It’S All Brand New
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It’S All Brand New

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An interactive presentation put together for an Aim Higher Expert Session delivered at Doncaster Business School to students and lecturers and then to a contingent of visitng Chinese Lecturers by ...

An interactive presentation put together for an Aim Higher Expert Session delivered at Doncaster Business School to students and lecturers and then to a contingent of visitng Chinese Lecturers by popular demand! It started with a quiz, then the colours represented brands, the ipods had hyperlinks to sound clips that also represent brands and links to marketing communications that try to engage emotionally... some of the text has gone a bit awry in the conversion, sorry!

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It’S All Brand New It’S All Brand New Presentation Transcript

  • It’s all brand new… Re-branding “branding” Doncaster Business School
  • The Brand
    • What on earth is it?
    Doncaster Business School
  • Doncaster Business School
  • Doncaster Business School
  • Doncaster Business School
  • Doncaster Business School
  • Doncaster Business School
  • Doncaster Business School
  • The brand
    • “ More than just a name”
    • “ Build a brand that resonates”
    • “ The idea of the brand is starting to wear thin”
    • “ We now live in a world of brands”
    • “ A name, term, sign, symbol or design”
    • “ Live the brand”
    • “ Develop brand touchpoints”
    • “ The concept of brand is now freely applied to pop bands, pets, movie stars and countries”
    Doncaster Business School
  • The brand
    • "The biggest misconception in branding strategies is the belief that branding is about market share, when it is really about 'mind and emotions share’,”
    • Marc Gobe
    Doncaster Business School
  • The brand
    • So, a new emotionally driven paradigm has evolved for branding
    • Two key influential texts
      • “ Emotional Branding”, Marc Gobe
      • “ Lovemarks”, Kevin Roberts
    Doncaster Business School
  • The brand
    • Functional , ‘known’ brands still have relevance; a place in the brave new world
    • … but the more emotionally intelligent , engaging brands have more differentiation, more attachment, more loyalty
    Doncaster Business School
  • Doncaster Business School
  • Doncaster Business School
  • Doncaster Business School
  • Doncaster Business School
  • The new brand
    • Competes for attention…
    • keeps that attention…
    • through connection, or engagement
    • Differentiates from competition
    • Is built through an understanding of the customer
    • Forges a deep and lasting connection
    Doncaster Business School
  • The new brand
    • Focuses on emotional needs of people rather than the physical needs of the customer…
    Doncaster Business School
  • The new brand
    • The good, service or idea is no longer enough in today’s market…
    • … these are all now mere commodities
    • Organisation’s need to engage with people, form relationships and develop “win-win” situations…
    • … both parties benefiting
    Doncaster Business School
  • The new brand
    • The increasing shortage of time, stress of modern-living and near bewildering array of choice and options support the need for powerful, emotional engagement
    • Organisations begin to realise that loyalty can’t be bought by money…
    • … but it can be bought by love!
    Doncaster Business School
  • The love / respect axis
    • Designed by Kevin Roberts and Bob Seelert from Saatchi & Saatchi
    • It works as a perceptual map…
    • … a projective tool best filled in by customers through discussion, debate, argument, sulking and agreement
    Doncaster Business School
  • The love / respect axis Doncaster Business School high respect low respect high love low love lovemarks brands commodities fads
  • Falling in love
    • How will you encourage customers to love your brand?
    • How will you earn respect?
    • Lovemarks are owned by the people who love them…
    • Who do you love ?
    Doncaster Business School
  • The love / respect axis Doncaster Business School high respect low respect high love low love lovemarks brands commodities fads
  • Falling in love
    • How do you make the most functional products emotional?
    Doncaster Business School
  • Finding love
    • Who are your most passionate customers?
    • Find them and listen…
    • Why do they love what you offer?
    Doncaster Business School
  • Finding love
    • Start telling stories
    • Stop talking about benefits, features, advantages, performance, USP’s, UBP’s…
    • Instead, show your brand as part of an experience, an adventure, a myth, a dream
    Doncaster Business School
  • Finding Love
    • Computers now offer "lifestyle entertainment“
    • Food is no longer about cooking or chores but about “home and lifestyle design” with exciting "sensory experiences”
    • Universities functioning as “modular knowledge banks” enhanced by a “learning experience”
    Doncaster Business School
  • Got love..?
    • Like.No.Other
    • Don’t Stop Me Now
    • Ban Boredom
    • This is Living
    Doncaster Business School
  • Commandments of emotional branding adapted from Marc Gobe
    • From consumers to people
    • Consumers buy, people live
    • In communication circles, the consumer is often approached as the "enemy" whom we must attack
    • Create desire in consumers based on a relationship of mutual respect
    • After all, the consumer is your best source of information
    Doncaster Business School
    • From product to experience
    • Products fulfill needs, experiences fulfill desires
    • Buying just for need is driven by price and convenience
    • Can you remain in the consumer's emotional memory through a connection made on a level far beyond mere need
    Doncaster Business School Commandments of emotional branding adapted from Marc Gobe
    • From honesty to trust
    • Honesty is expected
    • Trust is engaging and intimate
    • It needs to be earned
    • Trust is something else altogether…
    • … it's what you would expect from a friend, and it requires a real effort
    Doncaster Business School Commandments of emotional branding adapted from Marc Gobe
    • From quality to preference
    • Quality for the right price is a given today
    • Preference creates the sale
    • Quality is a necessary offering if you want to stay in business
    • But preference toward a brand is the real connection to success
    Doncaster Business School Commandments of emotional branding adapted from Marc Gobe
    • From notoriety to aspiration
    • Being known does not mean that you are also loved!
    • Awareness alone does not bring success
    • Can you connect to people's aspirations..?
    Doncaster Business School Commandments of emotional branding adapted from Marc Gobe
    • From identity to personality
    • Identity is recognition
    • Personality is about character and charisma!
    • Brand personalities are special…
    • … they evoke an emotional response
    Doncaster Business School Commandments of emotional branding adapted from Marc Gobe
    • From function to feel
    • Many marketers design for maximum function or visibility and not for the real experience of the consumer
    • Absolute Vodka, the Apple iMac, and Gillette razors are brands that are focused on presenting fresh shapes and sensory experiences consumers appreciate.
    Doncaster Business School Commandments of emotional branding adapted from Marc Gobe
    • From ubiquity to presence
    • Ubiquity is seen
    • Emotional presence is felt
    • There is hardly an urban space of size that has not been used to promote a brand
    • Is there an inventive way of standing out and making a connection?
    Doncaster Business School Commandments of emotional branding adapted from Marc Gobe
    • From communication to dialogue
    • Communication is telling
    • Dialogue is sharing
    • Media, such as digital, PR, brand presence and promotions can stretch further to really speak to consumers Real dialogue implies two-way communications
    • A conversation with the consumer
    Doncaster Business School Commandments of emotional branding adapted from Marc Gobe
    • From service to relationship
    • Service is selling
    • Relationship is acknowledgment
    • Service involves a basic level of efficiency in a commercial exchange
    • But relationship means that the brand representatives really seek to understand and appreciate who their customers are
    • It is what you feel when you walk into a certain environment and find that the music, the decor, and the salespeople all speak the same language…
    • … the customer's!
    • It is becoming expected; a new norm.
    Doncaster Business School Commandments of emotional branding adapted from Marc Gobe
  • From brand to lovemark
    • Information
    • Recognised by consumers
    • Generic
    • Presents a narrative
    • The promise of quality
    • Symbolic
    • Defined
    • Statements
    • Defined attributes
    • Values
    • Professional
    • Relationship
    • Loved by people
    • Personal
    • Creates a story
    • Touch of sensuality
    • Iconic
    • Infused
    • Story
    • Wrapped in mystery
    • Spirit
    • Passionate
    Doncaster Business School
  • Building your lovemark… MYSTERY
    • Tell stories
      • Stories connect, interest, touch…
    • Use your past, present and future
      • Acknowledge the past and use it to shape your future
    • Tap into dreams
      • Information is boring!
    • Nurture your myths and icons
      • Make them memorable
    • Build on inspiration
      • What would inspire your customers…
    Doncaster Business School
  • Building your lovemark… SENSUALITY
    • Synchronisation of…
    • Sight
    • Hearing
    • Smell
    • Touch
    • Taste
    Doncaster Business School
  • Building your lovemark… INTIMACY
    • Empathise
    • Commitment
    • Passion
    • Pet names?
    Doncaster Business School
  • From brand to lovemark Doncaster Business School BE PASSIONATE INVOLVE CUSTOMERS CELEBRATE LOYALTY FIND, TELL AND RETELL STORIES ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY
  • The future
    • “ The reason I don't buy it is simple: Lovemarks is just a sweetened, cutey-pie metaphor to justify his company's and industry's behaviour. But the basic behaviour, the basic business model remains fundamentally unchanged ”
    Doncaster Business School
  • The future
    • Marketing refocuses further, markets become smart, and fast, faster than companies…
    • The Cluetrain Manifesto
    • “ We are not seats or eyeballs or end users or consumers. We are human beings – and our reach exceeds your grasp… deal with it ”
    Doncaster Business School
  • The future
    • “ Unlike the lovemarks approach, if brands are real and use real people in the communication of the brand, real people will engage with them and they will be authentic.”
    • CIM, ‘This is Your Life’, Shape the Agenda Paper
    Doncaster Business School
  • The future
    • Production is dead…
    • … long live consumption
    Doncaster Business School
  • The future
    • Your customers are in control of the market…
    • … and the market is now in control of you.
    Doncaster Business School
  • Sources
    • Cowley, D. (editor), Understanding Brands , 1996, Kogan Page: London
    • De Pelsmacker, P., Geuens, M., Van den Bergh, J., Marketing Communications: A European Perspective , 2007, Prentice Hall: Harlow
    • Dibb, S., Simkin, L., Pride, W., Ferrell, O., Marketing: Concepts and Strategies , 2007, Houghton Miffin: Boston
    • Gobe, M., Emotional Branding , 2001, Allworth Press: New York
    • Roberts, K., Lovemarks , 2005, Powerhouse Books: New York
    • Wilson, A., Zeithaml, V., Bitner, M., Gremler, D., Services Marketing , 2008, McGraw Hill: London
    Doncaster Business School
  • Sources
    • Branding is dead, long live the nonsense of branding. By: Murray, Ian. Marketing Week (01419285), 5/12/2005, Vol. 28 Issue 19, p98
    • Brands: More Than a Name. By: Lozito, William. Restaurant Hospitality, Sep2004, Vol. 88 Issue 9, p56-60
    • Emotional branding isn't hokey, it's essential. By: Portnoy, J. Elias. Advertising Age, 4/12/2004, Vol. 75 Issue 15, p24-24
    • Emotional Branding: How Successful Brands Gain the Irrational Edge. By: Marken, G.A.. Public Relations Quarterly, Summer2003, Vol. 48 Issue 2, p12-12
    • 'Emotive branding is the future'. By: Adkins, Helen. Caterer & Hotelkeeper, 6/1/2006, Vol. 196 Issue 4427, p8-8, 1p;
    • Generate brand passion. By: Hopewell, Nikki. Marketing News, 5/15/2005, Vol. 39 Issue 9, p10-10,
    • Lovemarks. By: Roberts, Kevin. Sales & Service Excellence, Dec2004, Vol. 4 Issue 12, p8
    • Making the Emotional Connection. Brandweek, 01/29/2001, Vol. 42 Issue 5, p23
    Doncaster Business School