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The renaissance and shakespeare
 

The renaissance and shakespeare

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    The renaissance and shakespeare The renaissance and shakespeare Presentation Transcript

    • Our revised scheduleContact info:*please include your full name and your class in emails*please call or text before coming overBook report: Look at your revised schedule to see whatchapters and questions are due on weeks 6, 9 & 13 for your book report project.
    • Warm-up: sonnet 116
    • Match the lines of sonnet 116 with their summarized versions1. Let me not to the marriage of true a. Oh no! it is a lighthouse minds b. Love is the guiding north star to every2. Admit impediments. Love is not love lost ship,3. Which alters when it alteration finds, c. Which changes when it finds a change in circumstances,4. Or bends with the remover to remove: d. That sees storms but it never shaken;5. O no! it is an ever-fixed mark e. Whose value cannot be calculated,6. That looks on tempests and is never although its altitude can be measured. shaken; f. Or bends from its firm stand even when a7. It is the star to every wandering bark, lover is unfaithful:8. Whose worths unknown, although his g. Let me not declare any reasons why two height be taken. h. True-minded people should not be married. Love is not love Mabillard, Amanda. An Analysis of Shakespeares Sonnet 116. Shakespeare Online. 2000. (day/month/year you accessed the information) < http://www.shakespeare-online.com/sonnets/116detail.html >.
    • 9. Loves not Times fool, though rosy lips i. Love does not alter with hours and and cheeks weeks,10. Within his bending sickles compass j. Then I recant all that I have written, and come: no man has ever [truly] loved.11. Love alters not with his brief hours k. Comes within the compass of his sickle. and weeks, l. But, rather, it endures until the last day12. But bears it out even to the edge of of life. doom. m. Love is not at the mercy of Time,13. If this be error and upon me proved, though physical beauty14. I never writ, nor no man ever loved. n. If I am proved wrong about these thoughts on love
    • 1. Let me not to the marriage of true g. Let me not declare any reasons why two minds h. True-minded people should not be2. Admit impediments. Love is not love married. Love is not love3. Which alters when it alteration finds, c. Which changes when it finds a change in circumstances,4. Or bends with the remover to remove: f. Or bends from its firm stand even when a5. O no! it is an ever-fixed mark lover is unfaithful:6. That looks on tempests and is never a. Oh no! it is a lighthouse shaken; d. That sees storms but it never shaken;7. It is the star to every wandering bark, b. Love is the guiding north star to every8. Whose worths unknown, although his lost ship, height be taken. e. Whose value cannot be calculated, although its altitude can be measured.
    • 9. Loves not Times fool, though rosy lips m. Love is not at the mercy of Time, and cheeks though physical beauty10. Within his bending sickles compass k. Comes within the compass of his sickle. come: i. Love does not alter with hours and11. Love alters not with his brief hours weeks, and weeks, l. But, rather, it endures until the last day12. But bears it out even to the edge of of life. doom. n. If I am proved wrong about these13. If this be error and upon me proved, thoughts on love14. I never writ, nor no man ever loved. j. Then I recant all that I have written, and no man has ever [truly] loved.
    • • What is the theme or main idea of this sonnet?• What does Shakespeare compare love to?• Do you agree with the comparisons?• How would you describe love? What is love like?*These types of descriptions through comparison are types of figurative language called metaphors and similes.
    • • Metaphor: a figure of speech comparing things that are basically unalike to make the reader see them as similar in some waye.g. The thief was a fox. The boy remained a rock for his family during the tragedy. O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! (from ‘Romeo & Juliet)• Simile: a comparison of things that are basically unalike by using the words like, as, as if, than, such as, or resembles; most similes begin with like or ase.g. The unkind words struck like a knife in the girls heart. She eats like a bird.Sunshine and rain at once; her smiles and tears were like (from ‘King Lear’)
    • The Renaissance 1485-1660Noteson pg. 35
    • Two Time Periods:•The Elizabethan Period: the reign of Elizabeth I, 1586-1603•Jacobean Period: he reign of James I of England, 1603-1625Content:•world view shifts from religion and after life to one stressingthe human life on earth•popular theme: development of human potential•popular theme: many aspects of love explored•unrequited love•constant love•timeless love•courtly love•love subject to change
    • • Style/Genres:• poetry – the sonnet• drama – written in verse – supported by royalty – tragedies, comedies, histories• Effect:• commoners welcomed at some play productions (like ones at the Globe) while conservatives try to close the theaters on grounds that they promote brazen behaviors
    • • Historical Context:• War of Roses ends in 1485 and political stability arrives• Printing press helps stabilize English as a language and allows more people to read a variety of literature• Economy changes from farm-based to one of international trade• A Sampling of Key Literature & Authors:• William Shakespeare• Thomas Wyatt• Ben Jonson• Cavalier Poets• Metaphysical Poets
    • Queen Elizabeth I
    • The Globe Theatre
    • The Globe Galleries
    • Inside the Globe
    • The Globe Theatre• The Globe Theatre normally refers to one of three theatres in London associated with William Shakespeare.• The original Globe Theatre, built in 1599 by the playing company to which Shakespeare belonged, and destroyed by fire in 1613.• The rebuilt Globe Theatre built in 1614, closed in 1642, and demolished in 1644.• A modern reconstruction of the original Globe, named Shakespeares Globe Theatre, opened in 1997.
    • Group 1: William Shakespeare
    • The Facts... Born in 1564 Pg. 36- 1582 – marries Anne Hathaway how many 3 children – Susanna, Judith, Hamnet  154 sonnets & a few poems you blanks can Writes in 16th & 17th century English  Probably 35 plays fill in? Probably the most famous English writer EVER
    • Shakespeare wrote in three genres: Comedy Tragedy History+Sonnets
    • • Comedy – Often romantic – Characters resolve their problems – Usually ends with a wedding – Tragicomedy—looks like disaster, but ends well• History – Interpreted events from the past – Built nationalism – Often commented on current politics and leaders• Tragedy—different types – Noble hero falls due to a flaw – Wronged hero falls seeking revenge – Evil “hero” falls while doing evil
    • Shakespeare’s plays take place in: Denmark Italy Scotland Many locations Troy England Egypt France Unknown Greece islands
    • Shakespeare deals with issues we still deal with! Gender Religion Teenage love Sexuality Parent/child Racism disputes Honor Politics War & fighting Revenge Death
    • Romeo and Juliet
    • A Midsummer Night’s Dream
    • Hamlet
    • Sonnets Look on pgs. 37-38• What is a sonnet?• What are sonnets usually about?• How many lines does a sonnet have?• What is the rhyme scheme of a sonnet? – E.g. pg. 38• What is the meter of a Shakespearean sonnet?
    • Rhyme Scheme• Stanzas (=‘paragraphs’ in poetry) – 2 line stanza= couplet – 3-line stanza=triplet – 4-line stanza=_____train – 5-line stanza=_____tet ABAB CDCD EFEF GG Quatrain/quatrain/quatrain/couplet
    • Meter• Iambs and trochees (=pairs of syllables;either stressed/unstressed (trochee) or unstressed/stressed (iamb) e.g. wander; goodbye; forget; problem• A foot (=a pair of syllables)• 1 foot= monometer• 2 feet=dimeter• 3 feet= trimeter• 4 feet=tetrameter• 5 feet=?
    • Meter=type + number of feet per lineTo determine a poem’s meter:1.Divide each line into pairs of syllables anddecide whether they are iambs or trochees2.Count how many feet there are in each line
    • From ‘On His Blindness’ by John MiltonWhen I consider how my life is spentEre half my days in this dark world and wide When I / con si/ der how/ my life / is spent Ere half / my days / in this / dark world / and wide Are these pairs iambs or trochees? When I / con si/der how/ my life / is spent Ere half / my days / in this / dark world / and wide How many feet are in each line? =iambic pentameter
    • From ‘The Phoenix and the Turtle’ by William ShakespeareReason, in itself confounded,Saw division grow together Rea son,/ in it / self con/foun ded, Saw di/vi sion/ grow to/ge ther =trochaic tetrameter
    • Focus on Sonnet 18
    • Sonnet 18 What does Shakespeare compare his lover to? What is the “eye of heaven” in line 5? What else does Shakespeare tell us about a summer’s day in lines 1-8 How is his lover different from a summer’s day? What do the last two lines mean?
    • Homework: due next class• Write a Shakespearean sonnet describing someone you love or greatly admire. Make sure it has the correct rhyme scheme and use at least one simile or metaphor.• Read pg. 41-44 and answer questions on pg.43 & 45
    • Updated scheduleweek period In-class Homework4 Renaissance Group presentations on -read pgs. 41-44 + ?s on pg.43,45 Shakespeare -Write sonnet sonnets5 Renaissance Group presentation on Globe -read pgs. 46-48 + Theatre ?s on pgs. 48-49 Hamlet -Finish book report ?s for check #1 -Study for quiz6 Classical Group presentations on John -read pgs. 55-58 + ?s on pg. 58 Bunyan -Study for quiz on *quiz* on Renaissance/ Classical period Shakespeare *book report reading check #1