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Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
Hepatitis C in Egypt
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Hepatitis C in Egypt

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Hepatitis C in Egypt

Hepatitis C in Egypt

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  • Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis C virus. The disease can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong condition that can lead to cirrhosis of the liver or liver cancer. The hepatitis C virus is transmitted through contact with the blood of an infected person. About 150 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus, and more than 350 000 people die every year from hepatitis C-related liver diseases. Hepatitis C can be treated using antiviral medicines. There is currently no vaccine for hepatitis C; however, research in this area is ongoing.
  • 14.7% of the population in Egypt (0.147 X 78 million) is 11,466,000 persons who have been infected with this virus. This number is an underestimate because it does not include the number of people who have been infected that are under 15 years of age or over 60 years of age.   6/1000 new infections each year. In terms of absolute numbers of people in Egypt getting infected this over 500,000 individuals. 70,000 of them are children. This is a public health emergency. Transmission of HCV from person to person in Egypt is of course continuing
  • HCV is transmitted from one infected person to another uninfected person by blood from the infected person. This means that an uninfected person has to be EXPOSED to blood from an infected person. There are many ways this exposure can occur. The most common exposure to HCV infection in Egypt is from formal and informal medical and dental care . For example, injections of all kinds, blood tests or when blood is taken by syringe or by a lancet. A lancet is a small very sharp blade used to stick a finger for example to get blood for testing blood type. There are many proceedures and treatments that are percutaneous (means through the skin) or cause bleeding. If the person doing this is not using sterile equipment or materials or may be has not changed their latex gloves, you could be exposed to HCV infection .
  • 1 - The date of 28 July was chosen for World Hepatitis Day in honour of the birthday of Nobel Laureate Professor Baruch Samuel Blumberg, discoverer of the hepatitis B virus .
  • Transcript

    • 1. Hepatitis C in Egypt By: Nirmin ElSaber
    • 2. What is HCV? • liver disease. • Can range from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong condition that can lead to cirrhosis of the liver or liver cancer. • About 150 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus every year. • More than 350 000 people die every year • Hepatitis C can be treated using antiviral medicines. • No vaccine for hepatitis C.
    • 3. Spreading by BLOOD 1. A person is bleeding 2. A medical or dental person or assistant uses an instrument or a medical or dental equipment that was used for another patient 3. Injections 4. Medical and dental procedures 5. Sticking your finger for blood 6. Multi-dose vials 7. injection drug use 8. being born to a hepatitis C-infected mother
    • 4. Treatment
    • 5. Status in Egypt is a public health EMERGENCY • 14.7% of the population in Egypt is 11,466,000 persons who have been infected with this virus. (does not include the number of people who have been infected that are under 15 years of age or over 60 years of age). • 6/1000 new infections each year. • 70,000 of them are children.
    • 6. • The most common exposure to HCV infection in Egypt is from formal and informal medical and dental care.
    • 7. • Injections of all kinds, blood tests or when blood is taken by syringe or by a lancet. A lancet is a small very sharp blade used to stick a finger for example to get blood for testing blood type.
    • 8. How to Stay SAFE? •  Do not share your personal stuff: razors, tooth brushes, or cosmetic care equipment with people around you. Other examples that can cause infection is when diabetic people share their blood sugar monitoring equipment.
    • 9. • Try  not  to  use  Drugs  in  Multi  Dose  Vials:  Many drugs are in small glass bottles called Vials. Infection from contaminated multi-dose drug vials • Go find doctors and dentists who take  precautions to prevent HCV.
    • 10. Ask. . . ? Is this medical or dental care I am going to get, is it safe? Could I get virus C infection  from this medical or dental care?
    • 11. ? Questions time •? •? •? •? •? •? •?
    • 12. Reducing Exposure • The reduction of HCV transmission will require a reduction in exposure to infection. • Reducing exposure will require that all persons working in the health care sector including dental care, nursing, pharmaceuticals and all those who are assisting these professional will need to improve infection control and practice safe injection procedures and aseptic technique.
    • 13. Refrences • http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs16 • http://www2.hawaii.edu/~dewolfe/p.html

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