News21 Multimedia Storytelling
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News21 Multimedia Storytelling

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A News21 specific presentation related to the project being built by the UC Berkeley team at the Graduate School of Journalism. Talks about some examples of multimedia storytelling that we could do ...

A News21 specific presentation related to the project being built by the UC Berkeley team at the Graduate School of Journalism. Talks about some examples of multimedia storytelling that we could do during the summer.

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News21 Multimedia Storytelling News21 Multimedia Storytelling Presentation Transcript

  • MULTIMEDIA STORYTELLING
  • WHO ARE WE?
  • FACTS: • We publish once. • Our audience will probably find us through social networking, email, links on news/other websites and maybe search (probably not). • User loyalty doesn’t matter. • Time on site does. • We gain the most from evergreen content. • We are a destination site.
  • GOALS: • Innovate and experiment. • Tell compelling stories and try to make a difference. • Get as many people to our content as possible. • Get people to spend as much time on the site as possible. • Develop a project that will showcase your talents to future employers. • Get mainstream media to publish our content.
  • IDENTIFYING THE MEDIUM THE INTERNET
  • THE INTERNET It should not be just a distribution platform where we shovel content onto the Web. Rather... • The STORY will tell you the medium in which it wants to be told. • Think convergence. Every medium is on the table. • Stories often have multiple parts that can be told in a variety of mediums. • We are not defined as print, broadcast, documentary, photography or radio journalists. We are journalists.
  • ACTIVE MEDIUM CONCISION ENGAGEMENT HYPERLINKS VISUALS BROKEN DOWN INTO PIECES INTERACTIVITY
  • PLATFORMS Print stories Video stories Flash interactives Data visualizations Games, other interactives Mobile applications
  • PRINT Jakob Nielsen How Users Read on the Web They don't. People rarely read Web pages word by word; instead, they scan the page, picking out individual words and sentences. In research on how people read websites we found that 79 percent of our test users always scanned any new page they came across; only 16 percent read word-by-word. As a result, Web pages have to employ scannable text, using • highlighted keywords (hypertext links serve as one form of highlighting; typeface variations and color are others) • meaningful sub-headings (not "clever" ones) • bulleted lists • one idea per paragraph (users will skip over any additional ideas if they are not caught by the first few words in the paragraph) • the inverted pyramid style, starting with the conclusion • half the word count (or less) than conventional writing We found that credibility is important for Web users, since it is unclear who is behind information on the Web and whether a page can be trusted. Credibility can be increased by high-quality graphics, good writing, and use of outbound hypertext links. Links to other sites show that the authors have done their homework and are not afraid to let readers visit other sites. Users detested "marketese"; the promotional writing style with boastful subjective claims ("hottest ever") that currently is prevalent on the Web. Web users are busy: they want to get the straight facts. Also, credibility suffers when users clearly see that the site exaggerates. ALSO READ PRINT VS WEB
  • VIDEO STORIES According to studies, Web video differs from TV news. Broken down into short segments. Give them more choices. Users feel they have an entitlement. More active (action, voice, drama, humor, character) Viral, sharable with embed code. OLYMPIC RUN
  • DATA VISUALIZATIONS Great way to simplify esoteric stories in a visual way. Possibilities for evergreen content. Anecdotal evidence suggests that many data viz projects can often be complex, confusing or overwhelming to users. Most graphics lack context alone. VERY time intensive, both on data Wikipedia incarceration Obama’s budget collecting and production. State of Salmon
  • MOBILE APPLICATIONS Creating a “lean back” experience for the user. Magazines, long form journalism, a leisurely browsing experience. Native apps should go beyond duplicating a web site. (not just an RSS feed) Geo-location, SMS, phone, social networking, augmented reality are possibilities.
  • GAMES AND INTERACTIVES Engages the user to participate and become immersed in the project. Role playing, empathizing situations. Careful to not belittle the topic, or to sensationalize an otherwise serious issue. MORAL COMPASS Lots of work involved. VIRTUAL GUANTANAMO DARFUR IS DYING PLANE CRASH JOURNEY TO THE END OF COAL
  • FLASH INTERACTIVES Visually stunning way to really pull people into a story -- initially. The “tomb” of Flash keeps search engines, mobile devices out. Go beyond the eye candy. Have purpose for BLUE WHALE the interactivity. WATERLIFE FACING DEPORTATION