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I4Education webinar: IFRC learning network case study. Presented June 21, 2012 by Reda Sadki, Senior officer for Learning systems International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

I4Education webinar: IFRC learning network case study. Presented June 21, 2012 by Reda Sadki, Senior officer for Learning systems International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

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Red Cross Red Crescent Learning network Red Cross Red Crescent Learning network Presentation Transcript

  • Learning systems Red Cross Red Crescent Learning network Reda Sadki, Senior officer for Learning systems International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent SocietiesThursday, June 21, 12
  • The black hole Black Hole Outburst in Spiral Galaxy M83 (NASA, Chandra, Hubble, 04/30/12)Thursday, June 21, 12
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  • 75,000Thursday, June 21, 12
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  • ifrc.org/learning-platformThursday, June 21, 12
  • Rumble in the (learning) jungle: Distance learning vs. Face-to-face learningThursday, June 21, 12
  • Hallowed or demonized #1 Is the final academic performance of students in distance learning programs better than that of those enrolled in traditional FTF programs, in the last twenty-year period? (Mickey Shachar and Yoram Nuemann. Twenty years of research on the academic performance differences between traditional and distance learning: summative meta-analysis and trend examination. Merlot Journal of Online Learning and Teaching.Vol 6, No. 2, June 2010Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Yes. Distance learning results in increasingly better learning outcomes since1991.Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Hallowed or demonized #2 Does supplementing face-to-face instruction with online instruction enhance learning? U.S. Department of Education. Evaluation of evidence-based practices in online learning: a meta-analysis and review of online learning studies. September 2010.Thursday, June 21, 12
  • No. Positive effects associated with blended learning should not be attributed to the media, per se.Thursday, June 21, 12
  • ifrc.org/learning-platformThursday, June 21, 12
  • Building online learning for the Red Cross Red CrescentThursday, June 21, 12
  • 11 IFRC-designed courses Code of Conduct 30m Effective writing in English 40h H2P - Humanitarian pandemic preparedness programme 45m IDRL - International Disaster Response Laws - Introduction 30m Influenza pandemic preparedness 45m Introduction to cash transfer programming 2h Project/programme planning (PPP) course 2h Stay safe - personal security 3h Stay safe - security management 3h Strategy 2020 30m WORC - the world of Red Cross and Red Crescent 16hThursday, June 21, 12
  • In development • Sphere humanitarian standards • CBHFA • Volunteering induction • VCAThursday, June 21, 12
  • Pillars of online learning • Pedagogy • Content • TechnologyThursday, June 21, 12
  • A Red Cross Red Crescent pedagogy? • Learning continuum (academic partnerships) • Global learning (“productive diversity”) • Informal learning • Experience-based knowledge transmission • Social network dependent • Research and learning agendaThursday, June 21, 12
  • Thursday, June 21, 12 Old learning
  • Here we are, in a village school in Greece, in 1983.Thursday, June 21, 12
  • The teacher sits at his desk, on a little stage at the front of the classroom. ‘Look this way’, he says. ‘Listen to what I tell you.’. ‘Answer my questions, hands up, only one person speaks at a time.’Thursday, June 21, 12
  • ‘Now, everyone read chapter 7, and answer the questions at the end. No talking, silent work please.’Thursday, June 21, 12
  • One student looks up for a moment. Is she thinking about her work? Or is she daydreaming?Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Then she turns. ‘Turn around, Soula,’ says the teacher. ‘Don’t disturb the girls behind you’Thursday, June 21, 12
  • The classroom is a communications and knowledge architecture. Here is the pedagogical design of this classroom in Greece in 1983, and tens of thousands others like it before and since: Some typical discursive flows: ✓Teacher talks -> students listen. ✓Teacher Q. -> students A. (‘hands up!’, ‘one at a time!’). ✓Teacher says ‘read chapter 7’ -> students read and memorize. ✓Teacher sets test -> students respond with correctly memorized answers.Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Here, by contrast is the communication and knowledge architecture of the online classroom we want. Some typical discursive flows: • Teacher scaffolds peer <-> peer feedback. • All students involved simultaneously in constructive peer <-> peer learning dialogue. • An active, knowledge producing community. • Continuous formative assessment, supplementing teacher assessments with structured self and peer assessments.Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Online learning changes role of the teacher and the responsibilities of learners. Teaching and learning will never be the same again. But how?Thursday, June 21, 12
  • What do we want?Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Collaborative Learners create together, giving each other feedback (and even feedback on feedback), sharing their inspirations and discoveries. Within their knowledge communities, learners are connected through individual learner profiles.Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Flexible Learners work at their own pace, according to their own interests and capabilities, while teachers track their progress easily through multiple views and match progress against learning standards.Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Motivating Learners are inspired to create through embedding sound, image, and video within their texts for digital storytelling, lab reports with recorded experiments, local oral history projects, and more. They receive immediate feedback from other learners and from a range of computer-assisted tools in time to improve their work. Learner successes are shared with classmates, parents, and other classes in a web portfolio.Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Participatory Learners can join and lead project groups, post and share files, and start and engage in discussions at the assignment- and knowledge community-levels.Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Supportive Learners have access to tools that not only help them to improve their work, but also their knowledge of the writing process and mastery of written forms, from grammar to structure to genre, within English Language Arts and across other disciplines that require extended written or multimedia reports, such as Science and Social Studies.Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Assessment A rich learning information environment, supporting: • diagnostic assessment – finding out what students already know and still need to learn • formative assessment – rich, rapidly responsive feedback that directly supports student learningThursday, June 21, 12
  • Learning should be: • Collaborative • Flexible • Motivating • Participatory • SupportiveThursday, June 21, 12
  • Why do we want it?Thursday, June 21, 12
  • a time of disruptive change ...in society, educationThursday, June 21, 12
  • Seven fundamental principlesThursday, June 21, 12
  • 1.Ubiquitous learning • students using social media, Web. 2.0 • learn anywhere, anytime • cloud computingThursday, June 21, 12
  • 2. Recursive feedback • recursive feedback • “Work and dialogue about the work”Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Feedback tools • Review (against a rubric) • Annotations (in-text commentary) • Checker (by the software, natural language processing) • Survey (knowledge assessments)Thursday, June 21, 12
  • 3. Multimodal meaning • adding image, video, audio and any other datafile • a fully multimodal workspaceThursday, June 21, 12
  • 4. Active knowledge making • students as knowledge makers, • not just knowledge consumers • supplementing heritage hierarchical knowledge flows with lateral knowledge flowsThursday, June 21, 12
  • Balance of agency shifts • readers <=> writers (e.g. in the social media) • producers <=> consumers (e.g. ‘prosumers’)Thursday, June 21, 12
  • 5. Collaborative intelligenceThursday, June 21, 12
  • Social learning • not ‘friends’ or ‘followers’ but ‘peers’ working in ‘knowledge communities’ • teacher builds peer-to-peer learning scaffolds (projects, review formats) • finished works are shared knowledge in the community’s ‘bookstore’Thursday, June 21, 12
  • 6. Metacognition • “Learners thinking about their thinking” • Semantic tagging • Designing information architecture • Making and explaining change suggestionsThursday, June 21, 12
  • 7. Differentiated learning • not every learner on the same page at the same time • making space for learner differences • students work at their own pace, even do different things at the same time • multiple learning pathwaysThursday, June 21, 12
  • if we are all learners nowThursday, June 21, 12
  • a teaching environment that is a learning environmentThursday, June 21, 12
  • machine learning supporting student learning supporting teacher learning supporting…Thursday, June 21, 12
  • learning is the new teachingThursday, June 21, 12
  • teaching is the new learningThursday, June 21, 12
  • things we have always aspired to do in educationThursday, June 21, 12
  • but nowThursday, June 21, 12
  • a new economy of effort (the seven affordances)Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Learning about learning www.NewLearningOnline.com Scholar, a new tool for online learning learning.cgscholar.com Kalantzis, Mary and Bill Cope. 2008. New Learning: Elements of a Science of Education. Cambridge UK: Cambridge University Press.Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Trends in online learningThursday, June 21, 12
  • flipped classroomThursday, June 21, 12
  • Open accessThursday, June 21, 12
  • MOOC Massive Open Online CourseThursday, June 21, 12
  • Post-campusThursday, June 21, 12
  • reda.sadki@ifrc.org International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies Red Cross Red Crescent Learning network www.ifrc.org/learningThursday, June 21, 12
  • So you want to build a course...?Thursday, June 21, 12
  • Learning content development • Needs assessment • Procurement (RFP/CBA) • Instructional design • Content development • Quality assurance (testing) • Delivery and promotionThursday, June 21, 12
  • Procurement tools • Request for proposal (RFP) template • Evaluation criteria • Roster of external partners • Comparative bid assessmentThursday, June 21, 12
  • Instructional design tools • Pedagogy (how we teach/learn) and knowledge sharing (PKS) framework • Interaction toolkit • Script and storyboard templatesThursday, June 21, 12
  • QA and testing • Quality standards • Testing suite (pedagogy, content, technology) • Usability testingThursday, June 21, 12
  • Delivery and promotion • Discovery and metadata • Multiple entry points • Learning Network blog (ifrc.org/learning) • Tutoring as promotionThursday, June 21, 12