CLICK HERE TO GET THE LATEST      NeilMed Coupons    CLICK HERE TO GET THE LATEST          NeilMed Coupons
HOW TO GET NeilMed Coupons•   NeilMed Coupons - NeilMed Coupons: NeilMed is the world’s largest company for manufacturing ...
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NeilMed Coupons - Printable NeilMed Coupons

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NeilMed Coupons - NeilMed Coupons: NeilMed is the world’s largest company for manufacturing and selling large volume nasal rinse devices. Our products are available throughout the USA, Canada and several other countries. As a practicing physician, I have placed a great amount of effort, since 2000, in writing appropriate instructions to address anticipated concerns for the type of water to be used with our nasal wash devices. NeilMed has learned about recent news and internet articles concerning the improper use of unfiltered or contaminated tap water with neti pots. We emphasize when used as directed, NeilMed’s nasal wash devices are safe, affordable and effective to use. From the beginning, NeilMed’s directions of use have always stressed the importance of using clean and previously boiled, distilled or filtered water through a 0.2 micron filter for nasal irrigation. Our product brochure clearly notes that using tap water is not recommended. Please do not use tap or faucet water when using NeilMed’s nasal wash devices unless it has been previously boiled and cooled down.

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Transcript of "NeilMed Coupons - Printable NeilMed Coupons"

  1. 1. CLICK HERE TO GET THE LATEST NeilMed Coupons CLICK HERE TO GET THE LATEST NeilMed Coupons
  2. 2. HOW TO GET NeilMed Coupons• NeilMed Coupons - NeilMed Coupons: NeilMed is the world’s largest company for manufacturing and selling large volume nasal rinse devices. Our products are available throughout the USA, Canada and several other countries. As a practicing physician, I have placed a great amount of effort, since 2000, in writing appropriate instructions to address anticipated concerns for the type of water to be used with our nasal wash devices. NeilMed has learned about recent news and internet articles concerning the improper use of unfiltered or contaminated tap water with neti pots. We emphasize when used as directed, NeilMed’s nasal wash devices are safe, affordable and effective to use. From the beginning, NeilMed’s directions of use have always stressed the importance of using clean and previously boiled, distilled or filtered water through a 0.2 micron filter for nasal irrigation. Our product brochure clearly notes that using tap water is not recommended. Please do not use tap or faucet water when using NeilMed’s nasal wash devices unless it has been previously boiled and cooled down. NeilMed brochures also provide clear instructions for disinfecting our nasal irrigation devices. The neti pot devices are designed to allow for microwave disinfection as they do not contain any metal parts. Nasal rinsing appears particularly suitable in the management of pregnant women with seasonal allergic rhinitis since no deleterious effects on the fetus are to be expected. However, to date, no studies have specifically investigated this option. Methods: Pregnant women with seasonal allergic rhinitis were randomized to intranasal lavage with hypertonic saline solution 3 times daily (n = 22) versus no local therapy (n = 23) during a 6-week period corresponding to the pollen season. Patients were invited to keep a daily record of rhinitis symptoms (rhinorrea, obstruction, nasal itching and sneezing), to record consumption of oral antihistamine and to undergo rhinomanometry. Results: The rhinitis score was similar at study entry but a statistically significant improvement in this score was observed in the study group during all subsequent weeks (p < 0.001 for weeks 2–6). The mean number of daily antihistamines use per patient per week was significantly reduced at weeks 2, 3 and 6 (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Baseline rhinomanometry performed at week 1 showed similar nasal resistance in the study and control groups. In contrast, a statistically significant difference emerged in the 2 following evaluations. At week 3, nasal resistance in the study and control groups was 0.96 ± 0.44 and 1.38 ± 0.52 Pa/ml/s, respectively (p = 0.006). At week 6, it was 0.94 ± 0.38 and 1.35 ± 0.60 Pa/ml/s, respectively (p = 0.006). No adverse effect was reported in the active group. Conclusions: Nasal rinsing is a safe and effective treatment option in pregnant women with seasonal allergic rhinitis.
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