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Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
Spain
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Spain

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International Cuisine. …

International Cuisine.
>history
>religion
>foods

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  • 1. • the country is located on the Iberian peninsula and is therefore almost entirely surrounded by the waters. Naturally, due to this fortunate location, seafood forms one of the pillars of Spain's gastronomy and categorizes the country as having a Mediterranean diet. • The rest of Spain is a diverse
  • 2. • Over the centuries, Spanish cuisine has been influenced by many other cultures, both invaders and visitors, as well as from its colonies. • 1100 B.C. – The Phoenicians arrived in the South, and established a colony called Gádir, the modern day Cádiz. This became an important trading center. The Phoenicians stayed for centuries, establishing more colonies in what is today Huelva and Malaga. • In 218 B.C., the Romans arrived at the Iberian Peninsula. It was then that the Romanization of the Peninsula began and what we could consider the start of the history of Spain as a nation. The Romans
  • 3. • In 711 A.D., the Moors crossed the Straight of Gibraltar from Africa and invaded the Peninsula. They quickly established themselves in South and Central Spain and they flourished for many centuries. The Moors brought with them advanced agricultural technology, rich spices, new fruits and vegetables. • In 1492, with the discovery of the New World came revolutionary changes to Spanish cuisine, as well as the rest of Europe. The
  • 4. • Phoenicians left their sauces, the Greeks introduced Spain to the wonders of olive oil, and Romans, Carthaginians, and Jews integrated elements of their own cooking into that of Spain. However it was the Moors who, during their centuries of reign, most impacted Spanish gastronomy.
  • 5. • the discovery of the Americas with Christopher Columbus' famous 1492 voyage resulted in the addition of more important elements to the history of Spanish food. • 1520- foods from the new lands arrived in Spain and immediately began to integrate themselves into the Spanish diet. Amongst the
  • 6. • 587-Spain was once all catholic as the Roman Catholics were their influences. • 711- there was an arab raiding party and by 718 most of the muslims dominated the iberian peninsula. They established an islamic rule that ended in 1492. by then, the number of muslims increased
  • 7. • 1147- Spain was once again taken over by the Muslims. Muslims treated the Spaniards and the Jews so badly forcing them with choices of death, conversion, or emigration. • The Christianity and Catholic Church help shape the reestablishment of European rule over Iberia (Spain, Portugal, Andorra, and Gibraltar) • 1931- after trying for centuries to
  • 8. • A significant portion of Spanish cuisine derives from the Roman, Jewish, and Andalusian traditions.  •  The Moorish people were a strong influence in Spain for many centuries. However, pork is popular and for centuries eating pork was also a statement of Christian ethnicity or "cleanliness of blood", because it was not eaten by Jews or Muslims.  • The essential ingredient for real Spanish cooking is olive oil, as Spain produces 44% of the world's olives. However, butter or lard are also important, especially in the north.
  • 9. • As is true in many countries, the cuisines of Spain differ widely from one region to another, even though they all share certain common characteristics, which include: >The use of olive oil as a cooking ingredient in items such as fritters. It is also used raw. >The use of sofrito to start the preparation of many dishes. >The use of garlic and onions as major ingredients. >The custom of drinking wine during meals. >Serving bread with the vast majority of meals.
  • 10. 4 MEALS •El Desayuno – Breakfast •La Comida – Lunch •La Merienda - Snack •La Cena – Dinner
  • 11. Unique Ingredients
  • 12. • Paprika • Cayenne • Garlic • Saffron
  • 13. • Cinnamon • Cloves • Nutmeg • Vanilla
  • 14. • Parsley • Mint • Basil • Rosemary • Thyme
  • 15. • Sage • Oregano • Bay Leaf • Tarragon
  • 16. P aella  Paella is the typical rice meal of Valencia, and it originates from the 19th century. Paella comes in many varieties, including mixed paella, Valencian paella, seafood paella, vegetarian paella. Its main ingredients are white rice, green vegetables and, depending on the paella, some meat (duck, chicken or rabbit) or seafood (shrimp, lobster, mussels). 
  • 17. T apas When eating tapas, you can usually choose from an exquisite variety of delicious appetizers or snacks. There are cold tapas (olives, cheeses, vegetables, smoked salmon) and warm tapas (fried shrimps, backed squid), which have formed their own cuisine within the Spanish Then you can combine them according to your taste and create the perfect and complete tapas plate.   
  • 18. T ortilla E spaniola This is definitely the most famous Spanish omlette. It may also be called Tortilla de Patata. It is often served as an appetizer, however many people eat it at lunch as well. This omlette can also be served in little portions as tapas. Some Spaniards even put it on bread and eat it as a sandwich. It is made of potatoes, onions and eggs that are fried in a pan with a little bit of olive oil. 
  • 19. Chorizo Chorizo is a hard sausage used in many different meals in Spanish cuisine. You may find it in tapas and sandwiches, and can be eaten without any further cooking. It has a rich red color due to the smoked red peppers from which it is made.  
  • 20. Gazpacho is the name for the cold tomato soup that is one of the most refreshing Spanish appetizers. You can even try making it yourself, as it is not that difficult to make. You need to blend fresh tomatoes, green peppers, garlic, cucumbers, onions, vinegar, tarragon, sugar and water. Then you have to let is stand covered overnight. Serve it with croutons, cucumber and avocado.
  • 21. Chuletillas de cordero Lamb chops mixed with garlic and salt are typical for the Castilla region. Generally, they are served hot with fried or grilled potatoes. 
  • 22. E spanicas de catalana  Espanicas de catalana (Spinach with pine nuts) is a very healthy salad made of spinach, pine nuts, raisins, olive oil, garlic and pieces of stale white bread. 
  • 23. P ulpo a la Gallega Pulpo a la Gallega is a typical meal in Galicia. It is made of octopus, that is first boiled and later flavored with paprika, rock salt and olive oil. This dish might not be for every taste, because of the texture of the octopus. This dish can be also served with grilled potatoes and other vegetables, which makes it more attractive to the less adventurous.  
  • 24. P atatas B ravas Often served as tapas, this dish is made of white potatoes cut into irregular shapes, fried in oil and served with spicy hot tomato sauce. This dish often comes with a glass of wine or orujo.

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