Creating A Culture of Sharing <ul><li>Jack Herrick, WikiHow </li></ul><ul><li>Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons </li></ul>...
Continuum of Shared Content SIMPLE EXPRESSIONS AND OPINIONS WORKS REQUIRING  TIME, MONEY AND EXPERTISE Tweets Status updat...
<ul><li>How do you create a culture that is “safe” for sharing valued content? </li></ul>Difference is stat. sig. at a 95%...
Creators Only 1 in 5 think their works are copyrighted n=1000 Base: Creators Yes, some or all of them are copyrighted No, ...
Users  Less than 1 in 4 think the works they use are copyrighted <ul><li>Copyright protection is still misunderstood and n...
Judgment, Trust, Respect Perhaps Creators and Users share a common, intuitive understanding of what constitutes “proper us...
Do Users and Creators Agree? “ How commercial or noncommercial are various uses of a created work?” 100 = “Definitely a Co...
Anchor Points and Use Cases Money   would be made from the use of the work 12 cases The work would be used  online with ad...
Creators’ Average Scores 1 100 50 Money Online with advertisements On behalf of an organization Use by an individual Chari...
Users’ Average Scores 1 100 50 Money Online with advertisements On behalf of an organization Use by an individual Charitab...
Score Comparison 1 100 50 Money Online with advertisements On behalf of an organization Use by an individual Charitable pu...
Creating a Culture of Sharing Creators and Users are more alike than different in judging the commercial value of uses of ...
Welcome <ul><li>Jack Herrick: Founder and CEO, wikiHow </li></ul><ul><li>Mike Linksvayer:  Vice President of Creative Comm...
Topic 1 <ul><li>Building Trust </li></ul>
Topic 2 <ul><li>Infrastructure for Sharing </li></ul>
Topic 3 <ul><li>Curating Community: </li></ul><ul><li>Governance/Authority </li></ul>
Topic 4 <ul><li>Self Sustainability </li></ul>
Topic 5 <ul><li>Risks </li></ul>
Topic 6 <ul><li>What’s Next </li></ul>
Thanks!  How To Reach Us <ul><li>Emily Richards:  emily@artistechmedia.com  </li></ul><ul><li>@emilymusic on twitter </li>...
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Creating A Culture of Sharing @ 2010 SF Web2.0 Expo

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  • You would make money from selling a copy of someone else’s work You would use someone else’s work in a profit-making venture, and the entire work or “the heart” of the work would be used You would use someone else’s work on a blog or webpage that is supported by advertising, and you would not make any money directly from the advertising You would use someone else’s work on behalf of a not-for-profit organization for the organization’s website, and the organization would make enough money from advertising to cover the costs of hosting the website You use someone else’s work on behalf of a large for-profit company You use someone else’s work on behalf of a small for-profit company that has yet to turn a profit You would use someone else’s work on behalf of a not-for-profit organization You would use someone else’s work on behalf of a public not-for-profit school, for a fundraiser You, as an individual, would use someone else’s work for personal or private purposes You, as an individual, would share the work on a blog or on a website that anyone can access
  • All of us are involved with the creation of the kernel of this culture in some way or another. Where it goes from here is up to us. This is where our panel begins. Please help me welcome the esteemed panelists who have been rolling up their sleeves and shaping the way people share online for many years.
  • Read bios as panelists come to the stage. Jack is the founder and CEO of wikiHow, a wiki based how-to guide. With over 23 million unique visitors, wikiHow is one of the most popular sites on the web. Prior to starting wikiHow, Jack was co-owner and co-CEO of eHow.com.  Under Jack&apos;s leadership, eHow became the world&apos;s most popular how-to manual. Previous companies Jack co-founded include Luminescent Technologies, a provider of computational semiconductor lithography technology and BigTray.com, the largest online vendor of restaurant equipment and supplies. Jack enjoys rock climbing and surfing.  Before his startup career, Jack spent 2 years living in the back of a compact pickup truck in Yosemite Valley where he climbed El Capitan, Half Dome and Astroman.  He now lives in Palo Alto, California with his wife and 2 kids.
  • How do you message the principals and goals of your community and educate your community on an ongoing basis?
  • What kind of software and processes have you found helpful to building your communities? What are the tensions and benefits of combining software and human processes. Licenses, the technology and the human community.
  • What roles do your employees have in managing the community? What are there specific duties that are necessary to build trust and sharing? What’s the personal touch. Three tier community – Emily can speak to this. How to make policy – setting policy – you care about the rules. Having a governance Right to fork and voice. Facebook tried to extend policy changes to their community.
  • How does a community become self-sustaining? How do you make money? What issues have you encountered within your community? Mike might not answer this question.
  • What are the risks that derail community development? Share some examples of issues you have experienced building your communities. External and internal risks. Mismanagement by the corporate owner or startup. Granting the right to fork.
  • Where will we be next year? Where will we be in 5 years? Mike to start this question. People want to collaborate across websites. They are just containers. Want to position your community for x-community collaborator. Jack: collaboration. Technologies are in the infancy. Wiki software available to 5% of the audience only. Technology that has succeeded on the internet is not really collaboration, it’s a thumbs up or down. Doesn’t really create the ability to create collaborative works. Emily: Level of artists. Professional and amateur collaboration.
  • Creating A Culture of Sharing @ 2010 SF Web2.0 Expo

    1. 1. Creating A Culture of Sharing <ul><li>Jack Herrick, WikiHow </li></ul><ul><li>Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons </li></ul><ul><li>Emily Richards, ArtisTech Media </li></ul><ul><li>Josh Crandall, Netpop, Moderator </li></ul>
    2. 2. Continuum of Shared Content SIMPLE EXPRESSIONS AND OPINIONS WORKS REQUIRING TIME, MONEY AND EXPERTISE Tweets Status updates Comments Ratings LOW PERCEIVED RISK OF LOSS HIGH PERCEIVED RISK OF LOSS Photos Reviews Blog posts Wiki contributions Images Movies Books and writings Songs and music
    3. 3. <ul><li>How do you create a culture that is “safe” for sharing valued content? </li></ul>Difference is stat. sig. at a 95% confidence level Content Created Content Used Creators (n=1000) Users (n=1006)
    4. 4. Creators Only 1 in 5 think their works are copyrighted n=1000 Base: Creators Yes, some or all of them are copyrighted No, none of them are copyrighted Not sure
    5. 5. Users Less than 1 in 4 think the works they use are copyrighted <ul><li>Copyright protection is still misunderstood and not appropriate to create a healthy culture of sharing </li></ul>n=1006 Base: Users Yes, some or all of them are copyrighted No, none of them are copyrighted Not sure
    6. 6. Judgment, Trust, Respect Perhaps Creators and Users share a common, intuitive understanding of what constitutes “proper use” of shared content
    7. 7. Do Users and Creators Agree? “ How commercial or noncommercial are various uses of a created work?” 100 = “Definitely a Commercial Use” 1 = “Definitely a Noncommercial Use” 1 100 50 Asked of Creators and Users 53 Potential Uses Rated
    8. 8. Anchor Points and Use Cases Money would be made from the use of the work 12 cases The work would be used online with advertisements 9 cases The work would be used on behalf of an organization 9 cases The work would be used for a charitable purpose/social good 11 cases The work would be used by an individual 8 cases
    9. 9. Creators’ Average Scores 1 100 50 Money Online with advertisements On behalf of an organization Use by an individual Charitable purpose/social good
    10. 10. Users’ Average Scores 1 100 50 Money Online with advertisements On behalf of an organization Use by an individual Charitable purpose/social good
    11. 11. Score Comparison 1 100 50 Money Online with advertisements On behalf of an organization Use by an individual Charitable purpose/social good
    12. 12. Creating a Culture of Sharing Creators and Users are more alike than different in judging the commercial value of uses of created works. Now, the question is how to build trust, judgment and respect for one another in order to create a culture of sharing.
    13. 13. Welcome <ul><li>Jack Herrick: Founder and CEO, wikiHow </li></ul><ul><li>Mike Linksvayer: Vice President of Creative Commons </li></ul><ul><li>Emily Richards: CEO/Founding Artist, ArtisTech Media </li></ul>
    14. 14. Topic 1 <ul><li>Building Trust </li></ul>
    15. 15. Topic 2 <ul><li>Infrastructure for Sharing </li></ul>
    16. 16. Topic 3 <ul><li>Curating Community: </li></ul><ul><li>Governance/Authority </li></ul>
    17. 17. Topic 4 <ul><li>Self Sustainability </li></ul>
    18. 18. Topic 5 <ul><li>Risks </li></ul>
    19. 19. Topic 6 <ul><li>What’s Next </li></ul>
    20. 20. Thanks! How To Reach Us <ul><li>Emily Richards: emily@artistechmedia.com </li></ul><ul><li>@emilymusic on twitter </li></ul><ul><li>Mike Linksvayer : [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>@mlinksva on twitter or identi.ca </li></ul><ul><li>Jack Herrick: @JackHerrick on Twitter or Status.net </li></ul><ul><li>Josh Crandall: [email_address] </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>@NetpopJosh on Twitter </li></ul></ul></ul>
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