised Length of each exercise session Level of participation in sport Number of sports played per week
  8. 8. Effectiveness of massage therapy 4 3 16 18 8 13 16 22 22 22 21 22 22 19 2 3 1 15 10 0 Recovery 8 0 Prevention of injury 3 0 Maintenance Disagree Neither Preparation Agree Improving performace Strongly agree Increasing ROM
  9. 9. Complimentary aids % of respondents Anti inflammatory medication Anti inflammatory gel Heat pack Stretching Self massage Joint brace Rigid taping Kinesio tape Foam roller Compressive garments None 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90
  10. 10. Other health professionals consulted % of participants None Bowen therapist Naturopath Chinese medicine Acupuncturist Osteopath Doctor Chiropractor Physiotherapist 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80
  11. 11. • 60% used massage therapy only when needed • 44% exercise at least 6 days a week • 75% exercise for 60 or more minutes per session • Participants level of sport were 29% social, 45% amateur and 25% semi professional
  12. 12. Discussion • Remedial massage could be: – Predominately used when needed – Used more frequently in those aged 25-34 – Often used in combination with physiotherapy and complimentary aids – Rated to be most effective at increasing ROM • There is much discussion to the efficacy of the current literature on the benefits of massage therapy • In previous studies there was a lack of consistency in: – – – – Massage therapy techniques used Time periods in which massage was utilised Soft tissue therapists used Understanding of the mechanics of massage therapy
  13. 13. • Limited specific research has been conducted at this point in time • Further research into: – Different massage techniques and their use – More applicable outcome measures – In depth studies
  14. 14. Conclusion • From these results it could be concluded that remedial massage is: – Predominately used when needed, rather than part of a regular training regime – Used less in the ageing population – Most common in active people between 25-34 – Often used in combination with physiotherapy and complimentary aids • Has no significant correlation with any other measured criteria (eg. Hours of work/study, training frequency etc.) • Further research is needed to verify the benefits and practical applications
  15. 15. Acknowledgements Thank you to Nick Ball, University of Canberra, the staff at Pivotal massage and the survey participants.
  16. 16. References 1. 2. 3. 4. Hemmings B, Smith M, Graydon J et al. Effects of massage on physiological restoration, perceived recovery, and repeated sports performance. British Journal of Sports Medicine 2000; 34:109-115. Weerapong P, Hume PA and Kolt GS. The mechanisms of massage and effects on performance, muscle recovery and injury prevention. Sports Medicine 2005; 35(3):235356. Dinsdale N. Evidence-based massage: Part 1. SportEX Dynamics 2009; 22:12-17. Moraska A. Sports massage: A comprehensive review. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2005; 45:370-380.

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