Rankings determination- Golf and Tennis presentation
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Rankings determination- Golf and Tennis presentation Rankings determination- Golf and Tennis presentation Presentation Transcript

  • An Overview of Tennis and Golf World Ranking Systems (Men’s and Women’s)
  • A sports ranking classification system is a system that analyzes the results of sports matches to provide rankings for players or teams of a particular league or competition. Rankings are arranged in an ordinal fashion, with the highest rank person or team earning the #1 rank, the second highest the #2 rank, and so on.
  •  In some sports, like tennis and golf, the ranking system is used to determine qualification for entry and seeding in tournaments.  In other sports, like American college basketball and football, the ranking system is used to determine opportunities to participate in post-season competitions, and also seeding and home-team advantage within the tournament.
  • The system of determining national and international rankings for tennis and golf have developed over a number of years to deal with changes in the light of conflicts between amateur and professional tours, the commercial viability of tournaments and prize money allocation.
  •  Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) formed in 1972 as a kind of union for male players, and a year later introduced its own computerized ranking system, which is recognized today as the standard “official” system.  The Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) formed in 1973 and soon created a similar ranking system based on a multi-tiered structure of tournaments.
  • Since the 70s, there have been numerous changes to both ranking systems, as oversights were made apparent and changes made to account for the massive growth in tennis globally and commercially.
  • The four Grand Slams (controlled by the ITF) are worth the most ranking points (winners get 2000 points), followed by the ATP World Tour events, split into the ATP World Tour Finals (1100-1500 points), the nine ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournaments (1000 points).  The eleven ATP World Tour 500 series competitions (500 points).  The forty ATP World Tour 250 series competitions (250 points).  Next are the ATP Challenger (75-125 points) and then ITF Futures tournaments (17-33 points). 
  • Rankings are determined by taking the total from the best 18 tournaments (19 if a player qualifies for the Masters’ Cup) from which the player earned the most points from the previous 52 weeks.
  • Points by Round Futures ATP World Tour 250 Challengers ATP World Tour 500 Masters 1000 Grand Slam Winner 35 125 250 500 1000 2000 Finals 20 75 150 300 600 1200 Semifinals 10 45 90 180 360 720 Quarterfinals 4 25 45 90 180 360 Round of 16 1 10 20 45 90 180 Round of 32 12 20 45 90 Round of 64 10 25 45 10 10 16 25 Round of 128 Qualifying 5 5 10
  • Singles Playoff Round Playoff Round 1st Round Loss 1st Round 1st Round Quarterfinals Quarterfinals Semifinals Semifinals Finals Finals Finals Win per Match Loss per Match Team Bonus Performance Bonus Wins Cumulative Playoff Round 5 Loss per Match Team Bonus Wins Cumulative 10 1st Round Loss 10 10 1st Round 10 40 40 65 65 70 70 75 40 80 145 210 280 350 425 500 75 75 Doubles Win per Match 125 625 50 50 Quaterfinals 80 130 Semifinals 90 220 Finals 95 315 Winners 95 35 350
  •  The WTA structure also looked different before and after 2009.  Below the Grand Slam events, the women’s tour used to comprise Tier I and II events, which are now divided into three classes of Premier event, and Tier III and IV events, which are now called International tournaments.
  • Like the ATP, it prioritizes and offers most points for its four Grand Slam events (winners get 2000 points), but has a different system of mandatory and optional events below this.  The top women must play four of its Premier Mandatory tournaments (1000 points), as well as the end-of-season Tour Championships (1500 points) and at least two of the Premier 5 tournaments (900 points).  They make up their remaining points from a choice of ten Premier tournaments (470 points) and 31 International (280 points) tournaments. Below this are the numerous smaller ITF tournaments (12-150 points). 
  • Points by Round Winner Finals Semifinals Quarterfin als Round of 16 Round of 32 Round of 64 Round of 128 Qualifier Round Robin Match Round Robin Win ITF Circuit Events International Events Premier 600,700 Premier 5 Tournament of WTA Champions Championships Majors Premier Mandatory 150 110 280 200 470 320 900 620 1000 700 375 255 1500 1050 2000 1400 80 130 200 395 450 180 690 900 40 70 120 225 250 500 20 30 60 125 140 280 1 15 40 70 80 160 1 1 1 50 100 5 5 30 60 6 10 12 30 25 70 35 160
  •  Initially, the rankings were calculated by a total point score over a three-year period, with a system that added more weight to recent results.  In 1989, this system was replaced by one that better rewarded quality over quantity, and did not in effect discriminate against older golfers who tended to play fewer tournaments.
  • Alongside the four Majors (winners get 100 points), are the World Golf Championship (WGC) tournaments (avg. 70-80 points) and regular tour events.  Of the leading nine professional tours, the PGA and European tours offer the most points (minimum 24 points).  Next is the Japan Golf Tour and the PGA Tour of Australasia (16 points).  Then Sunshine, Asian and Nationwide Tours (14 points).  And lastly, Challenge Tour (12 points) and the Canadian Tour (6 points). 
  • Total Ranking with Points Canadian Tour Challenge Tour Asian/Sunshine/Web.com Japan/Australasia Asian Tour PGA/European BMW Championship Players Championship Major Championships 1 6 12 14 16 20 24 64 80 100 2 3.6 7.2 8.4 9.6 12 14.4 38.4 48 60 3 2.4 4.8 5.6 6.4 8 9.6 25.6 32 40 4 1.8 3.6 4.2 4.8 6 7.2 19.2 24 30 5 1.44 2.88 3.36 3.84 4.8 5.76 15.36 19.2 24 6 1.2 2.4 2.8 3.2 4 4.8 12.8 16 20 7 2.16 2.52 2.88 3.6 4.32 11.52 14.4 18 8 1.92 2.24 2.56 3.2 3.84 10.24 12.8 16 9 1.8 2.1 2.4 3 3.6 9.6 12 15 10 1.68 1.96 2.24 2.8 3.36 8.96 11.2 14 11 1.56 1.82 2.08 2.6 3.21 8.32 10.4 13 12 1.44 1.68 1.92 2.4 2.88 7.68 9.6 12 13 1.32 1.56 1.76 2.2 2.64 7.04 8.8 11 14 1.2 1.44 1.6 2 2.4 6.4 8 10 15 1.32 1.52 1.9 2.28 6.08 7.6 9.5 16 1.2 1.44 1.8 2.16 5.76 7.2 9 17 1.36 1.7 2.04 5.44 6.8 8.5 18 1.28 1.6 1.92 5.12 6.4 8 19 1.2 1.5 1.8 4.8 6 7.5 1.4 1.68 4.48 5.6 7 20
  •  An official ranking system for women’s golf was devised in 2004 at the World Congress of Women’s Golf, but was not instigated until 2006.  The system is similar to the men’s, in that a player’s average score over a two-year period is considered, with most recent tournaments being more heavily weighted.
  • Total Ranking with Points Future Tour 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 12 7.2 4.8 3.6 2.88 2.4 2.16 1.92 1.8 1.68 1.56 1.44 1.32 1.2 Australian LPGA Korea LPGA 14 8.4 5.6 4.2 3.36 2.8 2.52 2.24 2.1 1.96 1.82 1.68 1.56 1.44 1.32 1.2 LPGA of Japan 16 9.6 6.4 4.8 3.84 3.2 2.88 2.56 2.4 2.24 2.08 1.92 1.76 1.6 1.52 1.44 1.36 1.28 1.2 20 12 8 6 4.8 4 3.6 3.2 3 2.8 2.6 2.4 2.2 2 1.9 1.8 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.4 Ladies European Tour LPGA Tour 24 14.4 9.6 7.2 5.76 4.8 4.32 3.84 3.6 3.36 3.21 2.88 2.64 2.4 2.28 2.16 2.04 1.92 1.8 1.68 Major Championships 60 30 28.5 26 24.5 23 21.5 20 18.5 17 15.5 14 12.5 11 9.5 8 6.5 5 3.5 2 100 60 40 30 24 20 18 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9.5 9 8.5 8 7.5 7
  • Overall, professional tennis players and golfers recognize the value of the ranking system, and are always at the forefront of changes made to their respective systems.  Governing bodies consult players when deciding on potential changes, and are open to suggestions to ensure a suitable balance between fairness and striving to maximize growth in their sports. 