PG Cert: developing professional practice in HE Principles of Learning and Teaching 9 th  October 2009
Session objectives <ul><li>Reflect on your role in establishing an effective learning environment </li></ul><ul><li>Use ex...
What’s on your T-shirt? <ul><li>I’m gonna show you how much I care! </li></ul><ul><li>I’m gonna dazzle you with my knowled...
Consider… <ul><li>what message(s) would be on your T-shirt? </li></ul><ul><li>how will that make your learners feel? (e.g....
Berne’s model of  Transactional Analysis <ul><li>Structural model   Functional model </li></ul><ul><li>controlling parent ...
Developing an inclusive curriculum <ul><li>Consider the suggested actions from Newport’s inclusive curriculum checklist </...
Deep and surface learning (Ramsden 2003 et al) <ul><li>Deep  learning </li></ul><ul><li>processing of that which is to be ...
Haggis: a critique of “deep and surface learning” <ul><li>deep learning = a general description of “elite” goals and value...
Academic literacy in your subject <ul><li>What learning and assessment activities do your students need to do? </li></ul><...
References/further reading <ul><li>Haggis, T. (2003)  Investigating “Approaches to Learning” research  British Education R...
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Principles of Learning and Teaching (in Higher Education)

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This presentation is part of a workshop in the PGCert Developing Professional Practice in Higher Education run by the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at the University of Wales, Newport. This presentation was delivered by Rachel Stubley on the morning of Friday 9th October 2009 on the Allt-Yr-Yn Campus of the University of Wales, Newport.

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Principles of Learning and Teaching (in Higher Education)

  1. 1. PG Cert: developing professional practice in HE Principles of Learning and Teaching 9 th October 2009
  2. 2. Session objectives <ul><li>Reflect on your role in establishing an effective learning environment </li></ul><ul><li>Use extracts from Newport’s inclusive curriculum checklist to extend your practice </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the range of language or study skills your students need </li></ul>
  3. 3. What’s on your T-shirt? <ul><li>I’m gonna show you how much I care! </li></ul><ul><li>I’m gonna dazzle you with my knowledge! </li></ul><ul><li>I’m gonna make you laugh and make you think! </li></ul><ul><li>I’m gonna convert you! </li></ul><ul><li>I’m gonna take you out of your comfort zone! </li></ul><ul><li>I’m gonna give you whatever you ask for! </li></ul>
  4. 4. Consider… <ul><li>what message(s) would be on your T-shirt? </li></ul><ul><li>how will that make your learners feel? (e.g. relieved, pressured, frightened…) </li></ul><ul><li>how far is their likely response helpful to their learning? </li></ul><ul><li>from Mortiboys (2005:20/1) </li></ul>
  5. 5. Berne’s model of Transactional Analysis <ul><li>Structural model Functional model </li></ul><ul><li>controlling parent </li></ul><ul><li>nurturing parent </li></ul><ul><li>adapted child </li></ul><ul><li>free child </li></ul>
  6. 6. Developing an inclusive curriculum <ul><li>Consider the suggested actions from Newport’s inclusive curriculum checklist </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How could you put these into practice? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What would be the rationale for doing so? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Share your ideas with the group </li></ul>
  7. 7. Deep and surface learning (Ramsden 2003 et al) <ul><li>Deep learning </li></ul><ul><li>processing of that which is to be learned </li></ul><ul><li>focus on what is signified by words and other symbol s </li></ul><ul><li>relating new knowledge to previously acquired knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>inter-relating learning experiences – skills and knowledge from other learning (e.g. other modules) </li></ul><ul><li>an active meaning-orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Surface learning </li></ul><ul><li>memorisation for assessment / reproducing what has been presented </li></ul><ul><li>concentration on words, sentences, signs and symbols </li></ul><ul><li>collecting examples, facts, etc. but neglecting underlying principles </li></ul><ul><li>seeing modules, for example, as discrete units of learning </li></ul><ul><li>a passive approach to learning </li></ul>
  8. 8. Haggis: a critique of “deep and surface learning” <ul><li>deep learning = a general description of “elite” goals and values </li></ul><ul><li>culturally specific, and says little about majority of students in mass HE </li></ul><ul><li>Haggis supports “academic literacies” approach </li></ul><ul><li>HE tutors must explicitly teach/model specific discourse practices and skills of their own subject discipline </li></ul>
  9. 9. Academic literacy in your subject <ul><li>What learning and assessment activities do your students need to do? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the underpinning language/ academic skills required? </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the table on pp.48/9 of the guide </li></ul><ul><li>Choose one area to discuss today </li></ul>
  10. 10. References/further reading <ul><li>Haggis, T. (2003) Investigating “Approaches to Learning” research British Education Research Journal 29:1 pp 89-104 </li></ul><ul><li>Mortiboys, A. (2005) Teaching with emotional intelligence London: Routledge </li></ul><ul><li>Ramsden, P. (2003) Learning to teach in Higher Education 2nd Edition London: Routledge </li></ul>

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