• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
IPv6 Implementation and Migration
 

IPv6 Implementation and Migration

on

  • 718 views

Our entire IPv6 presentation on implementation and migration from Interop NYC 2012.

Our entire IPv6 presentation on implementation and migration from Interop NYC 2012.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
718
Views on SlideShare
339
Embed Views
379

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0

3 Embeds 379

http://www.netuf.net 307
http://2881950381259898357_33cac3894ea4526c9d93a7a831074e5207abdb1d.blogspot.com 45
http://feeds.feedburner.com 27

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    IPv6 Implementation and Migration IPv6 Implementation and Migration Presentation Transcript

    • IPv6 on the INTEROPNET Interop, Wednesday, 3 October 2012 Brandon Ross, Routing Team LeadJeff Enters, WW IPv6 Portfolio Manager, HP Aaron Hughes, CTO, 6connectChief Network Architect, Network Utility Force http://www.netuf.net/
    • Agenda• Background and Goals• How IPv6 works on the InteropNET• Subnetting and Addressing• Challenges and Lessons Learned• Results and Statistics• Conclusions
    • RFC 6540• Are you aware of this requirement?• Are your nodes IPv6 capable?
    • IPv6 Support Required for All IP- Capable Nodes – RFC 6540• “Given the global lack of available IPv4 space, and limitations in IPv4 extension and transition technologies, this document advises that IPv6 support is no longer considered optional.”• “IPv6 support must be equivalent or better in quality and functionality when compared to IPv4 support in a new or updated IP implementation.”
    • Background• IPv4 depletion is already occurring• IPv6 adoption is accelerating• Most network hardware supports IPv6• For the most part, dual stack Just Works IPv6 Routing Table Growth IPv4 Free Pool Depletion http://www.ipv6actnow.org/info/statistics/#alloc http://www.potaroo.net/tools
    • US Feds Lesson LearnedThe US federal government had a mandate for all public facing webservices to support IPv6 by September 30, 2012.287 of 1494 sites had IPv6 web support by the deadline. That’s nearly 20%. Not 100%, but far ahead of most other large organizations. Source: http://usgv6-deploymon.antd.nist.gov//
    • Europe out of Free Pool• Asia (APNIC) effectively ran out of free addresses in April, 2011• Europe (RIPE) is also out of addresses as of September 14th• ARIN predicted to run out of free space in August (Geoff Huston, http://www.potaroo.net/tools/ipv4/index.ht ml)
    • Goals• Network must be fully dual stack (IPv4+IPv6)• All IPv4 services should be reachable over IPv6• Connections to IPv6-enabled websites should use IPv6 by default• Nothing should break ☺
    • Agenda• Background and Goals• How IPv6 works on the InteropNET• Subnetting and Addressing• Challenges and Lessons Learned• Results and Statistics• Conclusions
    • Connectivity and Routing
    • Autoconfiguration• All client-facing networks use SLAAC to allow clients to auto-assign themselves an IPv6 address and default gateway on the correct subnet – Supported by all IPv6-capable devices Auto-assigned IPv6 address Default Gateway (Link-local from RA)
    • DNS• All DNS services are provided by DynDNS and load-balanced by F5• In order to connect to Google and Facebook over IPv6, we had to ask them to whitelist the InteropNET DNS servers – As a result, DNS requests for google.com and facebook.com receive AAAA (IPv6) responses
    • InteropNET NOC Services• Goal was to provide all internal services over IPv6 as well as IPv4• This required coordination with vendors to enable IPv6, make sure services were bound to their IPv6 ports, and publish AAAA records• Most (but not all) services ended up reachable over IPv6
    • Wireless• InteropNET wireless is provided by Xirrus• Purpose-built VLANs are shared across all APs and all are dual-stack
    • IPAM
    • IPv6 Attack TrafficSrc. Port Dst. Addr. Dst. Port Seg. Port In 50854 2607:f8b0:4001:c02::bd 443 3 56597 2607:f8b0:400f:800::100a 443 3 56593 2607:f8b0:400f:800::1005 443 3 56598 2607:f8b0:400f:800::1000 443 3 49336 2404:6800:4003:802::1001 443 3 53427 2607:f8b0:400f:800::1000 80 3 49875 2607:fae0:1:1:426c:8fff:fe59:5172 22 3 51154 2607:f8b0:400f:800::100f 80 3 53425 2607:f8b0:400f:800::1006 80 3 49717 2607:fae0:1:1:426c:8fff:fe59:5172 22 3 51654 2607:f8b0:400f:800::1003 443 3 49221 2607:f8b0:400f:801::1006 443 3 49233 2607:fae0:1:1:426c:8fff:fe59:5172 22 3 53616 2a03:2880:10:6f01:face:b00c::5 80 3 63077 2607:f8b0:4001:c02::bd 443 3 53419 2607:f8b0:400f:800::1002 80 3 58448 2607:f8b0:400f:800::1005 443 3 53416 2607:f8b0:400f:801::100e 80 3 60311 2607:f8b0:400f:800::100c 80 3 62773 2607:f8b0:4001:c02::bd 443 3 50390 2607:f8b0:400f:800::1003 443 3 53406 2607:f8b0:400f:800::1009 80 3 62751 2607:f8b0:4001:c02::bd 443 3 62320 2607:f8b0:4001:c02::bd 443 3 62059 2607:f8b0:400f:800::1006 443 3 50117 2001:4860:4007:801::1007 443 3 51679 2607:f8b0:400f:801::100f 443 3
    • Agenda• Background and Goals• How IPv6 works on the InteropNET• Subnetting and Addressing• Challenges and Lessons Learned• Results and Statistics• Conclusions
    • State of Assignments• All of the registries, for the most part, assign initial blocks for Service provider /32 Enterprise /48
    • What makes up a good addressing plan?• Depends on the type of network, the size of the network, and problem to be solved• Points to consider Documentation Ease of troubleshooting Aggregation Standards compliance Growth SLAAC Existing IPv4 addressing plan Human factors
    • Algorithmic Approach• Encode every IPv4 address in the network in an IPv6 address 10.10.10.10 (A0A0A0A) 2001:DB8:A0A:A0A::
    • Link Numbering Issues• OSPFv3 masks this problem, unlike in IPv4• Separation of addressing from the link state database means that OSPFv3 neighbor relationships will establish, even on links with mismatched addressing and/or masks• Link-local based forwarding prevents address mismatches from being easily detected because traffic flows normally and traceroutes don’t appear too strange
    • Link Numbering Issues• To detect link numbering errors, look for “Uturn” routing:$ traceroute6 2620:144:B0C::traceroute to 2620:144:B0C:: (2620:144:b0c::), 30 hops max, 80 byte packets 1 2620:144:8fc:: (2620:144:8fc::) 26.747 ms 26.730 ms 26.716 ms 2 2620:144:b0c::2 (2620:144:b0c::2) 29.137 ms 29.222 ms 29.264 ms 3 2620:144:8fc:: (2620:144:8fc::) 29.355 ms 29.335 ms 29.350 ms 4 2620:144:8fc:: (2620:144:8fc::) 29.438 ms !H 29.433 ms !H 29.413 ms !HNote hop 2 is the misnumbered address. This traceroute should have looked like this:$ traceroute6 2620:144:B0C::traceroute to 2620:144:B0C:: (2620:144:b0c::), 30 hops max, 80 byte packets 1 2620:144:8fc:: (2620:144:8fc::) 32.473 ms 32.447 ms 32.427 ms
    • Link Numbering Issues
    • Link Numbering Issues• Should you number your links at all or just use link-local?• Loopback interfaces usually show up so you know which routers traffic is following, so why waste address space on links?
    • Link Numbering Issues• Using equal cost multipath?• $ traceroute6 2001:DB8::5:2• traceroute to 2001:DB8::5:2 (2001:DB8::5:2), 30 hops max, 80 byte packets• 1 2001:DB8::6:1 (2001:DB8::6:1) 22.723 ms 26.730 ms 26.716 ms• 2 2001:DB8::1:1 (2001:DB8::1:1) 80.233 ms * ms 72.173 ms• 3 2001:DB8::5:2 (2001:DB8::5:2) * ms 99.223 ms 29.350 ms• Which link did it take?
    • Link Numbering Issues• Does your management system use link numbering for monitoring or circuit identification?• Are you really saving any significant addressing by not assigning addresses?
    • Link Numbering Issues• $ traceroute6 2001:DB8::5:2• traceroute to 2001:DB8::5:2 (2001:DB8::5:2), 30 hops max, 80 byte packets• 1 2001:DB8::6:1 (2001:DB8::6:1) 22.723 ms 26.730 ms 26.716 ms• 2 2001:DB8::4 (2001:DB8::4) * ms 88.322 ms * ms• 3 2001:DB8::5:2 (2001:DB8::5:2) * ms 90.123 ms 100.110 ms• Better, now we know which link is having issues.
    • Standards ComplianceNetworks smaller than /64 can be desirable, especially using /127s for point to point links (RFC 6164)To avoid future breakage, allocate a /64 in your documentation but use the smaller blockSimilarly, reserve /48s for EVERYTHING you can, there’s no reason to allocate densely, there’s plenty of spaceIf you have a complex network, allocate in a sparse way to enable easy aggregation
    • Addressing and Subnetting Recommendations• You can indeed add convenience and save on documentation by using an algorithmic approach• But ONLY if you have reasonably few IPv4 blocks, if you have 100s, you’ll probably need a different approach unless you can get a large enough v6 allocation• You DON’T want to reproduce IPv4 “cruft” into IPv6. If your IPv4 subnetting is a mess, it’s best to re-do it for IPv6.
    • Agenda• Background and Goals• How IPv6 works on the InteropNET• Subnetting and Addressing• Challenges and Lessons Learned• Results and Statistics• Conclusions
    • DUID• When a Windows machine is cloned, you can get two or more machines with the same DHCPv6 Unique IDentifier (DUID)• This DUID is used by the DHCPv6 server to identify the client, so when two clients with the same DUID request IPv6 addresses with DHCPv6, they will both be given the same address• When the second machine receives its address from the DHCPv6 server, it does IPv6 Duplicate Address Detection, determines there is an IP address conflict, and refuses the lease
    • Rogue RAs• When a client is configured to run 6to4 (an automatic tunneling protocol) and Internet Connection Sharing, it will advertise itself as an IPv6 router by sending out RAs on its wireless interface• Clients receiving such RAs will auto-assign themselves an address in the wrong subnet• Routers are generally configured with RA guard or equivalent on their wired ports• Unfortunately there is no way to block rogue RAs over wireless APs (and some wired switches)
    • Agenda• Background and Goals• How IPv6 works on the InteropNET• Subnetting and Addressing• Challenges and Lessons Learned• Results and Statistics• Conclusions
    • Usage Statistics – Internet Traffic• IPv6 usage on averaged 3% of total traffic • That’s up from 2% of Interop’s traffic last year
    • Usage Statistics – Internet Traffic IPv4 IPv6
    • Usage Statistics – By Type Most traffic is HTTP, probably not a surprise.How much of that is peer2peer hiding in port 80?
    • Usage Statistics – interop.com• Users inside the InteropNET preferred IPv4 to reach www.interop.com . • 29 GB delivered over IPv6 • 18 GB delivered over IPv4 • Possibly lower than previously due to Happy Eyeballs
    • Agenda• Background and Goals• How IPv6 works on the InteropNET• Subnetting and Addressing• Challenges and Lessons Learned• Results and Statistics• Conclusions
    • Conclusions• IPv6 works in the real world• Over 60% of Interop attendees were using IPv6 to reach interop.com without even knowing it• There are challenges to implementing IPv6, but nothing show-stopping• About 3% of the Internet’s content is reachable over IPv6 (and growing fast)• A much smaller percentage of Internet users have IPv6 connectivity (though this may change quickly with IPv4 depletion)
    • Today’s RealityWorld IPv6 Launch Facts • There is a proliferation of IPv6 enabled mobile devices, appliances, home networks, etc. • Content is NOW served over IPv6 • More and more users are operating in an IPv6 world UNKNOWNINGLY! - AND these users are having a better Quality of Experience • Companies that have not deployed IPv6 can’t get to these users and these users can’t get to them over IPv6 IPv6 adopters have a distinct competitive advantage! Don’t be shut out ! IPv6 is INEVITABLE!
    • Vote for Me!AC – Advisory Council “The Advisory Council serves in an advisory capacity to the Board of Trustees on Internet number resource policy and related matters. Adhering to the procedures in the Policy Development Process, the Advisory Council forwards consensus-based policy proposals to the Board for ratification.”Voting from October 24th-November 3rdElection HQ site:https://www.arin.net/app/election/
    • Learn More!• http://www.getipv6.info/• http://tunnelbroker.net/• http://www.sixxs.net/• http://www.ipv6ready.org• https://www.arin.net/knowledge/ipv6_info_center.ht ml• Contact us: – Brandon Ross, – Chief Network Architect and CEO – Network Utility Force • bross@netuf.net +1-404-635-6667