Science and Social Media: The Importance of Being Online
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Science and Social Media: The Importance of Being Online

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This powerpoint was a part of a 2 hour workshop on social networking for scientists that was given at the 2012 NIH, NIGMS Fourth Biennial National IDeA Symposium of Biomedical Research Excellence......

This powerpoint was a part of a 2 hour workshop on social networking for scientists that was given at the 2012 NIH, NIGMS Fourth Biennial National IDeA Symposium of Biomedical Research Excellence (NISBRE).

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  • Now, more than ever, science is fundamentally intertwined with national and international political issuesHow can we, as a nation, make responsible decisions on complex scientific issues like gmos, climate change, energy needs and biomedical research ethics when only a small percentage of our populace—including our policy-makers—has even a basic grasp on the science behind the debates?
  • Science communication has become a public relations nightmare. Scientists and science are under constant attack from political and religious interests. It is a culture where our research is not only questioned but mocked, and where our funding is constantly on the chopping clock. A culture where former U.S. Senate majority leader Trent Lott can call his four years of science and math in high school “a waste of my time and a waste of my teacher's time” and receive roaring applause
  • We aren't powerless against this bad public image. The onus is on us, though, to be more engaged. Right now, no one knows who we are. In 2009, Research!America polled the average American and asked them a very simple question: name a living scientist. Any living scientist – anyone in this room would have counted. Anyone at this conference. Any one of the over 7.1 million scientists employed world wide.
  • A sobering 65%didn’t even try, and another 18% got it wrong.
  • If we view science communication through the lens of public relations, the advice given by Rick Borchelt and his colleagues in an essay for the American Association for the Advancement of Science becomes even more poignant: “The scientific community needs to understand what ethical practitioners of public relations have long known: trust is not about information; it's about dialogue and transparency”
  • Putting out a press release isn't a conversation either. When you think about it, ournalists engage in one-way communication, too, rarely taking feedback from or engaging in a conversation with their audience. Although their reach may be broader, the message is the same: here is the information; end of story. Not to mention that, as many of you know, science reporting has its own set of issues. Most science journalists have never set foot in a lab or taken a college level course in science. We complain about sensationalist or poor reporting, but the fact of the matter is that journalists often haven't had the training to understand the science they are assigned to explain. 
  • It is especially important that we engage in social networking because studies have shown science literacy is only a small factor in how people form their opinions, while the interplay between values, religious affiliation, and the opinions of others whom they trust is much more influential.While political parties and religious organizations jump head first into discussions of their beliefs with anyone who will listen, thus playing an active role in the decision-making process, scientists stand back, hand out facts, and expect that information alone is enough to sway attitudes. Instead of appearing as beacons of knowledge, our actions make us appear stuffy, elitist, and disengaged. By connecting scientists with the rest of the world, social media is the most powerful tool available for us to shift this paradigm.
  • In one minute on the Internet, there are 100,000 new tweets, 80,000 new Facebook wall posts, 1,500 new blog posts, and 700,000 Google searches. The rate of growth of social media is astronomical. Facebook now touts over 800 million members and Google +, which only started last year, now reaches over 62 million people. 2010 social medis sites overtook porn as the most frequented
  • Yet when it comes to social adaptation and technology, we’re more than behind the curve. Although 72% of internet-using Americans are on Facebook, less than 2/3 of college faculty are. Similarly, in one survey, more than half of lab managers said they have never used Facebook.
  • If we view science communication through the lens of public relations, the advice given by Rick Borchelt and his colleagues in an essay for the American Association for the Advancement of Science becomes even more poignant: “The scientific community needs to understand what ethical practitioners of public relations have long known: trust is not about information; it's about dialogue and transparency”
  • ALSO networking with each other! Participation in new media can also improve connection and collaboration on an unprecedented scale. Think of social networks as conference mingling on steroids: instead of rubbing elbows with a handful of colleagues, a social-media-savvy scientist can interact with thousands of people from all walks of life.BertalanMesko of Scienceroll.com “blogging and Twitter don't just help me in my research but totally changed the way I interact with other researchers and collaborators.” John Fossella, who blogs at Genes 2 Brains 2 Mind 2 Me, “Instead of getting feedback from the same handful of folks I regularly see in the lab, I'm getting comments and new ideas from folks who I used to work with 5, 10 and even 20 years ago, not to mention new folks who I've struck up online interactions with.”
  • Superficial:Social media can increase funding efforts by 40%,
  • “Don’t be afraid. Spend as much time or as little time as you want on this. These systems are tools, no more or no less. You decided how to use them just like you decide how to use a microscope. But like a microscope they can be really useful – so consider experimenting with them”
  • “Don’t be afraid. Spend as much time or as little time as you want on this. These systems are tools, no more or no less. You decided how to use them just like you decide how to use a microscope. But like a microscope they can be really useful – so consider experimenting with them”
  • http://www.nature.com/news/2011/110727/full/475425a.html
  • So impt as central hub for networking to be sent back to. You want it to include

Transcript

  • 1. Science and Social MediaThe Importance of Being Online Christie Wilcox University of Hawaii at Manoa Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology http://christiewilcox.com http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/science-sushi Twitter: @NerdyChristie Facebook: http://facebook.com/christie.l.wilcox
  • 2. Twitter Hashtags #NISBRE2012 #SNFShttp://socialnetworkingforscientists.wikispaces.com/
  • 3. 28%... the percentage of Americans which pass a basic science literacy test.
  • 4. “When I was in high school, if you were in the "so-called" pre-college curriculum, you had to take four years of science and fouryears of math - a waste of my time, a waste of my teachers time and a waste of space.” Former U.S. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott
  • 5. AlbertStephen Marie Einstein?Hawking! Curie?
  • 6. "The scientific community needs tounderstand what ethical practitioners of public relations have long known: trust is not about information; it’s about dialogue and transparency" Rick E. Borchelt, Lynne T . Friedmann, & Earle Holland Managing the Trust Portfolio: Science Public Relations and Social Responsibility
  • 7. The Paywall
  • 8. The Jargon Wall
  • 9. Where do you get most of your news about national and international issues? PEW Research Center, Dec 2010
  • 10. Where do you get information on specific scientific issues?The Internet is the mainsource of information forlearning about specificscientific issues such asglobal climate change orbiotechnology University of Chicago, National Opinion Research Center, General Social Survey (2008)
  • 11. 57% of Americans say they talk to people online more than they do in real life.
  • 12. 100 90 80On a Social Network? 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Average American Scientists .
  • 13.
  • 14. Highly Cited Low/No Tweets Highly Tweeted
  • 15. >12,000 pageviews... in a week.
  • 16. Two words:Personal
  • 17. “One of the things I hear most frequently about a new hire is howdisturbing it is that he doesn’t have a web presence. Something must be wrong, right?” Danah Boyd Assistant Professor, NYU; Visiting Researcher, Harvard Law
  • 18. Don’t trust my word on it…
  • 19. “I view it as a fundamental part of my job as a scientist and aneducator. I use social networking to follow the literature, to do outreach, to communicate with colleagues, etc.”
  • 20. “If you have, say, a thousand followers on Twitter, that’s like talking to a large auditorium every time you tweet something about your science: a powerful tool indeed. A direct line like that means thescientist can ensure that their science is accurately portrayed and that they have an opportunity to share with the public the personal passion that drives them to science in the first place.”
  • 21. “A new generation of young researchers has grown up with an ever-present Internet. Publishers have been quicker thanacademics to react to this new world, but scientists must catchup. Even if you choose not to blog, you can certainly expect that your papers and ideas will increasingly be blogged about. So there it is — blog or be blogged.”
  • 22. What is New Media?A Map of the Online Landscape
  • 23. Web 1.0 Web 2.0250,000 sites 80,000,000 sites Collective Intelligence User Generated Content 45 million users 1 billion + users 1996 2006
  • 24. Dont think you need to be on Facebook? 72% 48% 3 million links of internet use it as their primary shared every users are. news source hour
  • 25. Dont think you need to be on Twitter? 1 500 5,530 billion new tweets per second million userstweets every 3 during the Japanese per day days earthquake & tsunami
  • 26. "The qualities that make Twitter seem inane andhalf-baked are what make it so powerful." Jonathan Zittrain Harvard University Law professor and Faculty Co- Director, Berkman Center for Internet and Society
  • 27. 5,106 Tweets Per Second
  • 28. >80,000pageviews...in 48 hours.
  • 29. Every Journey Starts With The First StepDIY New Media