TARGETING ECONOMIC AND HEALTH BENEFITS OF GREENWAYS AND TRAILS Stunningly beautiful Southern Appalachia has some outstandi...
OBJECTIVES:  <ul><li>VIRGINIA CREEPER TRAIL </li></ul><ul><li>HOW LINKS TO OTHER HEALTH EFFORTS </li></ul><ul><li>HOW LINK...
CONTRIBUTOR:  <ul><li>GARRETT JACKSON-IN ABSENTIA </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>FORMER PLANNER FOR DAMASCUS </li></ul></ul></u...
CONTRIBUTOR:  <ul><li>TIM PETERS </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR HEALTH FITNESS CORPORATION (EASTMAN CHEMI...
CONTRIBUTOR:  <ul><li>ROY SETTLE – IN ABSENTIA </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>DIRECTOR, APPALACHIAN RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND D...
CONTRIBUTOR:  <ul><li>ANTHONY (TONY) DELUCIA </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>PROFESSOR (PULMONOLOGIST), EAST TENNESSEE STATE UNI...
CARTOON “SAYS IT ALL”
FORTUNATE TO HAVE BEEN A RESEARCHER… <ul><li>TOOK ME TO THE AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION </li></ul><ul><ul><li>FROM RECEIVING...
FOR YOURS TRULY, A BIT OF A “LIFE CYCLE” THING
WE WOULDN’T BE HERE W/O  ORGANIZATIONS LIKE THIS MISSION: TO IMPROVE OUR COMMUNITY THROUGH CITIZEN PARTICIPATION IN DETERM...
PEOPLE, PLACES, PLAY, JOBS, GOVERNMENT
ABINGDON, VA KEEPING HEALTHY THROUGH HISTORY
THE VIRGINIA CREEPER TRAIL
35 MILES…ABINGDON TO NORTH CAROLINA
VIRGINIA CREEPER TRAIL <ul><li>ONE OF THE MOST SPECTACULAR “RAILS-TO-TRAILS” IN THE ENTIRE COUNTRY </li></ul><ul><li>OVER ...
 
 
CREATIVE CLASS CONSTRUCTING EDUCATIONAL KIOSKS ALONG THE CREEPER TRAIL
 
 
ABINGDON 2012 GREENWAY PLAN
PORTERFIELD GATEWAY – WOLF CREEK NATURE WALK
TRAFFIC/PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS
TAX $ = HEALTH <ul><li>Cigarette Tax ($.10/pack) goes toward health initiatives in the community </li></ul><ul><li>Abingdo...
CREEPER TRAIL A “BEST PRACTICE” IN THIS PUBLICATION BY HANNAH TWADELL & DAN EMERINE
Blue Blaze Bike & Shuttle – Damascus, Virginia REVENUE FROM RELATED ACTIVITIES
The Buchanan Inn Bed & Breakfast at Green Cove Station estimates that 75% of its business comes from visitors using the Vi...
ESRI COMMUNITY TAPESTRY 15. Silver and Gold Silver and Gold  residents are the second oldest of the Tapestry segments and ...
SAGA FOLKS WHO LIVE IN ABINGDON “CO-HOUSING”
THE TRAIL MODEL WORKS WITH HEALTHY SENIORS: KATY TRAIL
EFFECT ON PROPERTY VALUES <ul><li>Multiple studies show that well managed trails and parks have a positive effect on home ...
MARYVILLE - RUBY TUESDAY’S “ the specific site (for the new headquarters) was chosen in downtown Maryville primarily due t...
“ IMPORTANT 1 ST  ATTEMPT TO ORGANIZE AN INDUSTRIAL COMMUNITY AND PROVIDE ADEQUATE HOUSING FOR WORKERS IN A SYLVAN SETTING...
JOHN NOLEN – THE DESIGNER OF GREAT PLACES
BRIEF DESCRIPTION <ul><li>KINGSPORT </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>CURRENT POPULATION ~50k </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>...
EXPANDING THE EVER-POPULAR KINGSPORT GREENBELT
A DESCRIPTION OF THE KINGSPORT GREENBELT FROM ITS WEBSITE HTTP://WWW.KINGSPORTGREENBELT.COM/ The Kingsport Greenbelt is a ...
USED IN “MOVE TO…” LITERATURE
 
ROLE OF STRONG COMMUNITY STEWARD
 
ENGAGE OUR LOCAL LEADERS: TWO LOCAL MAYORS WHO “GET IT”
AWARD WINNING LOCAL PROGRAMS:  JOHNSON CITY “UP AND AT ‘EM” TURKEY TROT AWARDS ON THANKSGIVING DAY
IF PEOPLE HERE THINK THIS IS  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Childhood Obesity Prevention Summit  /  October 18-19, 2007    Physical activity    Air pollution And by the way…    In...
LOCAL FOOD AND LAND USE ECONOMICS
LOCAL SUSTAINABILITY EFFORTS
“ I CAN ALWAYS GROW HOUSES”
A STATISTIC
 
ROY’S 2003 URBAN FORESTRY MEETING IN KINGSPORT A BETTER WAY THROUGH LAND USE EDUCATION
  WE APPLIED FOR ATTENDANCE AT THIS!!!
ED McMAHON TALKING ABOUT ENVIRONMENT, ECONOMIC, AND COMMUNITY GOALS…AS THE CONTAINER VESSELS AND DOLPHINS CRUISE BY
WORK OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA TEAM
“ WORK” OF OUR TEAM!!!
WORKSHOPS WITH A BUILT ENVIRONMENT FOCUS – JAMIE BUSSELL, ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION
 
MARK FENTON’S 1 ST  VISIT
 
SCHOOLS AN EARLY SUCCESS
 
ONE-HALF THE TEAM FOR WORKFORCE HEALTH
  A STRONG FUTURE WITH  OUR PARTNERS  GREENWAYS  ALLIANCE “ CONNECTING PEOPLE, NATURE, AND COMMUNITIES WITH GREENWAYS AND ...
 
CURRENT SAGA AREA Scott Hancock Sullivan Hawkins Johnson Washington Carter Washington Greene Lee Unicoi Virginia Tennessee
REGIONAL VISION 2025 <ul><li>It is my vision that our Region will encourage PLAY through TRAILS and PARKS that link us Wit...
GOVERNOR BREDESEN  SAGA PLAN RELEASE EVENT APRIL 20, 2007 KINGSPORT - GREENBELT
Historic Tweetsie  Trail ELIZABETHTON TO JOHNSON CITY
HISTORY The ET&WNC was chartered in 1866. The 5-foot gauge railroad would run from the Cranberry Iron Works, west through ...
LOCATION Where is the Historic Tweetsie line located?
PIKE’S PLACE MARKET WAS TO BE CONDEMNED PLACEMAKING:  PUBLIC MARKETS BECOME VIBRANT PUBLIC SPACES WHILE ALSO ACHIEVING BRO...
SAGA MEMBERS RECEIVING THE  “OZZIE AWARD” FROM REGIONAL  OZONE ACTION PARTNERSHIP ITS VOLUNTEERS AND STAFF LIKE THIS WHO M...
POSTSCRIPT THIS WAS WAITING FOR ME IN MY LOCAL NEWSPAPER WHEN I RETURNED HOME
WHEN YOU MAKE THOSE FALL COLOR PLANS, DON’T FORGET CREEPER TRAIL  <ul><li>   Johnny Molloy  </li></ul><ul><li>      Lookin...
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  • This is the Blue Blaze Bike shop in Damascus Virginia. It was the first bike rental shop &amp; shuttle service to open there. Now there are 4 shops in town that operate using the Creeper Trail as a base for business. If you visit Damascus in the summer or a good weekend you will see shuttle buses and cars from multiple states and lots of money being spent with local businesses. Damascus also holds an event called Trail Days based on the Through Hikers on the Appalachian Trail. If you took these two trails away from Damascus, it would be a very different place.
  • A complimentary trail Amenity;A Bed and Breakfast along the Creeper Trail out side of Damascus, VA.
  • Source: Economic Impacts of Rivers, Trails and Greenways: Property Values Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance National Park Service 1995, Fourth Edition, Revised Photo on Left: This photo was taken by &amp;quot;Greenways Incorporated&amp;quot; at a residential subdivision in Apex, North Carolina.  The subdivision has been very successful and the greenway is utilized everyday by community residents.
  • Ruby Tuesday Inc. moved its national headquarters from Mobile, Alabama to the Knoxville, Tennessee area for several reasons, but the specific site was chosen in downtown Maryville primarily due to its location on the beautiful Greenbelt and trail system. Approximately 104 people are currently employed at the site. The Training facility uses the trail by offering Bicycles to guests while they are training at the Headquarters. Ruby Tuesday also houses the Maryville Trail Authority Coordinators offices at their facility.
  • Wrote grant to EPA Aging Initiative
  • City, suburban designs could be bad for your health By Martha T. Moore, USA TODAY Why don&apos;t Americans walk anywhere? Old answer: They&apos;re lazy. New answer: They can&apos;t. There is no sidewalk outside the front door, school is 5 miles away, and there&apos;s a six-lane highway between home and the supermarket. Many experts on public health say the way neighborhoods are built is to blame for Americans&apos; physical inactivity — and the resulting epidemic of obesity. The health concern is a new slant on the issue of suburban sprawl, which metro regions have been struggling with for a decade. These health experts bring the deep-pocketed force of private foundations and public agencies into discussions about what neighborhoods should look like. The argument over whether suburbs are bad for your health will hit many Americans precisely where they live: in a house with a big lawn on a cul-de-sac. &amp;quot;The potential for actually tackling some of these things, with the savvy of the folks who have tackled tobacco, is enormous,&amp;quot; says Ellen Vanderslice, head of America Walks, a pedestrian advocacy group based in Portland, Ore. A study by the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking 8,000 residents of Atlanta to determine whether the neighborhood they live in influences their level of physical exercise. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in New Jersey, the country&apos;s largest health care philanthropy, is spending $70 million over five years on studies and programs to make it easier for people to walk in suburbs, cities and towns. &amp;quot;We want to engineer routine activity back into people&apos;s daily lives,&amp;quot; says Kate Kraft, the foundation&apos;s senior program officer. &amp;quot;That means we need to start creating more walkable, bikeable communities.&amp;quot; For decades, cities, towns and suburbs have been developed on the assumption that every trip will be made by car. That has all but eliminated walking from daily life for people in most parts of the country. Americans make fewer than 6% of their daily trips on foot, according to studies by the Federal Highway Administration. Three-quarters of short trips, a mile or less, are made by car, federal studies show. Children don&apos;t get much more of a workout. Fewer than 13% of students walk to school. That&apos;s partly because regulations for school construction effectively encourage building schools on large sites at the edge of communities, beyond walking distance for most students, according to a National Trust for Historic Preservation report. Federal health statistics show that nearly 65% of Americans are overweight and that 31% are obese, or more than 30 pounds over a healthy weight. A big part of the cause is all that driving and not enough walking. &amp;quot;Obesity is not just (that) we&apos;re eating more. We&apos;re getting less activity. People just don&apos;t walk that much,&amp;quot; says Tom Schmid, head of the CDC&apos;s Active Community Environments program. Why you can&apos;t walk there from here: Spread-out neighborhoods. Bigger houses on bigger lots mean neighborhoods stretch beyond walking distance for doing errands. Zoning. Residential neighborhoods are far from jobs and shopping centers, even schools. Reign of cars. Roads are built big and busy. Intersections and crosswalks are rare. Shopping centers and office parks are set in the middle of big parking lots, all of which have become dangerous places to walk. In many cul-de-sac suburbs and along shopping strips, sidewalks don&apos;t exist. Suddenly, the crowded city looks healthy. In old, densely built cities such as New York and Boston, people walk. It&apos;s not necessarily for exercise, but simply to get from one place to another. College towns and cities with military bases also have high rates of walking, Census data show. Houses and workplaces are near each other. If people don&apos;t walk to work, they often walk to public transit. In November, Oakland became one of a few large cities to pass a pedestrian master plan. The city already has a walking-friendly design because it was laid out at the turn of the 20th century along streetcar lines. Nevertheless, city officials want to make sure that people can walk to a new rapid-transit bus system. That will mean spending money to upgrade sidewalks and intersections near the transit stops. &amp;quot;It&apos;s back to the future. We&apos;re going to have this transportation system where you don&apos;t need to drive,&amp;quot; says Tom Van Demark, director of Oakland&apos;s pedestrian safety project. In newer cities, especially those in the Sun Belt where growth has boomed since 1950, walking anywhere is not easy. Families wanted more space for their children, so they moved to single-family houses with yards in big residential neighborhoods. Jobs and services, like shopping, followed people to the suburbs, away from the downtown that could easily be served by public transit. Hopping into SUVs Even in places designed to be walkable, things have changed. Victoria Talkington, a lawyer and mother of two children, lives north of San Francisco in Mill Valley, on the slopes of Mount Tamalpais. A network of paths and steps connects roads that switch back along the mountainside. The footpaths lead from downtown into elevated residential neighborhoods. But in the hundred years since the paths were laid out, they had fallen into disuse. Instead, people drive down the roads. &amp;quot;People with SUVs and kids have moved in, and they&apos;ve displaced people who knew about the paths,&amp;quot; says Talkington, a planning commission member. Near her house is a path with a great view of the mountain. &amp;quot;Nobody who lived within a hundred yards of it knew about it,&amp;quot; she says. So she took a pruner and cleared the overgrown path last fall. Now, people occasionally use it. Steven Gayle, director of the transportation system in Binghamton, N.Y., is running seminars on pedestrian improvements, paid for by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. &amp;quot;What we really need to do is redesign our communities so that people walk as a matter of course, the way they used to do,&amp;quot; Gayle says. &amp;quot;Hopping in your SUV to drive to the park to walk on the trail for 20 minutes and hopping in the car to drive home is not what we need to see.&amp;quot; Public health advocates are well-funded allies for advocates of &amp;quot;smart growth,&amp;quot; who criticize suburban sprawl and development. They have been arguing for a decade that communities should be walkable. Neighborhoods should be built with shorter blocks, smaller yards and streets that connect to each other rather than dead-end. Stores and offices should be close to or mixed with residential neighborhoods, they say. The Urban Land Institute, a group for developers and planners, estimates that 5% to 15% of new development follows the principles of &amp;quot;walkable&amp;quot; neighborhoods. Nearly 1.6 million homes were built in 2001. &amp;quot;There&apos;s a big awareness of the issue in the planning community, that walkable places are nicer and sometimes are more economically viable,&amp;quot; says Reid Ewing, a Rutgers University professor and author of an upcoming study on sprawl and health. &amp;quot;The question is, are they healthier? That&apos;s really the new wrinkle.&amp;quot; To find the answer, the CDC and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation are funding studies such as the one in Atlanta. The public health experts want to find out what kind of neighborhood designs and amenities have a statistically significant link to increased walking. Some metro areas are taking steps to make their cities pedestrian-friendly, either by upgrading neighborhoods with sidewalks and crosswalks or changing the rules for building developments. Lots of people walk in Rochester, N.Y. And enough people commute by bicycle that city buses are equipped with bike racks. But &amp;quot;the suburbs are built without sidewalks and without adequate shoulders on the roads,&amp;quot; says Bill Nojay, chairman of the regional transportation authority. Last year, the region spent $5 million to upgrade walking and biking trails that connect the 19 towns in the county surrounding Rochester. &apos;Shocked into it&apos; Fewer people walk to work in Atlanta and Charlotte than in any other large metro areas, according to Census data. But both cities are trying to make walking easier. They want to focus development around public transit and spend money on sidewalks. In Atlanta, poor air quality from traffic congestion forced the issue. The region could not spend federal transportation funds on new highways until it came up with a plan to improve air quality. &amp;quot;The only projects we could build were the small projects geared toward the pedestrian,&amp;quot; says Tom Weyandt of the Atlanta Regional Commission, the metro area&apos;s planning agency. &amp;quot;So in a sense, we were sort of shocked into it.&amp;quot; The region is spending $175 million to build 385 miles of sidewalks by 2005. That&apos;s a small slice of the region&apos;s 16,000 miles of roads and highways. But $350 million more over 10 years will go to transportation projects tied to the development of higher-density, mixed-use areas. Those will be mostly pedestrian improvements, Weyandt says. In Charlotte, fewer people walk to work than any other metro area of more than 1 million people. The city also made the top 10 &amp;quot;fattest cities&amp;quot; list in the February issue of Men&apos;s Fitness magazine. But a master plan adopted by the city in 1998 calls for development to be clustered along light-rail and rapid-bus lines to encourage people to walk to public transit. The city now requires new subdivisions to have sidewalks and few cul-de-sacs. Also, the city is hiring a &amp;quot;pedestrian coordinator&amp;quot; to work with developers. Voters approved a $10 million bond issue in November to build sidewalks in places that never had them. Less than half of Charlotte&apos;s 2,800 miles of streets have sidewalks on one or both sides. Most of the motivation for these changes has been to cut down on traffic and pollution. &amp;quot;The community health aspect of it is one that&apos;s just emerging as a topic,&amp;quot; says Danny Pleasant, deputy director of transportation for Charlotte. Public health vs. the good life Many people, of course, get physical exercise regardless of where they live. And for good or ill, a suburban house in a bedroom community is to many people the American dream. &amp;quot;A large part of what some people call sprawl is what other people call affordable housing, jobs, highways that go somewhere and get you there,&amp;quot; says Daniel Fox, president of the Milbank Memorial Fund, a health policy research foundation based in New York. Builders of suburban neighborhoods and office parks often view a walkable development as expensive to construct, hard to get past local planning agencies and difficult to finance, says Clayton Traylor of the National Association of Home Builders. Also, the main component of walkable neighborhoods is density, or the number of people per square mile — but density is what many homebuyers are trying to get away from. &amp;quot;It&apos;s just our own definition of what the good life includes, which is a couple of cars and a house on the cul-de-sac,&amp;quot; says Kraft of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. &amp;quot;The good life means you can be a couch potato.&amp;quot; That may mean Americans don&apos;t want to walk regardless of what public health experts urge. &amp;quot;Population health is what the population says it is,&amp;quot; Fox says. &amp;quot;Why can&apos;t Americans change their values? Why can&apos;t everyone in Texas, instead of going to high school football games, spend their Friday nights exercising? Well, that&apos;s the way it is, folks.&amp;quot; Even so, those pushing for walkable developments hope that a public health approach will be more palatable than talking about smart growth and sprawl. &amp;quot;Too many people just don&apos;t care at all about design or sprawl,&amp;quot; says Adrienne Schmitz of the Urban Land Institute, based in Washington, D.C. &amp;quot;But when you start talking health, it&apos;s a real hot button.&amp;quot;  
  • Full benefits accounting – Howie Frumkin CDC
  • City, suburban designs could be bad for your health By Martha T. Moore, USA TODAY Why don&apos;t Americans walk anywhere? Old answer: They&apos;re lazy. New answer: They can&apos;t. There is no sidewalk outside the front door, school is 5 miles away, and there&apos;s a six-lane highway between home and the supermarket. Many experts on public health say the way neighborhoods are built is to blame for Americans&apos; physical inactivity — and the resulting epidemic of obesity. The health concern is a new slant on the issue of suburban sprawl, which metro regions have been struggling with for a decade. These health experts bring the deep-pocketed force of private foundations and public agencies into discussions about what neighborhoods should look like. The argument over whether suburbs are bad for your health will hit many Americans precisely where they live: in a house with a big lawn on a cul-de-sac. &amp;quot;The potential for actually tackling some of these things, with the savvy of the folks who have tackled tobacco, is enormous,&amp;quot; says Ellen Vanderslice, head of America Walks, a pedestrian advocacy group based in Portland, Ore. A study by the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking 8,000 residents of Atlanta to determine whether the neighborhood they live in influences their level of physical exercise. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in New Jersey, the country&apos;s largest health care philanthropy, is spending $70 million over five years on studies and programs to make it easier for people to walk in suburbs, cities and towns. &amp;quot;We want to engineer routine activity back into people&apos;s daily lives,&amp;quot; says Kate Kraft, the foundation&apos;s senior program officer. &amp;quot;That means we need to start creating more walkable, bikeable communities.&amp;quot; For decades, cities, towns and suburbs have been developed on the assumption that every trip will be made by car. That has all but eliminated walking from daily life for people in most parts of the country. Americans make fewer than 6% of their daily trips on foot, according to studies by the Federal Highway Administration. Three-quarters of short trips, a mile or less, are made by car, federal studies show. Children don&apos;t get much more of a workout. Fewer than 13% of students walk to school. That&apos;s partly because regulations for school construction effectively encourage building schools on large sites at the edge of communities, beyond walking distance for most students, according to a National Trust for Historic Preservation report. Federal health statistics show that nearly 65% of Americans are overweight and that 31% are obese, or more than 30 pounds over a healthy weight. A big part of the cause is all that driving and not enough walking. &amp;quot;Obesity is not just (that) we&apos;re eating more. We&apos;re getting less activity. People just don&apos;t walk that much,&amp;quot; says Tom Schmid, head of the CDC&apos;s Active Community Environments program. Why you can&apos;t walk there from here: Spread-out neighborhoods. Bigger houses on bigger lots mean neighborhoods stretch beyond walking distance for doing errands. Zoning. Residential neighborhoods are far from jobs and shopping centers, even schools. Reign of cars. Roads are built big and busy. Intersections and crosswalks are rare. Shopping centers and office parks are set in the middle of big parking lots, all of which have become dangerous places to walk. In many cul-de-sac suburbs and along shopping strips, sidewalks don&apos;t exist. Suddenly, the crowded city looks healthy. In old, densely built cities such as New York and Boston, people walk. It&apos;s not necessarily for exercise, but simply to get from one place to another. College towns and cities with military bases also have high rates of walking, Census data show. Houses and workplaces are near each other. If people don&apos;t walk to work, they often walk to public transit. In November, Oakland became one of a few large cities to pass a pedestrian master plan. The city already has a walking-friendly design because it was laid out at the turn of the 20th century along streetcar lines. Nevertheless, city officials want to make sure that people can walk to a new rapid-transit bus system. That will mean spending money to upgrade sidewalks and intersections near the transit stops. &amp;quot;It&apos;s back to the future. We&apos;re going to have this transportation system where you don&apos;t need to drive,&amp;quot; says Tom Van Demark, director of Oakland&apos;s pedestrian safety project. In newer cities, especially those in the Sun Belt where growth has boomed since 1950, walking anywhere is not easy. Families wanted more space for their children, so they moved to single-family houses with yards in big residential neighborhoods. Jobs and services, like shopping, followed people to the suburbs, away from the downtown that could easily be served by public transit. Hopping into SUVs Even in places designed to be walkable, things have changed. Victoria Talkington, a lawyer and mother of two children, lives north of San Francisco in Mill Valley, on the slopes of Mount Tamalpais. A network of paths and steps connects roads that switch back along the mountainside. The footpaths lead from downtown into elevated residential neighborhoods. But in the hundred years since the paths were laid out, they had fallen into disuse. Instead, people drive down the roads. &amp;quot;People with SUVs and kids have moved in, and they&apos;ve displaced people who knew about the paths,&amp;quot; says Talkington, a planning commission member. Near her house is a path with a great view of the mountain. &amp;quot;Nobody who lived within a hundred yards of it knew about it,&amp;quot; she says. So she took a pruner and cleared the overgrown path last fall. Now, people occasionally use it. Steven Gayle, director of the transportation system in Binghamton, N.Y., is running seminars on pedestrian improvements, paid for by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. &amp;quot;What we really need to do is redesign our communities so that people walk as a matter of course, the way they used to do,&amp;quot; Gayle says. &amp;quot;Hopping in your SUV to drive to the park to walk on the trail for 20 minutes and hopping in the car to drive home is not what we need to see.&amp;quot; Public health advocates are well-funded allies for advocates of &amp;quot;smart growth,&amp;quot; who criticize suburban sprawl and development. They have been arguing for a decade that communities should be walkable. Neighborhoods should be built with shorter blocks, smaller yards and streets that connect to each other rather than dead-end. Stores and offices should be close to or mixed with residential neighborhoods, they say. The Urban Land Institute, a group for developers and planners, estimates that 5% to 15% of new development follows the principles of &amp;quot;walkable&amp;quot; neighborhoods. Nearly 1.6 million homes were built in 2001. &amp;quot;There&apos;s a big awareness of the issue in the planning community, that walkable places are nicer and sometimes are more economically viable,&amp;quot; says Reid Ewing, a Rutgers University professor and author of an upcoming study on sprawl and health. &amp;quot;The question is, are they healthier? That&apos;s really the new wrinkle.&amp;quot; To find the answer, the CDC and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation are funding studies such as the one in Atlanta. The public health experts want to find out what kind of neighborhood designs and amenities have a statistically significant link to increased walking. Some metro areas are taking steps to make their cities pedestrian-friendly, either by upgrading neighborhoods with sidewalks and crosswalks or changing the rules for building developments. Lots of people walk in Rochester, N.Y. And enough people commute by bicycle that city buses are equipped with bike racks. But &amp;quot;the suburbs are built without sidewalks and without adequate shoulders on the roads,&amp;quot; says Bill Nojay, chairman of the regional transportation authority. Last year, the region spent $5 million to upgrade walking and biking trails that connect the 19 towns in the county surrounding Rochester. &apos;Shocked into it&apos; Fewer people walk to work in Atlanta and Charlotte than in any other large metro areas, according to Census data. But both cities are trying to make walking easier. They want to focus development around public transit and spend money on sidewalks. In Atlanta, poor air quality from traffic congestion forced the issue. The region could not spend federal transportation funds on new highways until it came up with a plan to improve air quality. &amp;quot;The only projects we could build were the small projects geared toward the pedestrian,&amp;quot; says Tom Weyandt of the Atlanta Regional Commission, the metro area&apos;s planning agency. &amp;quot;So in a sense, we were sort of shocked into it.&amp;quot; The region is spending $175 million to build 385 miles of sidewalks by 2005. That&apos;s a small slice of the region&apos;s 16,000 miles of roads and highways. But $350 million more over 10 years will go to transportation projects tied to the development of higher-density, mixed-use areas. Those will be mostly pedestrian improvements, Weyandt says. In Charlotte, fewer people walk to work than any other metro area of more than 1 million people. The city also made the top 10 &amp;quot;fattest cities&amp;quot; list in the February issue of Men&apos;s Fitness magazine. But a master plan adopted by the city in 1998 calls for development to be clustered along light-rail and rapid-bus lines to encourage people to walk to public transit. The city now requires new subdivisions to have sidewalks and few cul-de-sacs. Also, the city is hiring a &amp;quot;pedestrian coordinator&amp;quot; to work with developers. Voters approved a $10 million bond issue in November to build sidewalks in places that never had them. Less than half of Charlotte&apos;s 2,800 miles of streets have sidewalks on one or both sides. Most of the motivation for these changes has been to cut down on traffic and pollution. &amp;quot;The community health aspect of it is one that&apos;s just emerging as a topic,&amp;quot; says Danny Pleasant, deputy director of transportation for Charlotte. Public health vs. the good life Many people, of course, get physical exercise regardless of where they live. And for good or ill, a suburban house in a bedroom community is to many people the American dream. &amp;quot;A large part of what some people call sprawl is what other people call affordable housing, jobs, highways that go somewhere and get you there,&amp;quot; says Daniel Fox, president of the Milbank Memorial Fund, a health policy research foundation based in New York. Builders of suburban neighborhoods and office parks often view a walkable development as expensive to construct, hard to get past local planning agencies and difficult to finance, says Clayton Traylor of the National Association of Home Builders. Also, the main component of walkable neighborhoods is density, or the number of people per square mile — but density is what many homebuyers are trying to get away from. &amp;quot;It&apos;s just our own definition of what the good life includes, which is a couple of cars and a house on the cul-de-sac,&amp;quot; says Kraft of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. &amp;quot;The good life means you can be a couch potato.&amp;quot; That may mean Americans don&apos;t want to walk regardless of what public health experts urge. &amp;quot;Population health is what the population says it is,&amp;quot; Fox says. &amp;quot;Why can&apos;t Americans change their values? Why can&apos;t everyone in Texas, instead of going to high school football games, spend their Friday nights exercising? Well, that&apos;s the way it is, folks.&amp;quot; Even so, those pushing for walkable developments hope that a public health approach will be more palatable than talking about smart growth and sprawl. &amp;quot;Too many people just don&apos;t care at all about design or sprawl,&amp;quot; says Adrienne Schmitz of the Urban Land Institute, based in Washington, D.C. &amp;quot;But when you start talking health, it&apos;s a real hot button.&amp;quot;  
  • PLACEMAKING: PUBLIC MARKETS BECOME VIBRANT PUBLIC SPACES WHILE ALSO ACHIEVING BROADER SOCIAL IMPACTS – FROM COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, TO HEALTH AND NUTRITION, TO PRESERVING FAMILY FARMS -- PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES WEBSITE: WWW.PPS.ORG
  • Targeting economic and health benefits of greenways andb

    1. 1. TARGETING ECONOMIC AND HEALTH BENEFITS OF GREENWAYS AND TRAILS Stunningly beautiful Southern Appalachia has some outstanding greenways and trails. This workshop exposes attendees to the Virginia Creeper Trail, a successful example of creating economic and health benefits. Hear how wellness, environmental, and agriculture experts work with urban planners in addressing challenges in adding trail mileage and improving livability. Learn of stakeholder efforts to promote healthy lifestyles and go well beyond tourism dollars to target schools and workplaces. ANTHONY J. (TONY) DELUCIA, PH.D. EAST TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY 423 439-6202 [email_address]
    2. 2. OBJECTIVES: <ul><li>VIRGINIA CREEPER TRAIL </li></ul><ul><li>HOW LINKS TO OTHER HEALTH EFFORTS </li></ul><ul><li>HOW LINKS TO OTHER ECONOMIC EFFORTS </li></ul>
    3. 3. CONTRIBUTOR: <ul><li>GARRETT JACKSON-IN ABSENTIA </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>FORMER PLANNER FOR DAMASCUS </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>CURRENT TOWN PLANNER FOR ABINGDON </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>VIRGINIA CREEPER ADVISORY BOARD </li></ul></ul></ul>
    4. 4. CONTRIBUTOR: <ul><li>TIM PETERS </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR HEALTH FITNESS CORPORATION (EASTMAN CHEMICAL COMPANY ACCOUNT) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>FORMER CHAIR, KINGSPORT TOMORROW </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE TENNESSEE CENTER FOR DIABETES PREVENTION AND HEALTH IMPROVEMENT </li></ul></ul></ul>
    5. 5. CONTRIBUTOR: <ul><li>ROY SETTLE – IN ABSENTIA </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>DIRECTOR, APPALACHIAN RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>SULLIVAN COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>LANDS OF BOONE AND CROCKETT LAND TRUST, LOCALGOODS.ORG, QUILTTRAIL.ORG </li></ul></ul></ul>
    6. 6. CONTRIBUTOR: <ul><li>ANTHONY (TONY) DELUCIA </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>PROFESSOR (PULMONOLOGIST), EAST TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>LOCAL GOVERNMENT COMMISSION (SMART GROWTH) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>LEAGUE OF AMERICAN BICYCLISTS </li></ul></ul></ul>
    7. 7. CARTOON “SAYS IT ALL”
    8. 8. FORTUNATE TO HAVE BEEN A RESEARCHER… <ul><li>TOOK ME TO THE AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION </li></ul><ul><ul><li>FROM RECEIVING THEIR GRANT FUNDING TO BECOMING A NATIONAL SPOKESMAN </li></ul></ul><ul><li>TOOK ME TO KINGSPORT TOMORROW </li></ul><ul><ul><li>FROM USING MY GRANT FUNDING TO BECOMING A REGIONAL SPOKESMAN </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. FOR YOURS TRULY, A BIT OF A “LIFE CYCLE” THING
    10. 10. WE WOULDN’T BE HERE W/O ORGANIZATIONS LIKE THIS MISSION: TO IMPROVE OUR COMMUNITY THROUGH CITIZEN PARTICIPATION IN DETERMINING OUR FUTURE, SUCH AS CITY’S BAYS MOUNTAIN PARK
    11. 11. PEOPLE, PLACES, PLAY, JOBS, GOVERNMENT
    12. 12. ABINGDON, VA KEEPING HEALTHY THROUGH HISTORY
    13. 13. THE VIRGINIA CREEPER TRAIL
    14. 14. 35 MILES…ABINGDON TO NORTH CAROLINA
    15. 15. VIRGINIA CREEPER TRAIL <ul><li>ONE OF THE MOST SPECTACULAR “RAILS-TO-TRAILS” IN THE ENTIRE COUNTRY </li></ul><ul><li>OVER 150K VISITORS/YEAR </li></ul><ul><li>$MULTI-MILLION DIRECT ECONOMIC BENEFIT </li></ul>
    16. 18. CREATIVE CLASS CONSTRUCTING EDUCATIONAL KIOSKS ALONG THE CREEPER TRAIL
    17. 21. ABINGDON 2012 GREENWAY PLAN
    18. 22. PORTERFIELD GATEWAY – WOLF CREEK NATURE WALK
    19. 23. TRAFFIC/PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS
    20. 24. TAX $ = HEALTH <ul><li>Cigarette Tax ($.10/pack) goes toward health initiatives in the community </li></ul><ul><li>Abingdon spends more per capita on parks & recreation than ANY other Virginia locality! </li></ul><ul><li>Meals and Lodging tax brings in double the amount, per year, that real estate taxes do…haven’t raised real estate taxes in 40+ years and still have a great quality of life! </li></ul>
    21. 25. CREEPER TRAIL A “BEST PRACTICE” IN THIS PUBLICATION BY HANNAH TWADELL & DAN EMERINE
    22. 26. Blue Blaze Bike & Shuttle – Damascus, Virginia REVENUE FROM RELATED ACTIVITIES
    23. 27. The Buchanan Inn Bed & Breakfast at Green Cove Station estimates that 75% of its business comes from visitors using the Virginia Creeper Trail pictured here in the foreground. TOURISM BENEFITS
    24. 28. ESRI COMMUNITY TAPESTRY 15. Silver and Gold Silver and Gold residents are the second oldest of the Tapestry segments and the wealthiest seniors, with a median age of 58.5 years; most are retired from professional occupations. Their affluence has allowed them to move to sunnier climates. More than 60 percent of the households are in the South (mainly in Florida); 25 percent reside in the West, primarily in California and Arizona. Neighborhoods are exclusive, with a median home value of $326,600 and a high proportion of seasonal housing. Residents enjoy traveling, woodworking, playing cards, birdwatching, target shooting, salt water fishing, and power boating. Golf is more a way of life than a mere leisure pursuit; they play golf, attend tournaments, watch golf on TV, and listen to golf programs on the radio. They are avid readers, but allow time to watch their favorite TV shows and a multitude of news programs.
    25. 29. SAGA FOLKS WHO LIVE IN ABINGDON “CO-HOUSING”
    26. 30. THE TRAIL MODEL WORKS WITH HEALTHY SENIORS: KATY TRAIL
    27. 31. EFFECT ON PROPERTY VALUES <ul><li>Multiple studies show that well managed trails and parks have a positive effect on home sales. </li></ul><ul><li>Properties closer to trails are generally easier to sell and have a higher value than those further away from the amenity. </li></ul>
    28. 32. MARYVILLE - RUBY TUESDAY’S “ the specific site (for the new headquarters) was chosen in downtown Maryville primarily due to its location on the beautiful Greenbelt and trail system,” said Sandy Beal, Chairman & CEO, Ruby Tuesday, Inc.
    29. 33. “ IMPORTANT 1 ST ATTEMPT TO ORGANIZE AN INDUSTRIAL COMMUNITY AND PROVIDE ADEQUATE HOUSING FOR WORKERS IN A SYLVAN SETTING” KINGSPORT, TENNESSEE
    30. 34. JOHN NOLEN – THE DESIGNER OF GREAT PLACES
    31. 35. BRIEF DESCRIPTION <ul><li>KINGSPORT </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>CURRENT POPULATION ~50k </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>HOME OF EASTMAN CHEMICAL COMPANY </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>PART OF TRI-CITIES TN/VA 1999 ALL-AMERICAN DESIGNATION </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>PROGRESSIVE GOVERNMENT </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>DESIGNED BY ARCHITECT JOHN NOLEN (COMMISSIONED 1915) …ALSO SAN DIEGO, MARIEMONT, OH, CHARLOTTE </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>PART OF THE “GARDEN CITY” MOVEMENT </li></ul></ul></ul>
    32. 36. EXPANDING THE EVER-POPULAR KINGSPORT GREENBELT
    33. 37. A DESCRIPTION OF THE KINGSPORT GREENBELT FROM ITS WEBSITE HTTP://WWW.KINGSPORTGREENBELT.COM/ The Kingsport Greenbelt is a linear park that connects residential neighborhoods, traditional parks, downtown, commercial districts, schools and activity centers. A special feature of this unique park is a pathway for pedestrian and bicycle use. The pathway meanders through marshlands, glides across open meadows, and passes by sites of historical and aesthetic value. Development and operation of the Greenbelt are guided by a citizen advisory committee and the Kingsport Parks and Recreation Department
    34. 38. USED IN “MOVE TO…” LITERATURE
    35. 40. ROLE OF STRONG COMMUNITY STEWARD
    36. 42. ENGAGE OUR LOCAL LEADERS: TWO LOCAL MAYORS WHO “GET IT”
    37. 43. AWARD WINNING LOCAL PROGRAMS: JOHNSON CITY “UP AND AT ‘EM” TURKEY TROT AWARDS ON THANKSGIVING DAY
    38. 44. IF PEOPLE HERE THINK THIS IS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
    39. 45. Childhood Obesity Prevention Summit / October 18-19, 2007  Physical activity  Air pollution And by the way…  Infrastructure costs  Social capital  CO 2 emissions  Depression  Injuries  Osteoporosis  petroleum consumption COURTESY, HOWIE FRUMKIN, MD
    40. 46. LOCAL FOOD AND LAND USE ECONOMICS
    41. 47. LOCAL SUSTAINABILITY EFFORTS
    42. 48. “ I CAN ALWAYS GROW HOUSES”
    43. 49. A STATISTIC
    44. 51. ROY’S 2003 URBAN FORESTRY MEETING IN KINGSPORT A BETTER WAY THROUGH LAND USE EDUCATION
    45. 52. WE APPLIED FOR ATTENDANCE AT THIS!!!
    46. 53. ED McMAHON TALKING ABOUT ENVIRONMENT, ECONOMIC, AND COMMUNITY GOALS…AS THE CONTAINER VESSELS AND DOLPHINS CRUISE BY
    47. 54. WORK OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA TEAM
    48. 55. “ WORK” OF OUR TEAM!!!
    49. 56. WORKSHOPS WITH A BUILT ENVIRONMENT FOCUS – JAMIE BUSSELL, ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION
    50. 58. MARK FENTON’S 1 ST VISIT
    51. 60. SCHOOLS AN EARLY SUCCESS
    52. 62. ONE-HALF THE TEAM FOR WORKFORCE HEALTH
    53. 63. A STRONG FUTURE WITH OUR PARTNERS GREENWAYS ALLIANCE “ CONNECTING PEOPLE, NATURE, AND COMMUNITIES WITH GREENWAYS AND NATURE”
    54. 65. CURRENT SAGA AREA Scott Hancock Sullivan Hawkins Johnson Washington Carter Washington Greene Lee Unicoi Virginia Tennessee
    55. 66. REGIONAL VISION 2025 <ul><li>It is my vision that our Region will encourage PLAY through TRAILS and PARKS that link us With Natural, Cultural, and Historical Treasures* </li></ul><ul><li>* This was the most popular response of all ideas generated from the 1000+ citizens participating in the 38 regional public meetings. </li></ul>
    56. 67. GOVERNOR BREDESEN SAGA PLAN RELEASE EVENT APRIL 20, 2007 KINGSPORT - GREENBELT
    57. 68. Historic Tweetsie Trail ELIZABETHTON TO JOHNSON CITY
    58. 69. HISTORY The ET&WNC was chartered in 1866. The 5-foot gauge railroad would run from the Cranberry Iron Works, west through the Doe River Gorge to Elizabethton and then to “Johnson’s Depot” (Johnson City), and a connection with the East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia Railroad (later Southern Rail).
    59. 70. LOCATION Where is the Historic Tweetsie line located?
    60. 71. PIKE’S PLACE MARKET WAS TO BE CONDEMNED PLACEMAKING: PUBLIC MARKETS BECOME VIBRANT PUBLIC SPACES WHILE ALSO ACHIEVING BROADER SOCIAL IMPACTS – FROM COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, TO HEALTH AND NUTRITION, TO PRESERVING FAMILY FARMS -- PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES WEBSITE: WWW.PPS.ORG
    61. 72. SAGA MEMBERS RECEIVING THE “OZZIE AWARD” FROM REGIONAL OZONE ACTION PARTNERSHIP ITS VOLUNTEERS AND STAFF LIKE THIS WHO MAKE IT ALL WORTHWHILE THANKS <ul><li>Pictured: l-r </li></ul><ul><li>Kitty Frazier, Director, Kingsport Parks and Rec </li></ul><ul><li>Roy Settle, Appalachian Resource and Development Council </li></ul><ul><li>Liesa Jenkins, formerly Executive Director of Kingsport Tomorrow </li></ul><ul><li>Ambre Torbett, Director of Planning Sullivan County, TN </li></ul>
    62. 73. POSTSCRIPT THIS WAS WAITING FOR ME IN MY LOCAL NEWSPAPER WHEN I RETURNED HOME
    63. 74. WHEN YOU MAKE THOSE FALL COLOR PLANS, DON’T FORGET CREEPER TRAIL <ul><li>  Johnny Molloy </li></ul><ul><li>     Looking for a new way to enjoy fall’s beauty? Don’t forget the Creeper Trail. It is so easy to enjoy. Drive up to Damascus, bring or rent a bike, then get a shuttle to the top at Whitetop Station. Coast your way 17 miles back to town, enjoying fall foliage as you drop 1,500 feet, passing numerous streamside and forest vistas. Then top your adventure off with a little dinner in town, or bring a picnic. </li></ul><ul><li>   The Virginia Creeper Trail was nearly a century in the making. Of course, the originators of the railroad through this slice of southwest Virginia had no vision whatsoever of plastic clad pedalers, backpack-toting hikers and equestrians plying their railbed for pleasure and exercise. That would come later. First, entrepreneurs vying for iron and timber resources raised capital, then came the sweat from many men building trestles   and blasting through hillsides. </li></ul><ul><li>   Next came a period of economic prosperity borne of untold millions of timber feet cut from the Virginia Highlands, followed by a period of slow decline in business for the Virginia-Carolina Railroad, or V-C, until it was nothing but fodder for railroad nostalgia buffs, until the train whistles stopped in 1977. After that, the reality of a rail trail was still uncertain and a lot of effort by local groups led to the complete rail trail, which now extends from Whitetop Station to Abingdon, a distance of more than 34 miles.   </li></ul><ul><li>   Along the way, the railroad was nicknamed the Virginia Creeper, maybe for the vine of the same name that thrives locally, or maybe because of the slow nature of the railroad as it climbed through the mountains. Today, the Virginia Creeper is the most popular trail in the Old Dominion. The popularity is well deserved. From Whitetop Station at 3,525 feet, the Creeper courses down through the mountains, passing vistas near and far, deep woods, small farms and by clear, fast streams. It passes Green Cove, where an original train station still stands. And it crosses numerous trestles that deliver treetop views. The trailside terrain finally opens up at Damascus.   </li></ul><ul><li>   The second section of the Creeper, from Damascus to Abingdon, heads through farmlands, meadow and woods. Fall foliage fans who want to get some exercise as they enjoy autumn should head toward Abingdon, where the trail is level enough to require physical exertion, i.e. pedaling. </li></ul><ul><li>   This 16-mile lower section is less popular than the upper section, but the lower section was built first, and was in operation by early 1900. This section has a more pastoral feel than the upper section. From Damascus, the Creeper passes by many homes and farms, where there are gates to open and close. Please do so and respect the landowners who are gracious enough to cooperate and make a path for all to enjoy. And there is plenty of scenery to enjoy, as the trail descends alongside Laurel Creek and the South   Fork of the Holston River. </li></ul><ul><li>   A highlight of the trip is the long and high trestle that spans the confluence of the South Fork and Middle Fork Holston River. Trail’s end in Abingdon offers parking and restrooms. No matter which section of the Creeper you bike, it will be a great way to experience fall. </li></ul>
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